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  1. #1
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    Hello Night Riders!

    I did my first night ride last night, and I can say I had a blast, and this will become a Thursday night ride for me.

    For my bars, I've picked these lights from Amazon and they should arrive Saturday. Thoughts?

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...6IW5SMQL&psc=1

    For my helmet, I'm having issues! even though I spent a few hours researching yesterday, I only came up with this light (which I haven't ordered yet). I found it in a thread I can no longer find!

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...3FOSFZJZ&psc=1

    I prefer rechargeable lights, as I don't want a lot of weight on my head.

    I'm open to suggestions, I can't seem to find a Niterider with a helmet attachment. Budget is flexible but under $80.00/$100.00 would be great!

    Anyways, I appreciate your experienced feedback.
    Surly Krampus
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  2. #2
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    Awesome man, I'm glad you enjoyed it.

    That first light you picked I don't know know much about. Maybe you could post a review of it. I think someone in the cheap light thread may have picked one up. Did you pick the all-in-one, i.e flashlight style, or the one with the separate battery pack.

    As for the second light, the cateye, I think that's probably pretty underpowered these days. I would aim for around 700 lumens such as the Niterider Lumina series. They sometimes go on double sale at performance bicycle. I got one around $45-$50 that way.
    https://www.performancebike.com/shop...lusive-40-5096
    You can also get a helmet strap for these (I need to get one myself)
    https://www.performancebike.com/shop...-mount-40-0658

    As far as other lights go I would recommend the Yinding light with two led.
    https://www.gearbest.com/led-flashlights/pp_133573.html

    Note that this has a neutral white tint which is much warmer than the cool white leds you normally get. A lot of guys have switched to this type of tint as it's easier on the eyes in the woods. It's less glare and a bit more like natural sunlight. Obviously you need a separate battery pack with these. The lighthead is very small and light though.

  3. #3
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    Not a big fan of self-contained bike lights for helmet use. Even the smaller/lighter ones require more elevated mounting because of their size/shape and makes them more tiring to use on longer rides. A small torch would probably be your best helmet option if you want to stay on the cheap side. I don't know enough about them to make any recommendations but am sure other here will post some suggestion on this.

    From your comments I get the feeling you will end up regularly night riding. With that in mind and since you provided a upper spending limit (thanks for that) my recommendation for the best helmet light under $100 is the Ituo XP2 currently $99.99 on Amazon. This is a high performing light that's well made and one your needs probably won't out grow. Fragile bar mount is only mechanical weakness but unknown service/warranty is something to consider since you'll probably be dealing directly with the Chinese manufacturer if you were to have a problem. I own 3 Ituo lights that other than the fragile bar mount issue have been trouble free. Like the Yinding the XP2 is also a separate lighthead tethered to a battery via a power cord which is the way I prefer to run my helmet lights.
    Mole

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...hps_bw_c_x_1_w
    Last edited by MRMOLE; 04-07-2018 at 06:53 AM.

  4. #4
    Downcountry AF
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...3FOSFZJZ&psc=1

    I prefer rechargeable lights, as I don't want a lot of weight on my head.

    I'm open to suggestions, I can't seem to find a Niterider with a helmet attachment. Budget is flexible but under $80.00/$100.00 would be great!
    Your headlight should be at least 700 lumens. I like my Night rider Lumina Micro 750. https://www.niterider.com/product/lumina-micro-750/ They also make a 950. I've had a couple of these and they're still going strong after years of punishment in rain, dirt, winter/snow, crashes, etc.

    The universal mount is sold separately. https://www.niterider.com/product/lumina-helmet-mount/ works well.

    If you have a Gopro mount built into your helmet, K-edge makes a simple adaptor. https://k-edge.com/shop/light-and-ac...gopro-adapter/
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  5. #5
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    ...I prefer rechargeable lights, as I don't want a lot of weight on my head.

    I'm open to suggestions, I can't seem to find a Niterider with a helmet attachment. Budget is flexible but under $80.00/$100.00 would be great!

    Anyways, I appreciate your experienced feedback.
    I'm going to assume you meant to say, "self-contained rechargeable" when you said, "rechargeable".

    Choosing a set-up for the helmet is not always easy. That's because the first issue to be dealt with is whether the lamp mount will actually work with the helmet you own. That's because not all helmets have their vents situated in a way that is conducive to mounting a bike light. That and sometimes there just isn't a flat enough spot on top of the helmet to allow the mount base to sit flush with the helmet. Almost every type of lamp out there will require a helmet with vents to line up in such a way that they will allow a strap system to go through the helmet. If you have a good helmet for such a set-up you will know it. If not you will either need a new helmet or you will need to jury-rig the helmet you already have to allow a helmet light.

    Like all the other people that have commented, I could recommend any number of lights that would work very well as a helmet lamp. I too recommend something that could at least provide 600 lumen if you indeed intend to use these for MTB'n. The lamp you use on the helmet needs to be able to illuminate well beyond 100 ft. That said I'm not sure many self-contained single emitter lamps will do that unless they are using reflectors ( instead of optics ).

    From what you've previously said you already know weight is an issue when dealing with a helmet lamp. With this in mind I'll recommend that you buy a simple single emitter 18650 multi-mode torch and use that as your first helmet light. You will however need to find a way to mount it to your helmet. I was going to recommend one of the ITUO Gopro helmet mounts but after checking Amazon I see they no longer carry them ( *sigh* ). Seems ALL the ITUO products are just about gone now. I was then going to recommend using it with this torch clip and one of the Convoy or A6 torches I've talked about on a previous thread that talked about using torches as helmet lights.

    Anyway, with a good torch set-up you could get yourself going with maybe spending just under $75...( that would included the torch, the mount /clip, two 18650 cells and a cheap charger ). There are other options of course. You could buy something like this but no telling what kind of beam pattern it puts out. The Lezyne lights have had some pretty good reviews although I have no experience using them myself.

  7. #7
    Bikesexual
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    This forum never dissapoints!

    Thanks guys, lots of info. I will update and give a review once I figure it out.

    I'm excited to incorporate nite rides into my riding.
    Surly Krampus
    All City MMD
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    ......I prefer rechargeable lights, as I don't want a lot of weight on my head.
    If you want an internal battery and don't want much weight on your head you will be left with choices of low output or short runtime. If you want lots of light or long runtime (without having to change batteries) you might consider a light with a remote battery. Then you carry the battery in a jacket or jersey pocket.

    Also as noted earlier all-in-one lights mount high on the helmet. If your trails have low hanging branches or brush a light right on top of the helmet makes a great snag.
    GoPro adapters for bike lights http://www.pacifier.com/~kevinb/index.html

  9. #9
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    All right guys my amazon lights arrived, a bit heavy! Im assuming this is normal for the price range?

    I will test them out, and give them a shot.

    If anyone has any feedback on these it would be awesome.
    Surly Krampus
    All City MMD
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vancbiker View Post
    If you want an internal battery and don't want much weight on your head you will be left with choices of low output or short runtime. If you want lots of light or long runtime (without having to change batteries) you might consider a light with a remote battery. Then you carry the battery in a jacket or jersey pocket.

    Also as noted earlier all-in-one lights mount high on the helmet. If your trails have low hanging branches or brush a light right on top of the helmet makes a great snag.
    Thanks, that seems to be the way to go, I'm not a weigh winnie at all, except on my head lol. I got a handlebar mount for the GP.

    But I can stash the battery. I prefer not to worry, and just ride.
    Surly Krampus
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  11. #11
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    I've had niterider lights for a long time (20 years?) and they have progressed drastically over the last 10-15 years. Current models are awesome...900 Lumina (900 lumens) is all you will need. Has 3 brightness settings, can get a helmet mount ($15?), USB charge (plug into USB in car or computer), light weight and bright as hell. I've always been fine with just a helmet mount doing New England singletrack. Good for a couple hours even in temps below freezing. Also good support...I've had to have repairs done once or twice and they repair and send back quickly.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    All right guys my amazon lights arrived, a bit heavy! Im assuming this is normal for the price range?

    I will test them out, and give them a
    If anyone has any feedback on these it would be awesome.
    That light was $27? I wouldnít expect quality at that price point. Most often you get what you pay for. I would not trust riding technical trails at night with this light. Save your pennies and invest in better lights. Anyone here can help you BEFORE you purchase..

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrGT View Post
    That light was $27? I wouldnít expect quality at that price point. Most often you get what you pay for. I would not trust riding technical trails at night with this light. Save your pennies and invest in better lights. Anyone here can help you BEFORE you purchase..
    Thanks! It was recommended to me by someone from my group.

    But I get your point, maybe lights is another mtb item that you can't cheap on, like a helmet.

    Now that I know it will be a regular thing, I will slow down a bit.
    Surly Krampus
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  14. #14
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    Lumina 750 micro with helmet mount sold separately is the minimum I would recommend. It should easily outperform the one you bought.

  15. #15
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    [QUOTE=jcd46;13615401]Thanks! It was recommended to me by someone from my group.

    But I get your point, maybe lights is another mtb item that you can't cheap on, like a helmet.

    Agreed, going cheap with night lights makes little sense. You are sort of trying to emulate daylight, especially on technical trails at speed. Many of us here, not all of course, have spent hundreds on good lights and donít regret it one bit.

  16. #16
    RAKC Industries
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    Id say the spent good money and dont regret it fits in here really well. Most of us regulars have a collection of lights, kind of an Obsession. Cat, Garry and Mole are the worst, kind of my "Idols" as though Ive been in it a while now, still nothing like those guys. But its the nerdy side of it we enjoy too.

    That said, spending crazy money these days isnt required. Big money comes with fancier options. Bluetooth apps, insanely programmable systems, battery level indicators on the battery packs and so on. However going cheap can end badly too. Cheap lights have an amazon warranty no matter what it says. Its good till the return and dispute windows close (30 days return, 45 for the other matter IIRC). Just sellers straight out of China who could care less. They pay $3 for the light and sell for $27.

    Now nothing wrong with having a cheap light at all. If you rarely ride after dark no big deal. Or as your doing, having 2 lights. It becomes almost a backup when you have a good helmet light. Great starting point for someone who wants to get into it but has a budget at the moment.

    So dont sweat the cheap bar light, if it fails worst case your our $27 but was able to enjoy night riding for a while learning and deciding what set up you want to roll with permanently. Also time to save for whatever you decide you want after getting more rides under your belt.



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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    I did my first night ride last night, and I can say I had a blast, and this will become a Thursday night ride for me.

    For my bars, I've picked these lights from Amazon and they should arrive Saturday. Thoughts?

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...6IW5SMQL&psc=1

    For my helmet, I'm having issues! even though I spent a few hours researching yesterday, I only came up with this light (which I haven't ordered yet). I found it in a thread I can no longer find!

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...3FOSFZJZ&psc=1

    I prefer rechargeable lights, as I don't want a lot of weight on my head.

    I'm open to suggestions, I can't seem to find a Niterider with a helmet attachment. Budget is flexible but under $80.00/$100.00 would be great!

    Anyways, I appreciate your experienced feedback.
    For your helmet Iíd go with a Niterider Micro 750. Small footprint, very light, rechargeable by usb. You can find them cheap on eBay make an offer. Iíve picked them up for spares for as low as $38! At that price you could get 2 and be under your budget, that doubles your run time! Helmet mount separate for $15 like the other member said. I would not go less than 700 lumens on your head..

  18. #18
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    The Micro 750 loses about half its output after just 30 minutes and after an hour is only producing ~200 Lumen. OK for a road maybe, but on a trail you will want more.
    GoPro adapters for bike lights http://www.pacifier.com/~kevinb/index.html

  19. #19
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    Spring time in the Front Range

    Morning assault




    Relive 'Monday morning therapy'




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    Last edited by scar; 04-08-2018 at 10:36 AM.

  20. #20
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    Interesting. My friend uses 3 of them. One on his helmet and 2 on his bars and we didnít experience this. Strange.

  21. #21
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    Your eyes adjust to the dimming to some extent.

    It takes something like 4 times the lumen output for a human to perceive that a light looks twice as bright.

    It takes about 2.5 amps at ~3Volts to get ~750 Lumen out of a light. A light the size of a Micro can't hold a battery large enough to produce that much power for long.
    GoPro adapters for bike lights http://www.pacifier.com/~kevinb/index.html

  22. #22
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    Got ya. I own one myself but I donít use it on trails. Currently Iím a Gloworm X2 user for both bar and helmet. I retract my recommendation of the 750 micro for trail. Although you could own 5 of them for the price of one X2 LOL.

  23. #23
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    Good example of one of the major drawbacks to higher powered single cell self-contained bike lights. Much over 400 - 500 lumens is very hard to maintain consistent light output. Dual cell lights do much better but the corresponding increase in weight makes them less desirable for helmet use. Separate lighthead with helmet mounted 2 cell battery spreads the weight out and can be mounted lower so better option IMO and in my case the need for larger capacity 4 cell to match my typical 4+ hour rides battery best carried in my Camelpack. Here's a link that shows output vs. runtime on a lot of the more common self-contained lights.
    Mole

    We Test Lights | Bike Tests and Teviews

  24. #24
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    True, a small single cell light will not hold full output for very long ( when on maximum setting ) but I've always assumed that most people figure that out real quick when they start to use one. When I use a torch as a helmet light I always have the option to use a lower output mode. This helps extend run time. Helps big time if the torch ( or lamp ) has some usable modes. The two torches that I have that are most usable on the helmet have lower modes in the 600 lumen range. Most of the time this is good enough for helmet use as long as I'm not going too fast. I can always go lower if I'm just poking along. Of course this means more fiddling with the modes but if you don't mind reaching your hand up to change modes when needed it's not a problem most of the time. Also keep in mind with torches you can bring as many loose 18650 cells as you think you will need. This is why I prefer torches over most mini battery self-contained bike lamps ( for helmet use ). Of course I also use a decent bar lamp along with the helmet lamp so most times I'm always using a combo of at least 800-1200 total lumen. If I need more for a given moment I have it. If I need less I have that option as well.

    Of course I have to agree wholeheartedly with the recommendation that a dedicated multi-emitter bike light ( with separate battery ) for a helmet lamp is the best way to go. The downside is you have to live with the wire coming off the back of the helmet and the battery being stored into either a hydration backpack or jersey pocket. The upside though is you get more light to play with, more run time and a much better overall beam pattern.

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