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  1. #1
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    Gloworm and Gemini batteries

    Have there ever been any problems with gloworm or gemini batteries? Are they made in taiwan or china? Are they made by the same company that makes magic shine batteries?

  2. #2
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    First all cells used are made by their corresponding manufacturers. Panasonic, LG, Sanyo, Samsung, BAK etc.

    All light manufacturers pick the cells they want to use for their lights from which ever company. And assemble their own packs from them.

    Sent from my XT1565 using Tapatalk

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by lighty View Post
    Have there ever been any problems with gloworm or gemini batteries? Are they made in taiwan or china? Are they made by the same company that makes magic shine batteries?
    Hey Lighty - thanks for your email yesterday. As tigris has indicated below, we source our battery cells from Panasonic for our X Series Lights (Separate Battery Packs) and Sanyo/Samsung for our CX Range.

    We assemble our own battery packs in China in our own facility (we lease a space that is managed and overseen by Vaggelis - He's Greek!). Each battery pack is hand assembled and each battery is checked prior to shipment. Also each pack has been submitted for MSDS purposes and is approved for air shipping via DHL.

    Our battery protection electronics were designed in NZ and now feature a 10 stage fuel gauge. This was a huge investment, but as we had previously experienced failures with the Chinese designed PCB we initially used, it was a necessary stage in the development of the product. All components are sourced direct through named suppliers such as Maxim and Microchip.

    The batteries are protected by the hard-case and foam in the interior of the pack. The cable has a strain relief to protect the cable and is water proof to the extent it can be submerged for short periods of time.

    Although our batteries are very good and we are satisfied with their performance we think we can do better, so we are in the process of revising the design for functionality and aesthetics.

    Don't hesitate to ask any further questions - we will be happy to help out.

    Bruce and Vag
    Gloworm Lights - 'Create Your Escape'
    High End LED Light Designer - New Zealand

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    When will the new design be available?

  5. #5
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    While it's important to select quality batteries if you want a reliable pack, it's also important to consider who manufactures the pack. The 7 LED Nitefighter lights from Gearbest is a good example where quality Panasonic batteries were used, but Nitefighter's workmanship in the pack was poor, resulting in unreliable batteries. Not hard to fix if you can use a soldering iron, but it could be a problem if it happened on the trail.

    Tim

  6. #6
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    I never saw an issue with the pack, but the light heads always had problems (which is why their gone)

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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gloworm Manufacture View Post
    Hey Lighty - thanks for your email yesterday. As tigris has indicated below, we source our battery cells from Panasonic for our X Series Lights (Separate Battery Packs) and Sanyo/Samsung for our CX Range.

    We assemble our own battery packs in China in our own facility (we lease a space that is managed and overseen by Vaggelis - He's Greek!). Each battery pack is hand assembled and each battery is checked prior to shipment. Also each pack has been submitted for MSDS purposes and is approved for air shipping via DHL.

    Our battery protection electronics were designed in NZ and now feature a 10 stage fuel gauge. This was a huge investment, but as we had previously experienced failures with the Chinese designed PCB we initially used, it was a necessary stage in the development of the product. All components are sourced direct through named suppliers such as Maxim and Microchip.

    The batteries are protected by the hard-case and foam in the interior of the pack. The cable has a strain relief to protect the cable and is water proof to the extent it can be submerged for short periods of time.

    Although our batteries are very good and we are satisfied with their performance we think we can do better, so we are in the process of revising the design for functionality and aesthetics.

    Don't hesitate to ask any further questions - we will be happy to help out.

    Bruce and Vag
    Maybe a cold weather/winter pack with the best cells for cold temps?
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

    Quote Originally Posted by iheartbicycles View Post
    Specialized sucks ass.

  8. #8
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    there isnt really a "best cell for cold temps". All Li-Ion batteries suffer from the same issues in the cold. Higher discharge amp rated cells will perform a little better due to lower internal resistance but wont be a real, noticeable difference during use. This is where self contained units that are able to generate enough heat to warm the entire light up come in handy. They keep the cells warm. Something I love about the Ituo WIZ20. I think the gloworm CX trail would do well also, in that sense. the urban may be lacking on output enough for the emitters to keep things warm enough on cold winter nights.

    Ya a little "off topic" but was to explain the only real option for the problem of cold temperatures.

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    As someone who does a lot of ice climbing and deep winter camping down to -40C, the best battery solution for truly cold conditions is an external battery pack routed inside a jacket to be kept warm. While the heat from a self-contained unit can help warm a battery, it really doesn't keep it warm enough. Modern flashlight bodies are designed to draw heat away from the unit with the use of aluminum bodies and cooling fins - this is actually a drawback in the cold when you want to keep the batteries as warm as possible.

    Compared to alkaline or nimh cells, lithium cells already work much better in the cold. However, even with lithium cells, I've experienced significantly lower output and run times with self-contained units like the Zebralight H600 and H602w which use 18650 cells. Zebralights are already some of the most efficient lights out there in terms of output/runtimes but they are still affected by the cold. In my experience, self-contained units just get way too cold in the winter to be reliable.

    If you do plan on using a self-contained unit in the winter, I would insulate it with neoprene foam to retain as much heat as possible. Of course, be careful not to let the unit overheat (unlikely when it's -20C out). Another option is to keep spare cells close to your body and swap in warm batteries from time to time.

  10. #10
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    I actually have a gemini xera flashlight and it gets plenty hot on max blast. I never noticed any shorter runtimes with it in the winter. Then i swapped to gloworm and with that one I notice it. I'm guessing I get about half the runtime on high in the (cold) winter.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

    Quote Originally Posted by iheartbicycles View Post
    Specialized sucks ass.

  11. #11
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    What gloworm flashlight are you talking about? They don't make a flashlight that I know of. Big difference between a standard bike light with external battery pack and flashlight that's self contained.

    Light with seperate battery packs will all run into issues with cold temps. Self contained, flashlight style keep the cells warm on their own and won't be effected unless you left it out in the cold before use.

    Sent from my XT1565 using Tapatalk

  12. #12
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    the glowrm is a 3 diode one. not a flashlight.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

    Quote Originally Posted by iheartbicycles View Post
    Specialized sucks ass.

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    I store external battery packs next to my body to keep them warm in the winter.

    Like I said earlier, ALL my self contained lights suffer from the cold when below -10C. Once below -25C, output and runtimes are significantly reduced by approximately 50%. You probably won't notice a difference unless you are outdoors in these conditions for extended periods of time. I've been on many multiday trips when daytime highs were -20C and nighttime lows were -40C so believe me when I say external battery packs kept next to your body is the way to go for the deep cold.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by car bone View Post
    the glowrm is a 3 diode one. not a flashlight.
    That's not the same as the xera flashlight. Its an external pack, that's why runtimes are lower in the cold.

    My wiz20 I've used down to 12F and no issues, leaving on high the entire time makes it a good hand warmer too lol.

    Ya for extremely cold temps external pack inside your jacket is perfect idea, but at least in the Midwest where I live, a self contained light that's on the higher output side so it generates decent heat is plenty good enough.

    Just depends on your conditions and use.

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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by tigris99 View Post
    That's not the same as the xera flashlight. Its an external pack, that's why runtimes are lower in the cold.
    yeah I know. I was just a bit surprised by it when I experienced it first hand myself. I had seen all the graphs and eveything for the cells, but I thought it would be insignificant. It wasn't.

    stanza:

    I stop riding at -25C thats my limit. Then I just call in sick.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

    Quote Originally Posted by iheartbicycles View Post
    Specialized sucks ass.

  16. #16
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    That's alot colder than I'll ride lol. -15C (5F) is the coldest I've ridden. And that lasted less than 15 minutes (I live close to my job). Only did that once.

    Now I have a fat bike and better gear but coldest I got to ride in this last winter was around -9C. May be able to ride when it's a bit and still be comfortable.

    I did run into the cold effecting batteries for my helmet light alot this last winter though, I already usually only ride with a 2 cell for the helmet light, about the best cells currently available and still loose a lot of run time. Need to work out a solution for holding a pack under my jacket by the time winter comes around again.

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    Haha the girlfriend and I do a lot of ice climbing so we'll usually stay out for a couple nights to maximize the weekends. Most of the time they stay below We actually got fatbikes to use on our approaches this coming winter. Most approaches are on frozen lakes where snowmobilers have left tracks so hopefully our fatbikes will work.

    Here's how we dress for a -35/-40 night:
    Gloworm and Gemini batteries-yxfrad0.jpg

    This is the temperature in the late morning:
    Gloworm and Gemini batteries-f9vurea.jpg

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by tigris99 View Post
    That's alot colder than I'll ride lol. -15C (5F) is the coldest I've ridden. And that lasted less than 15 minutes (I live close to my job). Only did that once.

    Now I have a fat bike and better gear but coldest I got to ride in this last winter was around -9C. May be able to ride when it's a bit and still be comfortable.

    I did run into the cold effecting batteries for my helmet light alot this last winter though, I already usually only ride with a 2 cell for the helmet light, about the best cells currently available and still loose a lot of run time. Need to work out a solution for holding a pack under my jacket by the time winter comes around again.

    Sent from my XT1565 using Tapatalk
    I actually think the cells starts losing juice at like -2C or so just below freezing.

    ****************

    I use only 2 layers in the cold, but then I'm always riding, And i have to ride harder the colder it is to stay warm. Helly hansen warm base layer than either a thin jacket or a thicker one. But no arctic stuff. I just adjust my tempo to stay warm. Also i have good gloves and socks.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

    Quote Originally Posted by iheartbicycles View Post
    Specialized sucks ass.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by car bone View Post
    I actually think the cells starts losing juice at like -2C or so just below freezing.

    ****************

    I use only 2 layers in the cold, but then I'm always riding, And i have to ride harder the colder it is to stay warm. Helly hansen warm base layer than either a thin jacket or a thicker one. But no arctic stuff. I just adjust my tempo to stay warm. Also i have good gloves and socks.
    Some companies claim lithium cell performance down to -40C but it's totally false. Sure, they'll work but not very well and not for very long. You're absolutely right that once temperatures starts to dip below freezing, the cells are affected and there will be reduced output/runtimes.

    While riding in the winter, I don't need that many layers either. I'm usually in a baselayer and a windstopper-softshell on top. The puffy jacket only comes out when I stop or when it is below -20C.

  20. #20
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    My winter trail clothes are a bit interesting. I can go well below freezing in my base layers, some Chinese softshell pants I got off Amazon and a UA storm hoodie. If I end up in more open ground on a windy day I have a thin cycling jacket that I wear between my hoodie and base layer. Once I get snow and down towards my limits I have a better softshell jacket and snowboard pants and good boots.

    I don't care what lies manufactures say, no lithium based batteries like the cold.

    Sent from my XT1565 using Tapatalk

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