Does this light exist?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Addicted
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    749

    Does this light exist?

    I've been thumbing through a few of the reviews here in the threads and in the review section trying to come up with a light that will be suitable for my night riding this winter.

    My rides are 3+ hours which puts alot of lights out of the question. Even lightls like the BLT Firewire 4.0 that claim 20hr run time are getting reviews of sub 3hrs.

    I'm after a light:
    -that will be water resistant. I live in Washington. I ride in the wet 9 months out of the year.
    -that will light up my path well enough to not have to creep through the woods.
    -is durable and won't suffer from fast rough riding shaking up the batteries and what not(I don't know if this is an issue with bike lights but car batteries seem to fail with rock crawling and what not)
    -is available to me. I don't really want to pay retail on something if I can get an equivilant product at cost through my shop. Although this is really not a deal breaker. If there is a high quality well priced light that meets my needs I'll do it.

    I plan on running a light off my helmet and a light off my handlebars.

    What can you point me to?

    -Kevin

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: zen bicycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    463
    they exist. Maybe not from large manufacturers but they exist.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    2,790
    Quote Originally Posted by bmxconvert
    My rides are 3+ hours which puts alot of lights out of the question.
    Get whatever lights you like and get 2 batteries for longer run times.

  4. #4
    Addicted
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    749
    Quote Originally Posted by gmcttr
    Get whatever lights you like and get 2 batteries for longer run times.
    I've taken that into consideration but carrying 4 batteries doesn't sound too appetizing.
    I'm certainly willing to look at some of the smaller companies/folks out there producing them but I'm not sure what fits the bill(even once you exclude run time).

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    403
    What, where and how do you ride? For windy singletrack, you don't need a lot of light, a double Dinotte 400L setup could be all that you need (5 hours runtime per battery). I'm picking on Dinotte because they have the best CS in the US.
    Do you ride fast? Do you ride on open terrain? In that case, you need something more capable. If you have the money, get a Lupine Wilma + Tesla combo, and choose from a gazillion battery sizes (from a 50gr nano to a 600gr monster), and if you held a Lupine lighthead in your hand you won't want to buy anything else...
    Or do you mind a little DIY here and there? There are now several independent light builders, their lights may not be so aesthetic as the big boys', but they do everything, and you can get your own battery deal. You get more light for your money, but you need to spend a little time understanding light technologies first.
    I can recommend you this site:
    http://luminousdiy.com/FAQ.htm
    not necessarily for the lights but for the information on these pages. Have a nice reading ;-)

    Generally, you don't need to worry about the lights shaking or getting wet, these are very basic demands and no LED light should have trouble in these two departments.
    Runtime is something you could compromise on, because LEDs are dimmable (unlike HIDs), so for climbing or on slow sections you should dim your light and get a much longer runtime. I find that I use my light's "high" mode in perhaps 10% of my rides (but I don't ride that much in the wet though).

    Oh, I almost forgot your neighbours:
    http://lightonlights.com/about/
    I remember their introduction, and they were super keen on their light's water resistance.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    284
    Ayups are very water resistant and durable.

  7. #7
    Addicted
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    749
    Quote Originally Posted by radirpok
    What, where and how do you ride? For windy singletrack, you don't need a lot of light, a double Dinotte 400L setup could be all that you need (5 hours runtime per battery). I'm picking on Dinotte because they have the best CS in the US.
    Do you ride fast? Do you ride on open terrain? In that case, you need something more capable. If you have the money, get a Lupine Wilma + Tesla combo, and choose from a gazillion battery sizes (from a 50gr nano to a 600gr monster), and if you held a Lupine lighthead in your hand you won't want to buy anything else...
    Or do you mind a little DIY here and there? There are now several independent light builders, their lights may not be so aesthetic as the big boys', but they do everything, and you can get your own battery deal. You get more light for your money, but you need to spend a little time understanding light technologies first.
    I can recommend you this site:
    http://luminousdiy.com/FAQ.htm
    not necessarily for the lights but for the information on these pages. Have a nice reading ;-)

    Generally, you don't need to worry about the lights shaking or getting wet, these are very basic demands and no LED light should have trouble in these two departments.
    Runtime is something you could compromise on, because LEDs are dimmable (unlike HIDs), so for climbing or on slow sections you should dim your light and get a much longer runtime. I find that I use my light's "high" mode in perhaps 10% of my rides (but I don't ride that much in the wet though).

    Oh, I almost forgot your neighbours:
    http://lightonlights.com/about/
    I remember their introduction, and they were super keen on their light's water resistance.
    The reason that I want both a headlight and a handlebar mount is because I ride winding heavily wooded single track but at a good clip(15-19mph depending on the section of trail) much of which has gnarly root sections and log overs. I obviously won't be riding my DH bike at night but I'm very concerned about out riding my lights, although the trees are clearly going to be blocking the light in some corners.
    The dimming point is an awesome that I had never thought of, however.. my climbs are typically short bursts and not even enough to bother flipping the knob on the fork to drop the travel/lock it out. I'll probably be spending a little bit mor time seated this winter than on most of my current rides.

    I do not have a problem going DIYDBSE(Done By Someone Else). I just want to be able to sell the products I use through my shop and sometimes the small guys aren't set up to work through a bike shop. I suppose it really just depends on the specific manufacturer.

    Thanks for the link! I'm still in the research stages obviously but it's dark at 8 o'clock now and not too long till it's dark at 5:30 so I'd like to have my lighting situation figured out by then.

    -Kevin

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    31
    Second the Ayups. You didn't mention your price range. Ayups are expensive, but are the last lights I'll ever buy. Read the reviews and decide for yourself. My HID/giant battery carrying friends were all jealous when they saw these, and were even more so when I was lighting up the trail for them from behind.

    I was a bit worried about service with them being so far away and all. I ordered the X4 (i.e. two lights, mounts, batteries in a kit). The package arrived 2 days after ordering. The pelican box was broken. I e-mailed them and received a new one THE NEXT DAY.

    Good luck in your search.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.