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  1. #1
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    Cable management

    This is my first season really night riding. I've played around with different cable setups for my helmet light but haven't settled on one yet. Where do you guys put your battery and how do you route your cable for a helmet light with an external battery?

  2. #2
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    velcro on the very back of helmet then down to Jersey pocket or hydropack.

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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by RAKC Ind View Post
    velcro on the very back of helmet then down to Jersey pocket or hydropack.

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    A hydration pack makes it easy but I prefer to ride without one. It's a long way down to a jersey pocket. Do you go over or under the jersey?

  4. #4
    Rod
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    As long as the cable is attached at the back of my helmet I dont care. I run it over the out Jersey so it doesn't touch the skin.

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  5. #5
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    this time of year it's cool or cold (well close to 12" of snow on the ground and still coming down) so I can run it between my outer layer and inner layers.

    I Only ride hydropack if I'm going out for a long time or during hot weather and rides longer than 30-45 minutes.

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  6. #6
    Rod
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    Quote Originally Posted by RAKC Ind View Post
    this time of year it's cool or cold (well close to 12" of snow on the ground and still coming down) so I can run it between my outer layer and inner layers.

    I Only ride hydropack if I'm going out for a long time or during hot weather and rides longer than 30-45 minutes.

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    This is what I do when I have on multiple layers. Keep that battery warm for longer life

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  7. #7
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    Actually depends on the duration of your rides what Battey size/type you need.

    I used to run the 4*18650 2s2p Li-Ion battery packs that came with most cheap Chinese lights and had to place them within my CamelBak (with an extension cord).

    For the last two years I decided to buy a better quality pack in 2*18650 2s configuration that proved to be light enough to mount it on the backside of my helmet without any issues. Depending on your helmet you might have to get slightly creative in building a proper mount (pouch/velcro/zip ties).

    Far less hassle getting the cables sorted, and enough juice for my Yinding to provide about 3-4 hours of proper lighting.

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    I keep the 2s2p battery in the sidepocket of my shorts and run the extension cable under the jacket

  9. #9
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    I so despise riding with stuff on my shoulders that I'll sooner loop back to the trailhead to refill bottles, than use a hydration pack. Two 24 ounce bottles is almost 1.5 liters, plus another in the jersey pocket if it's really hot/that far away.

    I find that (miraculously) most corded lights I've had manage to fit down to a (classic) jersey pocket. Maybe not comfortably when I'm standing upright, but easily when I'm riding the bike. I am on the short side, though.

    I have some storage bibs, now, which easily accommodate a battery, with a bit of length to spare. Puts it about mid-back.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by sptimmy43 View Post
    A hydration pack makes it easy but I prefer to ride without one. It's a long way down to a jersey pocket. Do you go over or under the jersey?
    I think everyone would prefer to ride without a H-backpack but sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do. I suppose you could use a small fanny pack but then you have the wire flopping all over the place. Yeah, you can put the wire under the outer garment but that could be a PITA to setup not to mention uncomfortable. I've used fanny packs before and personally I don't like the feel of something pulling at my waist. The more weight the F-pack has the more uncomfortable it is.

    Keep in mind there are many brands, sizes and types of hydration back packs. Some are smaller than others so perhaps you just need to find one that fits the bill. Personally I'd stop using mine if I could figure another way to carry all the other stuff I need when I'm mountain biking. I suppose I could consider a frame bag similar to the one I use on my road setup, that might work.

    In the mean time a H-backpack solves a lot of problems. Other than carrying water it also can carry extra clothing, pump/tube/tire levers and of course that battery you might need for your helmet lamp.

    I have no problems using a H-backpack in the Fall or Winter. It's in the Summer that I wish I didn't have to use it as wearing one makes your back unable to cool as well as it could without one. I could possibly figure a way around not using one but if I do I really don't have a good option for carrying a decent size battery if I'm using a good dedicated helmet light.

    Side Note...Cat-man update; Been a while since I've commented or done any mountain biking. A couple weeks ago I somehow managed to throw my lower back out. Sunday was just a beautiful day and near 60F. Haven't had many of those days lately but sadly I thought it best to let my back continue to heal since it is still hurts a little. I still don't know what I did that threw it out....*sigh*...it has not been a good year for me.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cat-man-do View Post
    I think everyone would prefer to ride without a H-backpack but sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do. I suppose you could use a small fanny pack but then you have the wire flopping all over the place. Yeah, you can put the wire under the outer garment but that could be a PITA to setup not to mention uncomfortable. I've used fanny packs before and personally I don't like the feel of something pulling at my waist. The more weight the F-pack has the more uncomfortable it is.

    Keep in mind there are many brands, sizes and types of hydration back packs. Some are smaller than others so perhaps you just need to find one that fits the bill. Personally I'd stop using mine if I could figure another way to carry all the other stuff I need when I'm mountain biking. I suppose I could consider a frame bag similar to the one I use on my road setup, that might work.

    In the mean time a H-backpack solves a lot of problems. Other than carrying water it also can carry extra clothing, pump/tube/tire levers and of course that battery you might need for your helmet lamp.

    I have no problems using a H-backpack in the Fall or Winter. It's in the Summer that I wish I didn't have to use it as wearing one makes your back unable to cool as well as it could without one. I could possibly figure a way around not using one but if I do I really don't have a good option for carrying a decent size battery if I'm using a good dedicated helmet light.
    I have integrated my multi-tool, pump, CO2, tire plugs, tire lever, tube, and water onto the bike so I don't really have a need for the H-pack. In fact I pretty much despise using one. I still use one when needed (longer or more remote rides to bring more than just the essentials). An H-pack does solve the problem of where to put a battery but I don't really like adding a pack to mix just for a battery.

    I don't consider myself to be a "bro" but I also don't wear lycra or other traditional cycling clothing. My summer kit consists of baggy riding shorts and an MTB "jersey" i.e. a semi-fitted t-shirt really. Actual cycling jerseys would be perfect for throwing the battery in a back pocket but my cycling shirts don't have said pockets. I don't think I want to switch to lycra just to make that work. I have a cycling jacket with back pockets I wear in cold temps (which is when all of my night riding occurs) but when it's warmer than 35 degrees or so it's just too warm.

    Anyone know of any MTB type jerseys that won't look silly with baggy shorts but still have pockets on the back?

  12. #12
    Rod
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    Quote Originally Posted by sptimmy43 View Post
    I have integrated my multi-tool, pump, CO2, tire plugs, tire lever, tube, and water onto the bike so I don't really have a need for the H-pack. In fact I pretty much despise using one. I still use one when needed (longer or more remote rides to bring more than just the essentials). An H-pack does solve the problem of where to put a battery but I don't really like adding a pack to mix just for a battery.

    I don't consider myself to be a "bro" but I also don't wear lycra or other traditional cycling clothing. My summer kit consists of baggy riding shorts and an MTB "jersey" i.e. a semi-fitted t-shirt really. Actual cycling jerseys would be perfect for throwing the battery in a back pocket but my cycling shirts don't have said pockets. I don't think I want to switch to lycra just to make that work. I have a cycling jacket with back pockets I wear in cold temps (which is when all of my night riding occurs) but when it's warmer than 35 degrees or so it's just too warm.

    Anyone know of any MTB type jerseys that won't look silly with baggy shorts but still have pockets on the back?
    Look for looser fitting jerseys that fit like a t shirt. They've been called club cut. What do you wear above 35 degrees? 35 to 50 you could get a lighter cycling jacket with pockets. Just an idea.

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  13. #13
    Rod
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    Cat,

    What all do you pack? Maybe I'm a minimalist. I have an under seat bag or just stuff everything in my jersey pockets. Tube co2, levers, pump, and mini multitool. Phone too.

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  14. #14
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    I only even pack the basics. multi tool, tire levers, CO2 and keys in a saddle bag.

    Hydropack is only for long rides when it's really hot. Most my rides are around an hour so a 2 cell on my helmet is usually plenty. Cold weather I have a jacket so it's easy to grab whatever battery pack.


    No need for lycra to get Jersey pockets.

    Also they have small hip pouches design to act like Jersey pockets but be under normal baggy clothes. Never used them but it's an option

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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod View Post
    Look for looser fitting jerseys that fit like a t shirt. They've been called club cut. What do you wear above 35 degrees? 35 to 50 you could get a lighter cycling jacket with pockets. Just an idea.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
    I usually wear an Under Armor Coldgear base layer, a short sleeve t-shirt and my baggy shorts in that temp range. If I wear any more than that I am soaked in sweat 20 minutes into the ride... which isn't great if I have to stop for any reason.

    I should probably invest in a lighter jacket or maybe just some long sleeve jerseys...

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod View Post
    Cat,

    What all do you pack? Maybe I'm a minimalist. I have an under seat bag or just stuff everything in my jersey pockets. Tube co2, levers, pump, and mini multitool. Phone too.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
    Pretty much what most people do but it all depends on the season and the weather. The basic list is; tire levers, tube, mini pump, CO'2 inflator with extra CO2 cylinder, gel packs, emergency 18650 cell for backup torch, car keys, Ccards/cash, and phone.

    If I think there is a good chance of rain I'll bring a light-weight rain shell. In the fall or winter I need less water so that helps keep things light. In the fall temperatures can sometimes drop 10-15 degrees in just a couple hours. That said I might carry a wind vest or a light jacket wind shell along with a pair of full finger glove liners.

    I hate the idea of using an under-seat or frame bag. That said I'm not as picky as I used to be so in the future if I can figure a better setup to work with I might try a different strategy.

    Nothing wrong with wearing a pair of baggies. I wear a pair of baggy shorts over my cycling shorts whenever I MTB. I like having some pockets for easy access to small items like a small AA torch or gelpack.

    Personally I don't like gaudy cycling jerseys. My last jersey purchase was a Zoic mountain bike jersey. Very plain with natural dark colors which I tend to favor. It does have a nice zip rear pocket. I believe I picked it up at REI about a year ago.

  17. #17
    Rod
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    Quote Originally Posted by sptimmy43 View Post
    I usually wear an Under Armor Coldgear base layer, a short sleeve t-shirt and my baggy shorts in that temp range. If I wear any more than that I am soaked in sweat 20 minutes into the ride... which isn't great if I have to stop for any reason.

    I should probably invest in a lighter jacket or maybe just some long sleeve jerseys...
    I do something similar. I put on a short sleeve under armor and a jacket for 30 degree temps and I have thermal Jersey, regular long sleeve Jersey, and even a light jacket and the sleeves remove from it. Below 30 I have the insanely warm under armor shirt.

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  18. #18
    Rod
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cat-man-do View Post
    Pretty much what most people do but it all depends on the season and the weather. The basic list is; tire levers, tube, mini pump, CO'2 inflator with extra CO2 cylinder, gel packs, emergency 18650 cell for backup torch, car keys, Ccards/cash, and phone.

    If I think there is a good chance of rain I'll bring a light-weight rain shell. In the fall or winter I need less water so that helps keep things light. In the fall temperatures can sometimes drop 10-15 degrees in just a couple hours. That said I might carry a wind vest or a light jacket wind shell along with a pair of full finger glove liners.

    I hate the idea of using an under-seat or frame bag. That said I'm not as picky as I used to be so in the future if I can figure a better setup to work with I might try a different strategy.

    Nothing wrong with wearing a pair of baggies. I wear a pair of baggy shorts over my cycling shorts whenever I MTB. I like having some pockets for easy access to small items like a small AA torch or gelpack.

    Personally I don't like gaudy cycling jerseys. My last jersey purchase was a Zoic mountain bike jersey. Very plain with natural dark colors which I tend to favor. It does have a nice zip rear pocket. I believe I picked it up at REI about a year ago.
    I can see why you would need to carry a pack once once it starts to get cold. Today it's 29 degrees in Kentucky and if you started around dark and it got colder you would need extra layers like you said. I would bring an extra battery or light depending on the situation. Something else to mention, it sucks going OTB with a battery in your jersey pocket or another tool. I landed on my battery last year. An a ATV broke a tree by riding it over, which was hidden in very thick grass. It caught my BB and tossed me over the bars. That hurt for a few days.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by sptimmy43 View Post
    [...]
    Anyone know of any MTB type jerseys that won't look silly with baggy shorts but still have pockets on the back?
    Specialized and Trek, currently, make storage bibs. If you don't like/don't need the chamois, it's easy to remove them with a seam ripper. I've done it with a few pairs, myself. Even if you don't like 'lycra', it's easy to get to like bibs, since they stay in place so well.

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