Advice needed!!!- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Advice needed!!!

    So im planning on getting an light set, to start riding at night, mostly singletrack, i found this on ebay 3x CREE 2400Lm XM-L T6 LED +2x XPE R2 LED 8.4v Bike Bicycle Light Rechargeable | eBay. Does anybody has any experience with this light set?
    there are a couple of words that will open you many many doors in life....... push and pull.

  2. #2
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    You can find cheap lights anywhere, but be careful about using just one light especially a cheap one. Even products from reliable manufacturers can fail, and just imagine what happens when you're going 20mph in the pitch black and your light goes out. Even if it fails while you're going slow, you could still be stuck out in the night miles from home. Two lights is the way to go and will give you a safety net should one fail.

    For a cheap solution, my recommendation is to go with 2x Magicshine MJ-808E for $80. I ran two of these for the past 2 years and they are plenty bright with one on the bars and one on the helmet. The light you linked to would be a great bar light, and pair it with the MJ808E on the helmet.
    "Got everything you need?"

  3. #3
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    My personal opinion is that if you're riding singletrack, you'd be better off with a helmet light instead of a bar light. On anything twisty, the light on bar will be pointing in a different direction that where you are looking. A helmet light + a bar light would be ideal if your budget can cover.

    I also personally tend to avoid the cheapest lights. No direct experience - but I've just had bad luck in general when chasing the cheapest solution in electronics. I'd recommend sticking with a known brand (amazing that Magicshine is now mid-level, 'known; brand). I also had very good experiences buying from Action LED Lights - Brilliant lighting for all your biking & outdoor sporting activities. and would recommend looking there.

  4. #4
    SS Pusher Man
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    Quote Originally Posted by TechniKal View Post
    My personal opinion is that if you're riding singletrack, you'd be better off with a helmet light instead of a bar light. On anything twisty, the light on bar will be pointing in a different direction that where you are looking. A helmet light + a bar light would be ideal if your budget can cover.

    I also personally tend to avoid the cheapest lights. No direct experience - but I've just had bad luck in general when chasing the cheapest solution in electronics. I'd recommend sticking with a known brand (amazing that Magicshine is now mid-level, 'known; brand). I also had very good experiences buying from Action LED Lights - Brilliant lighting for all your biking & outdoor sporting activities. and would recommend looking there.

    Only problem with helmet light only is if the trail is dusty and you have risers in front if you.....the white out coul e just as dangerous as not having a light at all.
    Bicycles donít have motors or batteries.:nono:

    Ebikes are not bicycles :nono:

  5. #5
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    What to expect when buying cheap lights

    There are just a few general things to know about this "class" of light (basically a <$80 light that is trying to compete with the high-dollar lights):

    1. They are the product of intense internal competition within China for bike light market share. I mean, who would have really thought that they could make a profit by "knocking off" an already ridiculously cheap magicshine?

    2. If any corner can be cut to lower the cost of production, assume that it's been cut. Consequently, you may need to disassemble, inspect, add some waterproofing, re-flow a few solder joints, improve on the thermal junctions (thermal compound in the right places), etc.

    3. If you don't do #2, you might only get a year or two out of the light before it "dies." Although, there will certainly be a percentage of lights that don't have any problems long term.

    4. Batteries will be the absolute cheapest Chinese cells available (and possibly unmatched). They may work, but maybe not as long as a higher quality pack. Learn and/or measure the voltage of the original battery pack, in case you end up wanting/needing to replace it.

    5. LEDs will not come from tightly "binned" lots and may or may not be authentic CREE products. This isn't too terribly critical, it's just that there may be a lot of variation from one sample to the next with regard to color temperature. This is neither here nor there for a lot of folks, but again, it's a cost of production thing.

    6. That remote switch is "barely" water-resistant (from personal experience). It will need some help if you expect it to stay dry long term. This is the case with most silicon switch covers. They may just need a little silicon grease to really make a water tight seal.

    7. Ignore any advertised Lumen count numbers. In this light category (<$80), those numbers are nowhere near reality. The "brightness" and/or usefulness of the light will only be determined by your own eyes and the type of beam that the light makes.

    8. Mode management (i.e. switching between power levels, and/or flashing modes) is often cumbersome, and flash modes may not be optimized for day use and definitely not for night use (i.e. On and flash).

    9. O-ring mounting is again, ridiculously inexpensive, but certainly not the best option in a lot of cases. A lot of R&D and $$$ can go into the making of a robust mounting system, which you may get with more expensive lights.

    However, the reason these lights exist in the first place is:
    1. They work... mostly, and do a fairly good job of lighting your path and making you more visible.
    2. A large population of consumers don't care about 1-9 above.

    and... most importantly

    3. They're sold at a price that makes them a throw-away consumable when/if they break.

    As long as you go into the buying process with the above expectations, you'll likely come out OK. It's a good idea to at least carry a backup flashlight anytime you're expecting to be in a situation where you're completely dependent on a single light, and this case is certainly no exception.

    I know this horse has been beat to death all over this forum, but I figured I'd put it out there one more time.

  6. #6
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    I've got one of those for my bars but it's just the T6 (center big one). It's more than enough light by itself for handlebar light. The o ring mounting (despite the hating) works fine, the light doesn't go anywhere and stays stable. I actually like it as I can easily adjust it on the fly as the terrain changes(adjusting the light closer or farther away from the wheel). Not to mention I don't leave my light on the bike unless I'm purposely going for a night ride, so quick install and removal is nice.

    Though, I am looking to add a helmet light to the setup as some have mentioned your not always looking the direction your bars are pointed. Plus it helps against the (cheap lights will fail and you'll die argument). At least with 2 lights the chances of both of them going out at the same time are slim.
    14' Specialized Crave

    13' Trek Superfly100 AL Elite - Sold
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  7. #7
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    Rather then get the one light for $65, I'd go with 2 of the $37-40 single XML-t6 lights (all over ebay) so you can put one on bars and one on helmet. It's a better set up, and this gives you a backup if one goes out.
    And it's only a little more money.

  8. #8
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    No experience with the light you link to.

    For what it's worth... I learned a few years ago to suck it up and buy quality lights from manufacturers I could deal with if anything went wrong.

    For the record... it did one night when I snapped my Serfas True 200 off it's base.
    I emailed them asking if I could just buy a body to replace the broken one... they suggested I send the light in and they would fix it free... which they did... got my dirty light housing back with a new shiny plastic body.... not sure you'd get that with ebay/china folks.

    I still run in the dark compared to the growing masses here it seems
    I use my old NightRider 200 & 300, although I did invest in a Light&Motion 600 (2 - 300's).
    Plus my old Serfas is still at home waiting for another chance.

    I strongly suggest you cut corners when it comes to spending money on other things like... food... toilet paper... gas for the vehicle... rehydration substances (beer)... maybe not toilet paper on second thought ... and put that hard-saved coin towards a quality lightset, both headlamp and handlebar lamp.

    I think your night riding will way better with good lights.. and like some folks have mentioned... two sets... helmet and bars.

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