Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens

    So with daylight savings coming to an end, if I figured it was time to bust out the bigger guns. Everyone seemed to enjoy my sharing of the Wall-E Dual Ostar light (http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?p=6262966), so I thought I'd share Wall-E's new barlight companion, Rubix.

    For the design, I'm using (4) P7 D-Bin (900 lumens each theoretical) emitters, a hipFlex driver from Taskled, and Ledil Boom lenses. The lens choice comes from alot of experimenting to see which patterns I liked best. And since I already have a 2,000 lumen helmet spot light, I wanted Rubix to be really floody. I ended up on deciding to go with (2) smooth spot lenses aimed 10 degrees higher up than the (2) medium lenses mounted below the 2 smooth spots, which gives a great flood from close to the tire all the way out 30-40 feet or so.

    The design stage:
    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix1.jpg

    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix2.jpg

    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix3.jpg

    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix4.jpg

    Took a while to hack these parts out, but I'm pleased with the outcome:

    Front cover completed:
    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix6.jpg

    Back cover completed:
    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix5.jpg

    All parts completed:
    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix7.jpg

    Time for a little color (anodize). Here are some of the parts in the acid bath, getting the ano treatment:

    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix8.jpg

    Parts all anodized:
    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix9.jpg

    Assembly stages: It was an absolute beyotch trying to get all the wiring crammed up inside the housing. You can see the voltage regulator and thermostat used to control the active cooling circuit mounted to the mid section of the housing with the P7's are mounted to:

    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix10.jpg

  2. #2
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    Back housing assembly completed and LED's mounted using AAA:
    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix11.jpg

    Ledil lenses installed. Two boom Smooth spots on top, two boom mediums on the bottom:
    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix12.jpg

    I used O-rings and glass lenses from DX to seal from the elements:
    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix13.jpg

    Completed pics!!!!!
    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix14.jpg

    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix15.jpg

    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix16.jpg

    Yeah that's the fan in the back. Active cooling again.... my trademark
    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix17.jpg

    And here's how it looks mounted onto the stem faceplate. I have a knob which unscrews and the entire light comes off real quick. I designed the bracket so that I could set my angle and not have to re-align it every time I put the light on the bike. Dowel pins line up the light mount to the stem faceplate, so it doesn't rotate:

    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix18.jpg

    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix19.jpg

    And shot of the duo tag team (Wall-E on the left, Rubix on the right). 5,600 lumens total:

    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix27.jpg

  3. #3
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    Sooooooo, this thread is useless without beamshots right? Right?!

    Here they are.... all pics taken at "standard MTBR settings" of ISO-100, F4, 6 Seconds.

    I set the hipflex to multimode, so you could get the picture for all 5 levels. The max power is set to the hipFlex maximum of 2.8 amps.

    Control shot:
    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix20.jpg

    Hipflex level 1:
    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix21.jpg

    Hipflex level 2:
    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix22.jpg

    Hipflex level 3:
    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix23.jpg

    Hipflex level 4:
    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix24.jpg

    Hipflex level 5:
    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix25.jpg

    And just for $hits and giggles, here's Wall-E and Rubix on together (5,600 lumens):
    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix26.jpg

    Questions? Comments? Do I win (for now)?
    Last edited by cosmoworks; 10-30-2009 at 11:42 AM.

  4. #4
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    Insane....

  5. #5
    I spelled Knievel wrong
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    Wow, that is really nice. Very nice machine work and anodizing and the mounting system is awesome! You win for now!

  6. #6
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    wow!

    cos,

    You bringing that behemoth out for the wednesday ride? Love to take a closer look.

    Bob

  7. #7
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    GOOD FRIGGIN APPLESAUCE!!!!!!!! I went blind just thinking about the amount of light your pouring onto the trail- have your started fires as you pass by dry brush?

    Beautiful machine work and design. Golf clap for you bro!

  8. #8
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    Good enough for me.........
    You're king of the pile for now. "Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown"

  9. #9
    aka RossC
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    I think that might be the most technically amazing light I have ever seen built here. The attention to detail is second to none and the finish product looks like it should be on display, it is almost too good to get covered in mud while biking. Congratulations on some stellar craftmanship

  10. #10
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    I just wet myseft. That's light porn if I ever saw it

  11. #11
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    WOW, I would like to think that the commercial stuff out there is as good and had as much design thought, since your using non bleeding edge Led's but that is truly art and the build quality is tops.

  12. #12
    Austin, TX
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    The attention to detail, especially inside, is incredible! Form and function are top. Maybe MTBR should make a new sub-forum called "Artisan Lighting"

  13. #13
    It's soil, not dirt!
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    Truly inspiring...hats off to you cosmo.

  14. #14
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    Can't wait to see the quad XPG 7up!

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rich_SC
    Can't wait to see the quad XPG 7up!
    Thats' how the game is played here now isn't it.!!

  16. #16
    what a joke
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    Speechless!!! Seriously, that is an amazing light!
    blah blah blah

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by ocean breathes salty
    I think that might be the most technically amazing light I have ever seen built here.
    The attention to detail is second to none and the finish product looks like it should be on display,
    it is almost too good to get covered in mud while biking. Congratulations on some stellar craftsmanship
    ..... +1, absolutely stunning! and the anodizing is beautiful
    ...Scun.thorpe, UK

  18. #18
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    Wow.

  19. #19
    www.hahntronix.com
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    Excellent looking light. The anodizing looks really slick.

    I have a few questions, if you don't mind:

    I'm assuming you drive the P7s in series? Any interest in a custom designed buck driver that could drive your P7s in a 2s2P configuration at 2.8 amps each P7 (or a bit more)? Allows for lower battery voltage. Or are you using a boost driver? What is the interior dimension of your driver space. My driver is roughly circular and fits in a 1.25 inch diameter space.

    How do you like the BOOM reflectors compared to the Fraens you used on the Wall-E. I've built a few P7 lights using the Fraen OSTAR reflectors you used and was pleased with the results. How do the BOOMs compare? I've tried the MCE version and been a bit disappointed, they just produce a wall of light. Your beam shots look awesome, but the center looks kind of washed out. Do you get a center spot?

    Mark
    Last edited by [email protected]; 10-30-2009 at 04:17 PM.

  20. #20
    Go faster!
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    OK YOU WIN, I SURRENDER!

    It is perfectly built! Congrats you have great skills.

    What battery pack are you using to power all that?

    hmm why didn't you use a quad OSTAR? more lumens!!

    Do you have any plans for the XP-G?

  21. #21
    One Gear
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    WOW! The machining is absoulutely beautiful. Love the mount. The lumen race has escalated to a new level.

    Nice job!

  22. #22
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    Hey thanks for the kind comments everyone!!!!!


    Quote Originally Posted by il2mb
    You bringing that behemoth out for the wednesday ride? Love to take a closer look.
    Yep, see you on Wed Bob!

    Quote Originally Posted by mojojojoaf
    I went blind just thinking about the amount of light your pouring onto the trail- have your started fires as you pass by dry brush?
    No fires... yet!

    Quote Originally Posted by ocean breathes salty
    I think that might be the most technically amazing light I have ever seen built here. The attention to detail is second to none and the finish product looks like it should be on display, it is almost too good to get covered in mud while biking. Congratulations on some stellar craftmanship
    Thanks ocean. Trust me, I'm gonna cry if I ever crash on the bike and scratch Rubix up. The finish came out way better than I hoped for... I'm getting this finishing/ano stuff really dialed in now.

    Quote Originally Posted by odtexas
    Quote Originally Posted by Rich_SC
    Can't wait to see the quad XPG 7up!
    Thats' how the game is played here now isn't it.!!
    Don't laugh... that just might happen! For now I'll enjoy the glory of the crown.... at least for another couple weeks?

    Quote Originally Posted by [email protected]
    I'm assuming you drive the P7s in series? Any interest in a custom designed buck driver that could drive your P7s in a 2s2P configuration at 2.8 amps each P7 (or a bit more)? Allows for lower battery voltage. Or are you using a boost driver? What is the interior dimension of your driver space. My driver is roughly circular and fits in a 1.25 inch diameter space.

    How do you like the BOOM reflectors compared to the Fraens you used on the Wall-E. I've built a few P7 lights using the Fraen OSTAR reflectors you used and was pleased with the results. How do the BOOMs compare? I've tried the MCE version and been a bit disappointed, they just produce a wall of light. Your beam shots look awesome, but the center looks kind of washed out. Do you get a center spot?
    Yep, all in series. Thanks for the offer, but my battery packs are all 18.5V packs, so running 4-up doesn't present a voltage problem for me. My light is designed to use TaskLED's hipflex driver, which is 1.4" diameter. The driver cavity is the light is alot larger than the driver itself mainly to accomodate all the wiring for active cooling circuit.

    I like the BOOM lenses alot. They're VERY floody which is why I chose them. Even the spot BOOM lens doesn't focus nearly as well as the Fraen lenses do on on Wall-E, but that's what I wanted was a very floody beam. It doesn't have great throw, but I didn't want that, since I have Wall-E for throw, and I just wanted this light to light up everything immediately in front of me.

    The beamshots look washed out, because the "standard MTBR camera settings" probably don't work for lights in the several-thousand-lumens range. I propose the MTBR community standardize on a newer "high power standard camera settings" for lights 3,000 lumens and up (maybe all the same settings but just use 2-stops smaller aperature at F8?) In reality, your eyes adjust and it doesn't look like a bright washed out spot, it actually looks like a nice even wall of light.

    Quote Originally Posted by sergio_pt
    OK YOU WIN, I SURRENDER!

    It is perfectly built! Congrats you have great skills.

    What battery pack are you using to power all that?

    hmm why didn't you use a quad OSTAR? more lumens!!

    Do you have any plans for the XP-G?
    Haha! Thanks man! I'm using the same pack that I use to power Wall-E, 18.5V pack made up of ten li-ion 18650 cells. Trust me, I thought about doing quad ostars, but I wanted to keep this light on the smaller side, and the P7/Boom lens combo fit the bill.

    All this XPG 7-up stuff on the forums recently is grabbing my attention though. Rich_SC's idea of quad 7-up's doesn't seem so bad. I have a way-outside-the-box idea of how to cool it too, but need to research further. Damn this forum!!!!! I've got many ideas floating around in my head, and so little time to build!!!

  23. #23
    Single Speed Junkie
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    Very nice work. Keep thinking of dusting off the mill and giving it another go. With your latest build I might just give it a shot. Don't think I'll shoot for the crown though...

  24. #24
    what a joke
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    I just came back for another look! I'm still blown away!

    If you do some more beam shots could you put some markers out to show different distances?
    blah blah blah

  25. #25
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    That's a beautiful light cosmoworks.

    I suppose you have some kind of grader blade built onto the rear of your bike too..... to sweep up all the melted rocks on the way through.

    That's nice.

  26. #26
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    Because I'm such a weight-weenie when it comes to heavy looking lights I usually don't comment too much about builds that look to weigh one down. In this case however the over all beauty and craftsmanship of the build begs to be drooled upon. A matter of fact, not to comment would be a crime against nature due to the fact that it is so awl inspiring. I think it is safe to say that you have achieved what you set out to do....create a light that can permeate the immediate perimeter with light. No doubt the beam shots don't do justice to what the light can really do. On a side note, while looking at the beam shots I think I have discovered something that you are probably unaware of. I will explain...( TIC )....I noticed in the beam photos that there is a small red light in the distance ( to the left ). In all the photos it is the same except for the last one showing the brightest mode where the red dot has moved during the photo exposure. This is first proof of a light that has emitted what I will call , An Electromagnetic induced over-excitation of the visual Light spectrum. This has induced what I will term, ..."An Electostatic Photonic Doppler Shift". Congratulations...Good chance a Nobel Peace Prize is headed your way. We are not worthy....

  27. #27
    A waste of time it is is
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    Absolutely a work of art.

    Thanks for taking the time with all the pics.

    Stunning

  28. #28
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    That is an amazing light, thanks for sharing it!

  29. #29
    Spice
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    thats insane, i serisouly think you should make more, then sell them!

    whats the battery life like though? : )

  30. #30
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    We the people ...

    Ok Cosmo, I feel that that you have reset the standard once again. Your light is stunning. I also think your choice of a Hipflex as a controller is also top drawer. Does the fan even come on? It looks to me as if you got PLENTY of surface area. The reflectors are nice and floody too. James

  31. #31
    100% italian mtbiker
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    now, that's a pro housing.
    +++++

  32. #32
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    How long does it take to machine one of those housings?
    Looks quite complicated...

  33. #33
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    Very, very nice!
    did you make Rubix on the same mini mill as the also very nice WALL-E and if so what mini mill do you have? I have thought about getting a mini mill at some point but there are so many on the market.

  34. #34
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    DAMN MAN! You make the rest of us (or at least me) who have to fabricate out of what we can buy insanely envious. Best looking homemade lights I have ever seen.

  35. #35
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    run time at full sunburn mode?

  36. #36
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    Beautiful work there

    quad p7s <i>plus</i> dual p7s on the helmet, can you say overkill. I love it.

  37. #37
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    That's an iris-rippin' setup!
    I really like the 2 straight, 2 tilted line setup (or whatever you call it) , i currently have an xpg light in the works, with two rows of leds paired in an angle!

  38. #38
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    great work man! very compliments!

    you have anodized at home?

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by danny36

    you have anodized at home?
    I have an anodizing setup at home. It's not that hard...it's just kinda messy. You need a sulfuric acid bath, a power supply, anodizing dye, distilled water. Storing and disposing of the chemicals is the biggest pain. You can finds tons of info if you google "DIY Anodizing"

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by MtbMacgyver
    I have an anodizing setup at home. It's not that hard...it's just kinda messy. You need a sulfuric acid bath, a power supply, anodizing dye, distilled water. Storing and disposing of the chemicals is the biggest pain. You can finds tons of info if you google "DIY Anodizing"
    have a look on this thread

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=525267

  41. #41
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    Thanks again for the comments guys.

    Quote Originally Posted by ozlongboarder
    I just came back for another look! I'm still blown away!

    If you do some more beam shots could you put some markers out to show different distances?
    Yeah if I actually get the time to go out with a tape measure one day, I'll do that!


    Quote Originally Posted by Cat-man-do
    Because I'm such a weight-weenie when it comes to heavy looking lights I usually don't comment too much about builds that look to weigh one down. In this case however the over all beauty and craftsmanship of the build begs to be drooled upon. A matter of fact, not to comment would be a crime against nature due to the fact that it is so awl inspiring. I think it is safe to say that you have achieved what you set out to do....create a light that can permeate the immediate perimeter with light. No doubt the beam shots don't do justice to what the light can really do. On a side note, while looking at the beam shots I think I have discovered something that you are probably unaware of. I will explain...( TIC )....I noticed in the beam photos that there is a small red light in the distance ( to the left ). In all the photos it is the same except for the last one showing the brightest mode where the red dot has moved during the photo exposure. This is first proof of a light that has emitted what I will call , An Electromagnetic induced over-excitation of the visual Light spectrum. This has induced what I will term, ..."An Electostatic Photonic Doppler Shift". Congratulations...Good chance a Nobel Peace Prize is headed your way. We are not worthy....
    Hahah... I think we should call it, "An Electostatic Photonic Camera-Accidently-Bumped-While-Taking-Picture Shift"!!


    Quote Originally Posted by [email protected]
    thats insane, i serisouly think you should make more, then sell them!

    whats the battery life like though? : )
    Actually I did have some dialog with Steve (Deesta) earlier this year about a possible run of this light. I guess if there's enough interest, I'll contact him again. Making these myself to sell would just be plain stupid given the time involved.

    I didn't get a chance to measure the full Vf of the emitters at 2.8amps, but I did measure the Vf at 13.38 volts when I set the hipflex to 2.4 amps. So at the 2.4amp hipflex setting, my light is around 32 Watts output. I don't see an efficiency graph on Taskled for (4) P7's so figure a safe 90% efficiency? That makes the light 35 Watts draw or so at 2.4 amps. My battery pack is 88W-hrs, so that gives me a runtime of 2.5 hours at Level 5.

    I still need to measure Vf at 2.8 amp hipflex mode, but I'm guessing I'll still get around 2 hours runtime at max power (level 5) on that setting.


    Quote Originally Posted by OldMTBfreak
    Ok Cosmo, I feel that that you have reset the standard once again. Your light is stunning. I also think your choice of a Hipflex as a controller is also top drawer. Does the fan even come on? It looks to me as if you got PLENTY of surface area. The reflectors are nice and floody too. James
    Thanks James! Yes the fan comes on in sitting around stationary in a 20-25C room with zero airflow. But just like Wall-E, in practice riding on trails, the fan will only come on during a really hot night or if I do extended climbs in max power mode. Realistically I could just turn on the hipflex's thermal management and use that without having to design an active cooling mechanism, but I like the fact of knowing that even without airflow, my light will never reach over 50C in the worst case scenario.


    Quote Originally Posted by rob1111
    How long does it take to machine one of those housings?
    Looks quite complicated...
    Too long!


    Quote Originally Posted by yetibetty
    Very, very nice!
    did you make Rubix on the same mini mill as the also very nice WALL-E and if so what mini mill do you have? I have thought about getting a mini mill at some point but there are so many on the market.
    Thanks yetti.... yep same mini-mill. Mill is an X2 with a few mods.


    Quote Originally Posted by jbsteven
    run time at full sunburn mode?
    See my reply to OldMTBfreak.... 2-2.5 hours. For low power mode (I usually run duomode on the hipflex), should be around 17 hours runtime. For comparison, the lower power mode looks to be about the same brightness as my friend's triple R2 light!


    Quote Originally Posted by Ratt
    quad p7s plus dual p7s on the helmet, can you say overkill. I love it.
    Yeah only those aren't P7's on my helmet. Take a closer look at the emitters, they're 6-die Ostar LED's.


    Quote Originally Posted by Giant-Lander
    That's an iris-rippin' setup!
    I really like the 2 straight, 2 tilted line setup (or whatever you call it) , i currently have an xpg light in the works, with two rows of leds paired in an angle!
    You'll like it! Angling the upper row farther out allows you to put the spottier lenses up top and the floodier ones at the bottom. The net result is a nice even blanket of light.


    Quote Originally Posted by danny36
    you have anodized at home?
    Yes. Didn't want to clutter this post with anodizing pics, but there are a few more detailed pics of anodizing in my Wall-E thread you can check out. Same setup was used. As others have stated, it's deceptively easy.

  42. #42
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    Impressive light. The quality of the machining and the finish is amazing.

    This begs a question I've been wondering about for a while and have been thinking of how to do some real world testing. Assuming no light from other sources such as the moon or other riders with lights. With increasing light intensity (lux), your eyes readjust. Of course you can go with a wider beam patterns to light a larger area as the total light output (lumens) of lights increase. But at some point you'll have everything you need to see lit at a sufficient lux level.

    Seems like the optimum arrangement would be to have a large area lit at the light level that gives good visibility but not so brightly that your eyes readjust to limit the light. That would also imply that you don't really need a hot spot in the beam anymore. What I don't know is the exact details of how eyes adjust. Do they key off the highest lux level in the field of view? Do they basically work just like the meter in a camera which is a combination of highest level and weighted averaging. If that's the case, then ideal would be to have a large area lit to a specific lux level. But, I don't have a good feel for that Lux level? From that you could also figure out how many lumens is needed to accomplish that. Is it 1000 lumens or perhaps 3600 lumens.

    Cosmo, with that much light do you really feel like you need a hot spot with the helmet light? Can you even see the hot spot of the helmet light?

  43. #43
    Lets RIDE!
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    Quote Originally Posted by MtbMacgyver
    What I don't know is the exact details of how eyes adjust. Do they key off the highest lux level in the field of view? Do they basically work just like the meter in a camera which is a combination of highest level and weighted averaging.
    What we need is mode-selectable eyes....choose center-weighted average, large aperture, and then select a high ISO setting, and we won't need lights at all

    JZ
    It's not about speed, it's about lack of control.

  44. #44
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    Doing this on a mini mill makes it even more impressive. I thought for sure you had a CNC setup. How did you make the face plate that attaches to your stem? Do you use a rotary table?

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by cytoe
    Doing this on a mini mill makes it even more impressive. I thought for sure you had a CNC setup. How did you make the face plate that attaches to your stem? Do you use a rotary table?
    Cosmo, was this done on a manual X2 mill or did you CNC your X2? I have an X2, but have never thought it would be capable of something like you created without some CNC help. I would really like to know what mods you made to your mill (so I can make them to mine ). Thanks!

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by cytoe
    Doing this on a mini mill makes it even more impressive. I thought for sure you had a CNC setup. How did you make the face plate that attaches to your stem? Do you use a rotary table?
    Agreed using a mini mill and getting these results, that is some fine work. I would suspect that the build would require a rotary table. Then again pulling this off on a mini mill....

  47. #47
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    I am utterly gobsmacked with your light! Well done!

    I too am interested in your mods for your mill. I havent got one yet but but after seeing what can be done on a mini mill I may just have to convince the Long Haired General that I need one!

    Also do you have the circuit diags for the thermistor circuit as I am interested in learning a bit more about it.

    Congrats again on an impressive looking light

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by MtbMacgyver
    Cosmo, with that much light do you really feel like you need a hot spot with the helmet light? Can you even see the hot spot of the helmet light?
    My helmet light is aimed way up so that it lights up the road farther up ahead. Rubix doesn't have a whole lot of throw (wasn't designed to throw), so wall-e compliments Rubix. For tight twisty singletrack or lower speed rides, I really only need the one light. And yes if I look down, I can easily see a 2,000 lumen spot on the ground.


    Quote Originally Posted by cytoe
    Doing this on a mini mill makes it even more impressive. I thought for sure you had a CNC setup. How did you make the face plate that attaches to your stem? Do you use a rotary table?
    Very carefully. (Plus I have a 6" rotary table ).


    Quote Originally Posted by HuffyPuffy
    Cosmo, was this done on a manual X2 mill or did you CNC your X2? I have an X2, but have never thought it would be capable of something like you created without some CNC help. I would really like to know what mods you made to your mill (so I can make them to mine ). Thanks!
    Haven't CNC'd it yet, but planning to next year sometime if I get around to it. So far only accuracy mods I have are acme leadscrews, adjustable backlash leadnuts, and DRO. If you really wanna see what the X2 is capable, do a google search on the "Hoss Machine X2 Freak".


    Quote Originally Posted by piesoup
    I am utterly gobsmacked with your light! Well done!

    I too am interested in your mods for your mill. I havent got one yet but but after seeing what can be done on a mini mill I may just have to convince the Long Haired General that I need one!

    Also do you have the circuit diags for the thermistor circuit as I am interested in learning a bit more about it.

    Congrats again on an impressive looking light
    Thanks man. Mods and capabilities explained above.

    I have a really ugly, messy wiring diagram that I created for my buddy who's making Rubix's for some friends, but I'll come up with a cleaner diagram that is actually legible and post it up here tomorrow.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmoworks

    I have a really ugly, messy wiring diagram that I created for my buddy who's making Rubix's for some friends, but I'll come up with a cleaner diagram that is actually legible and post it up here tomorrow.

    Can you include links for where you got the various components?

    Thanks

  50. #50
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    I would love to have that light! If you plan to CNC and sell some separate housings please send me a PM!

  51. #51
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    great lights, show some pictures of the mini mill
    _______________
    1x10 IS SO FINE on my 21.9 lbs IBIS SL-R
    11-36 XTR in the rear, 36T wide-narrow upfront

  52. #52
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    Wow! This is incredible! It looks so good, with a fan and is 3600 Lumens! This is very impressive!

    /Fredrik

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    Quote Originally Posted by piesoup
    Also do you have the circuit diags for the thermistor circuit as I am interested in learning a bit more about it.
    piesoup, it's not a thermistor circuit - it's simply a mechanical thermostat. You could probably do speed-controlled using a thermistor and transistor, but then it would sort of always be "on", unless you added a thermostat on top of it... gets quickly more complicated that I prefer.

    Anyway, here's the wiring diagram for my light:
    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix_diagram.jpg


    Quote Originally Posted by emu26
    Can you include links for where you got the various components?
    Here ya go mang!

    Switch: Apem IP67 Momentary w/ LED (Digikey 679-1118-ND)
    Thermostat: Airpax 50C TO-220 Themostat (Digikey 723-1192-ND)
    5V Regulator: Fairchild 5V Regulator (Digikey LM7805CT-ND)
    Fan: Sunon 45mm Maglev (Digikey 259-1347-ND)
    Resistor: 1k-Ohm 1/4-Watt (Digikey 1.0KQBK-ND)
    Driver: Taskled hipFlex

    These are the components I used for this build. The regulators and thermostats also come in different packaging as well, but I prefer using TO-220 cased components for their ease of use.


    Quote Originally Posted by biketuna
    great lights, show some pictures of the mini mill
    Don't have a pic of my mill handy at the moment, but this is my buddy's X2. Mine's basically setup the same.... just DRO, and leadscrew/nut mods:

    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-x2_timight.jpg

  54. #54
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    Amazing that the light was cut on a manual mill.
    Anodizing is technique and surface preparation.
    The light surfaces, inside and out, look perfect.
    You have shared everything possible about this build.
    Everything except the number of hours to cut, surface prep, anodize, and assemble the light.
    Would love to know how many hours went into this piece of engineering art.
    (and how many tries it took to get those final parts)

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by odtexas
    Amazing that the light was cut on a manual mill.
    Anodizing is technique and surface preparation.
    The light surfaces, inside and out, look perfect.
    You have shared everything possible about this build.
    Everything except the number of hours to cut, surface prep, anodize, and assemble the light.
    Would love to know how many hours went into this piece of engineering art.
    (and how many tries it took to get those final parts)
    Hours? Honestly I couldn't tell you the hours.... I worked on it on-and-off a little bit here-and-there and never kept any time tallies on anything. The parts you see are my first attempt, no scrap parts.

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmoworks
    Hours? Honestly I couldn't tell you the hours.... I worked on it on-and-off a little bit here-and-there and never kept any time tallies on anything. The parts you see are my first attempt, no scrap parts.

    Amazing!

  57. #57
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    Thank you for the diagram, it makes sense now!

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    Just realized that's a hip flex not a hip CC, so even if your fan failed there would be the additional fail safe of the flex cutting the current at a prescribed temperature. Nice.. I might have to make an accessory fan for one of my lights so I can use it for task lighting with no thermal cut back. Your active cooling has me thinking it might actually be more efficient with a small enough current draw from the fan, the temp vs lumen curve that ktronic posts is steep.

  59. #59
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    Wow Eye Poper

    Quote Originally Posted by God_Speed
    I would love to have that light! If you plan to CNC and sell some separate housings please send me a PM!
    SAME HERE WOULD LOVE TO GET MAY HAND'S ON THOSE MODLE FILES

  60. #60
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    Ok, ok, the light looks good. But did you see that mill?!?!?!?!!? DAM!!!!!!

    Nice work as always Cosmoworks!! I'm hacking mine out now. Hehehe...

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by piesoup
    Thank you for the diagram, it makes sense now!
    No problem!


    Quote Originally Posted by bikerjay
    Just realized that's a hip flex not a hip CC, so even if your fan failed there would be the additional fail safe of the flex cutting the current at a prescribed temperature. Nice.. I might have to make an accessory fan for one of my lights so I can use it for task lighting with no thermal cut back. Your active cooling has me thinking it might actually be more efficient with a small enough current draw from the fan, the temp vs lumen curve that ktronic posts is steep.
    Yep exactly... the hipflex's thermal management is set higher than the fan thermostat so that hipflex never lowers power automatically unless the active cooling were to fail.


    Quote Originally Posted by timight
    Ok, ok, the light looks good. But did you see that mill?!?!?!?!!? DAM!!!!!!

    Nice work as always Cosmoworks!! I'm hacking mine out now. Hehehe...
    Yeah I saw that mill.... in your garage! Don't be jealous I got mine done first.

  62. #62

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    Hi Cosmoworks.

    I'm well impressed with your mechanical design and build skills. I bet you are quite proud of what you have created here. I bet your getting a bit fed up with all the questions so I hope you can fit some answers in for me.

    Where do you get hold of the Boom reflectors?
    I have seen a lot of posts that rate optics better than reflectors for quality of beam but your flood beams look perfect. Is that because of the 4 emitted beams are overlapping and filling in?
    I'm suprised you can shift that much heat out of the housing paticularly at the point of the LED substrate junctions which like to sit at +25C. Have you done any temperature measurement profiles?
    I see that you are anodising quite a few items at once (i.e. quite a large surface area) What current were you needing to run that process and was it heating up your acid i.e. do you have pumped cooling on that tank set-up? Wow that black finish is amazing!

    And finally, what 18650 cells do you use in your packs? do you have charge balancing and over discharge protection built-in?

    Cheers Bud

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1113562
    Hi Cosmoworks.

    I'm well impressed with your mechanical design and build skills. I bet you are quite proud of what you have created here. I bet your getting a bit fed up with all the questions so I hope you can fit some answers in for me.

    Where do you get hold of the Boom reflectors?
    I have seen a lot of posts that rate optics better than reflectors for quality of beam but your flood beams look perfect. Is that because of the 4 emitted beams are overlapping and filling in?
    I'm suprised you can shift that much heat out of the housing paticularly at the point of the LED substrate junctions which like to sit at +25C. Have you done any temperature measurement profiles?
    I see that you are anodising quite a few items at once (i.e. quite a large surface area) What current were you needing to run that process and was it heating up your acid i.e. do you have pumped cooling on that tank set-up? Wow that black finish is amazing!

    And finally, what 18650 cells do you use in your packs? do you have charge balancing and over discharge protection built-in?

    Cheers Bud
    No offense Bud or anyone else who has asked questions as I have asked my fair share, BUT, this is what you get Cosmo for creating such a masterpiece .

  64. #64
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    No problem on the Q's guys!

    Quote Originally Posted by 1113562
    Where do you get hold of the Boom reflectors?
    I got the booms from a seller on CPF. You can also get them from led-spot.com.


    Quote Originally Posted by 1113562
    I have seen a lot of posts that rate optics better than reflectors for quality of beam but your flood beams look perfect. Is that because of the 4 emitted beams are overlapping and filling in?
    It's really hard to focus the P7 emitters into a spot with such a small reflector. Boom lenses are tiny in comparison to the P7's dome... Even the spot lens puts out a wider pattern that one would expect. The mediums puts out a nice wide beam that looks equal in intensity in all the areas of the beam. If you're looking to use Booms to create a throw light, you're looking in the wrong place!


    Quote Originally Posted by 1113562
    I'm suprised you can shift that much heat out of the housing paticularly at the point of the LED substrate junctions which like to sit at +25C. Have you done any temperature measurement profiles?
    I've done "sitting still" temperature tests (on my desk) as a worst case scenario, and potted a thermocouple into the center of my heatsink (part the LED's are mounted to). With the fan on, the heatsink hits a steady-state 55C, so the LED's are likely a running hotter.

    I'm not too concerned about it, since P7's are rated for a junction temp of 140C and an operating temp of 85C, and I'm pretty sure I'm no where near that with a 55C heatsink. Plus that's a worst case scenario... like I mentioned, the fan doesn't come on much during riding unless I'm climbing at max power or it's a REALLY hot night.


    Quote Originally Posted by 1113562
    I see that you are anodising quite a few items at once (i.e. quite a large surface area) What current were you needing to run that process and was it heating up your acid i.e. do you have pumped cooling on that tank set-up? Wow that black finish is amazing!
    Can't remember exactly, but off the top of my head... starts off at around 8 amps and ends around 2. This is tank-in-tank, so cooling can be done by adding cool water on the outer tank if needed. Also, this is "home ano", but I AM using commercial dyes and sealers from Caswell.


    Quote Originally Posted by 1113562
    And finally, what 18650 cells do you use in your packs? do you have charge balancing and over discharge protection built-in?
    5-cells wired in series then paralleled to another 5-cells. Balancing and protection are provided from the 5-channel PCB in the pack (p/n PCB-S5A9-GS from batteryspace).

  65. #65
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    Count me in for two if you ever do a run!!

  66. #66

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    Thanks for the helpful info! I just ordered up all the parts to build the same setup for my motorcycle. Unfortunately I cant repeat your craftsmanship on my X2.....

    Wes

  67. #67
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    Wow! Amazing!
    Excellent Work!

  68. #68
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    Seriously...

    is $500 an insult for this light? I'm straight up on that price tag if its not...PM me if its a viable negotiation!

  69. #69
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    Very nice work, never seen anything so professional. What do you do for a living if you dont mind me asking? Ever thought of making lights under your own company name?

  70. #70
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    Or you could at least consider selling the casings and let folks build their own up.

  71. #71
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    If I may, has it been mentioned what aluminum alloy you used to construct your light out of? I ask because your anodizing is so perfect (maybe it's the Caswell dyes?). Anyway, all my attempts to date have been utter failures and I do not know whether to blame it on alloy, prep, dyes or technique. Probably some of each of them. After seeing your results, I am thinking it is time to revisit the home anodizing front.

    Thanks for posting up your build and inspiring all of us to new highs!

  72. #72
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    Thanks again for the comments!

    Quote Originally Posted by Wesley J
    Thanks for the helpful info! I just ordered up all the parts to build the same setup for my motorcycle. Unfortunately I cant repeat your craftsmanship on my X2.....

    Wes
    No problem. Glad it helped! You probably won't need any of the fan cooling stuff at the speeds you'll be going on your motorcycle though.


    Quote Originally Posted by Goldigger
    Very nice work, never seen anything so professional. What do you do for a living if you dont mind me asking? Ever thought of making lights under your own company name?
    Thanks! I have thought of it, but just doesn't interest me at this time....doesn't mean it won't happen, but no intentions as of this posting. I might consider selling bare housings though, if I decide to go through with getting a CNC run made up.


    Quote Originally Posted by lsocoee
    Or you could at least consider selling the casings and let folks build their own up.
    These are machined parts, not casted. I did look into casting for the Wall-E light once upon a time, but the quantities I'd have to sell didn't justify the tooling costs.


    Quote Originally Posted by kmacon
    If I may, has it been mentioned what aluminum alloy you used to construct your light out of? I ask because your anodizing is so perfect (maybe it's the Caswell dyes?). Anyway, all my attempts to date have been utter failures and I do not know whether to blame it on alloy, prep, dyes or technique. Probably some of each of them. After seeing your results, I am thinking it is time to revisit the home anodizing front.

    Thanks for posting up your build and inspiring all of us to new highs!
    This is grade T6061. If your ano problems were getting the color to penetrate and stick, then I'd recommend you retry with caswell or some other commerical grade dye.

  73. #73

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    Cosmo,

    How did the 10 degree angle work out? I'm building a very similar (and inferior) light geared towards motorcycle use so I'll plan to shoot the beams a bit further out. I'll be moving a bit faster than a MTN bike so I'd like to cover a larger area, so I'm going to split my beams in the vertical plane also. Did you look at this at all? I've been drawing something with 2 axis adjustability but being robust is too important. I crash the dirt bike more than I ever crashed my MTN bikes....

    Reflectors arrived today!

    Wes

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    My other and likely much more simple option is to build 2 lights (like yours split vertically) and build the adjustability into the mounting system. Mount one on either side of my HID main light kinda thing.

  75. #75
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    So where do I place an order? lol. Amazing craftsmanship. Love your work!

  76. #76
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    designs like this make me afraid to post mine!

    the switch is different than the 'Wall-E' light, where did you source that?

    BTW, what 3D program are you using to render things? I don't have one and the shade function on my AutoCad is mediocre at best...
    "mountain biking and flyfishing, what more do you want?" - Yeah, I said it

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wesley J
    How did the 10 degree angle work out? I'm building a very similar (and inferior) light geared towards motorcycle use so I'll plan to shoot the beams a bit further out. I'll be moving a bit faster than a MTN bike so I'd like to cover a larger area, so I'm going to split my beams in the vertical plane also. Did you look at this at all? I've been drawing something with 2 axis adjustability but being robust is too important. I crash the dirt bike more than I ever crashed my MTN bikes....
    It's working great. For your dirt bike though, I think 4 spots would work best aimed out... your speeds will be much higher so the spots will work better for you....despite being spots, they will still spill to the sides like crazy.

    I did consider angling the bottom two leds outwards as well as downwards, but some preliminary testing changed my mind, once I saw how wide the medium lens beam pattern was.


    Quote Originally Posted by jbflyfshr
    designs like this make me afraid to post mine!

    the switch is different than the 'Wall-E' light, where did you source that?

    BTW, what 3D program are you using to render things? I don't have one and the shade function on my AutoCad is mediocre at best...
    Thanks man! The switch is the ever so MTBR popular Apem IP67 momentary from digikey. Also those aren't renderings, that's just the default view of Solidworks.

  78. #78
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    God_Speed, cyciumx, joraff, badsamaritan, and other's potentially interesting in a housing....

    What would be the preferred method of mounting? This isn't a weight weenie light and the bulk of the light sits forward which might cause some rotation problems if using a standard bar mount and hitting a large bump/jump.

    I'm just pondering the feasibility of this.... Would you guys consider switching to a Hope stem faceplate (the one with integrated light mount) if I were to sell housings?

  79. #79
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    My Nomad has a 1.5 head tube. Not sure if hope make an oversized stem.

    I like what Jim did with a modified terracycle accessory mount and his DiNotte 400

    See https://cyclingexperiences.com/2009/...d-light-mount/

    Surely someone here has crafted something similar that is a little more appealing to the eyes?

  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmoworks
    God_Speed, cyciumx, joraff, badsamaritan, and other's potentially interesting in a housing....

    What would be the preferred method of mounting? This isn't a weight weenie light and the bulk of the light sits forward which might cause some rotation problems if using a standard bar mount and hitting a large bump/jump.

    I'm just pondering the feasibility of this.... Would you guys consider switching to a Hope stem faceplate (the one with integrated light mount) if I were to sell housings?
    I use a Hope stem already so id have no problem what so ever with that The Hope plate is also avaliable for FSA and Thompson at a bargain price.

  81. #81
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    I like the faceplate mount, but I'm sure that adds to the cost (or... would add to the cost) ...but it seems necessary for the weight of the light.

    So, a dual pivot system would be revolutionary and perfectly viable for rocky conditions /::/

    That may be fantasy however.

  82. #82
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    I think my retinas are scarred from just looking at the pictures. Could of named them White Out!.

    urmb

  83. #83
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    Simply outstanding!!!

    how much water can it take with a open fan??

    K

  84. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by ktronik
    Simply outstanding!!!

    how much water can it take with a open fan??

    K
    Looks like you've got some stiff competition here Ktronik..

  85. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by Goldigger
    Looks like you've got some stiff competition here Ktronik..

    Competition!?!? this guy is in a whole different race to me...it really is a work of art!!...this guy has some serious skills...

    I am just a bike mechanic that likes to tinker...

    K

  86. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by ktronik
    Competition!?!? this guy is in a whole different race to me...it really is a work of art!!...this guy has some serious skills...

    I am just a bike mechanic that likes to tinker...

    K
    Must admit I was amazed when i scrolled down and saw the finished article.. It makes anything in the shops seem overpriced and mediocre..

    The only thing that wont work for me is the fan and the water issue as it loves to rain in the uk..

  87. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by Goldigger
    Must admit I was amazed when i scrolled down and saw the finished article.. It makes anything in the shops seem overpriced and mediocre..

    The only thing that wont work for me is the fan and the water issue as it loves to rain in the uk..
    Ride with it??...naa it would be in a shiny cabinet in my lounge...

    Shelf queen this one...

    K

  88. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by Goldigger
    Must admit I was amazed when i scrolled down and saw the finished article.. It makes anything in the shops seem overpriced and mediocre..
    I would have to agree, absolutely beautiful! The minute I saw it I had to send a link to my best friend who designs and machines stuff for nuclear powerplants, satelllites etc. for a living. His comment was "hats off". He was really impressed it was done with a small, cheap manual chinese mill

    But I think the reason this kind of stuff isn't common is the cost; I'd guess this kind of machining would easily cost 10 times more than a Lupine's Betty, for example. I don't even dare to think how much a commercial version of "Rubix" would cost. Hope Vision seems to have some nice milled lights for reasonable price, though.

    The only thing that wont work for me is the fan and the water issue as it loves to rain in the uk..
    The fan may not have any problem with water; my KTM LC4 (enduro motorcycle) has a fan behind the radiator and it has seen some serious water It doesn't seem to mind it at all, it still works just fine even though it's not sealed in any way.

  89. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by [jsl]
    I would have to agree, absolutely beautiful! The minute I saw it I had to send a link to my best friend who designs and machines stuff for nuclear powerplants, satelllites etc. for a living. His comment was "hats off". He was really impressed it was done with a small, cheap manual chinese mill

    But I think the reason this kind of stuff isn't common is the cost; I'd guess this kind of machining would easily cost 10 times more than a Lupine's Betty, for example. I don't even dare to think how much a commercial version of "Rubix" would cost. Hope Vision seems to have some nice milled lights for reasonable price, though.



    The fan may not have any problem with water; my KTM LC4 (enduro motorcycle) has a fan behind the radiator and it has seen some serious water It doesn't seem to mind it at all, it still works just fine even though it's not sealed in any way.
    Can you provide me with some more info on the mill used please?
    How much does one cost?
    how much noise do they make?
    How much mess?
    Do they need some sort of coolant?

    Cheers..

  90. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by Goldigger
    Can you provide me with some more info on the mill used please?
    How much does one cost?
    how much noise do they make?
    How much mess?
    Do they need some sort of coolant?

    Cheers..
    Not running a Taig, but here are a few thoughts after learning quite a few things on a sherline mill and micromark lathe.

    Cost for the mill, lathe and a few carbide or HSS bits was about $2500. You can find some of it for less.

    Noise depends upon how much material you removing in a pass and how sharp your end mill is. Also skill comes into play here as well as I have learned.

    Mess? Yep they meake a mess. Consider a means of containing the chips in a single area. Currently thinking of the best means of accomplishing this.

    Coolant, I'm sure it would help, but I have bee using some lube / oil when taking heavy cuts.

    Keep in mind I am amature at best. The work cosmo has done here is outstanding. I would consider getting one of these just for the machining and design, not to mention it looks like a great light.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-2000pic.jpg  


  91. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by crux
    Not running a Taig, but here are a few thoughts after learning quite a few things on a sherline mill and micromark lathe.

    Cost for the mill, lathe and a few carbide or HSS bits was about $2500. You can find some of it for less.

    Noise depends upon how much material you removing in a pass and how sharp your end mill is. Also skill comes into play here as well as I have learned.

    Mess? Yep they meake a mess. Consider a means of containing the chips in a single area. Currently thinking of the best means of accomplishing this.

    Coolant, I'm sure it would help, but I have bee using some lube / oil when taking heavy cuts.

    Keep in mind I am amature at best. The work cosmo has done here is outstanding. I would consider getting one of these just for the machining and design, not to mention it looks like a great light.
    $2500 US? AUD?
    Someone at work came up with a good idea.. sign up for an evening class at college learning maching, at the same time making your own light housings...

  92. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by Goldigger
    Can you provide me with some more info on the mill used please?
    How much does one cost?
    how much noise do they make?
    How much mess?
    Do they need some sort of coolant?

    Cheers..
    They have some Okumas, but they aren't really just mills but CNC machining centers. I have no idea how much they cost, but 250k should get you at least something. They do make a lot of noise, the mess is mostly contained within the sort of work compartment of the centers. They do use coolant, and lots of it.

    Or.. were you asking about the mill cosmoworks used to make his lights? I have no idea, never seen one.


  93. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by [jsl]
    They have some Okumas, but they aren't really just mills but CNC machining centers. I have no idea how much they cost, but 250k should get you at least something. They do make a lot of noise, the mess is mostly contained within the sort of work compartment of the centers. They do use coolant, and lots of it.

    Or.. were you asking about the mill cosmoworks used to make his lights? I have no idea, never seen one.

    Im curiuos of what the minium requirement of a mill is that would suit the home builder to make decent housings...

  94. #94
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    Thanks again for the nice words guys! ktronik, GoldDigger... you guys are making this manly-man


    Quote Originally Posted by badsamaritan
    My Nomad has a 1.5” head tube. Not sure if hope make an oversized stem.
    Thomson makes X4 1.5" stems, and as God_Speed stated, the Hope makes faceplates to fit Thompson and FSA.

    But my mounting worries might be a mute point afterall, I have a mounting idea that should fit most bikes without the need for a custom or specific brand name stem. I'll let you guys know if a CNC run will become reality in the next few weeks.


    Quote Originally Posted by urmb
    I think my retinas are scarred from just looking at the pictures. Could of named them White Out!.

    urmb
    Haha... thanks! No seriously, thanks!.... I been pondering ideas for names for my next light. I just might the use the name "White-out", if you don't mind.


    Quote Originally Posted by ktronik
    Simply outstanding!!!

    how much water can it take with a open fan??

    K
    This much?
    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix_water.jpg
    (thanks to my buddy timight for performing the "dunk" tests)


    Quote Originally Posted by Goldigger
    Looks like you've got some stiff competition here Ktronik..
    Haha.... no competition with anyone here, unless it's all in good fun only! ktronik, and many other innovative minds on these forums have influenced my passion to build lights and I'm thankful to everyone here for sharing ideas, builds and further driving innovation.


    Quote Originally Posted by [jsl]
    I would have to agree, absolutely beautiful! The minute I saw it I had to send a link to my best friend who designs and machines stuff for nuclear powerplants, satelllites etc. for a living. His comment was "hats off". He was really impressed it was done with a small, cheap manual chinese mill

    The fan may not have any problem with water; my KTM LC4 (enduro motorcycle) has a fan behind the radiator and it has seen some serious water It doesn't seem to mind it at all, it still works just fine even though it's not sealed in any way.
    Again, more of this....

    You're right... fan is not affected (see above). At first we thought maybe the fan was spinning so fast that water never had a chance to get into the stator. So timight tested by dunking the fan powered off, then powered it on while submerged, and still no problems.


    Quote Originally Posted by Goldigger
    Im curiuos of what the minium requirement of a mill is that would suit the home builder to make decent housings...
    Really depends on what your definition of "decent" is. I can make a "decent" housing with a file and hacksaw like many people can on this forum.

    But your friend's idea is best.... a machining class would expose you to basic mill/lathe skills if you've never machined before. And like you said, on top of that you get to use their machines!

  95. #95
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    Decent housing? Depends on your definition... to mill or lathe a round metal tube with a hole in the front (for the optic/LED/PCB combination), and in the back for electronics, and make a cover for each, a $700-800(US) investment will get you in the door ($400 for a decent X2 mill, $300+ in tooling/clamps/holders/measuring instruments/supplies.

    That's a "minimum" setup, but you'll be able to mill or machine anything you can move the x/y/z handles to mill with whatever size bits you buy. That plus some math, conversions, calculations, and layout skills.

    If you want the mill to do it automatically (CNC), you are looking at 2500 for the basic mill package when all is said and done. And you'll want to add cooling, so another several hundred for that, plus the worksurface/enclosure, etc.

    A mill can (with difficulty, and one or more rotary tables), make anything that a lathe can make.... a lathe, with an x/y mount on it, can almost make anything a mill can make (but not nearly as easily or well).

    Basically a mill is the one machine in the shop that can 100% duplicate itself (with proper work holding equipment)... of course table dimensions and such limit that feat in many cases, but in basic theory, with nothing more than clamps and skillful operation, you can make anything on a mill. One thing that sucks (without cnc at least) though is threading, a lathe is definitely the ideal tool for that.

    100 years ago, diesel engines the size of houses were made for ships like the Titanic using nothing fancier than metal casting and manual milling and lathing techniques, so even on a simple manual mill, you can make very fancy items, it's just how much work is involved in planning (95% of the challenge), setup (3%), alignment(1-100%, LOL), etc. That and your ingenuity are the limits.

  96. #96
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    Beamshots at High Power MTBR Camera Settings

    I just haven't had the time to post back up new beamshots using the high-power light camera settings (ISO 100, F4, 1 sec) as I promised in my post here...

    MTBR Standard Camera Settings for High Power Lights:
    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=568224

    So I'll do the next best thing and post up equivalent setting beamshots that I took a while back. Keep in mind the actual light output looks brighter in real life, but the following shots give a better idea of the beam pattern spread since the standard MTBR settings (ISO 100, F4, 6 Sec) cause certain parts of the beamshots to be blown out.

    Control shot:
    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix_hp_cam_1.jpg

    Level 1:
    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix_hp_cam_2.jpg

    Level 2:
    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix_hp_cam_3.jpg

    Level 3:
    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix_hp_cam_4.jpg

    Level 4:
    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix_hp_cam_5.jpg

    Level 5 (3,600 lumens):
    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix_hp_cam_6.jpg

    Rubix and Wall-E together (5,600 lumens):
    Rubix - The Quad D-Bin P7 Light 3,600 lumens-rubix_hp_cam_7.jpg

    Also to update on the CNC run front.... I did contact Steve as well as another contact, and it doesn't look like good timing at the moment for anyone (including myself) to make this happen. If anything changes though I'll post an update.

  97. #97
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    Very nice Nomad! Oh, the light is ok too. Just kidding. Frick man, that's some very nice work. Probably give it a little more wiring room next time, right? Almost makes me wish I was back at school so I could write up come g-code and turn out a few of those. But I don't have access to anything anymore. The few times I've had someone quote something for me it's so damn expensive I just end up buying something commercial.
    "It looks flexy"

  98. #98
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    Wow that is a really nice homemade bike light! But what battery did you use for your build???
    He who hesitates is lost.

  99. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by losimaster117
    Wow that is a really nice homemade bike light! But what battery did you use for your build???
    Thanks! See post #22 and #64 about the battery.

  100. #100
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    Where did you purchase your Optics?
    This is a beautiful light.

  101. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by BEDFSR
    Where did you purchase your Optics?
    This is a beautiful light.
    See post #64.

  102. #102
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    Last edited by Goldigger; 12-30-2009 at 06:32 PM.

  103. #103
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    wow - awesome stuff
    It is possible for rice to absorb other odors in storage. Or could be the quality of water in it was prepared. Mahatma Rice

  104. #104
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    Updating my thread with a link to the Dual Rubix Light (aka Rubii):
    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?p=7138193

  105. #105
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    Wow

    Bringing up an old thread, but I'm floored by the diy quality here. A true craftsman.

    What's the latest? Surely you've been working on something since.

    Also, the diy anodize; what did you use for dye's and sealers? I've tried myself but black ended up a deep green...

  106. #106
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    Thanks heffster. I use caswell dye to get the blacks black. I'm still using these lights on my night rides, and actually did start (and almost finish) another project last year... but lack of time caused me not to touched it all this year. One of these days I'll pick it back up and finish it, then post back on here.

  107. #107
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    Nice light. I wanted to make one of these for my work helmet. I have been on the candlepowerfourms for years just jelous of the skills of the light builders! Amazing work!!

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