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  1. #1
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    One for the machinists out there

    saw this on the machining forum and remembered a bunch of old posts about reducing backlash on mills and cross slides. Thought it might be useful:
    Making Acetal leadscrew nuts the easy way
    the nut on my cross slide is somewhat worn, but it's a bugger of a shape (screws in to the tool post) so I'm not sure this will work for me.

  2. #2
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    That's an interesting approach to thread cutting...
    I was wondering what thread my ball screws are...

    Is there an easy way to make new gibs? Mine could do with replacing.

  3. #3
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    funnily enough iv been trying to find the time to try this out. my entire half nut assembly is missing, including the handle, so im gonna have to make up all the metal bits first.( when iv not got a bit of metal in the chuck for difernt projects lol)


    but it's a bugger of a shape (screws in to the tool post) so I'm not sure this will work for me.
    if you can get your old nut out, you should be able to bore the threads out then make up the new nut and pressfit/glue it in place

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Goldigger View Post
    That's an interesting approach to thread cutting...
    I was wondering what thread my ball screws are...

    Is there an easy way to make new gibs? Mine could do with replacing.
    I thought it was pretty neat Seems about as simple as it could be.

    WTH are gibs though?

    Quote Originally Posted by b-bassett View Post
    if you can get your old nut out, you should be able to bore the threads out then make up the new nut and pressfit/glue it in place
    that's worth thinking about. Trouble is it's a weird upside down t-shaped piece with main screw (lead screw? I need to catch up on my terminology!) going through the head of the T and the tail bolted into the tool post above. It's also about the size of my thumbnail too - it's a very small lathe In fact, if I wasn't married with kids, I'd feel very insecure about the size of my lathe..

  5. #5
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    it's a very small lathe In fact, if I wasn't married with kids, I'd feel very insecure about the size of my lathe..
    I've got a 12"................

    Rotary table for my mill. Plus two sons. No insecurity here.
    Last edited by Vancbiker; 10-10-2012 at 07:53 AM. Reason: fixed quote

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Goldigger View Post
    That's an interesting approach to thread cutting...
    +1

    Very cool indeed

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mattthemuppet View Post
    WTH are gibs though?
    The gibs are metal pieces (relatively soft, often brass) that take up the slack between two moving pieces (or one moving and one stationary, like in the case of the lathe's cross-slide). Usually a spring/screw/something maintains pressure on them against the matting surface to maintain a pre-set resistance to the two parts sliding. As the softer gibs wear out, you apply more pressure to maintain the desired tension/resistance.

    gibbs in a lathe - Google Search


    Will

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Goldigger View Post
    Is there an easy way to make new gibs? Mine could do with replacing.
    people use Moglice to repair worn out ways, not sure what they do about gibbs

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by wquiles View Post
    The gibs are metal pieces (relatively soft, often brass) that take up the slack between two moving pieces (or one moving and one stationary, like in the case of the lathe's cross-slide). Usually a spring/screw/something maintains pressure on them against the matting surface to maintain a pre-set resistance to the two parts sliding. As the softer gibs wear out, you apply more pressure to maintain the desired tension/resistance.

    gibbs in a lathe - Google Search


    Will
    ah, so that's what that screw was for! I was wondering about a strange screw in a piece of my cross-slide when I took it apart to clean. Now I know

  10. #10
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    Gibs can get uneven wear so that when you crank the table X or Y you can get tight spots..
    Only easy ish way i've come accross is to make this holder to mill the gibs for an Sieg X2/SX2, this allows you to mill the correct angles..

    http://www.fignoggle.com/plans/figNo...pViseBlock.pdf

  11. #11
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    I ended up scraping the gibs and ways on my mill after I bought it to remove the tight spots. I made the scraper by shaping an old file to the correct radius, then with the help of some prussian blue and a granite surface plate, found all the high spots then scrapped them of.

    Let me tell you, after an hour or so of scraping you discover muscles you never had, but the results are brilliant. Once done I lubed the ways with Caltex way oil and the mills slide glide like butter.

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