Old school packs, new school LEDS?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    TCW
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    Old school packs, new school LEDS?

    A few years ago, before LEDs became the norm, I threw together a few halogen DIY lights systems based off MR-11/MR-16 light-heads, 20 watt bulbs, 7.2 volt (14.4 volts Ė wired together) 3800 mAh RC battery packs made by Tenergy with Tamiya plugs and Rat Shack chargers.

    Last X-mas the good wife got me a NiteFLUX Photon Max and my eyes were opened, hehe, to how far LEDs have come. So now Iím left with quite a few good to excellent condition RC battery packs and chargers.

    My wife likes to night ride with me but I feel bad loading her down with the old-school halogen systems. So Iím wondering if it would be possible to use the old-school battery packs with some new school LED light heads. Specifically, I noticed Geoman selling the Magicshine lighthead for only $45. What do you think? How difficult would it be to use my old 7.2V 3800mAH NiMH packs with the Magicshine Lighthead? Would it even work? Any ideas on burn time?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by TCW
    A few years ago, before LEDs became the norm, I threw together a few halogen DIY lights systems based off MR-11/MR-16 light-heads, 20 watt bulbs, 7.2 volt (14.4 volts Ė wired together) 3800 mAh RC battery packs made by Tenergy with Tamiya plugs and Rat Shack chargers.

    Last X-mas the good wife got me a NiteFLUX Photon Max and my eyes were opened, hehe, to how far LEDs have come. So now Iím left with quite a few good to excellent condition RC battery packs and chargers.

    My wife likes to night ride with me but I feel bad loading her down with the old-school halogen systems. So Iím wondering if it would be possible to use the old-school battery packs with some new school LED light heads. Specifically, I noticed Geoman selling the Magicshine lighthead for only $45. What do you think? How difficult would it be to use my old 7.2V 3800mAH NiMH packs with the Magicshine Lighthead? Would it even work? Any ideas on burn time?
    It should work. I have no idea what the burn time would be, but with 3800 packs it should be 2-3 hours.

    I use a mix of new and old 7.2v nimh and nicad packs for my homebrew lights along with 7.4v li-ions.

  3. #3
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    That like looks a lot like the DX P7 bike light. Might even be the same thing.

    It says 8.4v max input so it shoud work with one of the 7.2v packs just fine. Perhaps an hour and a half at high and about 3 hours on low.

  4. #4
    TCW
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    Any wiring concerns with cutting the orginal wire and fitting it for a tamiya plug compatible with the battery pack? Of course with halogens theres no positve/negative issues. Are LEDs different in that regard?

  5. #5
    Carbon8er
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    LED's have a + and - connection.

    Those Tamiya plugs are kind of wimpy for high current applications.
    But if you like em, use em cause you already have them.

  6. #6
    TCW
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    Quote Originally Posted by El34
    LED's have a + and - connection.

    Those Tamiya plugs are kind of wimpy for high current applications.
    But if you like em, use em cause you already have them.
    I've never encountered any problems with the Tamiyas, but they certainly aren't anything special. The only reason I use them is they came on the battery packs and they interface directly with my chargers; like you said I already have them. Any ideas how would one determine + and - on the Magicshine lighthead cable?

  7. #7
    Carbon8er
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    You can measure the DC voltage coming out of the charger with a multimeter to figure out which is + and -

    Then look at the connector you hook up to the charger and follow the + and - wires down the wire to determine which is which on the end that hooks to the light.

    Was that what you were asking?

  8. #8
    TCW
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    Quote Originally Posted by El34
    You can measure the DC voltage coming out of the charger with a multimeter to figure out which is + and -

    Then look at the connector you hook up to the charger and follow the + and - wires down the wire to determine which is which on the end that hooks to the light.

    Was that what you were asking?
    The batteries are easy to tell, red wire/black wire. But I would need to cut off the MagicShine's connector and replace with a male (or maybe it's a female) tamiya. So, figuring what is +/- on the lighthead is the challenge. I might just pick up a Magicshine and battery then use the multimeter on it. If I can figure out +/- from that then I could pick up just a lighthead to try with my old pack(s).

  9. #9
    www.hahntronix.com
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    When changing connectors on any battery pack, be sure to observe this simple safety rule. Never, never, allow two uncovered live wire leads from a charged battery to be near each other at any time.

    I thankfully have not observed this up close and personally. But once as I was cutting the leads off a 50 watt NiMh battery pack to attach a nice new Dean connector, I happened to wonder what would happen if the 2 newly stripped battery wires came in contact with each other. Let's just say, that the least that would happen is my battery would be dead. Had I been working on a Li-Ion pack, well I probably wouldn't be dead, but serious flames and havoc could have ensued.

    When changing the connector on a battery pack, do one lead at a time. Bend the other lead out of the way, and tape it there. For banana style connectors, do the outside lead (typically the negative one) first.

    It never hurts to wrap the lead you are not messing with in some kind of electrical tape (Duct tape works in a pinch, or even scotch tape).

    When using something like a Dean connector, be sure to put some heat shrink around the fist connection you make, and cover any exposed metal bits with some kind of tape.

    Be safe, it only takes a tiny slip to trash a battery,

    Mark

  10. #10
    TCW
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    Excellent advice, but I don't plan on removing the connectors from the battery packs. Instead I hoped to change the connector on the lighthead's power connection to be compatible with the tamiya connector on the battery pack.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by TCW
    A few years ago, before LEDs became the norm, I threw together a few halogen DIY lights systems based off MR-11/MR-16 light-heads, 20 watt bulbs, 7.2 volt (14.4 volts Ė wired together) 3800 mAh RC battery packs made by Tenergy with Tamiya plugs and Rat Shack chargers.

    Last X-mas the good wife got me a NiteFLUX Photon Max and my eyes were opened, hehe, to how far LEDs have come. So now Iím left with quite a few good to excellent condition RC battery packs and chargers.

    My wife likes to night ride with me but I feel bad loading her down with the old-school halogen systems. So Iím wondering if it would be possible to use the old-school battery packs with some new school LED light heads. Specifically, I noticed Geoman selling the Magicshine lighthead for only $45. What do you think? How difficult would it be to use my old 7.2V 3800mAH NiMH packs with the Magicshine Lighthead? Would it even work? Any ideas on burn time?
    I didn't know this was available on its own?
    I can't find it on Geoman's site. Where did you see it?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by bradjackson
    I didn't know this was available on its own?
    I can't find it on Geoman's site. Where did you see it?
    Nevermind, I just found it. You have to select the "Magicshine" category. I was looking under "Lights for Cycling"

  13. #13
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    It is easy to tell the polarity on the magic shine. The centre post on the connector is +ve, outer -ve.
    When you cutoff the MS connector., the wires are colored, red and black as well. If not red and black then use a multi meter in continuity mode, to establish on the plug end to the cut end the continuity and hence the polarity.

  14. #14
    TCW
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    Quote Originally Posted by heatstroke
    It is easy to tell the polarity on the magic shine. The centre post on the connector is +ve, outer -ve.
    When you cutoff the MS connector., the wires are colored, red and black as well. If not red and black then use a multi meter in continuity mode, to establish on the plug end to the cut end the continuity and hence the polarity.
    Exactly the information I was looking for. Thank you Heatstroke.

  15. #15
    TCW
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    Does anyone know if there's a compaitible female connector for the MS cord? That way I wouldn't have to cut the cord and wire in the tamiya. I could just wire the compatible female connctor to the tamiya that would function as a MS to tamiya adapter.

  16. #16
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    New question here. Connecting battery pack

    Quote Originally Posted by TCW
    Does anyone know if there's a compaitible female connector for the MS cord? That way I wouldn't have to cut the cord and wire in the tamiya. I could just wire the compatible female connctor to the tamiya that would function as a MS to tamiya adapter.
    Its even easier now all one has to do is changeout the battery pack with the Magichine female power jack's courtesy the geomangear part(supplied link below):

    http://www.geomangear.com/index.php?...roducts_id=150

    All one has to do is cut off the two female DC power jack ends from the adapter that was ordered.

    And then simply transfer the positive lead to the positive and negative battery terminals on the external battery pack.

    Just as a second check the center portion of pin should be positive 8.6V polarity using ones uberhandy multimeter.

    cheers and good luck batterypacking

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