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  1. #1
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    New Sony 18650s

    When do we get our hands on these

    https://www.sonyinsider.com/2009/08/...ion-batteries/

    Quote Originally Posted by sonyinsider
    Sony has announced a new type of lithium ion rechargeable battery that combines high-power and long-life performance, using olivine-type lithium iron phosphate as the cathode material. The Olivine-type lithium iron phosphate used in this new battery is a perfect cathode material due to its robust crystal structure and stable performance, even at high temperatures. These bateries have a high power density of 1800W/kg, and extended life span of approximately 2,000 charge-discharge cycles. What’s most surprising is that the battery will keep an 80% charge retention after those 2,000 charge-discharge cycles, which is very impressive.

    This new battery is also able to charge rapidly (99% in 30 minutes). It will first be supplied for use in power tools, then gradually make its way to consumer electronic electronic devices. With lithium ion secondary batteries able to deliver both compact size and high capacity, their usage continues to diversify and grow. This new battery delivers an extended life-span of over four-times existing rechargeable lithium ion batteries used in conventional electronic devices. By adding this high-power, long-life lithium ion rechargeable battery to its lineup, Sony has certainly strengthened its battery business going forward. Here are some specifications:


  2. #2
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    1.1Ah looks kinda low and 3.2 rather than 3.7 so not alot of use for us at all really.

    Only 10grams lighter than my 2.5Ah's to.

  3. #3
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    I think it has more to do with application, I am sure they'll have other capacities now that Sony is working on them (you can buy non-Sony right now - https://www.dealextreme.com/details.dx/sku.1879 ). HP is using a new type of lion batteries in their laptop batteries now and Apple is claiming a long lasting LiPo now too (via unique battery chemistry and microprocessor managed charging (Adaptive Charging) according to them).

    https://www.edn.com/blog/1470000147/post/130037813.html

    Dec. 11, 2008

    Boston-Power announced yesterday that HP will offer Boston-Power’s long-life rapid-charge lithium ion battery Sonata as an upgrade option to HP customers. The battery, which has a 3-year warranty, supports at least 1000 charge-discharge cycles before experiencing any degradation in its charge capacity. Compare this to the normal battery’s charge-discharge number of about 200 cycles. Boston-Power CEO Dr. Christina Lampe-Onnerud described the degradation over time of a conventional laptop battery: “The common user experience is that you typically are delighted with battery performance out-of-the-box, then two months later you see half the run time, and three to four months later half of that.”

    What if you’re not in the market for a new laptop right now but your battery pack has passed its 200-cycle point and you are now less-than-delighted with it? If you currently have an HP laptop, the chances are good you can still upgrade to a Sonata: Lampe-Onnerud estimates that the Sonata is compatible with 80-90% of existing HP laptops.

    HP is emphasizing the longer life of the environmentally-friendly pack by branding it as their Enviro pack. The packs will sell for a $20-30 premium over a conventional battery pack.
    Shipped in March - https://www.boston-power.com/boston-...-notebook.html

    Apple's claim in June at WWDC, a half year after HP announced and they had already been shipping as a drop in replacement - no forced upgrades to get the better battery, still user replaceable. Apple, think shite:
    Last edited by syadasti; 08-16-2009 at 11:54 AM.

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    Not to burst your bubble... but LiFePO4 batteries are nothing new. A123 has been making them for power tools for quite some time. They have inferior energy density compared to the more common LiCoO2 based batteries. The only advantage they have is that they are far more resistant to exploding, and they can be very rapidly charged and extremely rapidly discharged in as little as 2 minutes (30C in battery-speak). It's a good match for power tools or radio control models where runtimes of only a few minutes are acceptable, but for bike lights, standard LiCoO2 based batteries are superior.

    typical LiCoO2 18650: 3.6V and 2500mAh
    LiFePO4 18650: 3.2V and 1100mAh

    Do the math and you'll see that these LiFePO4 cells have less than half of the energy (V*maH). However, because they can be discharged at 30C rates, they have much higher power compared to a typical LiCoO2 cell which can only be discharged at 3 to 5C rates.

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    Quote Originally Posted by desolder
    Not to burst your bubble... but LiFePO4 batteries are nothing new. A123 has been making them for power tools for quite some time.
    I hate to burst your bubble bursting, but I know that and posted that above:

    I think it has more to do with application, I am sure they'll have other capacities now that Sony is working on them (you can buy non-Sony right now - http://www.dealextreme.com/details.dx/sku.1879 ).
    I also suggested someone use one of the prefabbed LiFePO4 systems in October 2008...

    My point is now that a well known battery OEM (Sony's known for lion) with a huge R&D budget, maybe they'll make some progress on mass applications. They aren't quite a name like Sanyo in batteries but they are large and have a lot more money.

  6. #6
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    I think 30C opens up some interesting possibilities

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    Quote Originally Posted by syadasti
    I hate to burst your bubble bursting, but I know that and posted that above:
    OK just checking to make sure you weren't carried away by their claims.

    She says that the more common LiCoO2 chemistry degrades to 50% capacity after two months. That seems pretty exaggerated to me. My experience has been that it takes about a year or two before the cells degrade to such a degree. At 50% original capacity... you're now equal to the capacity of a LiFePO4 cell of equal size.

    I can see why this would be a terrific cordless tool battery or RC car/air battery, but the strengths of the chemistry are not necessarily a good fit for a bike light application.

  8. #8
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    we been testing some of the LiFePO4 and they are very promising in certain applications.Ii have some of the Sonys coming to check out

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