Laseredger Lights- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Laseredger Lights

    Is anyone using Laseredge lights? (http://www.bicyclelights.com/) They are listed on e-bay for a reasonable price, and was wondering if they are any good. I donít have any night riding experience, and am looking for a good set of entry-level lights so that I know that I am going to be into it before shelling out a bunch of $$$. Any info would be helpful. And listing them in the Product Reviews would be helpful too. Is there something better I should be looking at in the same approximate price range?

    http://www.bicyclelights.com/

  2. #2

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    Good job! Laseredge lights

    These lights are an outrageous value. I was going to make a homebrew light setup, but wasn't happy with the getto look of pvc or trailer ball hitch cases on my nice Blur and I soon realized that to do it right was going to cost over $100. One night I came across www.bicyclelights.com and found exactly what I was looking for. I cannot say enough good things about these. They guy who makes them, Chad I think, answered my questions via email within 5 minutes. I ordered both the dual bar lights and the helmet light on a monday morning and the lights arrived the next morning by 10am.
    The bar mount is CNC'd and works well. I was skeptical it would hold, but the lights don't rotate at all. The battery pack uses NiMH which is nice for this price range. The low 5 watt is plenty for climbing and fireroads. The 15 watt high beam is enough for almost anything. Adding the helment to that is perfect for single track. I don't use the 5 and 15 at the same time to save a bit of juice till I'm close to the end of a ride. On my first night out with the lights I wasn't planning on being out late enough to use them, but after my buddy broke his chain 3 times they were life savers. We didn't get off the trail til 9pm and I ran them for close to 2 hrs. While I broke my ribs in an endo, and the battery pack came out of the cage, the lights survived.
    The only things I would improve on are the helmet mount (nylon stip with two velcro straps). It works well for my helmets but isn't easy to put on and off. Also, I'm not sure why there is a dongle with a switch for the helmet mount. Would have prefered a switch on the light housing. Also the switch for the handlebar mount needs to be attached very tight or it will rotate. I'm using a strip of rubber from a computer mount and it stays put. Also the chargers are trickle (not smart) chargers. So set your buzzer to remember to unplug. I may go out and get a nice smart changer to replace these. These are just little grips. Overall I'm extremily pleased. Chad sell on ebay for $10 less than his online store for the dual and I think a couple bucks can be saved on the helment light too. I think I paid $73 for the dual bar lights, $33 for the helmet. I've recommended to all my friends. Do yourself a favor and go buy these lights.

  3. #3
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    To the guy who emailed me about these, i thought i had left some review, i think on the homemade light post. Anyway, i agree, i've cycled my battery about 4 times now and am getting around 1.5+ hours with both beems. I was initially going to buy a used nite rider set up and build a battery for it. I'm glad i didn't, i'd have had more in the system. My light is easily bright enough for technical night riding, gets great battery life, mounts securely( use electrical tape around the bars, holds better and doesn't mark the bars that way), and i have 2 spare bulbs. Unreal price, i also have to say that the service of the company is great, i had plenty of questions and they were answered effectively and quickly. Definately buy these lights. I think next year i'll be buying his helmet light too.

  4. #4

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    I purchased only the handlebar mounted lights. Overall, I would say that this light is a good value. The system is well made, but probably not as polished as a commercial system (but this is not unexpected considering the $73 price). I recently used this light (along with a homemade 20W helmet light) at the Seven Springs 24 hour race (in PA).

    Chad at Laseredge Lights was very quick in responding to my questions about these lights, and provided accurate information. I would happily do business with him again.

    The 14.4V NIMH battery is great. The higher voltage (compared to 13.2V or 12V) gives a significantly whiter and brighter beam (but not as bright as the expensive HID lights). I replaced both bulbs (5W and 15W) with two 20W bulbs, and run only one bulb at a time. (I bought off the web, for $2-5 each, a bunch of bulbs with different beam patterns.) The 2nd 20W bulb is used as a backup in case the 1st should burn out during a race. The two 20W bulbs (helmet and handlebar) provided plenty of light for all conditions during the 24 hour race. I'm getting close to 2 hours of burn time on the handlebar light when running a single 20W bulb. My only concern with this setup is that the housing gets very hot, and I wonder if the internal wiring can withstand the heat. After half a dozen or so rides, it's still working fine, but I haven't opened it up to see what the inside looks like.

    Changing the bulbs was a little difficult. You have to remove a snapring to free the bulb. Then you have to shake the housing until the bulb and lamp socket come out. This was sometimes difficult. There's not much slack in the internal wiring, so it's difficult to access the lamp socket when plugging the new bulb in. Once the new bulb has been installed into the socket, it was tricky getting the socket and bulb seated straight in the housing. The bulb and socket is held in position with a piece of foam that pushes on the socket (back side) toward the front of the housing, onto the removable snapring. Oftentimes, the bulbs would twist sideways before the snapring was installed. When this happens, you have to remove the snapring, straighten the bulb, and try again.

    The main wire between the battery and the bulb housing is 18 gauge white "lampcord" wire; It seems to work fine, but looks a little out of place. Black "lampcord" would have looked better.

    The water bottle that the batteries are mounted in has very thin walls and gets deformed by my water bottle cage.

    The bulb housings are made of aluminum. The walls of the housings are thin enough that if you crash and hit a housing on a rock, it will bend. If this happens, it may be difficult to remove the bulb from the housing due to the already tight fit between the bulb and the inside of the housing.

    None of the above issues is a serious problem for this lightiing system. Other commercial lighting systems may have similar problems, but I don't know since I have never used any other. I would definitly recommend this light if you're looking for an inexpensive, but still functional light (bright enough for mtn. bike racing).

  5. #5

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    LaserEdge Lights

    I have became a daily commuter rider since last year. As my ride was a combination of dark forest trail and roadway, I needed lights that work well for both illumination and increase visibility to drivers.

    I bought my LaserEdge Bike Lights through EBay which ended up about $10 less than from the http://www.bicyclelights.com website. The service from Chad was excellent. I ended up requiring some new connectors so I can customize a longer battery cable. Chad was very helpful in selling more connectors to me.

    The LaserEdge Bike Light is very well constructed. Although it appears very simple with the one bracket, that is the very beauty of its design. The two light housing and the mounting bracket is contructed out of anodized aluminum. The bracket looks flimpsy at first but works better than any of the plastic mounts I have used before. I added a piece of rubber around the bracket to ensure a snug fit without scratching my handlebar finish.

    The lights use an MR11 bulb which are available in various wattages and beam widths. The bulbs supplied with the Bike Light are of good quality. A spare set is supplied as standard. The bulbs are held in place with a snap ring. Only a small slotted screwdriver is required to twist off the snap ring and to remove the bulb from the connector.

    The modular connector in the battery cord holds strongly and does give away if a crash was to occur. For me, I clumsily got my knee caught in the cable and it just pulled the connector off without any damage to the light unit or the battery. For those of you requiring a longer cable than 3 feet, you can custom order the the length from Chad or you can add your own afterwards.

    The switch is nicely waterproofed. I have riden several times in heavy rain and had absolutely no problem with water ingress. The switch comes off the left light housing. This was a bit of a mounting problem for me because I am out of handlebar space with my bike computer already mounted. So I had to mount the switch (with the supplied Velcro strap) to the handlebar stem instead.

    Performance wise, the lights put out sufficient light with only the 5W bulb. With the 15W bulb, there is enough illumination for any situation (on or off road). The beam pattern is wide enough to light up corners yet the projection forward down the path will reach 30-50 feet. It is easy to change out the 5W bulb for another 15W for 30 total watts of bright illumination.

    As my daily ride is only about 15 minutes, I get about 4 days of riding on one charge. The battery comes in a water bottle which fits well in my bottle cage. I would prefer to have a smart charger instead of the trickle charger included with the package. An overnight charge seems to fill up an empty battery nicely.

    Overall, the Bicycle Lights are excellent value. There is nothing else like it in performance and durability for under $100. I have used NiteRiders and Vistalites in the past and the Bicycle Lights are at least equal to these. I do like the Vistalites for their focusing ability (like a Mag-Lite) but the Bicycle Lights are much more even in the lighting pattern. On a scale of 1 (bad) to 10 (excellent), I would give these a rating of 9.

  6. #6
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    So how are your Laseredge lights holding up, I was thinking of going homebrew, but this may run about the same price depending on how I go.

  7. #7

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    Laseredge Lights

    I have been very happy with my lights. I ended up building a constant voltage controller and upgrading the batteries to two 7.2V packs so the lights are fed 6VDC constantly over the entire charge of the batteries. This resulted in a constant burn for just over 2.5 hours.

    I think for the price, you cannot go wrong. If you do decide to do any sort of upgrade down the road, spend a few more bucks and order the battery connectors to save on a second shipping cost (which was what I ended up doing).

    Cheers,

    Kin

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by tkleong
    I have been very happy with my lights. I ended up building a constant voltage controller and upgrading the batteries to two 7.2V packs so the lights are fed 6VDC constantly over the entire charge of the batteries. This resulted in a constant burn for just over 2.5 hours.

    I think for the price, you cannot go wrong. If you do decide to do any sort of upgrade down the road, spend a few more bucks and order the battery connectors to save on a second shipping cost (which was what I ended up doing).

    Cheers,

    Kin
    Kin, would the 2 battery packs fit in water bottle? I know a little about wiring, but what do you mean by a constant voltage controller? And do you have any pics of your setup?

  9. #9
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    a bunch of us bought them. They work great.

    The cables are shoddily crimped and you'll probably have to re-crimp the cables because they either won't charge or will go out on you ( I know three people that had a problem with these ) anyway that's an easy 5-minute task.

    The actual light housing is bomber, very well made.

    Ask the guy for the 20 watt setup when you order them.

    Almost cheaper than doing it yourself.

    I never apologize. I'm sorry, but that's just the way I am.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frozen208
    Kin, would the 2 battery packs fit in water bottle? I know a little about wiring, but what do you mean by a constant voltage controller? And do you have any pics of your setup?
    I opted to keep my water bottle free so I bought a couple of 6-C NiMH packs that I placed in my saddle bag. These flat packs measure about 2.5" x 4". Together, the two packs output 14.4V.

    The constant voltage controller is a simple electronics circuit that my EE friend help me produce for under $10. It is basically a "switching regulator" that takes a high voltage and drops it to a constant, but lower voltage. In this case, 14.4V regulated down to 6.6V for the two MR11 halogen bulbs. An example of such circuit can be found here: http://www.circuitrydesigns.com/dc/1...-step-down.htm

    The effect of the switching regulator is to keep a constant 6.6V to the bulbs regardless of the charge life of the batteries. As the batteries run down, their output voltage will decrease. So instead of having a slowly dimming set of lights while riding into the night, the lights will run at full brightness until the battery pack is totally dead. But in order to protect the batteries from being totally discharged (which shortens the life of the batteries), the controller will shutdown the lights when the batteries drops below 10V. My friend also added a soft start feature to the controller so the voltage is slowly ramped up to full at power on. This feature helps to prolong the life of the bulbs. I had borrowed these ideas of the voltage controller and soft start from the Jet lights and some of the other high end halogen light manufacturers (i.e. Surefire).

    Although the controller sounds very fancy, all the electronics would not be worthwhile if the lights are not physically strong. For the money, I would definitely recommend the Laseredge lights even if you use them in stock form.

    Happy Riding!

    Kin

  11. #11
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    Kin since it is running 6.6v to each light, do they seem dimmer, than they are stock?

  12. #12
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    I assume he would be running 6 volt globes and overvolting them a little.

  13. #13

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    Yes, I am using 6V bulbs. It would be too difficult to get 24V battery packs, so I opted to run with the lower voltage bulbs instead.

    At 6.6V, the 6V 20W bulbs will put out more light than 12V 20W bulbs running at 12.0V.

  14. #14
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    Do you know of any place that sells a constant voltage controller that would do the trick?

  15. #15

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    Sorry, I do not. Perhaps you can try to look for a motorcycle voltage regulator as those typically take in 12-18V and regulate down to 6V. But you have to watch for their efficiency as the battery life may be significantly reduced.

  16. #16
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    I too have one, its a solid light, for an excelent price. I would definatly recomend it. The only downfall ive found so far is that the charger is a trickle and takes 10 to 12 hours but you could get a smart charger for probably $30. Simple design and easy to use.

  17. #17
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    Laseredge helmet mount light battery replacement

    Hey looks like laser edge is out out biz! too bad I can't find my helmet mount lamp battery! Can anybody who has one tell me proper values (volts mAh) I should look for when buying a replacement?
    I think it was some kind of RC car battery.
    Thanks.
    Alex

  18. #18
    Lets RIDE!
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    Alex, I'm not familiar with these lights, but it sounds like they use the mr-11 halogen bulbs. From the posts above it seems like some people have 6v bulbs and some have 12v. If you open it up and look at the bulb, the voltage is usually printed on the back of the bulb somewhere. So the light would have come with either a 6v or 12v battery. The higher the mAh rating, the longer the light will run on a charge. Price and weight are the penalties for a higher mAh battery though.

    BUT....the way to go is to over-volt the halogens by about 20%, which gives a big increase in brightness, and just a small decrease in run time. Bulb life is cut by around half, but these bulbs are rated for ~2000 hours, and they're dirt cheap to replace, so not a real issue. I just bought a 14.4v 5000mAh (5Ah) NiMH battery from batteryspace.com. for my dual halogen light. The brightness is impressive and it's getting me through 2 hour rides with no noticeable dimming (switching between low and high as needed).
    (If your bulbs are 6v then 7.2v is what you'd want)

    JZ
    It's not about speed, it's about lack of control.

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