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  1. #1

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    I need some advice and help

    Sorry let me rephrase the question i want to see what is my option and what is the best course and cost to finish up my projest now i have 2 option so what can i do

    "option 1"
    I recent bought some flashlight energizer pack that came with 2 flashlight and a kronton bulb is power by 2 D battery each and what i want to do is hook em both up to a toggle switch so i can control em and i want to know what is the best ways to do so

    "option 2"
    I want to buy led per-made flashlight and i want to convert them by hooking em up a toggle switch setup and a external power supply i saw something at home depot and i want to see if it possible ?

    http://www.maglite.com/D_Cell_LED.asp

    http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/...01+502524+5244

    http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/...3+90401+502524

    and also i seen light one amazon that have 52 led flashlight are they good or just crap
    Last edited by Harold938; 07-26-2009 at 12:23 PM.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold938
    Sorry let me rephrase the question i want to see what is my option and what is the best course and cost to finish up my projest now i have 2 option so what can i do
    What, exactly, is your project? It's hard for us to help you decide upon the best course of action when we don't understand the project objective(s).

    Nonetheless, I'll provide what help that I can...
    "option 1"
    I recent bought some flashlight energizer pack that came with 2 flashlight and a kronton bulb is power by 2 D battery each and what i want to do is hook em both up to a toggle switch so i can control em and i want to know what is the best ways to do so
    You have at least three alternatives:

    1) Use a DPST (or even a DPDT) switch to control the two circuits independently. A DPST switch is essentially two separate SPST switches connected to a single controlling mechanism (e.g. toggle switch handle).
    2) Connect the batteries in series and connect the lamps in series. Control the lamps with a SPST switch.
    3) Connect the batteries in parallel and connect the lamps in parallel. Control the lamps with a SPST switch.

    Of these alternatives, 1 and 3 probably make the most sense. Alternative 2 is less attractive because the failure of one lamp will cause both to fail. Alternative 1 may be the easiest to wire up, but a DPST switch costs marginally more than a SPST switch.

    Again, knowing more about your application would help...
    "option 2"
    I want to buy led per-made flashlight and i want to convert them by hooking em up a toggle switch setup and a external power supply i saw something at home depot and i want to see if it possible ?
    This may be feasible, but we'd have to know more about the external power supply.
    and also i seen light one amazon that have 52 led flashlight are they good or just crap
    Don't know. Can you provide a URL?

  3. #3

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    this is what i want to do

    Flashlight bulb inside is

    2.4V / 0.7A

    and is take 2 D battery each

    and i want to replace the bulb with this

    http://www.radioshack.com/product/in...ductId=2062383

    but when i add it the light was barely powering it so is was under power but from what i read this is a good bulb and i figure is that if i get this

    http://www.radioshack.com/product/in...ductId=2062245

    4 D battery holder will it support it ?

    and i seen this also online and on amazon let me post the link

    http://www.amazon.com/Nite-Ize-LRB-0...8666878&sr=8-9

    and the 52 led flashlight

    http://www.amazon.com/Super-Bright-B...8666946&sr=8-5

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold938
    Flashlight bulb inside is

    2.4V / 0.7A

    and is take 2 D battery each

    and i want to replace the bulb with this

    http://www.radioshack.com/product/in...ductId=2062383

    but when i add it the light was barely powering it so is was under power but from what i read this is a good bulb and i figure is that if i get this

    http://www.radioshack.com/product/in...ductId=2062245

    4 D battery holder will it support it ?
    Yes, that will work. Each cell is 1.5V each. Therefore, 4 cells connected in series will give you 6V which is the rated voltage of the bulb under consideration.
    and i seen this also online and on amazon let me post the link

    http://www.amazon.com/Nite-Ize-LRB-0...8666878&sr=8-9

    and the 52 led flashlight

    http://www.amazon.com/Super-Bright-B...8666946&sr=8-5
    I have not used either of these products, but I will tell you something about how LED flashlights (should) work.

    The first thing you need to know is that you must be careful to limit the current that flows to an LED. The manufacturer's specifications for the LED device will state the maximum continuous current. They will also often specify a peak current that may be applied to the device when pulsed. (The duty cycle is often specified in a footnote.)

    The simplest way to light an LED is to place a current limiting resistor in series with the LED connected to a battery. The value of the current limiting resistor will depend upon the forward voltage of the LED and the voltage of the battery to which you are connecting the device. This, however, is a less than ideal arrangement for (at least) two reasons. First, you waste some of the current in the form of heat by using the resistor. Second, as the battery runs down, its voltage will decrease. This, in turn, will cause the current flowing through the LED to decrease, which in turn causes the LED to become dimmer. (This is also a problem with conventional flashlight bulbs.)

    A better way to supply current to the LED is to use an electronic device which supplies a constant current to the device. The best of these are "switching" converters. These will take some input voltage and rapidly switch the connection to the battery on and off, varying either the frequency, duty cycle, or both to maintain a constant current to the device. The circuit monitors the current by looking at the voltage across a sense resistor placed in series with the device. The sense resistor is very small, typically less than one ohm, so little power is wasted in the form of heat. Efficiencies of switching converters are often around 85% or so.

    The advantage of using current regulation (whether it be from a switching converter or via some other mechanism such as an LM317) is that a constant intensity may be obtained from the LED over some fairly wide voltage range. This is far better than the behavior of a traditional flashlight in which the light output decreases as the battery runs down.

    I believe that both LED products for which you provided links contain the necessary circuitry for efficiently current limiting the LED(s). The LED replacement bulb looks particularly attractive. One reviewer tested it in several 2-6 cell flashlights and found that it worked well with each.

  5. #5

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    How do i set them up

    i got this type of flashlight is a basic with the switch on to and there is a piece of metal that will make contact with the light is part of the on/off mechanism i already remove the switch so i can get better access also i have more question before i go any further

    1.what is the best ways is to make sure the wiring stay on the light housing where there is a metal tabs that was part of the on/off system

    2.How many D holder do i need between both light and how i hook em with between the light and power with the toggle switch i pick up and will it support it i dont have the link but is

    4a - 250v
    8a - 125v
    10a - 125vac

    3.can i use extension cored for what im building

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold938
    i got this type of flashlight is a basic with the switch on to and there is a piece of metal that will make contact with the light is part of the on/off mechanism i already remove the switch so i can get better access also i have more question before i go any further

    1.what is the best ways is to make sure the wiring stay on the light housing where there is a metal tabs that was part of the on/off system
    I would, if possible, drill a small hole in each of the metal tabs to which you want to connect a wire. The hole should only be slightly larger than the diameter of the stripped wire. Strip about 3/8" to 1/2" of insulation off of the wire. Place the stripped end in hole. Solder the wire to the metal tab, making sure that the hole is filled with solder in the process. If you can't drill a hole, wrap perhaps 3/4" of wire around the tab and then solder the wire to the tab.

    A few words about the efficacy of solder... Growing up, I was given several electronic project kits as birthday and holiday gifts. When I put together those early kits, I did not have access to a soldering iron. I decided to try to twist together the various component leads and wires. After all, I had done a number of electrical projects with lamps, batteries, and home made switches when I was younger, and had had success with constructing circuits using only mechanical connections. So... I put the kits together, using only mechanical connections (twisting wires together) with no solder. Few of those projects worked very well, if at all. I remember I had a radio that I managed to get to work for 15 to 20 seconds one time, but then it stopped working.

    Later on, I purchased an inexpensive soldering iron from Radio Shack. From then on, all of my projects (eventually) worked. Soldering the connections makes a night and day difference between having a poor vs good electrical connection.

    My first soldering iron was roughly equivalent to this low cost soldering iron set from Radio Shack. Actually, the one in the link is probably better. Believe it or not, my first soldering iron had a wooden handle!

    A good way to test your circuit ideas prior to soldering is to use some Test / Jumper Leads. These are insulated wires with alligator clips on the ends. Just clip an alligator clip to one of the metal tabs in your flashlight and connect the other end to, for example, your battery. (You'll need to make a few other connections as well.)
    2.How many D holder do i need between both light and how i hook em with between the light and power with the toggle switch i pick up and will it support it i dont have the link but is

    4a - 250v
    8a - 125v
    10a - 125vac
    Each D cell will supply 1.5V when fresh. If you want to power a lamp rated at 6V, you will need 4 D cells wired in series. (That 4 cell holder from Radio Shack will place the D cells in series.) You can make it even brighter by wiring more cells together in series, but at some point, if you make the voltage too high, you'll burn the light out.

    The battery holder should have two wires coming from it, a red wire, and a black wire. Assuming you place the batteries in the holder correctly, the red wire will be the positive side of the battery and the black will be the negative side. For your project, polarity doesn't matter. If you were to use an LED or connect the battery to any kind of electronic circuit, polarity matters a great deal. You stand a chance of damaging an LED or electronic circuit if the wires are connected backwards.

    So here goes... connect one of the wires from the battery holder to your switch. I'm assuming that the switch is an SPST (single pole single throw) switch with only two connections. (If your switch has more than two connections, we'll need to discuss connecting the switch a bit more.) Connect the other terminal on the switch to the one of the lamp terminals. Connect the other lamp terminal back to the unused wire of the battery holder. So... when the switch is turned on, current will flow from the battery through the switch, through the lamp, and back to the battery. It has to make a complete circuit (loop) in order for it to work properly.

    The switch that you have is more than adequate for your project.
    3.can i use extension cored for what im building
    Sure. If you have an old extension cord that doesn't work any more, you can use the wire for your project. Some extension cords have an outer sheath which protects insulated wires contained within the sheath. This type of cord is ideal for your purpose because the inner wires can be removed from the sheath. You'll likely find a black, white, and green wire inside the sheath. Other, less expensive extension cords consist of two or three wires attached together. You can use these wires too if you're careful. You'll need to separate the wires from each other taking care not to expose the underlying metal wire at any point along the way. Often times, you can separate them at the end with a pocket knife and then pull the two (or three) wires apart.

    If you don't have an old cord that you can scavenge, don't buy a new cord for this purpose. Instead, go to Radio Shack and buy some 22 gauge solid hookup wire. You can get thicker stuff - smaller numbers mean thicker wire - but it'll be harder to work with. You can also get stranded wire; this means that the wire inside the insulation consists of multiple strands of finer gauge wire twisted together. Stranded wire is more flexible, but is somewhat harder to work with for this type of project.

  7. #7
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    Nice one, Kevin. That's some pretty comprehensive advice. What do you say, Harold?

    What use is a philosopher who doesn't hurt anybody's feelings? -
    Diogenes


  8. #8

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    wow.......................

    let me get this straight i need 4 D-Battery holder in order to power that type of bulb

    that 16 D battery too

    wow........................................

    when i saw that i was shock so i when to radioshack and i see if there a better ways and i think i did but i want to make sure

    the bulb
    http://www.radioshack.com/product/in...ductId=2102807

    and will the same battery setup work

    1 x 4 D holder ?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold938
    let me get this straight i need 4 D-Battery holder in order to power that type of bulb

    that 16 D battery too

    wow........................................
    No, I think you misunderstood.

    You need a total of 4 D cells wired in series to get 6V. A single 4-cell D battery holder will do the job.

    If you used 16 D cells, you'd end up with 24 volts. You'd burn the lamp out if you wired them in series.
    when i saw that i was shock so i when to radioshack and i see if there a better ways and i think i did but i want to make sure

    the bulb
    http://www.radioshack.com/product/in...ductId=2102807

    and will the same battery setup work

    1 x 4 D holder ?
    Maybe. You're going to be 1.2 V over the bulb's rating when the batteries are fresh. It'll probably work, but then again, it might burn out the lamp. I'd stick with the previous plan.

  10. #10

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    more problem

    1.While i waited for you answeron the last 2 or 3 thread i pull the metal tabs out and whatim doing is take the wire and twisted on the the spring on itself and still nothing

    2.for the connecting the light and the battery holder do i use 2 or 1 wire

    3.if this will work and once it work can i hook up additional light ?

    4.this is how i have it set up

    battery holder for pos and neg to the wire and connected to the switch with the 2 wired and 1 wired each for each light am i doing something wrong

  11. #11
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    Pictures

    Quote Originally Posted by Harold938
    1.While i waited for you answeron the last 2 or 3 thread i pull the metal tabs out and whatim doing is take the wire and twisted on the the spring on itself and still nothing

    2.for the connecting the light and the battery holder do i use 2 or 1 wire

    3.if this will work and once it work can i hook up additional light ?

    4.this is how i have it set up

    battery holder for pos and neg to the wire and connected to the switch with the 2 wired and 1 wired each for each light am i doing something wrong
    The picture below should answer your questions. The top schematic shows how to connect one lamp. The bottom schematic shows how to connect two lamps in parallel.

    If you've connected the red and black wires on your battery holder together, that is very bad. Don't do that. If you've left them connected together for any significant period of time, you'll need to discard the batteries as they are now worthless.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  12. #12

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    that helpful..............but

    is doesn't show like

    question 2 and question 1

  13. #13
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    Regarding question 1... I didn't see a question there.

    Regarding question 2... Use a single wire to connect the lamp to the battery holder.

    Furthermore... Use another wire to connect the other side of the lamp to one of the switch terminals. Use a third wire to connect the other switch terminal to the unused wire of the battery holder.

    One of the possible gotchas is that you may be connecting your wires to the wrong spots on your flashlight. Since you're replacing both the battery and the switch, you need to make sure that you're connecting the wires to lamp.

    If you have access to a digital camera, take a picture of what you're doing and post it here. It'll make it easier to diagnose what's going on.

  14. #14

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    i cant post picture

    yea i cant but this is still hope for this diy project

    today i when back to home depot and i did some shopping got a new u-lock for the bike and flashlight 2 pack that were $3.00 due to i strip the other one to it bare bones but is doesn't have any metal tabs to make contact to the battery they only way it make contact is by the battery or the switch so let me know

    and i might go back to radio shack to see what can i use

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold938
    yea i cant but this is still hope for this diy project

    today i when back to home depot and i did some shopping got a new u-lock for the bike and flashlight 2 pack that were $3.00 due to i strip the other one to it bare bones but is doesn't have any metal tabs to make contact to the battery they only way it make contact is by the battery or the switch so let me know

    and i might go back to radio shack to see what can i use
    Let's get back to basics for a moment...

    Take a close look at one of the 6V bulbs that you want to use for this project. It consists of filament surrounded by a glass globe. When current passes through the filament, it will heat up and give off light. Two contact points are needed on the outside of the bulb in order to get current to the filament. One of these contact points is usually the very bottom tip of the bulb. That tip will be metallic and will be surrounded by some insulating material. The other contact point is usually the metal band / cup into which the glass globe is inserted.

    Remove the bulb from the flashlight and place it on a table or other work surface. Put your battery pack (with batteries loaded) beside it. Touch one of the wires to one of the contact points on the bulb and the other wire to the other contact point. The bulb should light up.

    Now that you know where the contact points on the bulb are, you'll be better able to trace the path that current will take within the flashlight.

    The way it often works is as follows... The bulb is secured in a reflector in the head of the flashlight. That little metal tip at the bottom of the bulb will poke out the bottom of the reflector. The metal band of the bulb will be in contact with the receptacle into which the bulb is placed. Sometimes there's a metal strip which is used to make contact with the switch. Sometimes, substantial portions of the reflector assembly are conductive.

    Now that you've studied the reflector assembly, put the bulb back in the reflector assembly and again touch the wires of the battery pack to the contact points on the reflector assembly. Again, the bulb should light up.

    Now look at the batteries. Actually, they aren't batteries, but cells. A collection of cells is a battery. One end of the cell (battery) is relatively flat. This is the negative (-) end of the cell. The other end has a little point or tip. This is the positive (+) side. When fresh, the electrical potential (voltage) between these two points is approximately 1.5V. If you place two cells in series, you have a 3V battery.

    Now, suppose two of these cells are in a flashlight. The positive side of one of the cells (with the protruding metal tip) is pressing against the tip of the bulb. The positive side of the other cell is pressing against the flat area (negative side) of the first cell. The flat side of the second cell is usually pressed upon by some sort of spring at the bottom of the flashlight. The spring ensures that the tip of the first battery presses firmly against the tip of the bulb. The spring also conducts current.

    That spring is connected either by the case material, if it's a metal flashlight, or by some metal strip, or even wire to one end of the flashlight switch. Flashlight switches are often slide switches due to the fact that they're cheap to fabricate as part of the flashlight. In any case, the other side of the switch makes contact with the reflector.

    When the switch is turned on, current will flow through the positive tip of the first battery into the tip of the bulb. It then flows through the filament, causing it to heat up and give off light. From there, it flows out the side (metal band) of the bulb to the switch mechanism. The current continues on through the closed switch, through the conductive material to the negative end of the battery (which is comprised of two cells). [The electrons actually flow from negative to positive, but the classical view of current is that it flows from positive to negative. I always try to visualize it as flowing from positive to negative because things like diode and transistor symbols in schematic diagrams make more sense.]

    Assuming that your flashlight resembles my description above, and also assuming that you've decided to not put batteries in the space provided by the flashlight, one of the significant challenges that you will face will be to connect a wire to the metal tip of the bulb. Something that you might try is to get a thick dowel (or a piece of a broom handle) and cut its length to that of two batteries placed end to end. Drill a small hole in the end of the dowel and screw a small screw part way into the hole. Then, wrap one of your wires around the screw and put the dowel in the flashlight in place of the batteries.

    Another approach is to actually put batteries into that space designed to hold batteries. Assuming you've disassembled the switch, you could connect your external switch and a two cell battery pack to the (former) internal switch connections.

  16. #16

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    yea i think i screw up with the modding

  17. #17

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    well not really screw up

    what happen is this i when down to a friend and he tested the system the lines,housing,etc and he found that the battery housing is have a bad lead and also there is a break in the electrical lines and there is no power also he told me that i need new lead for the light and i can get from radio shack but also a dollar store but he told me dont go to the

    "mom and pop dollar store because some of them don't have the right lead "

    instead go to the family store or dollar store here in ny and i didnt have a chance to go there but i will ether today or tomorrow

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