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  1. #1
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    looking at buying a coiler

    im thinking bout a coiler, i have a nice XC bike and i wanna get something i can be a litter ruffer on. but all the DH/freeride i will be doing i will be pedaling most rides i do are about 8-15 miles so i want something that i can peddal. how is the coiler with climbing and what not?? well imput would help. thanks
    nick

  2. #2
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    I have an 05 Coiler and I like it. It is a little on the heavy side, but feels real solid on the way down. It bobbed real bad on climbs when I first got it, but after I played around with the rear shock for a while, I can even pedal standing up with very little bob. You just get a better workout going up.

  3. #3
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    Sounds to me like you're in the same boat as me.

    My xc rides are all about 10 to 35 miles. I have an 04 Stinky Primo, which I reserve for chairlift and shuttle days. My Bear has been great, but is breaking down almost every ride now.

    I have to decide how much "up" I want to give up for "down". The 06 Dawg Primo (29 lbs.?) looks really nice, but will obviously not be as plush as the Coilair (34 lbs.?), which I am also seriously considering. I am not even looking at a Coiler (37 lbs.?) - I'm not willing to give up that much on the ascents, for the descents.

    Other bikes I'm looking at include:

    - Santa Cruz Nomad
    - Cannondale Prophet (likely the 1000)
    - new RM Slayer (likely 2nd from top)

    I am told that the Nomad can be easily built at under 30 lbs, which is quite amazing. I'm a pretty loyal Kona guy though and will have to very carefully consider jumping ship on them. Last time I did that (a Specialized FSR XC) I ended up in the hospital 3 times in one summer. I do not want to betray the Kona gods - they are pretty unforgiving.

  4. #4
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    New question here. coiler

    is the coiler really 37lbs??? didnt realize that..... well i use to have an enduro does anyont know how the compair????

  5. #5
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    New question here. coiler

    is the coiler really 37lbs??? didnt realize that..... well i use to have an enduro does anyont know how the compair????

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mntbikenbambam
    is the coiler really 37lbs??? didnt realize that..... well i use to have an enduro does anyont know how the compair????
    I certainly stand to be corrected but I think the weights I gave are pretty close. Of course, weight can be reduced from the spec'd version by changing tires and other modifications.

  7. #7
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    Stock coilers weigh in at 37 or 38 pounds. Mine weighs around 34 with a few upgrades. Picture and build in the picture thread.

    It's definitely a great bike. I thought it was going to climb like a pig when I got it, but it's surprsingly tame and sprite on the trails, even with the dual 24s. First week that I got it, I took it out for a 3 hour leg burner XC ride with my buddies. I don't notice a whole lot of pedal bob. There's definitely some brake jack present (running Hayes HFX Mag HD with 8 inch rotors).

  8. #8
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    The Coiler is a great choice for the riding you want to do. The weight is not bad for this type of bike and a bike at this price. Few worries about breaking it.

    You already have an XC bike for the big-climb rides.

    I ride an XL Coil De Luxe with the heavier 66 fork and heaver than stock favorite parts. It comes in around 41 lbs in "trail" trim (lighter wheels and tires) and 44-45 in DH trim (heavier wheels and DH tires).

    Either way it climbs well and is maneuverable/flickable on the trail once you get use to it.
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  9. #9
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    I bought a 2004 Coiler at the beginning of the summer to satisfy my freeriding/hard trailriding needs. I was going to buy a 2005, but the 2004 has a more managable amount of travel for me (5" as opposed to 6"), and its a bit lighter. The front end is also significantly lower providing better standover. I was skeptical at first, but I've really grown to love the bike, especially with the shock set for a progressive rising rate. 5 and 5 seems liek the perfect amount of travel....not too much for technical riding, but still plenty of travel for the steeps.

    BTW, if anyoen is interested in a 2004 Coiler let me know, as much as I love mine, I think I'm going to concentrate on my XC riding and sell mine to raise $$$ for a new "The King".....maybe......or maybe I'll wait till the end of October :P

  10. #10
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    Don't get me wrong. I'm not coming down on the Coiler. For me though, I have enough trouble keeping up with the frontrunners of my group on my 32 pound Bear. It took me an hour of work 5 days a week last winter, and riding to work 4 days per week since April, to move myself from dead last to midpack. There's too many grizzly attacks around here this summer for me to be the slowest again. I guess it comes down to how strong a rider you are, how strong your group is and whether you care (or your group cares) how fast you are on the trail.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mmmm...kona
    Don't get me wrong. I'm not coming down on the Coiler. For me though, I have enough trouble keeping up with the frontrunners of my group on my 32 pound Bear. It took me an hour of work 5 days a week last winter, and riding to work 4 days per week since April, to move myself from dead last to midpack. There's too many grizzly attacks around here this summer for me to be the slowest again. I guess it comes down to how strong a rider you are, how strong your group is and whether you care (or your group cares) how fast you are on the trail.
    I do not think you were. Just wanted to point out that 37 lbs is not an unreasonable weight for this type of bike. To go much lighter, especially in this price range, you may not get a bike that would hold up well to FR/DH riding.
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