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  1. #1
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    Knolly Mechanic Tips & Tricks

    Throughout different threads I see a lot of good information on tune-ups, repairs and other bike mechanic stuff. Unfortunately, when I need the info itís often difficult/impossible to find. My guess is that Iím not the only one with this problem, so Iím starting this thread as a place to collect any useful tips & tricks on being a Knolly DIY Bike Mechanic.
    "sounds like you need to find a better mechanic..." -- Calhoun

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    "sounds like you need to find a better mechanic..." -- Calhoun

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    Good idea TSC. The only tip I can think of right now is to have plenty of cold beer and patience (or Root Beer if you are KRob.) And if you have been fighting the same issue for too long, leave it alone and come back to it.

    Also find a good wrench at the LBS and figure out what beer they like. Nothing like bringing in a wheel and a six pack the night before a road trip.
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    I've got one for the Chilcotin. You know the upper linkage that has the bushings? You might want to check the torque on those bolts. When I removed my shock to send it in I noticed my suspension was barely moving. I figured I blew out a bearing so I went through each set of linkage until I came to the elbow with the bushings. As soon as I loosened the bolts the whole linkage dropped. After tightening all the linkage and giving a fresh squirt of WD-40 I confirmed that this was the problem.

    Fast-forward a week later when I got my shock back before installing I torqued down the linkage and I noticed that it still had a good bit of binding. I greased the crap out of the bushings and that helped but I still found it lacking. So I reduced the torque and used loc-tite on the bolts and it was look a whole new bike. It was so much plusher that I had to adjust the shock to deal with it. Be careful with these bolts though as the 1st time I didn't use loc-tite and the bolts came out.

    I was going to post a pic of the linkage but I don't know how with the new forum. Can anyone tell me how you can reply and add a photo?

    Cheers!

  5. #5
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    ... and if we just ...

    Quote Originally Posted by woodyak View Post
    I was going to post a pic of the linkage but I don't know how with the new forum. Can anyone tell me how you can reply and add a photo?

    Cheers!
    Yeah, and how do you make letters BOLD and use the "smiley" face!
    Last edited by blcman; 03-29-2013 at 12:26 PM.
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  6. #6
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    More Bearing maintenence

    I posted this a while back. http://forums.mtbr.com/knolly/bearin...ce-717118.html

    If you want to add photo's with a reply, use the Go advanced reply button and scroll down to the picture section.

    Use reply or reply with quote. A new box will open. The Go advanced button is at the bottom of that box.


    Edit: Thanks for the info on the bushing linkages Woodyak. I agree these bolts should require a thread locker. These are the only bolts in the linkage that have required attention from loosening.
    Last edited by bubba13; 03-29-2013 at 10:38 AM.
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  7. #7
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    On this note, what's a decent (quality and price) torque wrench that folks are using?

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    Quote Originally Posted by bubba13 View Post
    I posted this a while back. http://forums.mtbr.com/knolly/bearin...ce-717118.html

    If you want to add photo's with a reply, use the Go advanced reply button and scroll down to the picture section.

    Use reply or reply with quote. A new box will open. The Go advanced button is at the bottom of that box.
    Thanks bubba13!
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    I have a question: Is it possible to tell if the pivots need maintenance without tearing them down? I bought a 2011 Delirium second hand late last season and only got in about ten (very dry) rides in.
    Linkage operated freely from what I could tell when I built it up, but I have no idea what the previous owner did in terms of service intervals.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cerebroside View Post
    I have a question: Is it possible to tell if the pivots need maintenance without tearing them down? I bought a 2011 Delirium second hand late last season and only got in about ten (very dry) rides in.
    Linkage operated freely from what I could tell when I built it up, but I have no idea what the previous owner did in terms of service intervals.
    The only bearings I would be concerned about are the lower main bearings near the BB. Two seasons of riding and the rest of the bearings on the Delirium looked great. The main's were rusty and crunchy at the 6 month point... I finally replaced the main's after a year + 6 months. The linked post #6 bearing maint. above is fairly easy to do. Just pay attention to the washers and their locations.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ebxtreme View Post
    On this note, what's a decent (quality and price) torque wrench that folks are using?
    Norbar and Teng are good options.

  12. #12
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    My inspiration for this thread.

    Yesterday I was performing some annual maintenance on my Chiliótaking it apart and checking/lubing the bearingsówhen I came to a bolt I couldn't loosen. The bolt was attached to the shaft that goes through the center part of the linkage (to which the red arrow in the following picture is pointing).

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    This is my attempt at an exploded view so you get an idea of how it all goes together.

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    The shaft had a bolt in each side, so getting the bolt out of one side was no problem; but once one bolt is out you have nothing to stop the shaft from spinning. I tried lots of things but nothing would free the bolt. I didnít want to hook vice-grips or anything to the shaft that would damage it so I decided to use the old standbyóDUCT TAPE!

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    Notice that the duct tape is tore. The bolt was so tight that it wouldnít budge when holding the shaft with pliers. (Even after all my precautions and care I still put a small nick in shaft. SOB! I used some 600 grit wet/dry sandpaper to buff the nick out.)

    To get the bolt loose I had to put the shaft in a vice. NOTE: The vice was only touching the duct tape and I didnít tighten the vice down hard on the shaft. (The shaft has to be very smooth and round to function properly.) I only used the vice to create a larger friction area.

    Anyway, thatís my tip/trick to get the second bolt out of the shaft if the bolt feels like it was smothered with red Loctite and then cross-threaded for good measure.

    Iím sure that some of you have a better method so please let everyone know because it could save a lot of people a lot of time.
    "sounds like you need to find a better mechanic..." -- Calhoun

  13. #13
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    I just replaced the end bolts on the same push link pivot TSC mentions above. And as careful as I was I nicked up my pivot axle as well trying to get the second bolt out. Wrapped a few pieces of thick rubber around the axle and clamped the hell out of it with a vice grip. And it still barely broke loose. But when it did, I'd put a few scrapes and nicks in it.

    I hit the pivot with a few light strokes of a file, and just thew it back in. Hope it will be ok, but who knows. Going riding tomorrow and I don't have much option.

    So if you try to mess with this axle, just be careful. Maybe soft jaws in a bench vise would work, but I don't have one of those....
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    TSC or anyone else that may know...See that washer on the left in your picture? Is there another one on the opposite side of that axle? When I removed mine I only noticed that washer on one side.

    Thanks! And nice job with the thread.

  15. #15
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    To take that shaft off I put it in a drill presses jaws then just use your allen key to remove the bolt. I held the drills head still with channel locks.

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    Mayha, there should be a washer on both sides, to go between the bearing and the pivot shaft.
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    Quote Originally Posted by rscecil007 View Post
    Mayha, there should be a washer on both sides, to go between the bearing and the pivot shaft.
    Damn, I must have dropped the other washer when I removed the axle!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by rscecil007 View Post
    I just ... Wrapped a few pieces of thick rubber around the axle...

    Maybe soft jaws in a bench vise would work, but I don't have one of those....
    I don't have a vice with soft jaws. I'm pretty sure rscecil007 is talk about rubber jaws on a vice. (Sometimes when you are working with aluminum you can use aluminum jaw inserts but I wouldn't try that here.) I would make sure to only use rubber or tape.

    My first choice was to use one (or two) jelly-type sticky pads instead of duct tape but I couldn't find the one I have (and I live in the sticks so going to Walgreens/Home Depot wasn't an option); so I used duct tape. It works well but requires a bit of cleanup afterwards.
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by rscecil007 View Post
    Mayha, there should be a washer on both sides, to go between the bearing and the pivot shaft.
    Adding on to what rscecil007 said: you will notice that the inner, metal part of the bearing is raised above the dust seal. This is because you don't want any moving parts touching your dust seal. Rotating/moving parts touching your dust seal will destroy it (or, at a minimum, pop it out of place); making it useless. To protect against this, Knolly's bearing inserts have a small raised ridge (I tried to highlight it in red to make it more visible) to make sure the insert only touches the metal part of the bearing. The washers do the same thing on the other side. Note: in other areas of the bike's suspension there is no need for washers as it is aluminum that will be butted up against the bearing. Since aluminum doesn't deform it won't hit your dust seal, making washers unnecessarily.

    Hope this helps!


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    BTW, if the bearing insert pictured looks too big for the hole; it is. I used the bigger one to make the raised ridge easier to see.
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  20. #20
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    This is a good article for the DIY bike mechanic; although I wouldn't follow their "pack your bearing full of grease" advice on anything other than suspension bearings, which are very limited in their rotation speed. Too much grease in a bearing will slow it down and will cause heat buildup in high-RPM bearings.

    Workshop: Caring For Mountain Bike Suspension Pivots - BikeRadar
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    on this topic, heres something really cool that intense are putting on for their customers on pinkbike later

    April 2nd, Intense Cycles Live in The Lounge by CaneCreekCyclingComponents - Pinkbike

    thats a cool way of nailing 000's of queries in one go. Knolly, you up for something like this?

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    The tool recommended to to me by Knolly for removing the second bolt from the "shaft" was heat. I had the rusty bolt issue and this was the only one I could not get to break free. The issue is the loctite thats used. I used a heat gun on high and it did the trick.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by TSC View Post
    I'm pretty sure rscecil007 is talk about rubber jaws on a vice.
    Yup, that's what I was talking about. Thanks for the correction. I need to go buy a vice and a set of those.
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndyD View Post
    The tool recommended to to me by Knolly for removing the second bolt from the "shaft" was heat. I had the rusty bolt issue and this was the only one I could not get to break free. The issue is the loctite thats used. I used a heat gun on high and it did the trick.
    Good to know for anyone reading. Wish I had known that though and not eff'd my pivot axle up. Oh well. I used blue loctite on all my bolts when I re-installed them. No idea what Knolly recommends.
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodyak View Post
    Fast-forward a week later when I got my shock back before installing I torqued down the linkage and I noticed that it still had a good bit of binding. I greased the crap out of the bushings and that helped but I still found it lacking. So I reduced the torque and used loc-tite on the bolts and it was look a whole new bike. It was so much plusher that I had to adjust the shock to deal with it. Be careful with these bolts though as the 1st time I didn't use loc-tite and the bolts came out.
    EXCELLENT GUIDANCE! I found the same thing two weeks back.

    What torque value did you settle on - just short of spec?

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by TSC View Post
    Adding on to what rscecil007 said: you will notice that the inner, metal part of the bearing is raised above the dust seal. This is because you don't want any moving parts touching your dust seal. Rotating/moving parts touching your dust seal will destroy it (or, at a minimum, pop it out of place); making it useless. To protect against this, Knolly's bearing inserts have a small raised ridge (I tried to highlight it in red to make it more visible) to make sure the insert only touches the metal part of the bearing. The washers do the same thing on the other side. Note: in other areas of the bike's suspension there is no need for washers as it is aluminum that will be butted up against the bearing. Since aluminum doesn't deform it won't hit your dust seal, making washers unnecessarily.

    Hope this helps!


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    BTW, if the bearing insert pictured looks too big for the hole; it is. I used the bigger one to make the raised ridge easier to see.
    Big thanks for the pics TSC!! That confirms that I'm missing one for sure. Do you think the hardware store holds washers of that type or is this bike industry specific?

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndyD View Post
    The tool recommended to to me by Knolly for removing the second bolt from the "shaft" was heat. I had the rusty bolt issue and this was the only one I could not get to break free. The issue is the loctite thats used. I used a heat gun on high and it did the trick.
    I was thinking of that but I was afraid to use heat on aluminum as it's pretty low. Metals - Melting Temperatures
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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by mayha View Post
    Big thanks for the pics TSC!! That confirms that I'm missing one for sure. Do you think the hardware store holds washers of that type or is this bike industry specific?
    I'm guessing you can buy it from a hardware store. From the Knolly website:

    FASTENERS:
    We use only high end name brand fasteners ensuring that our fastener products are consistent and reliable. All Fasteners are stainless steel and where required, super hard grade 12.9 plated steel. We do this to ensure that the fasteners don't corrode and don't bend.

    We use M8 bolts for all of our shock mounting hardware on our heavier duty frames, again from a strength perspective. And, wherever possible, we use commonly available metric fasteners so that they are easily replaced if damaged or lost.
    Email Knolly support for the details (e.g. is it stainless steel); and take the one you have to your hardware store so you can make sure to get the same one.
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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by CharacterZero View Post
    EXCELLENT GUIDANCE! I found the same thing two weeks back.

    What torque value did you settle on - just short of spec?
    The article I posted in post #20 talks about lubing your bushings. It's worth the read.
    "sounds like you need to find a better mechanic..." -- Calhoun

  30. #30
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    Another thing:

    I hope everyone noticed that the "nut" with a long, smooth shaft that attaches the chainstay to the bike goes in from the drive side, and the bolt that attaches to it goes in from the non-drive side. When I put it in the opposite way, it looked like it almost fit but there was a little lip showing. When I reversed it to the direction described above, it fit flush on both sides.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TSC View Post
    I was thinking of that but I was afraid to use heat on aluminum as it's pretty low. Metals - Melting Temperatures
    If you don't have access to a heat gun, try a hair dryer on high. Alternatively, if the part is clean of any combustibles, throw it in the oven.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by BryanS. View Post
    If you don't have access to a heat gun, try a hair dryer on high. Alternatively, if the part is clean of any combustibles, throw it in the oven.
    I especially like your oven idea, although with the attached pivot arm that's a lot to bake. In the oven you could take it up to a really high temperature without worrying about overheating any particular part of it. Wish I had thought of this. All I thought was "torch"; then added in my bad luck and thought "melted shaft"; so I backed away.

    The one thing I did do was put the shaft in the freezer overnight before putting it through the bushings. I thought I would give it a try because of the tight tolerances; but I really can't say if it did any good.
    Last edited by TSC; 04-03-2013 at 07:31 AM.
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  33. #33
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    Hello.
    I have a frame with less than a year old and I got rust in the linkage screws.
    Do you know if it is possible to buy identical but titanium made?
    I think a frame with this price should sold with betters screws.

    Thanks

  34. #34
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    Knolly acknowledged this is a problem for some frames. Get in contact with them and they will replace all the affected hardware.

    Quote Originally Posted by graypaw View Post
    Hello.
    I have a frame with less than a year old and I got rust in the linkage screws.
    Do you know if it is possible to buy identical but titanium made?
    I think a frame with this price should sold with betters screws.

    Thanks

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by easygonow View Post
    Knolly acknowledged this is a problem for some frames. Get in contact with them and they will replace all the affected hardware.
    OK, thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by CharacterZero View Post
    EXCELLENT GUIDANCE! I found the same thing two weeks back.

    What torque value did you settle on - just short of spec?
    Exactly. Just a hair short of spec.

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    Replacing the bolts.

    I finally got around to replacing the rusty bolts on my early release Chilcotin. The new bolts have a black coating vs. the standard bolt finish from the originals.

    Everything went well and I wanted to share how I got the bolt off of the shaft that TSC has mentioned in earlier posts. I also wanted to mention to check the bearings. The only bearings that were in bad shape were the ones at the rocker arms. Both bearings were frozen with rust. To fix them I popped off the bearing cover, with the rockers off the bike, and soaked them in with Tri Flow. Worked the bearing back and forth until they broke free and did a clean and re-grease.

    When I got to the bolts that thread into the axle at the horse shoe link, the left side came loose with out issue. As stated in TSC's posts, the right side bolt would not budge after removing the assembly from the frame. Luckily, I remembered I have a Dewalt 1/4 hex driver/impact cordless tool. I also had a 1/4" bit with the correct allen tip. So, I wrapped the axle in old inner tube, clamped it in a vise, and used the impact to remove the bolt. The impact wrench made the job very easy to do. Hope this helps.
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  38. #38
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    Nice bit of info. I like the use of the tube and the impact driver. One not of caution for those using the impact driver: be sure to have it going in the unloosen direction as these are "flat head" bolts (i.e. angled so they fit flush) which you can drive into the axle/shaft and flare its ends.

    Also, the bearings are cheap enough to replace on your own; but be sure to let Knolly know of any bad parts as they can show a problem with the manufacturer that needs to addressed.
    "sounds like you need to find a better mechanic..." -- Calhoun

  39. #39
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    Not sure if anyone has mentioned but another way of holding any shaft without damage
    (its what I've used in the past on stanchions).

    Take a suitable size block of wood(pine 4X2) drill it to the size of said shaft or slightly smaller , then cut it in half down the centre of the hole.
    You can clamp that shaft between the two halves in a vice.
    With this method you get a larger surface area to clamp & no damage.

  40. #40
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    Plug your water bottle cage holes!

    Most Knolly bikes do not come with bolts in the bottle cage holes. If water enters your frame then it will collect near the bottom bracket.

    In another thread mayha suggested using silicone or bolts; to which G-AIR added that disk rotor screws or screws from your front derailleur will work.

    Personally, I like the idea of extra hardware in case of an emergency but you should definitely consider at minimum using silicone.
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  41. #41
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    Protect your Paint/Frame

    There are lots of good tapes or stickers to protect your paint. I've found that a blow dryer is hot enough to make the thick tapes and stickers conform to the curves on my Knolly.

    If you're trying to protect against dents then you will need something thicker and/or stiffer.

    Obviously, adding protection sooner, rather than later, is the wise choice.

    This thread lists many of the options available: http://forums.mtbr.com/knolly/what-t...on-840028.html
    "sounds like you need to find a better mechanic..." -- Calhoun

  42. #42
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    Anyone know what the 'breakaway torque' is for the loctite Knolly use on the Chilcotin linkage bolts?

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    Hey guys I don't know anything about these linkages. How often should these be serviced? And what are the consequences if you don't?

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    After the first ride on my chilcotin I noticed play in the upper seat stay pivot. I can move the pivot that has the bushing side to side by hand, and no amount of torquing things down seems to help. By the looks of that pivot the only thing holding it snug would be the bushing width. I'm hoping my frame isn't out of spec, for such an expensive frame I really don't want to be dealing with problems after one mild ride. Any ideas? I emailed knolly but haven't heard back yet. Are they all at Sea Otter?

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by finch6013 View Post
    After the first ride on my chilcotin I noticed play in the upper seat stay pivot. I can move the pivot that has the bushing side to side by hand, and no amount of torquing things down seems to help. By the looks of that pivot the only thing holding it snug would be the bushing width. I'm hoping my frame isn't out of spec, for such an expensive frame I really don't want to be dealing with problems after one mild ride. Any ideas? I emailed knolly but haven't heard back yet. Are they all at Sea Otter?
    Do you mean the push link pivot axle?
    If jackasses could fly this place would be an airport.

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    Kevin got in touch with me today and he says that the axle is just slightly too long, and that the fix is to grind .2mm off. Essentially the bolts bottom out on the axle before the frame tightens down on the bushings.

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    Looks like I got it all fixed now.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by finch6013 View Post
    Kevin got in touch with me today and he says that the axle is just slightly too long, and that the fix is to grind .2mm off. Essentially the bolts bottom out on the axle before the frame tightens down on the bushings.
    qbert2000 posted how to fix it:

    So, the bottom of the horseshoe connects into the top of the seatstay. There is an axle in there that is slightly too long. (approx 73mm and should be 72.70-72.75mm) Take 2 allen keys to that pivot (fig. E)and one of the bolts will break loose. Back it out half way, because then you will hit it with a mallet AFTER you detach the linkage (fig C) on the opposite side of the bike, that attaches the seatstay directly to the seattube. If you don't detach that linkage from the seattube, you will not be able to punch the axle thru.

    Just drag the axle across a flat file about 20 times.

    i used a caliper to make sure i just took off the prescribed length. you dont want to take off too much. i used a lathe to shorten mine, but a file would make quick work of it as well.
    His pictures are gone but I have a previous post on this thread showing the part. (I labeled the axle "shaft", cause I'm up on all the tech jargon .) http://forums.mtbr.com/knolly/knolly...l#post10277720

    Edit: I'm too late; DOH! Hopefully it will help someone else.
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    Quote Originally Posted by finch6013 View Post
    Looks like I got it all fixed now.
    I had the same issue, same fix.

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    for those with hard to remove bolts a nice trick is to install the proper sized t-handle into the bolt then take a ball peen hammer & tap the t-handle - the shock transfered to the bolt will usually allow it to be removed without hassle

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    I've heard that if your push link pivot axle gets hung up half way out of the horseshoe pivot that a 3/8" drill bit slides easily into the horseshoe yet fits snugly in the end of the push link pivot axle. You put the base of the drill bit into the end of the pivot axle and tap lightly on the pointy end of the drill bit. The drill bit provides enough length to tap out the pivot axle, while providing enough surface area so you don't bugger your threads or axle.

    YMMV, but that's what I heard.
    "sounds like you need to find a better mechanic..." -- Calhoun

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    hi
    i would like to change my shock setting (ccdba) from steep to slack. what do i need to comply with to avoid any damage etc? i think i need to release the air from the shock first, right?

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    Quote Originally Posted by alfredo View Post
    hi
    i would like to change my shock setting (ccdba) from steep to slack. what do i need to comply with to avoid any damage etc? i think i need to release the air from the shock first, right?
    Ooo, ooo, even I know this one!(Raising hand)

    Just remove the lower shock bolt and move it to the other hole. Done. (No Root Beer required)
    I will cause thee to ride upon the high places of the earth...
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    that's all? really? not even release air etc? that's easier than i thought. thanks krob

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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    Ooo, ooo, even I know this one!(Raising hand)

    Just remove the lower shock bolt and move it to the other hole. Done. (No Root Beer required)
    But Root Beer would make it more exciting!
    "Mi amor Nuevo Miťrcoles!"

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    Quote Originally Posted by alfredo View Post
    that's all? really? not even release air etc? that's easier than i thought. thanks krob
    KRob's right; it's that easy. Only possible hangup I can think of is if you have a MRP 2x style chain guide snugged up close to your chainstay. The change of shock setting might make it catch. (This is pure speculation on my part.)
    "sounds like you need to find a better mechanic..." -- Calhoun

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    Quote Originally Posted by TSC View Post
    Adding on to what rscecil007 said: you will notice that the inner, metal part of the bearing is raised above the dust seal. This is because you don't want any moving parts touching your dust seal. Rotating/moving parts touching your dust seal will destroy it (or, at a minimum, pop it out of place); making it useless. To protect against this, Knolly's bearing inserts have a small raised ridge (I tried to highlight it in red to make it more visible) to make sure the insert only touches the metal part of the bearing. The washers do the same thing on the other side. Note: in other areas of the bike's suspension there is no need for washers as it is aluminum that will be butted up against the bearing. Since aluminum doesn't deform it won't hit your dust seal, making washers unnecessarily.

    Hope this helps!


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    BTW, if the bearing insert pictured looks too big for the hole; it is. I used the bigger one to make the raised ridge easier to see.
    this helps a lot. Recently in the last big ride I noticed a big "clunk...snap..pop" of some kind coming down off a jump or just pushing down on the seat moving the shock...that sound would happen. Thought my frame was cracked somewhere...turned out to be what your picture is...bearing are bad inside on the one rocker arm connecting to shock....bearings look like they're not spaced out evenly... cleaned them a bit...re-greased..put seal on and washer..tightened everything down...rode today...no noise til the end of the ride... again...same sound.. didn't work.. dust seal I believe also is damaged..crushed it looks like on one side.....need a new one...dang...need new bearings I think.. Wonder where I can find a new seal like that..bearings..hummmm???
    k n o ll y r o c k s

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    Hey guys,

    Quick question! I've recently picked up a used 2012 Chilcotin that I'm absolutely in love with. I've ran across a small issue that I've never really have had happen.

    When tightening down the rear axle, if the axle is too tight it seems to pinch the stays together so much that it binds up the wheels a bit and creates a ton of drag in the drivetrain. Loosening the rear axle a bit takes care of this instantaneously, so what my question is, is there a published torque measurement for the rear axle? I've looked a bit but haven't been able to find anything.

    Currently I just tighten it up until the wheels binds up a bit and slowly loosen it up until everything spins nice and free.

    The only other culprit is possibly the wheels. They are a brand new set of Industry Nine Enduro hubs laced to I9 rims, but I'm not sure that it could be them as they spin perfectly on my other bike.

    Thanks for the help!

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    Quote Originally Posted by monty797 View Post
    Hey guys,

    Quick question! I've recently picked up a used 2012 Chilcotin that I'm absolutely in love with. I've ran across a small issue that I've never really have had happen.

    When tightening down the rear axle, if the axle is too tight it seems to pinch the stays together so much that it binds up the wheels a bit and creates a ton of drag in the drivetrain. Loosening the rear axle a bit takes care of this instantaneously, so what my question is, is there a published torque measurement for the rear axle? I've looked a bit but haven't been able to find anything.

    Currently I just tighten it up until the wheels binds up a bit and slowly loosen it up until everything spins nice and free.

    The only other culprit is possibly the wheels. They are a brand new set of Industry Nine Enduro hubs laced to I9 rims, but I'm not sure that it could be them as they spin perfectly on my other bike.

    Thanks for the help!
    Measure your rear hub width. I suspect you have a 135mm x 12mm hub, rather than 142mm x 12mm. You should be able to bottom out the frame axle, and it should lock the chainstay to the hub axle.

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by BryanS. View Post
    Measure your rear hub width. I suspect you have a 135mm x 12mm hub, rather than 142mm x 12mm. You should be able to bottom out the frame axle, and it should lock the chainstay to the hub axle.
    That's a great idea. They were supposed to be 142x12 from I9 but that would explain it.

    Thanks!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bizarro View Post
    need new bearings I think.. Wonder where I can find a new seal like that..bearings..hummmm???
    The following PDF lists the bearing numbers in the description column. I just replaced the suspension bearings on my Giant Glory and my Transition Preston FR with Enduro bearings. I've heard good things about them. But I think these are common bearing sizes and you can find them almost anyplace.

    http://knollybikes.com/uploads/bike/...0Chilcotin.PDF
    "sounds like you need to find a better mechanic..." -- Calhoun

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by monty797 View Post
    That's a great idea. They were supposed to be 142x12 from I9 but that would explain it.

    Thanks!
    I think BryanS is on to something.


    The following link shows torque specs you want. See the bottom diagram on the left side. The torques you requested are K and possibly J.

    http://knollybikes.com/uploads/bike/...0Chilcotin.PDF
    "sounds like you need to find a better mechanic..." -- Calhoun

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    Quote Originally Posted by TSC View Post
    The following PDF lists the bearing numbers in the description column. I just replaced the suspension bearings on my Giant Glory and my Transition Preston FR with Enduro bearings. I've heard good things about them. But I think these are common bearing sizes and you can find them almost anyplace.

    http://knollybikes.com/uploads/bike/...0Chilcotin.PDF
    Does anybody know if there is a .PDF like this for the new Endorphin frames?

  64. #64
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    ouch...well..that's where that sound was coming from...hummm..

    hum...now where's that grinder???

    I thought I could get away with just cleaning out the bearings or replacing them..along with seal... guess not.

    Any suggestions?



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    k n o ll y r o c k s

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    Another very common source of clicks/creak on mountain bikes in general is the Bottom Bracket, sometimes the sound travels through the frame and makes it hard to identify the sounds origins until the time comes when it manifests on every pedal stroke (long after youve gone demented with it )

    Sheldon browns guide to Creaks, Clicks and Clunks gives a great heads up to most of the sources of irritating noises on bikes in general, ive found it very handy in the past:

    Creaks, Clicks & Clunks

    His analysis is very good i like his point where he says "sometimes a noise that appears to be coming from the bottom bracket is actually coming from the saddle" ...so true, creaks have a tendency to trick us into thinking the problem originates from another part of the bike, like it doesnt want to be found!

  66. #66
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    Hello.
    I have a Cane Creek 40 Headset installed in my Chilco. I have also an 1/8 fork and i will move to a 1/5 tapered fork. I guess only have to change the bottom cup. what is the right model?

    Thanks. Regards

  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by graypaw View Post
    Hello.
    I have a Cane Creek 40 Headset installed in my Chilco. I have also an 1/8 fork and i will move to a 1/5 tapered fork. I guess only have to change the bottom cup. what is the right model?
    Cane Creek actually have an online tool for that: Cane Creek Headset Fit Finder

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by graypaw View Post
    Hello.
    I have a Cane Creek 40 Headset installed in my Chilco. I have also an 1/8 fork and i will move to a 1/5 tapered fork. I guess only have to change the bottom cup. what is the right model?

    Thanks. Regards
    Hey Graypaw,

    I just happen to have a new Crane Creek 40 HS for the Chilcotin. The lower cup is for a tapered steer tube. The bottom cup is an External Cup EC49, upper is a Zero stack ZS49. The only part of the headset that has been used is the lower race for the fork. Needed it as a temporary solution for a fork swap between the Chilco and Delirium. Running a Chris King on the Chilco and don't need this one.

    If you are interested, PM me.

    Cheers,
    Lee
    Portland Off Road Navagators

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    Quote Originally Posted by graypaw View Post
    Hello.
    I have a Cane Creek 40 Headset installed in my Chilco. I have also an 1/8 fork and i will move to a 1/5 tapered fork. I guess only have to change the bottom cup. what is the right model?

    Thanks. Regards
    wrt chilco and cc headsets: the external bottom cup for 1/(1/8)th and 1.5 is the same (its the races that are different). internal bottom cup is for 1/(1/8)th only.

  70. #70
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    Curious what is the cost of a 4x4 suspension overhaul kit - complete set of bearings/bushings and any wear parts?
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    Curious what is the cost of a 4x4 suspension overhaul kit - complete set of bearings/bushings and any wear parts?
    they last for a long time, they're extremely well made, never heard a single peep out of anyone wrt durability...don't know Canadian price, UK is £120.

  72. #72
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    Hello.
    Thanks for your answers.
    Regards

    Enviado desde mi GT-P7500 usando Tapatalk 4

  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    Curious what is the cost of a 4x4 suspension overhaul kit - complete set of bearings/bushings and any wear parts?
    Neighborhood of 200$ us

  74. #74
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    Hello.
    I still searching my best solution. I think first solution is:
    Cane Creek 40.EC49/40.Bottom Assembly
    And the second, zero stack like my current for the 1/8, this:
    Cane Creek 40.ZS56/40.Bottom Assembly

    Now I have a RS 170 and I will move to a MZ 55, 170 too. I think the best solution is the second one. Thanks

    Regards

  75. #75
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    Other question, Anyone knows if the 4x4 lightweight is available for the chilco 2012 model? What's his price?

    Thanks

  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by graypaw View Post
    Hello.
    I still searching my best solution. I think first solution is:
    Cane Creek 40.EC49/40.Bottom Assembly
    And the second, zero stack like my current for the 1/8, this:
    Cane Creek 40.ZS56/40.Bottom Assembly

    Now I have a RS 170 and I will move to a MZ 55, 170 too. I think the best solution is the second one. Thanks

    Regards
    The second one is for a different HT diameter to the first one (1.5" 49mm vs Tapered 56mm standard), so one of those is not going to fit.
    I'm running the 40.EC49/40 in my Delirium so I'm pretty sure that's the one you want.

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by cerebroside View Post
    The second one is for a different HT diameter to the first one (1.5" 49mm vs Tapered 56mm standard), so one of those is not going to fit.
    I'm running the 40.EC49/40 in my Delirium so I'm pretty sure that's the one you want.
    Thanks man, I did a mistake.

    Also I keep a doubt.
    With a new fork that I should cut down the tube, what is better zero stack or the other?

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by graypaw View Post
    Thanks man, I did a mistake.

    Also I keep a doubt.
    With a new fork that I should cut down the tube, what is better zero stack or the other?
    I run zero stack on the top, but unless you run your bars completely slammed I don't think it matters?
    If you mean the bottom, external cup will increase your front end height and slacken the bike a tiny bit. Doesn't look like Cane Creek do a '40.ZS49/40' though.

  79. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by cerebroside View Post
    I run zero stack on the top, but unless you run your bars completely slammed I don't think it matters?
    If you mean the bottom, external cup will increase your front end height and slacken the bike a tiny bit. Doesn't look like Cane Creek do a '40.ZS49/40' though.
    Thanks.
    Me neither found a CC headset bottom cup with zero stack

    Regards

  80. #80
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    Hi guys, I have a noobie question about my Endo...

    1. How do I remove the rear axle? I would guess pinch bolts first, then the axle itself? Anyone know the torque? On the following diagram, it shows the axle, but not the pinch bolts:

    http://knollybikes.com/uploads/bike/...0Chilcotin.PDF

  81. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by tweasol View Post
    Hi guys, I have a noobie question about my Endo...

    1. How do I remove the rear axle? I would guess pinch bolts first, then the axle itself? Anyone know the torque? On the following diagram, it shows the axle, but not the pinch bolts:

    http://knollybikes.com/uploads/bike/...0Chilcotin.PDF
    no worries: to remove, pinch bolts then axle, to re-install, axle then pinch bolts, hand tight / and common sense is fine, no need to over do it, or to spend 90 bucks on a torque wrench.

  82. #82
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    I currently have my 2011 Delirium apart to service the bearings, and I'm having some trouble getting the main pivot apart.
    I've removed the 8mm bolt on the other side, but the sleeve that it bolts into will not move. I can rotate it, but it's pretty stiff. I'm assuming it's meant to just slide out.



    I'm also looking to replace the main pivot and chainstay pivot (rearmost) bearings, does anyone know the part numbers?

  83. #83
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    Yes, if its the same as the old endorphin, the bolt threads into body of the piece that you see there with the allen face. I would find a socket that just fits inside the bearing race and just hammer it loose. You may just want to use a penetrant like PB Blaster to help loosen things up before you start swinging.

  84. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by cerebroside View Post
    I currently have my 2011 Delirium apart to service the bearings, and I'm having some trouble getting the main pivot apart.
    I've removed the 8mm bolt on the other side, but the sleeve that it bolts into will not move. I can rotate it, but it's pretty stiff. I'm assuming it's meant to just slide out.





    I'm also looking to replace the main pivot and chainstay pivot (rearmost) bearings, does anyone know the part numbers?
    The main pivot axle slides out the drive side and it may need some persuasion. The Delirium design tends to hold water in the frame at that location and the bearings rust to the aluminum pivot. There should be a couple of washers in that assembly also.

    If the bearings don't have any play in them, you should be able to clean and re grease them via steps mentioned previously in this thread. Not sure of the part numbers. Knolly may still have Delirium bearings available.

    Bubba
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  85. #85
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    Thanks. I'll feel a lot betting about wailing on it with a hammer now, haha. I've had PB blaster on it over night; gave it a good wack and it seems to turn a lot more freely now, even though there isn't any visible movement.

    I'm pretty confident that the main pivot bearings are toast, but I'll have a go at repacking them. The chainstay bearings were no good, all the others seem fine after a clean and repack.
    Going to try and source bearings locally first, but if not I will get on to Knolly.

    In other news, about half of the 6 dropout bolts were rounded (?), hopefully I can find some replacements.

  86. #86
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    The main pivot bearings that you show in the picture are 3903 2RS. You can get them from enduro (enduroforkseals or universal cycles). The originally specced Knolly bearings are INA bearings and cost about $40-$50ea. The ones from enduro are about $16ea. I talked it over with Knolly, and they said they will be fine but might not last as long? I installed the same ones on my wife's endorphin and they are holding up fine for the past year.
    You can try and clean and re-pack the main pivot bearings, but be warned they are a double row ball bearing with a plastic cage separating the two rows of bearings. It took me a long time to clean them out, regrease, re-align that little cage and re-install only to find that they were still crunchy. Your best bet is to order a set from the sources I have listed. Let me know if you have any other questions!

  87. #87
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    Ive found soaking the bearings in a degreaser/solvent bath cleans out the old grease and grit real well. But to do that you have to pull the bearing, which can be a lot of trouble. I never had so much trouble pulling bearings before my endo, it must be the tight tolerances or something. Once that is done, regreasing them is a breeze.

  88. #88
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    Do you have a blind bearing puller? I got one just for this reason, makes getting the bearings out a snap and I dont worry about damaging them! Tapping them out with a socket works well too, but you have to be very careful. The bearing puller is quick and easy.

  89. #89
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    Yea, I have two blind pullers (slide hammer and regular) and its just hard to anchor the parts/frame in a way that doesn't mark and maim them while pulling/hammering. The good news is, I've always managed to get them out and I've yet to need to replace a bearing. The INA bearings seem to be quite durable.

    What puller do you use? Maybe there's a better tool out there than my inventory.

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    A bit off topic, but what is the best you guys have found to remove bolts with stripped head (that are pretty stuck). I bought a used Delirium a while back that had several stripped out bolts (like the ones that hold the dropouts in place. They are nice and snug, but I'm going to strip my bike and get it powdercoated, and need these out!

  91. #91
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    Penetrating oil and an EZ out? Failing that, you might have to resort to the drill...

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    Quote Originally Posted by arkon11 View Post
    A bit off topic, but what is the best you guys have found to remove bolts with stripped head (that are pretty stuck). I bought a used Delirium a while back that had several stripped out bolts (like the ones that hold the dropouts in place. They are nice and snug, but I'm going to strip my bike and get it powdercoated, and need these out!
    I rounded out one of these on my D-T. I used a nail puller, gripped it into the bolt head and turned, it worked surprisingly easy!!! I tried to drill it out first, but those bolts are very hard.

    Here is an image of a nail puller so you know what I'm talking about: https://thumbs4.ebaystatic.com/d/l22...xPl_u3p9Qg.jpg

    Finding spare bolts was easy, my local specialty fastners shop had them in 12.9 grade and they were cheap so I bought enough to replace the lot if needed down the track.

  93. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boyd and fiends View Post
    Finding spare bolts was easy, my local specialty fastners shop had them in 12.9 grade and they were cheap so I bought enough to replace the lot if needed down the track.
    Good to hear, mine aren't so far gone that I can't get them out but I'm going to replace them before I torque to spec.

    I'm thinking maybe the reason they are stripped is that the torque sheet on the Knolly website is for the DT, and lists 17 Nm, but the Delirium torque specs listed here give 9 Nm.

  94. #94
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    How did you manage to get the nail puller around the bolt if it's recessed? (Like the knolly bolts are)

  95. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buzz View Post
    Penetrating oil and an EZ out? Failing that, you might have to resort to the drill...
    Before resorting to EZ out I like to try jamming a closely sized standard size hex wrench in there if possible, sometimes tapping it in a bit. If that doesn't work, I try something similar with a Torx wrench. If those fail, then it's EZ out time.

  96. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by arkon11 View Post
    How did you manage to get the nail puller around the bolt if it's recessed? (Like the knolly bolts are)
    The bolt I had rounded out, was one of the drop out bolts for adjusting the chainstay length (as I mentioned I have the older D-T model). This bolt isn't recessed.

    ...sorry I just looked at the newer Delirium and realised it uses completely different bolts!

  97. #97
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    Its been a three year love affair and still going strong

    Time to give something back..full bearing replacement. I have never dabbled with bearings in the past..but after reading other posts and then seeing my lbs tap out the bearings I decided to do it myself. it is super easy...i used a solid piece of steel with a flat head and tapped gently in a circle all the way around the inside rim of the bearings. Popped out. To put the new ones in...i found that if i seated them by tapping lightly with a small hammer...i could then use my improvised bearing press (M6 bolt + piece of cut off handlebar + various washers) and they popped in perfectly. LBS charged me $50 a while back for the two main bearings on the Endo...this is so easy. To remove the bearings on the linkages - i used my vice, a bolt with a big head and piece of old steer tube (1.5?) to push the bearing out through the steer tube.

    Earlier in this post there was mention of using a 'soft jaw' vice to clamp the rear axle when the bolt gets stuck. I made a quick soft jaw for my vice with some rubber flooring i had. Drilled some different size holes in it. I had tried for a day to work out how to get that sucker out.

    <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/davemutton/15377542474" title="Knollyfest by Dave H, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7582/15377542474_a21044d406_z.jpg" width="480" height="640" alt="Knollyfest"></a>

    the soft jaw

    <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/davemutton/15999139102" title="Untitled by Dave H, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8571/15999139102_5c9d3dba68_z.jpg" width="480" height="640" alt="Untitled"></a>
    I support EMBA

  98. #98
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    Awesome. Great description and great pics. Way to get it done!

  99. #99
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    Well done!

    What are you using as your soft jaws? Looks messy.
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  100. #100
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    The other trick is to drill a hole in a block of wood the same size o.d. as the axel, cut the block in half and place the 2 pieces of the block in the vice with the axel. You won't scratch the surface and it gives you a really good purchase.

  101. #101
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    Bump for an informative thread.
    Portland Off Road Navagators

  102. #102
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    Found this thread recently and it's very informative! I have a Knolly Warden and I've been trying to isolate some noise issues and it looks like I can narrow it down to the horse-shoe shaped bit of the linkage (between points E and F in the torque diagram: http://knollybikes.com/uploads/bike/...%20EN%20WD.pdf)

    It looks like some dirt might be trapped in there so I'd like to remove it for cleaning -- any tips on getting this accomplished? I saw mentions somewhere of partially threaded bolts and hammers...

  103. #103
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    Yeah the small bushings in that location will make noise. Mine started in less than 3 rides. A lil lube or bearing grease will quiet it down. Just dont over tighten it & use a lil locktite to prevent losing pieces.

  104. #104
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    right, but I can't really get the grease in there without taking it apart. I tried just adding a dab of lube hoping it will work itself into the bushing. Maybe I need move the suspension around a bit by riding for it to work itself in there, but so far it hasn't gotten any quieter. It sounds like there is also dirt in between that linkage piece and the swingarm so it might be nice to take it apart regardless. The sound is like something sticking and releasing with a pop/crack -- not really a creak like you'd get from a BB.

  105. #105
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    I usually just hose the dirt away from the bushings and then apply a drop of triflow (Teflon lube) and work the suspension up and down, and it all goes away.
    It may repeat every 60 days or so and get noisy again , so just repeat the above process .

    I don't take them apart anymore as you risk them unthreading and dropping out during a ride , then your screwed.

    If you have already removed them, be sure to undo and get the treads with some blue lock tite, then re-thread into place.

    Cheers

  106. #106
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    On my Endo 27.5 I noticed some linkage stiction and isolated it to the horseshoe link at point f. The link definitely does not move without a good amount of force.

    http://knollybikes.com/uploads/bike/...%20EN%20WD.pdf

    To make matters worse, I can't seem to get he shaft to slide out. I've tried using a perfectly sizes socket and some light taps to encourage it, but it won't budge.

    Any tips????

  107. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by YzMxer99 View Post
    light taps...Any tips????
    Heavy Taps. When I had to remove this, Knolly told me it takes some work to get out.

  108. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by YzMxer99 View Post
    On my Endo 27.5 I noticed some linkage stiction and isolated it to the horseshoe link at point f. The link definitely does not move without a good amount of force.

    http://knollybikes.com/uploads/bike/...%20EN%20WD.pdf

    To make matters worse, I can't seem to get he shaft to slide out. I've tried using a perfectly sizes socket and some light taps to encourage it, but it won't budge.

    Any tips????
    Are you taking about shaft in link E or these small bolts in link F? In F there should be bolt and then press-fitted small sleeves inside IGUS bushing. I will be trying to remove them soon to replace bushings.

    That is pdf I'm referring with letters E and F to:

    http://knollybikes.com/uploads/bike/...%20EN%20WD.pdf

    I'm trying to remove shaft from linkage E on 2015 Warden. So far I was able to easily remove two side bolts but shaft is completely stuck inside. On previous posts I saw that other people had problems unscrewing one of bolts because shaft was sliding out. Is there anything that can hold this shaft inside or it should just slide out? Would appreciate some advice before I start using more force on this shaft...

  109. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by stereo007 View Post
    Is there anything that can hold this shaft inside or it should just slide out? Would appreciate some advice before I start using more force on this shaft...

    I had to replace the push-link since I snapped it. I don't remember it being that bad, but I probably used a little PB blaster on it first. I think it just comes out. I threaded a longer screw on there and tapped on it. Replacing the pivot bearing above the BB was quite a bit more work. I could have used a mini-sledge on that.

  110. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by alex345 View Post
    I threaded a longer screw on there and tapped on it. Replacing the pivot bearing above the BB was quite a bit more work. I could have used a mini-sledge on that.
    I was trying the same thing with bolt but I was not tapping hard not to waste tread. It did not move at all. I'll leave it for now I think because it works fine.

    Do you remember if other bushings (two small ones) had additional metal sleeve inside?

  111. #111
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    Thanks for the tips.

    After going through this all with removing that axle and swapping the bushing, my advice is don't do it if you don't have to. Getting the axle out is a pain and getting it back in is equally challenging. It sounds as if it's a tight fit by design and there is actually little movement that happens there.

    The bushing at point E do not have the metal sleeves. If memory serves me right, the bushings at point F do.

    Hope that helps.

    (PS Man, I love my Endorphin!)

  112. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by YzMxer99 View Post
    After going through this all with removing that axle and swapping the bushing, my advice is don't do it if you don't have to. Getting the axle out is a pain and getting it back in is equally challenging. It sounds as if it's a tight fit by design and there is actually little movement that happens there.
    Do you remember if shaft rotates together with black link or with portion of rear triangle? In my case shaft rotates together with black link, so I'm not sure about purpose of bushings there...because rotation is between shaft and rear triangle.

    Quote Originally Posted by YzMxer99 View Post
    The bushing at point E do not have the metal sleeves. If memory serves me right, the bushings at point F do.
    That is how I have it as well.

  113. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by YzMxer99 View Post
    Thanks for the tips.

    After going through this all with removing that axle and swapping the bushing, my advice is don't do it if you don't have to. Getting the axle out is a pain and getting it back in is equally challenging. It sounds as if it's a tight fit by design and there is actually little movement that happens there.

    The bushing at point E do not have the metal sleeves. If memory serves me right, the bushings at point F do.

    Hope that helps.

    (PS Man, I love my Endorphin!)
    I'm in the same boat here. Unless someone else tells me differently, I don't see pulling that sleeve out making any difference.
    That said, I'm resigned to the E and F links being stiff unless they are waaaay under torqued. If I pull the shock, and have E & F torqued to spec (10 & 8 Nm respectively), the bike does not sag under its own weight. If I drop the torque on all 4 of those bolts to 6 Nm, then it drops slowly. I'm not willing to let it go further than that and hope it'll be enough to allow for good small bump compliance. And hopefully loctite will keep it all together.
    Any wisdom from Knolly would be really really really appreciated here since these two bushing joints are both a source of creaking and stiction in the otherwise amazing suspension.
    Knolly Chilcotin
    Knolly Warden
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  114. #114
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    I have just finished full bearing and bushing replacement. Almost everything is fine, straightforward and easy except:

    * shaft (sleeve) in E is quite ok to push out. Replacing bushings is quite challenging, but doable. But pushing that shaft back in is pain! My take on this would be: if it is sitting nice and tight - don't touch it. Some people were saying that it is hard to unscrew second bolt from that shaft because it rotates. If it does so, I would think about replacing bushings. In my case (with new and old bushings) shaft is so tight that there is no way it would rotate. So either there is something wrong with my assembly or you have worn bushings (I've heard it should be tight).

    * Connection F (there is mistake on drawing - in F there should be 4 x IGUS LFM 1012-05, which is now in D. 1020-06 is not used anymore). If you tighten it to 8 or 10 Nm the whole rear triangle will be barely moving. What I did (and some people in previous posts) I tightened it to the point that it is still rotating relatively easy and I used a lot of blue loctite. Something to watch for during riding.

    * When you push in big bearings in G make sure tube in between is still aligned. When I was hammering in second one tube wend on angle and it was hard to disassemble it all.

    Now I can;t wait for good weather to try it!

    P.S. Does anybody know part number for ISCG05 tab? I'm trying to source it, but no luck so far, knolly and my local shop are both not responding about that.

  115. #115
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    I would be interested in how often do you must replace your bushings. There is wear and tear especially on the F-Pivot. To prevent micro play/crack between these parts, you can change the Igus bushings before they become thinner and thinner. But what is with the little axles inside the Igus bushings? In my case, they become a shape like a egg and I had to replace it too. After replacing these two parts the 3th time (after nearly 2 years riding, or approx. 200 ride days) I can notice heavy wear on the upper pushlink Alu part - at the spot, where the Igus bushings rub on the upper alu pushlink. Even with new Igus bushings and the right torque, there is sideway play.

    On the current models, the F-pivot is a little different. The axle inside the bushings is ways thinner and there is a special mounting hardware, called bolt assembly. We will see how much it wears. With cleaning and lubing I can not see any problems with it on my Deli after ~40 ride days or ~4 months. But I have to replace the Igus bushings in the near future, they`re getting thinner every time...

    I think you have to take special care of this pivot in order to prevent micro play or other malfunctions. Replacing axles and mounting hardware when replacing Igus bushings may be a useful behavior, IMHO.

    Knolly Mechanic Tips &amp; Tricks-p1040902.jpgKnolly Mechanic Tips &amp; Tricks-buchsen.jpg

    And for those who want to disassemble the E-Pivot, you will need a long bolt and a hammer, nothing else. But I agree with, that this Pivot is a really low stress pivot with almost no wear and tear on the Igus bushings. You have to replace these Igus bushings once while you need to replace the Igus bushings of the F-pivot the 10th time.

    Knolly Mechanic Tips &amp; Tricks-bolt.jpg




    cheers,
    Abstrax

  116. #116
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    I'm considering getting an Endo frame to build up.

    How do Knolly's pivots hold up to wet weather riding?

  117. #117
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    I got 5000 km out of the bearings on my Warden. Probably could have changed them at 4500 km though, and this is on Vancouver Island where it's pretty wet 1/2 the year.
    Formerly Travis Bickle

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  118. #118
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    And it's probably worth mentioning the definition of "hold up" means different things to different people. I have a 2004 model V-Tach with original main bearings. I still ride the bike, and the bearings have zero slop. They are still super tight, however, if you disassemble the frame and try to spin the bearings freely, one will quickly see that they do bind up beyond the degree of rotation that is otherwise limited by the travel. In other words, the bearings remain perfectly functional for the degrees of rotation used by the bike's travel, but are binding, or gritty, outside of that.

    So I have found that a gritty bearing, or one that binds slightly outside of it's typical rotation, will still function well for years. I personally have never been able to get play or looseness in one of the bearings.

    I ride roughly 600 miles per yr.
    '04 Knolly VTach | '15 Knolly Podium | '16 Knolly Delirium | Knolly Warden

  119. #119
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    I was told by Cavan at Knolly that the real wear and tear items that needs to be replaced in wet weather riding are the bushings on the connector link. These see a limited range of rotation and are self-lubricating, so while they're low maintenance, subjecting them to lots of sloppy riding can take its toll.

    Fortunately, those bushing kits are pretty cheap. Cavan also recommended pulling the bushings apart and cleaning them up after heavy mud and rain riding (so, after a winter or something) to ensure clean surfaces, and giving them a super light coating of grease.

  120. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by zhendo View Post
    I was told by Cavan at Knolly that the real wear and tear items that needs to be replaced in wet weather riding are the bushings on the connector link. These see a limited range of rotation and are self-lubricating, so while they're low maintenance, subjecting them to lots of sloppy riding can take its toll.

    Fortunately, those bushing kits are pretty cheap. Cavan also recommended pulling the bushings apart and cleaning them up after heavy mud and rain riding (so, after a winter or something) to ensure clean surfaces, and giving them a super light coating of grease.
    These are bushings in point F on schematic?

  121. #121
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    Here is video how to replace all bearings on Knolly frame

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sLTkYCkHGBM

  122. #122
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    Are the specs for the igus bushings used with the aluminum Warden published? I have the part numbers but can't seem to find the various diameters.

  123. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by mdg3d View Post
    Are the specs for the igus bushings used with the aluminum Warden published? I have the part numbers but can't seem to find the various diameters.
    Not to ignore your question, but you can buy them direct from Knolly.

    https://shop.knollybikes.com/collect...t-alloy-frames
    '04 Knolly VTach | '15 Knolly Podium | '16 Knolly Delirium | Knolly Warden

  124. #124
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    I am aware, however igus is pretty close to me and i have had good luck dealing with them in the past with other frames.

  125. #125
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    Maybe someone will chime in here, but you could also measure yours with calipers. I'd measure mine for you, but I just cleaned, blue loctited, and torqued them back in. Mine are still good after 2 years. Maybe I need to ride more in crappy weather.
    '04 Knolly VTach | '15 Knolly Podium | '16 Knolly Delirium | Knolly Warden

  126. #126
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    Does anyone know the bolt sizes for the Warden Carbon down tube protector ? 3 bolts 2 different sizes .

  127. #127
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    My Warden is aluminium so can't help. That aside, I was trying the trick of installing my reservoir shock upside down and backwards to give room for a bottle cage. Others have had success but it doesn't work with the Monarch plus rc3 debonair. Reservoir touches the seat tube.

  128. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by Couleecruiser View Post
    My Warden is aluminium so can't help. That aside, I was trying the trick of installing my reservoir shock upside down and backwards to give room for a bottle cage. Others have had success but it doesn't work with the Monarch plus rc3 debonair. Reservoir touches the seat tube.
    Steep mode or slack mode? I think the flipped shock only works in steep mode on a AL Warden.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  129. #129
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    Steep mode. I could get both bolts in but couldn't even slide a piece of paper between the reservoir and frame.

  130. #130
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    Reviving a zombie thread...

    Any advice on removing bearings for replacement? Got a carbon warden...

  131. #131
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    I see a lot of posts in this thread about issues with the bushings in the push link. Specifically, the pivots between the push link and the swing links.

    If you torque the bolts to spec and have too much resistance in the pivot, the bore is simply too tight on the axle. These bushings are press fit into the swing links, which compresses the bushing and reduces the i.d. slightly. It's the same thing with all press fit bushings, shock bushings being the most common example. For a shock bushing you would ream it back to 1/2" i.d. after pressing it in. With the push link bushings it needs to be 10mm (same on all current Knolly frames except I'm not sure about the Fugitive). This should really be done by whomever assembles the frame, but it doesn't seem to happen much regardless of manufacturer. Best case with the i.d. left too tight, it wears in eventually just from riding it. But that can take a LONG time. Worst case is that the resistance of the bushing on the axle creates a torque great enough to loosen up the pivot bolt, which is going to cause a bunch of unnecessary wear depending on how long it's run loose.

    ***So, if your push link bushings bind when you torque the bolts to spec, get yourself a 10mm hand reamer and get that bushing i.d. sized correctly. The axle (metal "sleeve")should fit snugly, but you should be able to push it in or out by hand.***

    You should NOT have to resort to under-tightening the bolts. If you do that, the axle or "sleeve" will not be locked in place to push link like it is designed to be. Yes, it will now rotate more easily but that is because the axle is now able to rotate on the bolt, effectively becoming your new bushing. This is now metal on metal, and it will squeak unless you keep lubricating it. Again, that is not how the pivot is designed to function and you risk wearing in the insides of the aluminum push link clevis from not having the axle locked in place.

    With the bore reamed to 10mm, you should be able to just put a drop of loc-tite 243 on the bolts threads and torque it to spec. No lube needed, no risk of the bolt coming loose, and no binding or squeaking.

  132. #132
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    Main lower pivot axle on a 2017 Endo.... How does one get that out? Tried loosening the bolt out a bit then tapping it to push the axle through but seems stuck. Do I just need more force or am I missing something?

    The bolt was held in with locktite but since I'm riding tomorrow I applied anti seize and tightened back down. Does this bolt loose easily? Had a creak from that area and now with a bit more torque the creak is gone.

  133. #133
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    Well, at first I wanted to disagree with hippopotamus, but after some thinking I need to agree. Maybe not fully, but he is right about comparing it to shock mount. I think (at least looking at my case) biggest problem is not having bushing bore under 10 mm after installation, but having bushings too wide or metal sleeve too narrow. So when you tighten the bolt, this metal sleeve is not in full contact with horseshoe piece and you end up with rotation between sleeve and bolt. Wrong bushing diameter definitely makes things worse - sleeve rotates now with bushing, not with bolt.

    Will be opening my suspension in a few weeks and will have a look at this, my guess is that I have sleeves too short or maybe horseshoe piece is worn out now. Will be interesting to see it

    But Iím sure bushing diameter is wrong in my case on the other side of horseshoe link, where bigger bushings are. This is why it was almost impossible to remove and install this pin and now it barely rotates at all

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