Keep bicycles in Boulder White Clouds- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Caution;  Merge;  Workers Ahead! Keep bicycles in Boulder White Clouds

    CEDRA is The Central Idaho Economic Development and Recreation Act, proposing to designate the Boulder White Clouds as Wilderness sponsored by Rep. Mike Simpson.

    The hearing next week for CIEDRA is on Wednesday (27th). Larry Craig is the key because CIEDRA already passed the House. It is essential that we tell Larry Craig that there is serious concerns to CIEDRA because it closes 100% of the non-motorized single track trails currently open to bicycles.

    Please take the time to call him or emailed him on this. We can make a difference!

    Call or e-mail this week, during the day or at night, but just do it
    because without your support we aren't going to keep the trails open to bicycles.

    [email protected] or call 342.7985

    The message is simple, "Please let bicycle keep access to non-motorized trails in CIEDRA" give your name and address and that's it! Be polite and brief.

    Feel free to improvise...say what ever you want just be polite.
    We have a reputation of being passionate but respectful.

    Thanks and don't you dare give up we haven't lost this battle!

    < FYI >
    In the following article Lindsay Slater is quoted as saying
    “Simpson has met with IMBA representatives and redrawn boundaries
    to take some of the bike trails in the Boulder-White Cloud
    mountains out of the wilderness area”

    The only trails that created a re-draw were motorized trails that were already open to bikes.

    Every trail that is non-motorized will be closed to bicycles if the current proposal in CEDRA is not changed.

    __________________________________________________ _________________
    Legislation in Congress bans mountain bikes
    http://www.sltrib.com/news/ci_4351987

    Salt Lake Tribune
    17 September 2006

    Idaho wilderness area

    By Jesse Harlan Aldermanm
    The Associated Press

    BOISE, Idaho - From the Fourth of July Lake trail, mountain
    bikers catch some of the widest views of the comb-like peaks of
    the Boulder-White Cloud mountains, but only if they can take
    their eyes off the wrist-twisting shale as the trail cuts across
    the picturesque alpine basin.

    Yet, to the dismay of fat-tire aficionados, bikes would be
    barred from Fourth of July and 85 miles of other nearby
    singletrack - the narrow, challenging trails prized by hard-core
    riders - under a bill gaining steam in Congress.

    The Central Idaho Economic Development and Recreation Act,
    sponsored by Rep. Mike Simpson, R-Idaho, pegs 492 square miles
    near the famed Sun Valley Resort as federally designated
    wilderness.

    It's a vexing paradox for the International Mountain Bike
    Association, whose mission largely is to preserve trails in wild
    areas across the country. Since the 1980s, the legal definition
    of wilderness has prohibited mechanized transportation like
    snowmobiles, all terrain vehicles and - inexplicably to some -
    mountain bikes.

    So now, the association finds itself battling wilderness bills
    and tangling with conservationists in Idaho, California, Montana
    and the corridors of Congress.

    "We love wild places, that's what brings us to mountain
    biking," said Mark Eller, a spokesman for the group. "It's
    really a double-edged sword for us."

    In Idaho, the group has split with its sometime allies, the
    Idaho Conservation League and the Wilderness Society. A call-to-
    action alert sent to members urges a letter-writing campaign
    against defining the Boulder-White Clouds as wilderness.

    But across the border, the group is lauding a measure to protect
    wilderness around Oregon's Mount Hood. That bill's authors -
    Rep. Earl Blumenauer, D-Ore., founder of the Congressional Bike
    Caucus, and Rep. Greg Walden, R-Ore., - adjusted wilderness
    boundaries to exclude popular biking trails.

    A measure that would lock in 468 square miles of the northern
    California coast as wilderness has rankled mountain bikers,
    while advocates are asking lawmakers to support a cycle-friendly
    wilderness bill in Virginia.

    The group is unlikely to mount a legal challenge against the
    wilderness definition, Eller said. Rather, mountain bikers will
    argue for land designations more inviting to cyclists, like
    national conservation areas and national monuments.

    Another tactic is to press heavyweight conservation groups to
    pitch a bigger wilderness tent - one with enough space for
    mountain bikers, said Chris Cook, an IMBA representative in
    Idaho who drapes a "Keep Mountain Bikes in the Boulder-White
    Clouds" banner from his car's roof rack.

    "Many people who run environmental organizations are older in
    age, and they have a misconceived perception because they've
    never ridden a mountain bike before," he said. "But the tide
    will turn as more people realize that just because we have two
    wheels, we're not dirt bikes."

    The legal definition laid out in the Wilderness Act of 1964
    predates mountain bikes. The Forest Service interpreted the law
    to bar mountain bikes in the 1980s after cyclists invented the
    new vehicle with fat tires and beefy shock absorbers, capable of
    wheeling over wild terrain.

    Many conservation groups are unlikely to welcome mountain bikers
    into the wilderness any time soon, said Michael Anderson, an
    attorney for the Wilderness Society in Seattle.

    The argument against bikers is not based on environmental
    concerns - some studies have shown mountain bikes cause no more
    damage to ecosystems than backpackers, while horses, which are
    allowed in wilderness, are far more harmful - but on purity.

    "You could have a million hikers going into an area and causing
    more damage than one snowmobile. We're not talking about that,"
    he said. "It's that the Wilderness Act provides for a primitive
    experience and solitude, an undisturbed type of recreation."

    In Congress, lawmakers find themselves caught in the sniping.

    Simpson has met with IMBA representatives and redrawn boundaries
    to take some of the bike trails in the Boulder-White Cloud
    mountains out of the wilderness area, said Lindsay Slater, the
    lawmaker's chief of staff.

    Still, conservationists wield more power than mountain bikers.

    After passing the House in July, Simpson's bill faces a hearing
    on Sept. 27 before a Senate committee. Despite the irony,
    Several wilderness lovers - many of them wearing spandex - will
    be watching, praying for failure.

    "Basically I just hope the bill dies," Cook said.
    __________________________________________________ ____________

    For epic photos go to:
    http://www.trailwize.com/bwc/bwc.htm

  2. #2
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    Ditto

    The thought of losing these trails makes me want to sh**. IMHO there are many issues with CIEDRA, but I'm most pissed about the disregard for MTBs. Carve-outs in wilderness bills can be made for jet boats, airplanes, helicopters, motorcycles, etc but not for MTB's- a group of trail-users that will gladly uphold the wilderness ethic?? Is this an oversight, or are we just the "one too many" special interest group with the least backing? On a recent ride in the White Clouds I swore I'd do more to stop this bill. Write Craig, call Simpson, or send a check to IMBA, but do something.

    Maybe if Simpson knew there were Yetis in the White Clouds he'd stay away...
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #3
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    Ive done some rides up in this region and they are nothing less than EPIC! I fired an email off to BigJonny @ DC and hopefully he can spread the word beyond the Idaho front. Cross your collective fingers.
    Act like I'm hate of the Haitian from Hateville

  4. #4
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    This week's High Country News has a good (imo) article on mountain bikes that mentions the Wilderness issue and the conflicts with the freeriding scene. Curiously, it mentions a mountain bike club in Idaho aligned with the Blue Ribbon Coalition. I wonder which club that could be...

    http://www.hcn.org/servlets/hcn.Arti...ticle_id=16535

    A more relevant article to this post is the editor's note accompnaying that article that expresses the way I feel about the mountain bikes in Wilderness issue:

    http://www.hcn.org/servlets/hcn.Arti...ticle_id=16536

    My point in posting this is not to stir the pot on a very hot subject, but to remind folks that not all people who mountain bike are against CIEDRA. I commend Harley for encouraging pulic participation in this process, even if I don't agree with his position...

    matt

  5. #5
    King of the Barneys
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    Thanks Howley. I called Larry's office and had a nice chat with his assistant, and registered my impassioned but respectful comments.

    CDB
    May your trails be narrow, crooked, lonesome and dangerous, leading to the most outrageous adventures. Paladin

  6. #6
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    Everyone should point out that information exists that horses and hikers actually can do more damage to a trail than a mtn biker, since it "appears" the closure is for that reason. I'll find the reference in the Wilson Creek EA, and try to draft something today.
    ...building wherever they'll let me...

  7. #7
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    Done.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Visicypher
    Everyone should point out that information exists that horses and hikers actually can do more damage to a trail than a mtn biker, since it "appears" the closure is for that reason. I'll find the reference in the Wilson Creek EA, and try to draft something today.
    I swear I thought I read somewhere from IMBA that said that hikers/horsies do more damage than the MTB'er. Don't know how "true" this is, but I've seen it referenced a couple of times.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Visicypher
    Everyone should point out that information exists that horses and hikers actually can do more damage to a trail than a mtn biker, since it "appears" the closure is for that reason. I'll find the reference in the Wilson Creek EA, and try to draft something today.
    The closure is not for that reason. Irresponsible use of any kind, be it foot, equine, or bike, can cause trail damage - that much I would bet everyone can agree to.

    Mountain bikes are not allowed in Wilderness because the forest service believes that they are not compatible with the Wilderness values set forth by the Act. It interprets bikes as "mechanized" forms of travel that are prohibited in Congressionally designated Wilderness...

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