Injuries- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 22 of 22

Thread: Injuries

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BoiseBoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    767

    Injuries

    So, my girlfriend has been a great sport and has been willing to try mountaing biking as she sees how passionate I am about it. The last time we did corrals, about a month ago, she got stuck on a rock after the stream crossing (pre bridge) and had one of the slow motion falls to her side and caught herself with her Right hand. She ended up subluxing her shouder that was already having instabilty issues.

    Couldn't get her back on the bike for a while.

    Fast forward to yesterday. Decides to come with me again up corrals. About a half mile off BB road she hits a small sand pile and overcorrects, takes a plunge onto her Left side while traveling less than 10mph.It didn't look that bad at all, stand up, brush it off and we'll be fine right? As she was falling we heard a "pop" like the cleat popping out of the pedal. The ankle was stable and tested out well. She had some odd swelling so we take her to the ER for some imaging. She sustained an unstable oblique fracture of the distal Fibula. Surgery will be later this week.

    Not only will she not be riding with me, but she loves to run and has to shelve it for a while as well.
    Should I feel terrible about "forcing" her to ride with me?
    Should I even bring up riding again once healed?

    It looks like I might be breaking down and doing more road riding this Winter.

    I would love to hear the female perspective on this as well SJ, SFS you gal's out there?
    BoiseBoy

  2. #2
    Tracking up the place
    Reputation: Haroow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    627
    Based on what you posted...I think you are ok. She wants to spend time with you, hence she wants to ride, and go places with you, She obviously enjoys biking, and wanted to go again. I really don't see how you "forced" her.. Unless you threw her the trunk and gagged her. and then pointed a gun to her head..

    I think you should be supportive as possible for her, through the injury and surgery and and help rehab her injury...She's going to be down for awhile, I assume she broke the bony protuberance at the bottom of the leg bone that is next to the ankle.. Few months at least ...Do it cause you care and not cause you feel guilty... If you feel guilty you will project resent later on... Support her and she'll support you..

    I am impressed with your GF drive...My wife suffered a break in the foot went through surgery, non cycling related, and she perserviered and was more worried about how the injury would affect her ability to exercise and to all things ride a bike... I have seen her endo twice now, and each time she smiles and says that was cool is the bike ok?

    I think after a time let her get back on take it slow and teach her slow riding maneuvers, trackstands and etc... Teach her that sand traps need to be hit with as much spin as possible and weight the rear and float the front.. That will help her.. But She probably already knows that... Good Luck and speedy recovery to her...
    "Home of the Bearlodge Mtn Classic"



    The only hill is the one you make of it....

  3. #3

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    20

    The woman's perspective

    I love to ride plain and simple. I have separated both shoulders, torn my ACL, MCL and fractured my fibia, cracked ribs and had 3 concussions in one year.

    Most of my injuries have been a result of learning to hit jumps and drops in preparation for downhill racing. I guess I chalk up the injuries as just part of the learning curve. Unfortunately for me I didn't learn to do these things when I was a kid so learning them as an adult has added some consequence in that you just don't seem to heal up that fast anymore. But all and all, for me, sustaining an injury is part of the sport. I keep on riding.

    If she is passionate about riding, she will keep doing so. Keep her safe and teach her some good bike handling techniques. Having skills is the best prevention of injury. Even learning to fall safely is a good skill to have.

    I hope she has a speedy recovery.

  4. #4
    roar
    Reputation: rocknrollbarbie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    300

    My two cents

    OK. Here's my perspective. It doesn't really sound like you forced her to ride. Didn't she volunteer to go with you to see what it is that you love so much about mtbiking? She made the choice to go and I'm sure she knew that riding a bike on dirt and rocks had some risks. Its a HUGE bummer though... I'm a runner too, and Fall has always been my favorite time of the year to run. Don't feel bad or guilty. Take good care of her though.

    As far as getting her back on a bike, just ask her and take her word for it. When I started mtbiking, I knew within the first couple of rides that I was in love with biking. I have had some good wipe outs and been to the ER because of bike wrecks, but I loved biking enough to get back onto my bike as soon as I was healed up enough. It sounds like she has ridden enough to tell if she is going to really like it or not. If not, and running is her thing, thats cool. Make sure she doesn't feel any pressure to go again. But also make sure she knows that you would love it if she wanted to go with you again. I think the most important thing is to not let biking become a source of contention or stress on your relationship. I can tell that's what you are aming for though, and I think it's really cool that you are concerned about it.

    Also, I think alot of women feel more comfortable, (especially if they are newer to mtbiking) riding with other women. Just a thought, and it doesn't apply to all women. But even if you are the nicest boyfriend in the world, she might want to try to ride harder and faster to try and not slow you down. This of course puts her at a greater risk for hurting herself. Ask her if she wants to ride with women. If she does, send me a PM.

    I hope this helps. Let us know how the surgery goes.

    sj
    Whenever I haul a$$ I have to take two trips.

  5. #5
    Back of the pack fat guy
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,984
    Not the female perspective, but a similar male perspective. I've been "seriously" mountain biking for 9 - 10 years, but with my wife for 12.5 years. We bought her a mountain bike the first time about 7 years ago and I made the mistake of taking her down Hulls Gulch. She was none too pleased with me and ended up scraped and bruised. The mountain bike went back into the basement for a while, and ended up being sold in lieu of a "greenbelt" bike. I realized that "pressuring" her to ride with me was a really, really bad idea.

    Fast forward a few years. Eventually, she warmed back up to the idea of mountain biking and we rode together at Tamarack last year or the year before at her request. She really enjoyed it. So, this spring I pieced together another mountain bike for her and surprised her with it. She's ridden it a few times off-greenbelt and has had a good time (crashing once at Tamarack a few weeks ago). However, when I tried to take her on the "small loop" on Jughandle (maybe a 4 mile loop, with a 2 mile climb on a fire road, followed by 1 - 1.5 mile singletrack descent back to the road) a couple of weeks ago, it was nearly a disaster. She hated the climb and struggled the entire way. (It didn't help that she's asthmatic, it was very smoky, and the road had been "graded," that day, making it 1' deep in dust.)

    Long and short of it is that I know for a fact that she's never going to be at my level of riding. She tries, but she's not as serious about exercise as I am, nor has she ever really been bit by the mountain biking bug. Some people just aren't. I really, really wish she were into mountain biking - I mean, how great would it be to be able to recreate at the same level together doing something we both love? I've come to the realization that an addiction to cycling is something we're never going share, but I'm OK with that. I do the cycling thing with others so inclined, and she does her stuff (hiking, usually) with others so inclined. She likes to hike and so we hike together. When she wants to go for a ride (she likes greenbelt/flat land riding), I go, but I don't ever pressure her to go.

    My advice: when she heals up, let her advance the idea of riding. If she doesn't mention it, I wouldn't either. If she does, great, but take it slowly. Hope she heals up quick!
    Last edited by Earthpig; 08-28-2006 at 09:47 AM.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: garnetspur's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    970

    my wife mtn. bikes

    but at first..it was painful.

    you really have to take it slow with new riders...especially woman (not to be sexist..just generally speaking)...and Especially with your wife/girlfriend..etc...depending on your relationship, of course..

    l let my wife work her way up (me bored to death at first..but happy she was out with me) but now she's doing great. she's a good climber and does well on downhills..

    she takes it at her speed...and she's getting faster and faster..we ride together pretty much all the time...it's great..

    she did fall off china wall when we first moved to boise...and she's still scared of fall off areas..

    but, going back to the early days...i was very patient...and never pushed her...the thing is..she wanted to ride and get more comfortable off road, etc...so, i think if someone wants to get better or wants to do it...they will. if not...don't pressure them at all..

    hope she gets back on the bike..'cause it's a blast...as you know..

  7. #7
    King of the Barneys
    Reputation: CBro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    1,121
    Quote Originally Posted by BoiseBoy
    So, my girlfriend has been a great sport and has been willing to try mountaing biking as she sees how passionate I am about it. The last time we did corrals, about a month ago, she got stuck on a rock after the stream crossing (pre bridge) and had one of the slow motion falls to her side and caught herself with her Right hand. She ended up subluxing her shouder that was already having instabilty issues.
    Should I feel terrible about "forcing" her to ride with me?
    Should I even bring up riding again once healed?

    It looks like I might be breaking down and doing more road riding this Winter.

    I would love to hear the female perspective on this as well SJ, SFS you gal's out there?
    This is another husband's perspective similare to EP's. Something's wrong when he and I start agreeing on so much... When I started riding, I got so excited I bought my wife a mtnbike. We did easy mtnbike trails together as a family, and she loved it so long as we took it easy. She did Corrals, Crestline, Swan Falls, easy McCall rides, that sort of thing.

    After a while, she lost interest and was afraid of breaking something after some quack said she's at risk for osteo-arthritis and to be careful with her bones. So I bought us a cruiser tandem (pictures in the TDF thread.. ) and I got her a singlespeed cruiser that we ride around town, the greenbelt, that sort of thing.

    I accept her where she's at, and we have a great time together. She doesn't ride Hard Guy or Eastside with me, but the joy she gets in riding easy stuff with me is satisfaction enough for me to go out with her and ride around the parks, etc. and it helps remind us why we said "I do" 20+ yrs ago

    My long-term dream is to get a good road tandem and slowly re-build her fitness so we can do things together like Ride the Rockies, STP, Going To The Sun, and other week-long adventures around the country. I love exertion and exercise, she's not as keen on it. I love riding, she's ok with it if it's not real rough and risky. But we both love being together, so rather than force her to come up to me, we found some fun compromises with the cruiser tandem and the ss cruiser bikes....

    For example, Exhibit A: http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=122642

    I guess in other words, it's not reasonable to expect her to share your passion or ride at your level, but that doesn't have to be the end of the story...if you really care for her, find what works for her where she's at.

    CDB
    May your trails be narrow, crooked, lonesome and dangerous, leading to the most outrageous adventures. Paladin

  8. #8
    Hoops - Big and Small
    Reputation: Crash_Burn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    1,083

    Another Trouser Trout Perspective

    Quote Originally Posted by BoiseBoy
    Not only will she not be riding with me, but she loves to run and has to shelve it for a while as well.
    Should I feel terrible about "forcing" her to ride with me?
    Should I even bring up riding again once healed?
    I'am mentoring a 12 yr old right now and experiencing some of these issues.

    Pick a trail that challenges the rider physically/technically just enough so that a progression of skills and athleticism can be measured.

    Riding easier trails is the best way to start. Very difficult for the leader but there is really no other way.

    Ride a particular trail over and over again until the trail is no longer the issue and bike handling skills and physical fitness are the focus of the ride.

    Ride that particular trail until it is mastered!

    Now to your situation -

    Sorry to hear about the crash Hope the fracture heals well!

    Since she's a runner and as her ankle is healing - biking will probably be a good rehabilitation tool. Of course, only very safe biking. So biking may be in her future.

    You should count yourself VERY lucky that you have a spouse that is willing to try "new things" with you.

  9. #9

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by BiggerIsBetter
    Most of my injuries have been a result of learning to hit jumps and drops in preparation for downhill racing. I guess I chalk up the injuries as just part of the learning curve. Unfortunately for me I didn't learn to do these things when I was a kid so learning them as an adult has added some consequence in that you just don't seem to heal up that fast anymore. But all and all, for me, sustaining an injury is part of the sport. I keep on riding.
    that's me, too. I wish I had taken this up as kid. Now, I'm very tentative on the downhills. I've been down this season so many times I lost count, so i figured crashing at 2 mph is better than at 20 mph.

    But, Im having fun. I rode corrals on Sunday and had a blast. I too, am interested in getting the wife involved, but after a friend's wife needed plastic surgery after she took a header on Red Cliffs, I'm worried about pushing her too fast.

  10. #10

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    3,544
    Quote Originally Posted by rad dude
    But, Im having fun. I rode corrals on Sunday and had a blast. I too, am interested in getting the wife involved, but after a friend's wife needed plastic surgery after she took a header on Red Cliffs, I'm worried about pushing her too fast.
    But is she interested in doing it or are you just interested in getting her riding? Your best bet is to keep suggesting it to her, but don't force the issue. You can find numerous threads on this very topic where it turned out for the worse. But obviously there are cases where it's turned out great.

    I'm not to sure of Jenny's plans next year, but you may want to suggest to your wife to attend the next BOMBB beginner women's MTB clinic and ride that is held in conjuction with REI (if she does decide to do it again for the third time). This past spring, I helped her out. You can read more about it (and the ensuing "controversy") here:
    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.ph...ighlight=bombb

    Several weeks ago in Military Reserve I ran into a friend and his fiance. He had just come down Eagle Ridge and was already past Cottonwood Creek when I asked him where his fiance was and he was telling us that this was her first time out or something like that. I kept my mouth shut, but was wondering why he wasn't riding WITH her. Next thing you know you see her walking her bike down the trail and when she met up with us it didn't look like she was having a good time. Later on during their ride, she crashed somewhere in MR and ended up in some poison ivy and has been off the bike since.

  11. #11

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by BelaySlave
    But is she interested in doing it or are you just interested in getting her riding? Your best bet is to keep suggesting it to her, but don't force the issue. You can find numerous threads on this very topic where it turned out for the worse. But obviously there are cases where it's turned out great.

    I'm not to sure of Jenny's plans next year, but you may want to suggest to your wife to attend the next BOMBB beginner women's MTB clinic and ride that is held in conjuction with REI

    Excellent point. She seems really enthusiastic right now. I'm not interested in pushing the issue. If she wants to go, that's great. If not, that's cool too.

    So when is this class at REI? .

  12. #12

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    3,544
    Quote Originally Posted by rad dude
    Excellent point. She seems really enthusiastic right now. I'm not interested in pushing the issue. If she wants to go, that's great. If not, that's cool too.
    Back2Kill went through this dilemna earlier this year and if memory serves me correct, she ended up not riding. I kept urging him to have her attend the REI clinic and ride, but nada.

    So when is this class at REI? .
    Ehhh probably next April again like it has been the past couple of years. It's been a well attended event the past two times she held it. Not too sure of the success rate though.

  13. #13

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    116
    Quote Originally Posted by BoiseBoy
    So, my girlfriend has been a great sport and has been willing to try mountaing biking as she sees how passionate I am about it. The last time we did corrals, about a month ago, she got stuck on a rock after the stream crossing (pre bridge) and had one of the slow motion falls to her side and caught herself with her Right hand. She ended up subluxing her shouder that was already having instabilty issues.

    Couldn't get her back on the bike for a while.

    Fast forward to yesterday. Decides to come with me again up corrals. About a half mile off BB road she hits a small sand pile and overcorrects, takes a plunge onto her Left side while traveling less than 10mph.It didn't look that bad at all, stand up, brush it off and we'll be fine right? As she was falling we heard a "pop" like the cleat popping out of the pedal. The ankle was stable and tested out well. She had some odd swelling so we take her to the ER for some imaging. She sustained an unstable oblique fracture of the distal Fibula. Surgery will be later this week.

    Not only will she not be riding with me, but she loves to run and has to shelve it for a while as well.
    Should I feel terrible about "forcing" her to ride with me?
    Should I even bring up riding again once healed?

    It looks like I might be breaking down and doing more road riding this Winter.

    I would love to hear the female perspective on this as well SJ, SFS you gal's out there?
    Sorry that your GF is having such a rough time. Hope she recovers quickly. I've been in your position before, and I'm not sure I can offer you any helpful input. My ex-whatever really wanted to share my passion for riding a bike, and he rode with me a few times. After he recovered from 2 broken ribs sustained by riding like an @sshole on a really awesome downhill section, he found many exuses not to ride anymore. I explained to him that if you mountain bike, you're going to fall; it's a fact of life. But, this was a fact he wasn't willing to accept, and he just wouldn't do it anymore. Should I have encouraged him more, spoken more softly? I'm convinced he just didn't care for it, and that was ok with me.

    Those of us with the love for mountain biking, whether we're good or not, are willing to practically kill ourselves for it. Similar to what RRB and BIB have reported, I've cracked ribs, fractured my wrist, fractured my thumb, jacked my ankle (right now it's turning colors), torn muscles on impact, knocked the wind out of my lungs, did some horrible thing to my left shoulder (haven't gone to the doctor yet), I have scrapes on top of bruises on top of scars, etc. etc. And like RRB and BIB, I get back on my bike and do it again.

    Sounds as though your GF has a little more sense, and she might not ever love it. Do you need her to love it, or will you settle for her just liking it a little? Do what RRB suggested and have your GF ride with the girls. Maybe this will help her feel more confident, which will help her ride better, and hopefully enjoy it. Good luck!!

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: flipnidaho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    7,197
    Quote Originally Posted by BoiseBoy

    Couldn't get her back on the bike for a while.
    What? Ditch her dude! She's no good broken like that...

    But in all seriousness, if she likes to mountainbike because she likes to mountainbike (and not because you like to do it), she'll get back on. In our beginner and intermediate clinics, a lot of women (who have spouses or SO's that ride seriously) take the clinic because they are intimidated riding with their spouses and want to get better before they do so. She needs to get confident enough on a bike that she can handle most things out on the trail. Once she gets well enough to ride (and Godspeed on her recovery btw), have her take a skills clinic from one of the local groups and then take her on some easier trails like the MR. Nick's idea of the BOMBB squad rides is also a good way to get her more into riding in a more social and non-intimidating environment.
    Oh yeah, one more thing, if it feels like you're "forcing" her to go riding, you probably are. Try not to do that. She has to go because she wants to go (or in the best case scenario, she'd LOVE to go)...
    Good Luck K and be careful on that roadie in winter. Between the sand on the roads, black ice, idiot drivers, etc..., I think it maybe safer staying on frozen dirt!

  15. #15
    aaarrrggghh!
    Reputation: Ivan the Terrible's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    630

    One more thing to consider.....

    Quote Originally Posted by BoiseBoy
    So, my girlfriend has been a great sport and has been willing to try mountaing biking as she sees how passionate I am about it. The last time we did corrals, about a month ago, she got stuck on a rock after the stream crossing (pre bridge) and had one of the slow motion falls to her side and caught herself with her Right hand. She ended up subluxing her shouder that was already having instabilty issues.

    As she was falling we heard a "pop" like the cleat popping out of the pedal.
    I might be stating the obvious here but perhaps the clipless pedals aren't such a good idea for her. I sounds like both injuries are a result of being clipped in and if she is a beginner being able to exit the bike much more rapidly would be to her advantage. My wife is riding platforms and says whe will never go back to clipless because she feels much safer and confident without them. In addition, riding platform pedals make you work a little harder on your bike handling skills and that's always a benefit for all riders who want to progress their riding skills. I am a firm believer in the platform pedal and I don't see myself ever going back to clipless unless I'm racing XC.

    My wife and a couple of other wives recently attended the Sugoi Dirt Series MTB camp for women only over in Bend, Oregon (http://www.spudhucksters.com/Bend2006.html.) The clinic was for advanced riders and beginners alike. She learned a ton and enjoys riding more now that she learned some things that I couldn't teach her. When your gal is healthy again she might be interested trying to go to some of those clinics.

  16. #16

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    3,544
    For any beginner females out there, you may want to consider the women's adult MTB class that will be taught once again by Heather Thiry through Boise Parks and Recreation. For some odd reason I can't find the online version of the new Boise Parks and Rec Activity Guide, but the info is as follows....
    Classes taught Sept. 6th, 13th, 20th from 5:30 - 7:30pm.
    The cost is $61 for residents and $94 for non-residents.

    I've spoken with some women that have taken the class before with Heather and previously Lauren Dorsch and they enjoyed it.

    I think Earthpig's wife took it this past spring too???

    EDIT

    Go here:
    https://parks-web1.cityofboise.org/RegistrationMain.sdi

    Under "Category", pull up "Special Interest Adult" and voila you are there.

  17. #17
    Back of the pack fat guy
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,984

    Yes and no

    Quote Originally Posted by BelaySlave
    I think Earthpig's wife took it this past spring too???
    Well, she made it to the first class, bonked really hard early in the ride (due to lack of eating lunch that day) and missed the other two classes due to new job/work conflicts. I don't think she's going to sign up for the September class (and, as noted above, I'm certainly not going to push her to do so.)

    NB - Even with that "beginner" group, a decent base-level of fitness is necessary to be able to keep up and have fun. (Meaning that if your significant other is not in reasonable riding shape, she may not really enjoy it.)

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    4,220
    Good point. On a related note, I just put clipless on my friend. I "made" her ride cheapy plastic platforms for a few weeks on her new bike (her first in 10 years) so she could get the hang of everything before worrying about clipless. Then I took her to Fort Boise's grass fields, and had her do dry runs on a windtrainer. Then it was off to the grass. She did well, but realizes a crowded trail with obstacles will be a different story.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ivan the Terrible
    I might be stating the obvious here but perhaps the clipless pedals aren't such a good idea for her. I sounds like both injuries are a result of being clipped in and if she is a beginner being able to exit the bike much more rapidly would be to her advantage. My wife is riding platforms and says whe will never go back to clipless because she feels much safer and confident without them. In addition, riding platform pedals make you work a little harder on your bike handling skills and that's always a benefit for all riders who want to progress their riding skills. I am a firm believer in the platform pedal and I don't see myself ever going back to clipless unless I'm racing XC.

  19. #19
    dirt enthusiast
    Reputation: georgezilla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    182

    ouch!

    here's to a speedy recovery!

    another no y chromosome (girl) perspective:

    if your girlfriend really liked riding, then she'll get back on the bike. dont feel guilty about what happened. it sounds like she is/was trying to spend time with you and something you love. i started riding mainly because it was fun as hell and my boyfriend at the time and all his friends loved it. every time i went i struggled. i walked my bike up kestrel. i swore as i was gasping for air and trying my best not to hurl dinner. but i continued because i had a great time riding. i can't say that i've broken anything from crashes but i've definately had my fair share of war wounds. there are many times that i was discouraged but always kept with it. i did it because i wanted to and i'm glad that i did. it will definately take some recovery time for her to get back on the bike so be patient and encouraging.

    i do agree with ian about riding with platforms instead of clipless. i've never ridden clipless mainly because i didn't want to be attached to the bike if i crashed! kinda sounds like you need to practice riding with those things too and i just want to get out and ride!
    i might be going to hell in a bucket, but at least i'm enjoying the ride

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BoiseBoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    767

    Thanks Gang

    I just wanted to say thanks gang for all of the words of encouragement and input.
    The good news is, after having another assessment the surgeon decided to try the conservative route and just the boot/Non Weight Bearing route.

    She will be out of commission for a month or two, but still a bit sooner than initially anticipated.

    Here is to all who have friends and significant other riding, keep it up and be safe.

    Thanks
    BoiseBoy

  21. #21
    Back of the pack fat guy
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,984
    Quote Originally Posted by georgezilla
    i do agree with ian about riding with platforms instead of clipless. i've never ridden clipless mainly because i didn't want to be attached to the bike if i crashed!
    Yeah, when I built up a new bike for my wife this spring, I put flats on it. She hated the clipless pedals she had on her first mountain bike and is way more comfortable using flats.

  22. #22

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    3,544
    I've read many threads throughout MTBR on this whole clipless debate. I switch out between my Shimanos and some bigass Wellgo platforms. Why do alot of folks (not saying anyone here) insist that clipless is "the way to go" if you are going to become a serious rider? I was lucky enough that I got the hang of using clipless within a couple of rides. But I've ridden with some folks that have been using clipless for a couple of years (mainly SPDs) and they are still clumsy on 'em and inevidably end up crashing somehow whether on a tricky section or on flats.

    I can maybe understand the whole "it's cuz they are alot more efficient" rhetoric that's thrown out there, but for alot of folks being clipped in somehow screws with them mentally. I say if you are comfortable riding on platforms or cages...so be it.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.