Any wheel builders out there?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    just a man
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    Man I'd be happy just learning how to true a wheel - building one's a lofty aspiration Chad!

    BTW - With CBro's helpful donation, the track area will be getting a new look and function. Skillz.

  2. #2
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    Any wheel builders out there?

    So, I have been toying with the idea of learning a new hobby. Is there anyone skilled at the art of building wheels out here? Oh yah, and willing to teach it for beer? If there is anyone else interested, maybe we could organize, burn some meat on Cbro's mini-grill, drink some Natties, have some fun building some hoops and maybe finish it off on CP's pump-track?

  3. #3
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    I more or less taught myself to build wheels, with the help of Sheldon Brown's web page.

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/wheelbuild.html

    Very easy to follow instructions. We had a safety program where i worked that paid you points that could be spent as dollars with certain places. One of the choices was REI so I always spent my safety bonus on bike stuff and tools. I saved my points up for a bit and bought a Park TS-2 truing stand and a spoke tension meter. I had an old wheel and some spoke wrenches so I took the wheel apart and laced it back up following Sheldon's directions. After a couple of practices with the old wheel it was really pretty easy.

    I built up a set of wheels for a parts bike that I made a single speed out of and rode them for a while to check everything out. I never had a problem with them. After I built up a few more sets I adapted a couple of dial indicators to the truing stand. I seems to me to be much easier to get the wheels dead nuts true.

    I have built several sets now with no formal instruction and have not had any trouble with any of the wheels I built. I have 2 wheel building books now and a wheel building CD. They are good for more advanced techniques and to get a few different opinions on things, but the information on Sheldon's page is still the way I build them.

    If you don't have a truing stand make one out of an old rigid fork and a dial indicator. Get an old wheel to learn with go for it.
    I'm not very smart, but I can lift heavy things

  4. #4
    King of the Barneys
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    Quote Originally Posted by k2cruiser72
    So, I have been toying with the idea of learning a new hobby. Is there anyone skilled at the art of building wheels out here? Oh yah, and willing to teach it for beer? If there is anyone else interested, maybe we could organize, burn some meat on Cbro's mini-grill, drink some Natties, have some fun building some hoops and maybe finish it off on CP's pump-track?
    I'm in for the bbq & the brews. Parker can bring the hamburger...after his bizarre and unlikely crash today he has some.... ouch!

    CDB
    May your trails be narrow, crooked, lonesome and dangerous, leading to the most outrageous adventures. Paladin

  5. #5
    rbtm member
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    If you have even a small amount mechanical skill and can get past the FUD, building them yourself is easy. Be sure to take advantage of the "Wheel and Tire" forum if you have any questions.

    Here's another useful resource:
    http://miketechinfo.com/new-tech-wheels-tires.htm
    "The mouth of justice contemplates wisdom."

  6. #6
    TERVOR THE GREAT
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    Quote Originally Posted by k2cruiser72
    Is there anyone skilled at the art of building wheels out here? Oh yah, and willing to teach it for beer?
    Ooooh, pick me!

    Really though it's super simple if you've got a truing stand. Said truing stand can be your frame and/or your fork utilizing a zip tie if you're not in the mood to buy one...

    One spoke will pull the rim one way and one will pull it the other...

    If you're building a rim you've simply gotta get the rim laced up real loose and take your time getting it tight and true.
    I am become death, the destroyer of worlds.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
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    wow duh, of course it makes sense to try with an old wheel. Now, I'm going to have to pull apart one of my old Ritchie/Deore DX wheels and try! I"ll watch for a session and see if I can get away from family duties...
    Oh sh!+ just force upgraded to cat1. Now what?
    Best thing about an ultra marathon? I just get to ride my bike for X hours!

  8. #8
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    Like 11 Bravo said....

    The sheldon brown website is perfect. This is how I learned. The best way to go about it is to print the article up. Read it twice. Get all materials needed. Take your time and play. I think the secret is taking your time and not trying to cut corners. Your first wheelset will be your slowest. Who cares. Just enjoy doing it and doing it right. Once you do it it is a liberating feeling that you can do it yourself and are no longer reiliant on others to fix things for you. It reallly is not much cheaper to build wheels yourself but I prefer doing it.

  9. #9
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    Here are a couple of other websites that will help you on your wheelbuilding quest.

    Spoke length calculator. Download the expanded spreadsheet and read the instructions
    http://www.damonrinard.com/spocalc.htm

    MikeT. over on the "Wheel and Tire" page does a great job of explaining how to stress relieve spokes. If you have more wheelbuilding questions, try posting them over on the "wheelbuilding" page. There are some real pros over there.

    http://miketechinfo.com/new-tech-wheels-tires.htm

    If you can find it, "The Bicycle Wheel" by Jobst Brandt is a great book on building wheels and gives more info than one may want.

    Go slow and enjoy!

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