Aid IMBA’s Work to Keep Trails Open in Idaho- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Aid IMBA’s Work to Keep Trails Open in Idaho

    Found this post date: Fri, 2010-10-01 12:00

    IMBA has been hard at work with U.S. Congressmen Mike Simpson (R- ID) and U.S. Senator Mike Crapo (R-ID) since the early workings of the Wilderness bill that is now H.R 2514 and S 3294: Central Idaho Economic Development and Recreation Act. This bill would designate Wilderness in the Boulder-White Clouds Mountains in central Idaho and the Sawtooth Recreation Area in the southwest corner of the state. As stewards of the public lands we love it is important that mountain bicyclists sign on our support for protection that preserve these wild areas for other forms of recreation and for the enjoyment of future generations. However, since federal agencies have defined Wilderness to exclude bicycles, we can not support Wilderness for areas with important trails.

    Both of these areas are home to unique and beautiful singletrack. Two trails of particular concern are the Fourth of July and Ants Basin trails, for which IMBA is asking that both non-wilderness corridors and companion designations be used to protect the wild nature of the land in balance with the continued use of these trails by cyclists. IMBA is a champion of companion designations, such as National Protection Areas, National Scenic Areas, National Conservation Areas or Wild & Scenic River designations. Companion designations offer a compliment to Wilderness to protect our public lands and do not restrict bicycle access.

    Call to Action!


    IMBA needs you to weigh in! Please send Rep. Simpson and Senator Crapo your stories about why you care or send a letter asking them to keep open the Fourth of July and Ants Basin Trails.

    Sign IMBA's petition to keep the 4th of July and Ants Basin trails open to mountain bikes in H.R. 2514.


    And the Rest Here: http://www.imba.com/pli/ciedra

  2. #2
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    Thanks Harley, for all you do.
    May your trails be narrow, crooked, lonesome and dangerous, leading to the most outrageous adventures. Paladin

  3. #3
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    Harley, I think this bill is dead now. After Labrador got elected Simpson decided it might be time to throw in the towel. No official announcement but that is the rumor.
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  4. #4
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    Chris, you heard that rumor where? From whom? I mean, I wouldn't be terribly upset if it were true, but I cannot possibly see Simpson, Crapo, the ICL and TWS giving up that easily.

  5. #5
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    Zombie legislation-The dawn of the un-dead bill that eats the brains of the living to keep un-living on and on and on sucking the life out of the public...


  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Earthpig
    Chris, you heard that rumor where? From whom? I mean, I wouldn't be terribly upset if it were true, but I cannot possibly see Simpson, Crapo, the ICL and TWS giving up that easily.
    Well at the last republican convention Simpson was not very well received and they even passed a resolution opposing CIEDRA. Since then Crapo has distanced himself from the bill and then with the election Labrador this means that support for the bill has dwindled down to just Simpson among the delegation and the Governor. So from a little bridy he is rumored to have lost interest in CIEDRA. It is not going anywhere this year and I don't see it being reintroduced next year in the Senate.
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  7. #7
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    I am new to Mt biking, but I have been an avid off road motorcyclist for over 25 years. All I can say is "welcome to the battle". I do not like to see ANY land locked up from multiple use. I think a fence makes a bad land manager. We have battled land lockups for 20+ years all over Idaho. The Mt bike community felt they were immune so they never offered any help, actually quite the opposite, they supported us getting locked out of more and more lands. Now you see that those practices have backfired. There coming after you now. (By "you" I mean all of us, I pedal as well)

    I urge you to look at supporting groups like The Blue Ridge Coalition that is all about managing lands for all users rather than locking it up with Wilderness designation. They do a good job of getting all users around the same table to work out issues and come to compromises that keep the lands open.

  8. #8
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    Blue Ribbon Coalition. good org.
    I don't know what trail we're on, but at least it's getting dark

  9. #9
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    Porschescum,
    What motorized groups and wilderness groups have never realized and admitted.....Bicycling is distinctly different, always has been. This needs to be quantified, recognized and understood for what it is. We don't fit either mold. And our closure situations are almost the same as motorized. That doesn't mean that we like to ride only on shared motorized multiple use trails all of the time. It means that we are getting shut out of areas that have been non-motorized for a long long time. It means that we are jointly getting shut out of shared use areas.

    Bicyclist power source is quiet and weak. But we are stealth. Bikers are extremely diverse.

    But motorized users are saying I told you so, join us. Sure maybe, but recognize that we are different. We cannot and generally will not ever be the same as motorbikes.

    FYI. I work regularly with motorized, horsemen, bikers, and these pesky wilderness types. I fit in well with most groups. I resent being told that I must join anything else that doesn't understand bicyclists, that only wants to sit back and complain.
    I don't know what trail we're on, but at least it's getting dark

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by GregB406
    Porschescum,
    What motorized groups and wilderness groups have never realized and admitted.....Bicycling is distinctly different, always has been. This needs to be quantified, recognized and understood for what it is. We don't fit either mold. And our closure situations are almost the same as motorized. That doesn't mean that we like to ride only on shared motorized multiple use trails all of the time. It means that we are getting shut out of areas that have been non-motorized for a long long time. It means that we are jointly getting shut out of shared use areas.

    Bicyclist power source is quiet and weak. But we are stealth. Bikers are extremely diverse.

    But motorized users are saying I told you so, join us. Sure maybe, but recognize that we are different. We cannot and generally will not ever be the same as motorbikes.

    FYI. I work regularly with motorized, horsemen, bikers, and these pesky wilderness types. I fit in well with most groups. I resent being told that I must join anything else that doesn't understand bicyclists, that only wants to sit back and complain.
    While the groups are different, they are also remarkably similar. I will never try and tell you that bikes do more damage than MCs, but to say that they have no impact is also irresponsible. (I'm not saying that you said that, just a point). Actually, from my years in the back country, horses do more damage than both cycles and MCs combined.

    The point I am trying to make is that MC groups created many (most?) of the trails that you use. We built them, we maintained them, and now are locked out of those very trails you still ride. (like the Boise foothills). For many years we fought the government to keep the trails open to us with ZERO help from the mountain bike community. Quite the opposite, actually, most MTB groups fought to get us locked out of the very trail networks we created. We maintained the trails. We were the ones with Polanski's, shovel's and chainsaws strapped to our bikes doing trail maintenance as MT bikers rode by and sneered at us for being there.

    Ultimately, we got banned from those trails we built to the joy of hikers and MTB riders. Now you find yourself in the same position we were in.

    Let me state that I do not believe all trails should be open to all users. I actually have no problem that the lower trails in the foothills are bike/ped only. I think a good trail network for MTBs close to town are a good thing. The problem lies in the fact that the hard core enviro groups will not stop until every trail is closed to all mechanical users, and that means us at MTBers as well. The sooner you accept that and do something about it the sooner we can all work together to protect the trails. Just screaming "but we are different" will fall on deaf ears and those groups will not stop until we are all locked out.

    I am simply trying to educate you before it is too late. The issues I am seeing being raised in the MTB community, as short as I have been involved in it, are the exact same issues I saw in the motorized community many years ago. I saw how those battles resulted and are continuing to result and just do not want to see the same thing in the MTB community.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Porschescum
    We were the ones with Polanski's...

    I am simply trying to educate you before it is too late. The issues I am seeing being raised in the MTB community, as short as I have been involved in it, are the exact same issues I saw in the motorized community many years ago. I saw how those battles resulted and are continuing to result and just do not want to see the same thing in the MTB community.
    Roman Polanski can cut a mean trail. Just sayin.

    I think there are some posters (smilycook, Visicypher and Irishbuddha come to mind) here who are VERY knowledgeable of the issues and have worked with motorized groups for years on these access issues.

    As for "exact same battles," yes, it is access "battles." But, I'm with GregB - the issues are not the same and it's time for mountain bikers to gain a voice and start uniting around the singular issue of separating mountain bikes from both hikers and motorized groups. We do stand in a very unique place vis-a-vis our preferred use, while in an identical place with the motos when it comes to certain access issues (such as "capital W" Wilderness.)

    Unfortunately, unlike the hikers and motos, the mountain bikers usually get split into two camps because a lot of mountain bikers (ie, you) are also motorized users, while a lot of other mountain bikers are also "hard core enviros." Until and unless we mountain bikers focus on the real issue and root cause of the problem - the mis-classification of mountain biking as inconsistent with Wilderness designation and associated anti-mountain biking bias of groups like ICL and TWS - we're going nowhere and yes, will be ignored.

    Fighting every single land parcel battle is a short term solution, but the long term goal is achieving re-classification of mountain biking as a compatible use. And that's going to take the moto/mountain bikers and the enviro/mountain bikers to compromise in the middle - where a lot of mountain bikers are now.

    Simply put - bikes do belong.

  12. #12
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    Thanks guys for keeping us updated on the (non) progress of CIEDRA. I remember thinking about it in those "bad outcomes can have good outcomes" times when Minnick lost his seat to Labrador.

    Also glad to see Greg from MT weighing in- they have been in some ugly fights up there and not come out on top- we have lost some gorgeous biking up there.

    We gotta make sure that the Lionhead area (CDT- just west of West Yellowstone) doesn't go non-motorized. Make some noise- make a stink.

    Great skiing these days, but still thinking about biking- what a great season. Hope some of you can come over to the east side for the Wydaho Rendezvous (http://www.tetonmountainbikefest.tvtap.org/

  13. #13
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    the land belongs to the people, not the federal gov't. 63% of Idaho is federal land. Of course the feds prefer infighting to take away the main issue at hand, the feds want more control.
    The Blue Ribbon Coalition, Sahara Club and a few other organizations have been trying to educate people about keeping our land open for everybody. As far as this place or that place and is it going to affect you, most of the time the typical response is we only lost
    this trail or we still have some of the area open. People are missing the big picture,
    the fed is slowly taking land away since 1974. Until all users unity and stand up against
    the fed gov;t, not much will change. At least the Tea Party has a backbone, unlike
    most of the rest of the status quot who would rather complain than do something.
    So take a few minutes a week and call our state representatives and tell them no
    to any land closures or send an e-mail or write a letter. So few people actually write
    letters that one letter as per a 2008 special interest organization, says that the letter
    is counted as a representation of 801 constituents.
    The Great Illusion: Trading Liberty For Security

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by homemadesalsa
    We gotta make sure that the Lionhead area (CDT- just west of West Yellowstone) doesn't go non-motorized. Make some noise- make a stink.

    ]
    The Lionhead trails are the most endangered in Montana. The area is a recommended wilderness and is on the verge of being closed. The MWA is also lobbying the Hebgen Lake Ranger District of the Gallatin N.F. to close the area. They presently are pushing a plan that would create a wilderness in both Idaho and Montana, with perhaps a corridor for the CDT.
    This last summer the riding use multiplied in Lionhead by several times. I think partially it was due to riders becoming aware that the trails there offer some alpine experience. But I think that those riders from Bozeman and Big Sky that have been frustrated by the closure of the Gallatin Crest are displaced to other locations, and last summer they gravitated to Lionhead. People love the big loop, a 8 to 10 hour ride.
    Give the ranger district a call and visit with the new district ranger. He seems to be very open to communication. 406-823-6961
    I don't know what trail we're on, but at least it's getting dark

  15. #15
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    the whole region one thing is a sham. remeber alot of idaho is region one.
    The clearwater scares me. that place is an awesome, remote, go play hard type of place. The wilderness people have been after it for years. I would like to see it stay the same.

    I have also heard that ciedra is dying.

    tim

  16. #16
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    Give the ranger district a call and visit with the new district ranger. He seems to be very open to communication. 406-823-6961[/QUOTE]


    Thanks Greg. Will do that when I get back home. A real phone call or handwritten note from a constituent means a lot these days. And we (from Driggs) were some of the new users this year, not because we got shut out, but because we got turned on to them, maybe even from the internet.

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