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  1. #1
    Guesswho117
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    What Pressure are you Running in your Rp23?

    How much do you weigh in pounds and what pressure do you run in your RP23 on your Mojo? So I was reading another post and saw a few people who were approx. 220 lbs saying they run 225-240 psi. Wow that seems like a whole lot to me. I'm currently running 130 psi and I weigh 185 without gear. I feel this is perfect for me.

  2. #2
    Ride More Work Less
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    188 with gear, 165psi on a medium tune 2008 RP23. I would not ride at 130psi on my SL as I would sit too low, blow through the travel, etc.

  3. #3
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    Wow that seems low. I'm about your weight and I run around 170 psi. This gives me 13 to 14 mm of sag.

    Seems like you would have too much sag running 130 psi?

  4. #4
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    I'm 150lbs geared up and have 130psi in a 2009 RPL, which uses the same psi setting as the RP23 and all float series rear shocks. For the Mojo, Mojo SL and any 5.5 inch rear travel bike with a fox float series shock, you should have 12-14mm of sag or 20psi less than what you weigh all geared up. Anymore than 15mm of sag and you might bottom out. You should deflate your rear shock of all it's air so you can completely compress the shock and measure the distance from the seal to the the middle of the rubber o-ring to get an acurate travel measurement. After you get the actual travel length, pump up your shock to 20-25% of your travel(20% for XC and 25% for all mountain plushness). All rear shocks have different actual travel lengths compared to the claimed travel. My 2010 TALAS has 144mm of travel, but I bought the 150mm and feel sort of cheated. Oh well.

    Cheers,
    majorbonr

  5. #5
    aka dan51
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    210-220lbs w/gear and 225psi.
    I could run less for a plusher ride, but then I'd bottom it easier on jumps. If I'm doing an XC ride where there is no chance of air time I might drop the pressure to 210-215.

  6. #6
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    185lb rider with 160ish lb in the rp23 gives about 35% sag. My rp 23 is a low tune but pushed with a firmer mid stroke

  7. #7
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    I'm 185lb with riding gear on, running 175 lb in 2010 rp23, gives 20% sag.

  8. #8
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    185 lbs, run 165 psi @ 25% sag. 2007 RP23, medium tune.

  9. #9
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    I'm 165 w/ gear, and run 150 in RP23.

    The 13-14mm or 20-25% sag rules (or ~90% of you body weight w/ gear) are good starting points, but to fine tune, I like this rule: Assuming you want to maximize plushness, just pay attention to how often you bottom out. Use a zip tie or rubber o-ring to monitor during ride. Make sure you're not in propedal mode.

    If you almost never bottom out, remove air. If you bottom out constantly, add air. You should bottom out on your big hits, or else you are not maximizing plushness during normal riding.

  10. #10
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    I'm 160ish w/ gear and run 140 psi, med tune, PUSHed, RP23, I never bottom out but my rubber o-ring is as far on the bottom as it could get without falling off.

  11. #11
    Guesswho117
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    Well definitely I am on low side compare to everyone else when it comes to psi. Initially when I first bought the bike, the guy at the shop set me up according to the sag rules which was about 170 if I recall correctly. To me, 170 was like riding a hardtail. I found this to be too harsh and I fine tuned it to my liking which brought me down to 130 for maximum plushness. If you guys all recall, many people complained about not being able to get the full travel out of their shocks or forks. My belief was they had too much air. Currently my O ring is at the very bottom and it hasn't fallen off yet. I don't get insane air but I do ride very aggressive. Thank you to everyone for your inputs. I will tinker around with a higher pressure and see how it goes.

  12. #12
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    How much sag are you getting with 130 psi? And what is the factory tune of your RP23?

  13. #13
    Guesswho117
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neldar
    How much sag are you getting with 130 psi? And what is the factory tune of your RP23?
    20 mm with gear on and it's a low tune. I just pump it up to 150 psi and measured 14 mm of sag but it sure feels harsh. I'll be taking it out in a few days to see how it feels on the trail.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guesswho117
    Well definitely I am on low side compare to everyone else when it comes to psi. Initially when I first bought the bike, the guy at the shop set me up according to the sag rules which was about 170 if I recall correctly. To me, 170 was like riding a hardtail. I found this to be too harsh and I fine tuned it to my liking which brought me down to 130 for maximum plushness. If you guys all recall, many people complained about not being able to get the full travel out of their shocks or forks. My belief was they had too much air. Currently my O ring is at the very bottom and it hasn't fallen off yet. I don't get insane air but I do ride very aggressive. Thank you to everyone for your inputs. I will tinker around with a higher pressure and see how it goes.

    The RP23 that comes with the mojo has a stroke of 2 inches and the shock body is 2.25 inches long. So the O ring will be approximately 0.25 inches from the end of the shock body when you have used the full travel. A lot of people see this and think they aren't using the full travel. Try letting all the air out of the shock and cycle it a few times while letting air out. You'll see that the O ring does not reach the end of the shock body. Running too low pressure will cause damage and premature wear. Are you sure the propedal is turned to the right when you are looking down at the bike?

    165 geared up and 152 psi.

  15. #15
    Guesswho117
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    Quote Originally Posted by mojobeer

    The RP23 that comes with the mojo has a stroke of 2 inches and the shock body is 2.25 inches long. So the O ring will be approximately 0.25 inches from the end of the shock body when you have used the full travel. A lot of people see this and think they aren't using the full travel. Try letting all the air out of the shock and cycle it a few times while letting air out. You'll see that the O ring does not reach the end of the shock body. Running too low pressure will cause damage and premature wear. Are you sure the propedal is turned to the right when you are looking down at the bike?

    165 geared up and 152 psi.
    Right before you posted this, I did what you suggested and realize what you just said about the O ring being .25 inches from the end of the shock body equals full travel. When I go out on my next ride, I will bring my shock pump and tinker some more with the pressure. Thanks.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by mojobeer

    The RP23 that comes with the mojo has a stroke of 2 inches and the shock body is 2.25 inches long. So the O ring will be approximately 0.25 inches from the end of the shock body when you have used the full travel. A lot of people see this and think they aren't using the full travel. Try letting all the air out of the shock and cycle it a few times while letting air out. You'll see that the O ring does not reach the end of the shock body. Running too low pressure will cause damage and premature wear. Are you sure the propedal is turned to the right when you are looking down at the bike?

    165 geared up and 152 psi.
    Yep, your spot on. People think they're not getting full travel if their o-ring doesn't pop off or isn't at the end of the shock body. Fox has varying build tolerances for their products so not all of one product is going to have the same travel. So it's very important that you deflate all the air out of your shock to fully compress it and measure the actual distance between the seal and the middle of the o-ring. Then adjust your sag to that measurement,.

    I dont know why Fox doesn't explain this in their owner's manuals? It should be a no brainer.

    Cheers,
    majorbonr

  17. #17
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    I think you should consider pushing your shock if you are running 130. I am about the same weight and when I got down to that pressure there were the bike was plush but I found other ride issues to do with the light mid stroke. In short you are doing exactly what I did. Lower the pressure until it is supple over the small bumps but this ends up being way too soft in other areas where you want the back to hold you up. It was a no brainer to get it pushed for me and allowed me to run closer to the 90% level than I had been without being too firm

  18. #18
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    I am 185-190 and run 155 lb on my 2007 standard 23. I don't use pro pedal. I use all my travel all the time, but almost never feel I bottom out harshly. I have used up to 165, but there is no benefit for the added harshness. Oddly I have never had more than 10mm sag.

  19. #19
    Guesswho117
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    So two weeks of testing with different pressures in different terrains from JMP, Skeggs to Tahoe, I concluded that 160 psi in my low tuned RP23 works great. Thank you to everyone for their inputs.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by nzl62
    185lb rider with 160ish lb in the rp23 gives about 35% sag. My rp 23 is a low tune but pushed with a firmer mid stroke
    exact same here

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by majorbonr
    For the Mojo, Mojo SL and any 5.5 inch rear travel bike with a fox float series shock, you should have 12-14mm of sag or 20psi less than what you weigh all geared up. Anymore than 15mm of sag and you might bottom out. You should deflate your rear shock of all it's air so you can completely compress the shock and measure the distance from the seal to the the middle of the rubber o-ring to get an acurate travel measurement. After you get the actual travel length, pump up your shock to 20-25% of your travel(20% for XC and 25% for all mountain plushness).
    Many MTBR posters have claimed that 30% sag is best for the Mojo. See http://tinyurl.com/yz59wel

    What is the number of mm of sag if you are doing 30% sag?

    Thanks.
    Mark

  22. #22
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    I"m runnign about 160 PSI and weigh 180 as noted above, and I have a Push'd shock. I found this to be a great pressure as it really makes the bike plush yet it still pedals great. The only downfall is that it bottoms kinda easily on drops to flat. Today I hit a 3 foot drop to flat (an honest 3 feet) and it bottomed pretty hard each time I hit it, 3 times in a row, each time the tire buzzed the seat tube. So if you plan on doing anything like that you might wanna bump the PSI up 10.

  23. #23
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    My Rpl stroke length is 51.4mm completely compressed, and 30% of that is 15.4. You should let out all the air in your rear shock and fully compress it to find out your true stroke length. Then multiply that length by .30 to get your 30% sag. Measure the distance from the rubber seal to o-ring.

    Best sag is what best suits your riding style. I ride about 30% sag and once in awhile, I pop off the o-ring. Constantly bottoming out suspension will damage it. So if you ride 30% sag and only bottom out ocassionally, it's not too bad. If your constantly bottoming out at 30% sag, then you should probaby try less until you find that "ocassional bottom out" sweet spot.

    I'm no pro rider or anything, just passing along my experiences and advice from people who have passed down knowledge to me. Hope that helps and good luck!

    Cheers,
    majorbonr

    Cheers

    Quote Originally Posted by moshemark
    Many MTBR posters have claimed that 30% sag is best for the Mojo. See http://tinyurl.com/yz59wel

    What is the number of mm of sag if you are doing 30% sag?

    Thanks.
    Mark

  24. #24
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    I ride with...

    140 psi in a low compression tune RP23. I weigh 170 lbs, and I never bottom it out, I have a little travel left for when I make an error, or take a really big hit. This pressure results in right about 30% sag, and the bike is very plush.. Position on the bike will affect sag as well (weight bias)-because I run the Minute Absolute MRD 130, and I have a low bar position and 110 mm stem, and a zero offset seatpost, I have a fairly forward weight bias. The forward weight bias will result in less sag in comparison with a rider of similar weight using a 140 mm fork and shorter/higher stem-bar position.

  25. #25
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    I weigh about 185 and I run about 160 psi.

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