Too early to talk about the Mojo 4?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Too early to talk about the Mojo 4?

    Well someone had to do it since it's next

    76 degree seat
    65.1 degree HT

    this seems so easy maybe we should just discuss colors.

  2. #2
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    Color me skeptical. Not sure it gets made. I think the market for short-travel 27.5 is pretty limited now, 29ers are ruling that space.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrewBird View Post
    Color me skeptical. Not sure it gets made. I think the market for short-travel 27.5 is pretty limited now, 29ers are ruling that space.
    I still think there's a place for them. The girl I ride with likes her mojo 3 and thinks my Ripmo's tires are too big. Also we have a friend she's 5-10 and getting her first mountain bike and she is leaning towards a 5010 because of the easier to handle 27.5" wheels.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrewBird View Post
    I think the market for short-travel 27.5 is pretty limited now, 29ers are ruling that space.
    There might be less demand, but still a demand.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dale-Calgary View Post
    I still think there's a place for them. The girl I ride with likes her mojo 3 and thinks my Ripmo's tires are too big. Also we have a friend she's 5-10 and getting her first mountain bike and she is leaning towards a 5010 because of the easier to handle 27.5" wheels.
    I just went through this with a friend of mine who is getting his first bike.
    He did a good job and demo'd several bikes in a wide range and he came up with a mid travel 27.5. He wanted to buy used so got a 5010, but wanted a M3. They have similar travel numbers.

    Personally I say take the HD3 frame, and paint it a new color and call it a Mojo4.
    140 rear, 150 front. I'd get rid of my HD4 in favor of that. No way am I going Hd5 route. It's too "enduro bro" for me.

  5. #5
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    I'm 5'5" M3 owner. I've test rode Ripmo, Ripley V4, SB100, SB150 all 29er. I'm still not convinced on 29er as the one tire size to rule them all.

    There is demand for 27.5 out there, maybe not as hyped as 29 right now.

    That said, I feel 66HTA would be better all-around for handling. SB150 64.5HTA felt pretty floppy and wandering to me on climbs.

  6. #6
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    Well frames look like they are getting blown out for cheap online so something is coming.

    Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk

  7. #7
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    I have been riding for 25 years and my Mojo3 with 2.8 tires is perfect for me. The HD3 is not the same bike. I had one. The Mojo3 is lighter and more playful. Yes I am 64 years old and have wrist arthritis. I do not look for big drops. But I ride Sedona rocky trails and could not be happier. Too many people only think about the young aggressive rider. I may be past my prime but climb 2000 feet and ride almost every day. I like tight uphill turns and the extra grip the 2.8ís offer. I will be very disappointed if the Mojo3 goes away.

  8. #8
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    I agree that there is a place for this category of bike. It may not be the hottest current trend, but it nicely fits the need for a considerable chunk of riders/riding. Simply, it is a very accessible trail bike that plays well with typical riders that ride typical terrain. Skilled riders can push it like a sports car (think Miata vs Mustang).

    My guess is it will get tweaked similar to the HD5: seat/HT angle adjustments, increased reach, maybe bumped to 150mm F/140mm R. I hope they keep the subtle logo on the side. I'm growing tired of the stealth branding that has been the trend for several years. I respect Santa Cruz for just sticking their name on the side of the bike. It doesn't seem to hurt their sales.

  9. #9
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    My take:
    M4 (5?) will be the _exact_ same geometry as the HD5, but rotated forward by changing the fork to ~150mm. Expect a new set of links to drive a 140mm shock, lighter frame based on reduced layup.

    The M3 had the same geometry as the HD3 when you account for the reduced A2C.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by smoothmoose View Post
    I'm 5'5" M3 owner. I've test rode Ripmo, Ripley V4, SB100, SB150 all 29er. I'm still not convinced on 29er as the one tire size to rule them all.

    There is demand for 27.5 out there, maybe not as hyped as 29 right now.
    This. 5' 3" here and haven't found a 29er that I prefer over my 27.5 bikes. I know us short folks are a small segment, but we're still a segment.

    Look at the dual slalom bikes. I think most are still 27.5... Mitch Ropelato has dominated on his 5010. Quick turns favor the smaller wheels... if for no other reason than they're not in the way as much as you move your body to make turns.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by bizango View Post
    I agree that there is a place for this category of bike. It may not be the hottest current trend, but it nicely fits the need for a considerable chunk of riders/riding. Simply, it is a very accessible trail bike that plays well with typical riders that ride typical terrain. Skilled riders can push it like a sports car (think Miata vs Mustang).

    My guess is it will get tweaked similar to the HD5: seat/HT angle adjustments, increased reach, maybe bumped to 150mm F/140mm R. I hope they keep the subtle logo on the side. I'm growing tired of the stealth branding that has been the trend for several years. I respect Santa Cruz for just sticking their name on the side of the bike. It doesn't seem to hurt their sales.
    I have been riding an all-mountain version of the HD3 (25-26 pounds, 150 fork, 2.6/2.35, Revive drop) for five years. Eventually (maybe in 2-3 years) it might be time to change it and a Mojo 4 with the same suspension balance to the new HD5 would be very nice. Ratio is is 90%, that is 150/135 for the Mojo 4. Drop 200 grams from the frame as icing on the cake.

  12. #12
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    I would order a Mojo4 150/140, HD5 Geo, 2.8kg frame tomorrow

  13. #13
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    Any guesstimate on timing given historical releases? Iím looking at the M3 and the 5010. The one thing I donít like about the M3 is the external brake cable which I would guess is addressed in the next version.

  14. #14
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    I shopped for a bike in this category and when the 5010 v3 came out, it was the winner...and I am a big an Ibis fan and previous mojo owner. If a mojo 4 had come out when I bought, I would have likely gone that way.

    LOVE my 5010 and there is tons of love out there for these kinds of bikes (5010, mojo, spider).
    Riding: '91 Carbon Epic Stumpjumper w/a rack on the back

  15. #15
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    Yup, another shorty here at 5'7". 150/140 or even 150/130 slacker with steeper seat tube might get me away from the HD3. I love my HD3, but I wouldn't call it playful and most of my rides these days are getting to be shorter and faster as my time is more limited. I'd love to drop 1.5lbs on the frame and get a bit more pop.

    I think I'd sell the HD3 for an M4.

  16. #16
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    "If" we follow the same thought process that gave us the Ripmo and then the less travel/slackened Ripley and apply it to the HD5 and possible future slackened/less travel M4 like the OP suggests..who knows. Wow 130mm rear travel slacked out HTA...36...damn

  17. #17
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    Looking for excuses not to order an SB140. A Mojo 4 might be just the ticket...

  18. #18
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    I really want it to get fresh geometry and lose weight. There aren't many light 650b 5" trail bikes any more. However, I heard a rumor that it could become a 29" "modern XC" or "downcountry" bike. That would make more sense because that's a hot segment and apparently a light, efficient, 27.5 trailbike that's fun but can do an occasional XC race is something only my customers are asking for.
    I built a $9,800 24.3lb Mojo 3 for a client a couple weeks ago and I wish it was 1/2lb lighter with a longer reach and steeper seat tube.
    Keep the Country country.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dale-Calgary View Post
    I still think there's a place for them. The girl I ride with likes her mojo 3 and thinks my Ripmo's tires are too big. Also we have a friend she's 5-10 and getting her first mountain bike and she is leaning towards a 5010 because of the easier to handle 27.5" wheels.
    We sold a TON of 5010s and Furtados to women this year. There's no getting around the fact that 29s feel big to smaller people and are heavier. Living in a place with extreme altitude and long climbs many clients don't want to haul a "big bike" around and want the lightest thing they can afford.

    We have pretty much two types of customers: New to biking but but with enough experience to recognize what feels good and works for their friends or middle aged and looking to replace their 15 year old 24lb trail bike with something that feels better in every way and worse at nothing. Convincing the former to spend enough to make a 29 feel light and nimble is tough and you'll never get a 29 to out-nimble an old Mojo SL.
    Keep the Country country.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lelandjt View Post
    We sold a TON of 5010s and Furtados to women this year. There's no getting around the fact that 29s feel big to smaller people and are heavier. Living in a place with extreme altitude and long climbs many clients don't want to haul a "big bike" around and want the lightest thing they can afford.

    We have pretty much two types of customers: New to biking but but with enough experience to recognize what feels good and works for their friends or middle aged and looking to replace their 15 year old 24lb trail bike with something that feels better in every way and worse at nothing. Convincing the former to spend enough to make a 29 feel light and nimble is tough and you'll never get a 29 to out-nimble an old Mojo SL.
    Well described.

    The friend looking at the 5010 keeps asking about getting the mojo 3 and I say a new one is just about out and she will kick herself after spending 5k on it and then miss out on the steeper seat tube for climbing the new one should have. But she kinda injured her foot and didn't get on this year. I'm pointing her at the 5010 but Santa Cruz must have the worst value of any bikes out there but they are good frames.

    I'm hoping the m4 comes out before spring and then I will say take a good look at it but a m4-AF would be the ultimate choice for her. She did like the feel of the Ripley but I'd kinda like her to start on a 27.5 to make it a bit more maneuverable while she is learning. She's a smart girl and very outdoorsy and rides road bikes and can feel the difference a good frame feels like.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lelandjt View Post
    Living in a place with extreme altitude and long climbs ...
    Curious where this is? What is the typical characteristic of the downhills? I agree that what we ride the most (not what we want to ride the most), is the best guide to what we should get, and it may not match what we read about on the bike sites. Sometimes I get to thinking I need a more enduro leaning bike, but remind myself that even though it would be better on that chunky trail that just beat me up, I don't race enduro and most of my riding doesn't involve super chunky trails (though I like them on occasion). When I'm on tight, twisty, naturally flowy trails, my M3 shines and I'm in love all over again. Anyway, it is reassuring to hear that it sounds like you are getting people on bikes that are well suited to them and the riding they will do.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by bizango View Post
    Curious where this is? What is the typical characteristic of the downhills? I agree that what we ride the most (not what we want to ride the most), is the best guide to what we should get, and it may not match what we read about on the bike sites. Sometimes I get to thinking I need a more enduro leaning bike, but remind myself that even though it would be better on that chunky trail that just beat me up, I don't race enduro and most of my riding doesn't involve super chunky trails (though I like them on occasion). When I'm on tight, twisty, naturally flowy trails, my M3 shines and I'm in love all over again. Anyway, it is reassuring to hear that it sounds like you are getting people on bikes that are well suited to them and the riding they will do.
    Breckenridge, CO. Some of the downhills are really rough and some are tame. Some of the climbs are long and some are only kind of long, but they're all between 10,000 - 13,000ft. A lot of us spend most of our time on enduro bikes and seek out the rougher trails at speed but plenty of people go slower on those same trails and ride the smoother trails. They just need a bike that is more capable than an XC but is efficient enough to reduce the suffering on climbs. Also, you don't see many 34-35lb "reasonably priced" enduro bikes. Most people spend the money to get them down to 30-31lbs to be more climb friendly.
    Keep the Country country.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lelandjt View Post
    Breckenridge, CO. Some of the downhills are really rough and some are tame. Some of the climbs are long and some are only kind of long, but they're all between 10,000 - 13,000ft. A lot of us spend most of our time on enduro bikes and seek out the rougher trails at speed but plenty of people go slower on those same trails and ride the smoother trails. They just need a bike that is more capable than an XC but is efficient enough to reduce the suffering on climbs. Also, you don't see many 34-35lb "reasonably priced" enduro bikes. Most people spend the money to get them down to 30-31lbs to be more climb friendly.
    This is pretty much the same as here and all Rocky Mountain areas. You can build rough or flow trails on the way down easily but the constant is you need to usually climb horrible ups. I like to overbike to make sure I'm ready for most anything and have something that climbs well enough with my Ripmo. My collarbone accident happened because the bike couldn't handle the rough area on the way down I was doing so after getting better I purchased something that would have handled it better. I'm no pro and will take all the help I can get.

    The mojo 4 could be the perfect 27.5" bike for around here and the Ripley will do just fine in the hands of an experienced rider though.

  24. #24
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    I'm one of those riders that likes to have a variety of bikes in my stable. There are some trails (Sedona, Hurricane) that I prefer to ride 27.5 bikes and others (Downieville, Oregon) where I love the 29er. I'm in the market for a new 27.5 bike as I sold my Intense Tracer and Yeti SB5 within 2 weeks of each other back in August. I'm going to ride the Yeti SB140 and 27.5 Intense Primer in November so I hope the new Mojo 4 comes out by then.
    Carpe Diem!!

  25. #25
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    Your spot on. Many of us still prefer 27.5 and believe it or not many are coming back to 27.5 from 29". I also just sold my SB5 v.2 and there seems to be a gap right now in what I want. The HD5 is just a tad to much for my style riding (mostly front range colorado flow). A Mojo4 could be the perfect one bike quiver for me and so I am holding out based on some of the speculation that it is the next bike Ibis should release. Would love to see it for Christmas and if not by spring I will go ahead and get the SB140. However the Trophy Truck Tune is very appealing to me. fingers crossed.

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