Things to check on bike that could adversely affect uphill pedalling on Ripmo?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 50 of 50
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    87

    Things to check on bike that could adversely affect uphill pedalling on Ripmo?

    Interesting experience yesterday riding with a good buddy on his carbon Spesh 6fattie. We traded bikes midway up just to compare and let him check out my Ripmo. We both immediately commented that his bike felt faster uphill / less fatiguing in the same gear. I'm wondering if there are factors that could affect that other than the normal (tires, wheel weight, cassette weight, etc) because by most of the variables we could come up with his should be slower. For reference:

    Tires: him Purgatory Grid 27.5x3.0 front and rear - 1100gr each. Me DHF 2.5f, Aggressor 2.3r - 1050 and 900gr I believe (advantage me I would think)
    Drivetrain: him GX Eagle with 32/34 oval, me GX cassette and crank with NX shifter and derailleur, 32t GX chainring (should be a wash)
    Him 175 crank, me 170 crank both GX eagle (mine lighter, his more leverage?)
    Pulled the chain off and both cranks seem to spin with about the same freedom - mine may have had a TINY bit more resistance.
    Wheels: both DT swiss XM rims (his are 40mm internal, mine are 30f, 25r) similar hubs (Hope for him, DT350 for me) so I think wheels are close to a wash or an advantage for me.

    Anyway, we both found it odd that his heavy / beefy tire setup with similar drivetrain felt easier to pedal uphill, especially given the efficiency of my suspension.

    Could it be shifting adjustment affecting resistance in the upper gears? I don't hear any grinding. Maybe it just is what it is, but figured I'd see if there was anything else to check to see if mine could be improved.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: simenf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    734
    Fork and damper setup is crucial.

    Wrong sag and everything feels wrong. Too much sag at the back and the whole bike feels soggy and unresponsive while climbing. This is especially true for DW-links in my experience. 25% sag?

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    443
    Brakes not rubbing I assume? You mentioned he's running 175s with an oval and you're running 170s with a round chainring...that alone can definitely have an effect on steep climbs IMO, especially depending on the mechanics of your pedal stroke.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: LyNx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    23,899
    When you say easier, do you mean the gearing feels easier to pedal in the same cog, i.e. the 50t cog on both bikes? If so, then of course his would feel easier, his tyres are smaller than yours by a decent amount, about 1/2-3/4" diameter.

    If you don't mean that, then geometry. No matter all the marketing BS in the world, you don't get anything for free, so that descending prowess you love, you pay for that on the climbs. That BS about steep STA making it a good climber, is exactly that. it's a good climber compared to other bikes with similar geo and travel, but compared to a bike with a steeper HTA and less stretched out WB etc, none.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    87
    Quote Originally Posted by simenf View Post
    Fork and damper setup is crucial.

    Wrong sag and everything feels wrong. Too much sag at the back and the whole bike feels soggy and unresponsive while climbing. This is especially true for DW-links in my experience. 25% sag?
    I'll take a look but yeah sag in the DVO Topaz is about 25% - rear is plenty firm it seems. I'm on an MRP Ribbon coil fork and it's on the soft spring - I'm about 170lbs. Doesn't sag very much and seems to be about right for me.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    87
    Quote Originally Posted by matt.s67 View Post
    Brakes not rubbing I assume? You mentioned he's running 175s with an oval and you're running 170s with a round chainring...that alone can definitely have an effect on steep climbs IMO, especially depending on the mechanics of your pedal stroke.
    Checking the brakes now, but I don't think there's any drag. I do know that the rear brake is not braking much at all right now. Full lever pull and I can't even lock up the tire. I think there's some contamination on the rotor - going to put a new one on, scuff the pads and try to re-bed them now. Good thing to check though!

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    87
    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    When you say easier, do you mean the gearing feels easier to pedal in the same cog, i.e. the 50t cog on both bikes? If so, then of course his would feel easier, his tyres are smaller than yours by a decent amount, about 1/2-3/4" diameter.

    If you don't mean that, then geometry. No matter all the marketing BS in the world, you don't get anything for free, so that descending prowess you love, you pay for that on the climbs. That BS about steep STA making it a good climber, is exactly that. it's a good climber compared to other bikes with similar geo and travel, but compared to a bike with a steeper HTA and less stretched out WB etc, none.
    Yes, gearing feels easier in the same cog. You think just the diameter makes that much of a difference? Wouldn't the heavier wheels and heavy tires also be a factor in that?

    One interesting thing he and I were just talking about is that when he got his 6fattie, another guy who worked at the shop he was at got the Specialized Enduro. Same build, similar geometry, different wheel size and he said his was noticeably easier to pedal than that Enduro as well. Maybe there's just something about the 6 fattie geometry / suspension that works well.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: redmr2_man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    5,169
    I'd bet money it's the 170s, purgatory grid 3.0's are tanks.

    Why you running grom cranks?

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    185
    Bearings? I have had bad wheel and free hub bearings that make things draggy.

    I don’t know his tires but the dhf and aggressor are pretty draggy (I run them).

  10. #10
    Too Much Fun
    Reputation: benja55's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    2,301
    Strictly IMO, but when I ride with shorter cranks it often feels like things take a bit more effort (because... physics! ). Not sure this is the case with you guys... but that's my experience.
    - -benja- -

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    149
    Gotta calculate gear inches (taking account tire diameter), and then factor in your lever arm difference (crank arm length). Once you get those, the results will probably be pretty telling.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: LyNx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    23,899
    One other thing to take into account is tyre compound, if you're running the 3C MaxxTerra compound on your Maxxis tyres vs the regular compound on the Purgatories, the Maxxis compound rolls a lot slower. Also, don't fool yourself and think just because tyres are wider, that they roll slower.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    88
    How about tire pressures? What surface were you riding on?

  14. #14
    Shortcutting Hikabiker
    Reputation: Acme54321's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    3,185
    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    One other thing to take into account is tyre compound, if you're running the 3C MaxxTerra compound on your Maxxis tyres vs the regular compound on the Purgatories, the Maxxis compound rolls a lot slower. Also, don't fool yourself and think just because tyres are wider, that they roll slower.
    Good points here. Tire compound and tread pattern can make a huge difference. The 2.5 DHF/Agressor is a slow combo and IMO overkill for most riders.

    Even though the 29er tires of the OP are lighter they are farther from the axis of rotation so rotational intertia could actually be higher than the 27.5 bike with heavier tires.

    If you want that Ripmo to roll faster lighten up the tires and go with something that rolls faster. I run a 2.4WT or 2.3 DHR up front (can't tell much of a difference, 2.3 is lighter), same cornering lugs as DHF but much shorter centers so it rolls faster. Out back I usually run a 2.35 Forekaster or Ikon depending on the trail conditions. Now I don't run this combo on a Ripmo but if I had one I probably would.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    87
    Quote Originally Posted by redmr2_man View Post
    I'd bet money it's the 170s, purgatory grid 3.0's are tanks.

    Why you running grom cranks?
    Grom cranks? I'm not sure what that means. I went 170 because I wanted fewer pedal strikes and had read some stuff saying they could be as, or more efficient than 175s. Although having had both now I do believe I probably like the 175 length a bit better.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    87
    Quote Originally Posted by lubb1 View Post
    How about tire pressures? What surface were you riding on?
    Just normal hardpack single track trails, moderate uphill climbs.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    87
    Quote Originally Posted by Acme54321 View Post
    Good points here. Tire compound and tread pattern can make a huge difference. The 2.5 DHF/Agressor is a slow combo and IMO overkill for most riders.

    Even though the 29er tires of the OP are lighter they are farther from the axis of rotation so rotational intertia could actually be higher than the 27.5 bike with heavier tires.

    If you want that Ripmo to roll faster lighten up the tires and go with something that rolls faster. I run a 2.4WT or 2.3 DHR up front (can't tell much of a difference, 2.3 is lighter), same cornering lugs as DHF but much shorter centers so it rolls faster. Out back I usually run a 2.35 Forekaster or Ikon depending on the trail conditions. Now I don't run this combo on a Ripmo but if I had one I probably would.
    There is no doubt tires could be part of it. I may try something lighter. I'm a pretty intermediate rider but getting faster, although I ride Colorado mountains and Phoenix area which is all rocks, so I at least want a strong sidewall. I may try some of the Specialized tires or go slightly less aggressive Maxxis next time and see if that lightens it up.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    87
    With regard to the hub not being as free as it could be, when you lift up your rear tire and give it a good "The Price is Right giant wheel spin, about how long will your rear tire free wheel? I suppose I can compare it to my front wheel. I'll try that tomorrow. They are almost brand new DT350s

  19. #19
    Shortcutting Hikabiker
    Reputation: Acme54321's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    3,185
    Quote Originally Posted by Tronner View Post
    With regard to the hub not being as free as it could be, when you lift up your rear tire and give it a good "The Price is Right giant wheel spin, about how long will your rear tire free wheel? I suppose I can compare it to my front wheel. I'll try that tomorrow. They are almost brand new DT350s
    The problem is not your hub. A rear won't spin as long as the front wheel because of drag from the freehub.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    87
    Quote Originally Posted by Acme54321 View Post
    The problem is not your hub. A rear won't spin as long as the front wheel because of drag from the freehub.
    Ah yeah, should have thought of that. But comparing to others' free hub spin might let me know if there's too much drag. It definitely doesn't seem to freewheel all that long and when it starts to slow down it slows pretty fast.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    443
    I don't know how freehub drag would effect climbing, if the hub itself is engaged since you'd be pedaling...

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ReXTless's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    481
    Tire diameter - If you pedal at the same cadence, his bike will feel easier, but your bike will be going faster.

  23. #23
    More Torque
    Reputation: Diesel~'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    1,967
    Try overinflating the tires and locking out the front and rear suspension on both bikes. Then go find a pavement hill to ride them both up. That will eliminate as many variables as possible, and you can work backwards from there. Also run the gear inch calcs, taking actual wheel diameter into account, as you may find that you need to be in a different gear on one of the bikes, for the roll out per crank revolution to be the same.
    -D

    Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk

  24. #24
    Keep on Rockin...
    Reputation: Miker J's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    5,859
    Tires.

    All those tires are pretty close to the same weights. But the 3.0 is obviously a much bigger tire, so that means the casing is a lot thinner. Thinner casing tires roll a lot faster. Its why a Minion 2.6 rolls considerably faster than a Minion 2.5. The tire compound may also make a difference.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    88
    I'm not familiar with the speesh.....is it a hardtail? Wasn't sure which model it was on the speesh site. If hardtail and smoothish climb, no brainer.

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MiWi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    96
    I have a Ripmo with DHF2.5 Front and run Aggresor 2.5 Exo and Butcher 2.6 grid rear.
    And I have a 2018 Karate Monkey runnning Purg Grid 27.5x3.0 front/back.
    I can confirm most of the comments written.

    1: Gear ratio....
    The 27.5x3.0 with 15PSI sag a lot and have a leverage like a 27.5x2.5 tire ((Axle to contact patch).
    Axle to ground with a sagged tire is something in the ballpark of 345-350mm for the 27.5x3.0 and 365-370mm for most of the 29x2.4ish.
    Changes a couple of mm depending on rim width, PSI and so on. But you get the point.
    The tires alone are a leverage advantage of 95% , which is close to the difference in running a 30T or 32T chainring.

    So in the same cog you´re NOT comparing the same gearinches.

    2: The 3.0er Purg grid are heavy, but quite good rollers.
    I´ve switched the 29er Ripmo wheelset into the Karate Monkey for comparisons.
    On fireroad the 27.5 plus and the standard 29er are quite equal. On rougher ground, like when there are roots or bigger gravel pieces, the 3.0 purg are actually faster. They swallow the ground irragularities.


    The Ripmo is up with the best / fastest uphill pedalling bikes I had.
    (trailbikes mostly, no XC bikes)

    I have a 2018 Devinci Django 29, same built/same parts as my Ripmo.
    Same weight (the Django frame has alloy chainstays and is not lighter than the Ripmo)

    The Django is firmer on the suspension. Of course. Short hard pedalstrokes when riding flat trails are a bit more efficient (not much), than on the ripmo.
    But believe me or not: I´m faster on the uphills with the Ripmo and it feels less exhausting. Doesn´t matter if it´s technical uphill or fireroads.
    The steeper it gets, the better the Ripmo gets. The seat angle of teh Ripmo and the longer reach just makes it easier for me to put down the power.

    The Django doesn´t have the steep seat angle of the Ripmo. But I run the Django in the steep setting and have the saddle rails all the way forward.

    Even now with a 29x2.3 Purgatory Grid on the Django, and 29x2.6 Butcher Grid on the Ripmo, I prefer the Ripmo. Feels more efficient.
    I´m running 32T chainring and 11-46 cassette on both bikes.
    On every uphill on my hometrails I constantly run a cog one size smaller on the Ripmo.
    I´ve tryied to use the same cog on my Django a couple of times. But it just feels a bit to hard and I often find myself switching into a bigger cog on the Django than what I´m used to on the the Ripmo.


    I also had a 2018 Transition Smuggler. Same parts that are now on the ripmo. Even same shock (Topaz). Alloy version, so 2-3 pounds heavier than the Ripmo.
    The Smuggler feels like dragging an anchor behind you, compared to the Django and the Ripmo. Especially on those short/punchy pedalstrokes. Never had a bike that sucked the power out of my legs as the Smuggler did.
    Last edited by MiWi; 6 Days Ago at 01:28 AM.

  27. #27
    Co Springs
    Reputation: bachman1961's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    2,012
    Quote Originally Posted by Diesel~ View Post
    Try overinflating the tires and locking out the front and rear suspension on both bikes. Then go find a pavement hill to ride them both up. That will eliminate as many variables as possible, and you can work backwards from there. Also run the gear inch calcs, taking actual wheel diameter into account, as you may find that you need to be in a different gear on one of the bikes, for the roll out per crank revolution to be the same.
    -D

    Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
    Yes,, good points.
    Setting up two bikes to feel the same is tricky. All the soft and squishy stuff has to be tuned to feel similar, suspension/sag, tire variations, tire pressure and I'd think the starting point has to be gear inches so you have a known (comparable?) drive ratio.

    I'm not sure you'll ever get two different tires to feel similar with testing and pressure variations to play around with but that might be the last detail to pin down.


    At the end of the day, if one bike still feels the clear winner in climbing effectiveness, drop the tire psi by .25 at a time until it's a tie.
    bachman must spread some Reputation around before giving it to himself again.


  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    87
    Quote Originally Posted by Goodwoodz View Post
    I'm not familiar with the speesh.....is it a hardtail? Wasn't sure which model it was on the speesh site. If hardtail and smoothish climb, no brainer.
    It's a 140/150mm or something like that, full suspension 27.5+

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    87
    Quote Originally Posted by MiWi View Post
    I have a Ripmo with DHF2.5 Front and run Aggresor 2.5 Exo and Butcher 2.6 grid rear.
    And I have a 2018 Karate Monkey runnning Purg Grid 27.5x3.0 front/back.
    I can confirm most of the comments written.

    1: Gear ratio....
    The 27.5x3.0 with 15PSI sag a lot and have a leverage like a 27.5x2.5 tire ((Axle to contact patch).
    Axle to ground with a sagged tire is something in the ballpark of 345-350mm for the 27.5x3.0 and 365-370mm for most of the 29x2.4ish.
    Changes a couple of mm depending on rim width, PSI and so on. But you get the point.
    The tires alone are a leverage advantage of 95% , which is close to the difference in running a 30T or 32T chainring.

    So in the same cog you´re NOT comparing the same gearinches.

    2: The 3.0er Purg grid are heavy, but quite good rollers.
    I´ve switched the 29er Ripmo wheelset into the Karate Monkey for comparisons.
    On fireroad the 27.5 plus and the standard 29er are quite equal. On rougher ground, like when there are roots or bigger gravel pieces, the 3.0 purg are actually faster. They swallow the ground irragularities.


    The Ripmo is up with the best / fastest uphill pedalling bikes I had.
    (trailbikes mostly, no XC bikes)

    I have a 2018 Devinci Django 29, same built/same parts as my Ripmo.
    Same weight (the Django frame has alloy chainstays and is not lighter than the Ripmo)

    The Django is firmer on the suspension. Of course. Short hard pedalstrokes when riding flat trails are a bit more efficient (not much), than on the ripmo.
    But believe me or not: I´m faster on the uphills with the Ripmo and it feels less exhausting. Doesn´t matter if it´s technical uphill or fireroads.
    The steeper it gets, the better the Ripmo gets. The seat angle of teh Ripmo and the longer reach just makes it easier for me to put down the power.

    The Django doesn´t have the steep seat angle of the Ripmo. But I run the Django in the steep setting and have the saddle rails all the way forward.

    Even now with a 29x2.3 Purgatory Grid on the Django, and 29x2.6 Butcher Grid on the Ripmo, I prefer the Ripmo. Feels more efficient.
    I´m running 32T chainring and 11-46 cassette on both bikes.
    On every uphill on my hometrails I constantly run a cog one size smaller on the Ripmo.
    I´ve tryied to use the same cog on my Django a couple of times. But it just feels a bit to hard and I often find myself switching into a bigger cog on the Django than what I´m used to on the the Ripmo.


    I also had a 2018 Transition Smuggler. Same parts that are now on the ripmo. Even same shock (Topaz). Alloy version, so 2-3 pounds heavier than the Ripmo.
    The Smuggler feels like dragging an anchor behind you, compared to the Django and the Ripmo. Especially on those short/punchy pedalstrokes. Never had a bike that sucked the power out of my legs as the Smuggler did.
    Really interesting thoughts - thanks! I may try some different tires since I generally feel over-tired for the riding I do anyway. May try a Purg / Purg combo or a Purg / Ground Control or some other combo if anyone knows of a solid option for medium aggressive trail riding, not balls out downhill. Overall I still think the Ripmo is quite good uphill, he and I were both just surprised how much easier his felt knowing how heavy his tires are. But many of thoughts here make sense.

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation: targnik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    4,883
    Tyres? Possibly...

    More likely wheels ;-)

    Spesh bikes run 28/28...

    Think I've read somewhere, certain models even have 24 on the front >.<

    Above refers to spoke count. Less material means lighter & easier to get moving.

    I've recently upgraded my wheels. The climbs are a little harder now, but the descents are much more reassured.

    PS - burlier tyres have increased resistance also.

    'Born to ride!'
    "Mountain biking: the under-rated and drug-free antidepressant"

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ReXTless's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    481
    Quote Originally Posted by targnik View Post
    Tyres? Possibly...

    More likely wheels ;-)

    Spesh bikes run 28/28...

    Think I've read somewhere, certain models even have 24 on the front >.<

    Above refers to spoke count. Less material means lighter & easier to get moving.

    I've recently upgraded my wheels. The climbs are a little harder now, but the descents are much more reassured.

    PS - burlier tyres have increased resistance also.

    'Born to ride!'
    Spokes weigh like 5g each. I’d bet my Ripmo that 99.9% of riders would never be able to tell the difference riding a 28 vs 32-spoke wheel in a blind test.

    There’s something else going on here. FSR pedals like garbage uphill compared to DW.

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    87
    Quote Originally Posted by ReXTless View Post
    Spokes weigh like 5g each. I’d bet my Ripmo that 99.9% of riders would never be able to tell the difference riding a 28 vs 32-spoke wheel in a blind test.

    There’s something else going on here. FSR pedals like garbage uphill compared to DW.
    Yeah it was odd, and that's what I thought about the FSR as well. And my wheelset is 28H anyway. I may try some lighter tires like an XR4/XR3 combo or an Eliminator / Ground Control or Slaughter since Spesh is doing buy one, get one 50% off on tires right now.

  33. #33
    Formerly of Kent
    Reputation: Le Duke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    10,284
    Chain lube and wear? Overall cleanliness of drivetrain? That can make a surprisingly big difference.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Death from Below.

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    87
    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    Chain lube and wear? Overall cleanliness of drivetrain? That can make a surprisingly big difference.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I'll double check it but mine is a pretty low-use unit so the drivetrain is pretty clean and I definitely lubed the chain right before we rode.

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ReXTless's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    481
    Quote Originally Posted by Tronner View Post
    Yeah it was odd, and that's what I thought about the FSR as well. And my wheelset is 28H anyway. I may try some lighter tires like an XR4/XR3 combo or an Eliminator / Ground Control or Slaughter since Spesh is doing buy one, get one 50% off on tires right now.
    What brakes do you use?

    I had a Mojo 3 that was just “slow”. I felt like I was always putting out more effort than those around me. At one point, I was riding with a friend, who weighs 20 lbs less. He was out rolling me on downhills on a fat bike with 5”, super aggressive tires. At that point I knew something was wrong. Took forever to figure out, though.

    In the end, we determined the pad caliper pistons weren’t fully retracting and the pads were rubbing on the rotor. The tricky part was, it only manifested itself with full body weight on the bike. The wheel would spin totally free in the repair stand. Weight on the bike caused just enough flex between the rotor and the caliper to cause rubbing/interference.

    These were Guide RSC and SRAM replaced them under warranty. No problems since.

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    87
    Quote Originally Posted by ReXTless View Post
    What brakes do you use?

    I had a Mojo 3 that was just “slow”. I felt like I was always putting out more effort than those around me. At one point, I was riding with a friend, who weighs 20 lbs less. He was out rolling me on downhills on a fat bike with 5”, super aggressive tires. At that point I knew something was wrong. Took forever to figure out, though.

    In the end, we determined the pad caliper pistons weren’t fully retracting and the pads were rubbing on the rotor. The tricky part was, it only manifested itself with full body weight on the bike. The wheel would spin totally free in the repair stand. Weight on the bike caused just enough flex between the rotor and the caliper to cause rubbing/interference.

    These were Guide RSC and SRAM replaced them under warranty. No problems since.
    Deore XT. That's another interesting thing. When we did a "roll test" my bike rolled slightly downhill faster than his. I was definitely pulling ahead of him when just rolling. And he probably weighs a little more than me. I think the brakes are good and not dragging.

  37. #37
    Shortcutting Hikabiker
    Reputation: Acme54321's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    3,185
    If you want to climb easier get lighter/faster rolling tires, lighter wheels, and proper gearing. Quit worrying about miniscule drag from your freehub, chain, brakes, whatever. That's not the issue.

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    45
    I have a Ripmo and had been running the 2.5 DHF and Aggressor tires that came on the bike until recently switching to a Bontrager 2.4 XR3 rear and XR4 front. First ride after changing, the bike felt A LOT faster climbing and accelerating. According to Strava, my overall times on a common loop are about 7% faster after making the change and I have set a bunch of new PRs.

    Sent from my SM-G955U1 using Tapatalk

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    443
    Quote Originally Posted by tarheel03 View Post
    I have a Ripmo and had been running the 2.5 DHF and Aggressor tires that came on the bike until recently switching to a Bontrager 2.4 XR3 rear and XR4 front. First ride after changing, the bike felt A LOT faster climbing and accelerating. According to Strava, my overall times on a common loop are about 7% faster after making the change and I have set a bunch of new PRs.

    Sent from my SM-G955U1 using Tapatalk
    This is good advice. The 2.5" DHF/Aggressor feel like boat anchors compared to my Rekon/XR2 2.6"

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    87
    Quote Originally Posted by tarheel03 View Post
    I have a Ripmo and had been running the 2.5 DHF and Aggressor tires that came on the bike until recently switching to a Bontrager 2.4 XR3 rear and XR4 front. First ride after changing, the bike felt A LOT faster climbing and accelerating. According to Strava, my overall times on a common loop are about 7% faster after making the change and I have set a bunch of new PRs.

    Sent from my SM-G955U1 using Tapatalk
    That's the exact setup I am looking at, except 2.6 XR4 in front. Do you have 2.6 or 2.4" XR4 in front?

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    443
    Quote Originally Posted by Tronner View Post
    That's the exact setup I am looking at, except 2.6 XR4 in front. Do you have 2.6 or 2.4" XR4 in front?
    I just don't see the 2.6 XR4 being worth the weight. 25g more and you get a 2.6 XR5 which has a ton more grip.

    I'll be running the 2.6" Rekon 3C/EXO/TR up front with a 2.6" XR2 out back. Super compliant, fast rolling, grippy combo for XC type trails and I've never had a single puncture with this setup in over a year and 1,000+ miles. I did buy a 2.6 XR5 / 2.4 SE4 combo for mountain riding and will be selling the DHF/Aggressor that come on my bike.

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    87
    Quote Originally Posted by Acme54321 View Post
    If you want to climb easier get lighter/faster rolling tires, lighter wheels, and proper gearing. Quit worrying about miniscule drag from your freehub, chain, brakes, whatever. That's not the issue.
    I'm going to go lighter tires. The wheelset I'm on should be at or under 1800gr. The gearing, when I do the gear inch calculator compared to his bike is as follows:
    Specialized: 46t - 20.29, 50t - 18.55
    Ripmo: 46t - 20.36, 50t - 18.62

    I can't imagine those being different enough to feel. I think tires will do it.

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    87
    Quote Originally Posted by matt.s67 View Post
    I just don't see the 2.6 XR4 being worth the weight. 25g more and you get a 2.6 XR5 which has a ton more grip.

    I'll be running the 2.6" Rekon 3C/EXO/TR up front with a 2.6" XR2 out back. Super compliant, fast rolling, grippy combo for XC type trails and I've never had a single puncture with this setup in over a year and 1,000+ miles. I did buy a 2.6 XR5 / 2.4 SE4 combo for mountain riding and will be selling the DHF/Aggressor that come on my bike.
    Interesting - I have been hearing / reading so many good things about the XR4 as a front. I have to assume it rolls faster than the XR5. With similar logic, the XR5 is within 35gr of the DHF I'd be replacing as well. Should it roll quite a bit faster than the DHF?

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    443
    Not sure. I'd think they would roll pretty similarly, but rolling resistance up front isn't nearly as big of a deal as it is in the rear. If I'm going with a tire that heavy up front, it's going to have more pronounced side knobs like the XR5/DHF. If you want fast rolling and light with good grip for XC stuff, 2.6" Rekon is the way to go. ~760g and works very well when paired with a 2.6" XR2 out back which is ~745g.

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    12,806
    Quote Originally Posted by Tronner View Post
    Interesting experience yesterday riding with a good buddy on his carbon Spesh 6fattie. Anyway, we both found it odd that his heavy / beefy tire setup with similar drivetrain felt easier to pedal uphill, especially given the efficiency of my suspension.
    This is why arm chair bike engineers who tell you how a bike will ride for you based on looking at some specs online get it wrong so often. There are a lot of reasons a bike will work really well or really poorly for a specific person and it's not something easy to nail down even when you are riding the bike.

    I would start with body position and tires assuming there was nothing obviously weird going on with your bike's suspension. Tires are the number one way to change how a bike performs and body position is the other.

    I'd experiment with both as a place to start. You can use his bike as a starting point for which way to direct your experiments.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  46. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    88
    Are you able to swap wheels with him? just to for fun, rule it out

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    1,730
    There are lots of good points from people here.
    My opinion is that 29ers always feel slower than 27.5" bikes but they aren't necessarily slower.
    Furthermore you have more travel than he does and even in an efficient platform you just naturally get more transfer of weight when you pedal and it still slows you down. Most importantly though is your tires and wheels. Those tires roll slowly, and your wheels being bigger have more rotational mass Even being a similar model.
    The biggest thing you can do to improve the way your bike pedals is buy the lightest rims you can live with and buy fast tires. The tires taking precedent obviously. Good luck.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Murchman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    867
    I have been riding a 6 Fattie S-works Stumper Jumper since 2016 and everyone assumes due to the width of the tires that it pedals slow and heavy and as you found out that is not the case at all. This is one of the reasons I fell in love with the bike, climbs like a good trail bike and goes downhill like an Enduro bike. I rode a Ripmo for two weeks straight when I thought I was going to switch over to it. At the end of the test, the bike just wasn't better enough to justify the cost to buy over what I already have. Both bikes weighed in at 29lbs in XL and both have carbon wheels.

    I did upgrade the travel on the fork to 160mm from 150mm on my 6-fattie. Before buying my 6-fattie I was on a Mojo HD and my wife rides a Ripley, so I am big Ibis fan and really wanted to get back to being on an Ibis.

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Davide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,933
    Quote Originally Posted by simenf View Post
    Fork and damper setup is crucial.

    Wrong sag and everything feels wrong. Too much sag at the back and the whole bike feels soggy and unresponsive while climbing. This is especially true for DW-links in my experience. 25% sag?
    And the most important: rear shock rebound. Have it too slow and the bike will feel like is not going anywhere. Check it and or just make it faster one or two clicks!

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    45
    Quote Originally Posted by Tronner View Post
    That's the exact setup I am looking at, except 2.6 XR4 in front. Do you have 2.6 or 2.4" XR4 in front?
    The XR4 is also a 2.4.

    Sent from my SM-G955U1 using Tapatalk

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 46
    Last Post: 02-10-2019, 08:43 AM
  2. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 01-02-2019, 02:46 PM
  3. Does SAG affect pedalling efficiency?
    By mtbpri in forum Niner Bikes
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-26-2013, 07:45 PM
  4. When to stand pedalling uphill ?
    By Picard in forum XC Racing and Training
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 04-13-2005, 05:08 AM
  5. Head angle affect pedalling?
    By MaxMouse in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-22-2005, 12:33 PM

Members who have read this thread: 208

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.