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  1. #1
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    Speculation thread - new bike coming

    I might be of the mark here, but speculating is fun so here goes... Robin put up a gallery of photos from Ibis HQ where both pics of him with the bike are obscured. Last time pics like this appeared the Ripmo followed (admittedly there were more pics than just one post). If I'm right I think this could be one of 3 things:

    1. New Ripley - updated geo, possibly manufactured in the USA
    2. New downcountry bike - maybe they will use the Ripley name for this
    3. Ripmo HD/Mojo HD 29 - unlikely but I'd love to see a 29er version of the HD4 with more travel, a slacker head angle, and the more progressive suspension of the HD4


    Speculation thread - new bike coming-screen-shot-2018-12-06-8.02.44-pm.jpg

    Speculation thread - new bike coming-screen-shot-2018-12-06-8.03.05-pm.jpg

    Or maybe there's no new bike and these are just great pics of Robin
    Last edited by Creg; 6 Days Ago at 03:35 AM.

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    I did notice the same type of pictures at https://www.instagram.com/lewbuchanan/?hl=nb yesterday, but now they ar gone....

    One month before the Ripmo was released, i placed an order for an HD4, and one week ago i placed an order for a Mojo 3.... and now...?
    Typical!

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    I hope you are right, i would love to see an updated Ripley !!

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    Ripley makes the most sense. It's the last of the bikes that is in need of a refresh. I guess one could argue for the HD4, but outside of colors and maybe a tweak I doubt it.

    My guess, as well, is USA made Ripley with new geo and maybe ditching the eccentrics. Would love it to be a lighter weight if possible. Current trends would have it get slacker HA and steeper SA and not sure that is what I would want for the riding I'd want it for...putting on the miles and endurance racing. People want downhill capability and I get that, but my needs are lighter weight, stability when needed and speed over undulating terrain and climbing. With the new geo trends these days maybe they have a trick up their sleeve that gets me everything!

    Oh, and please make it TransFat Orange!!!

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    The HD4 is an damn fine machine as it is, no need for a change there

    My bet is the Ripley, but i didít expect it to appen so soon(relativily speaking) after the releace of the small... but if it is a new Ripley, i would place an order at once.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nikno View Post
    The HD4 is an damn fine machine as it is, no need for a change there

    My bet is the Ripley, but i didít expect it to appen so soon(relativily speaking) after the releace of the small... but if it is a new Ripley, i would place an order at once.
    Maybe the small stays the way it is given geometry constraints, but that is kind of a janky product mix.

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    Longer travel ripmo would be mint, 170/170

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    He does have a full face helmet on. 170mm??
    Mojo 3 and Ripley are most likey up for refresh for 2019.
    Flip chips are in fashion Pivot Firebird Santa Cruz bikes and Spot Rollik have em.
    A mojo 4 29r 27.5+ combo 120 to 130mm is achievable with a flip. That would leave room for a shorter travel downcountry that us popular.

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    What I heard for order product refresh: Hardtail (done), new Mojo 3 paint (done), Ripley refresh. My guess is Ripley refresh. Also heard slight rumor of bushing'd lower Mojo3.

  10. #10
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    Definately Ripley refresh. It is the most dated bike in the lineup in terms of geo, and it has a history of pretty frequent updates. Overdue!

    And I belive the complexity of the current eccentrics are not offering anything extra if the shortlinks and bushings are working so well as ppl say.

    Is it gonna change much? Probably keep roughly the same travel, but new geo with slacker front, steeper seattube and longer reach/overall, but not in Ripmo territory. A 20-25 mm travel step between models is probably ideal. A bit lighter with more updated manufacturing should be expected.

    Anyhow, most light trail/marathon bikes are 130/120 mm travel these days, so no need to downsize it into pure XC territory. It will still be a trailbike at heart, I hope.


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    Sounds about right there is no advantage to eccentrics. Frame weight for ripmo is listed as lighter than the Ripley on the ibis site.

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    He had a picture of some carbon molds with a holding chin hmmm emoji too

  13. #13
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    Lew just posted a shot of a performance elite fork and again no bike in shot. Looks like 27.5 minion and Saint brakes so maybe just testing a black fork on his hd4

  14. #14
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    HD4 29r. Look at the numbers of all the other bikes on the EWS.

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    Serious question, what is "downcountry bike"?

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    Quote Originally Posted by mattf View Post
    Serious question, what is "downcountry bike"?
    A cross country bike (short travel) with some downhill characteristics (mainly geometry). Basically an XC bike that doesn't mind getting a little rowdy.

  17. #17
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    Xc travel 100mm ish and with more aggressive geo like slacker HA steeper ST longer reach and more burley build.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Creg View Post
    [FONT=-apple-system][COLOR=#000000]
    1. New Ripley - updated geo, possibly manufactured in the USA
    2. New downcountry bike - maybe they will use the Ripley name for this
    3. Ripmo HD/Mojo HD 29 - unlikely but I'd love to see a 29er version of the HD4 with more travel, a slacker head angle, and the more progressive suspension of the HD4
    1. The Ripley is only a year old and while they want to "Ripmo" more bikes I don't see this happening this year.
    USA manufacturing is very limited and would not be able to support a full production run. Odd sizes and custom stuff only.

    2. The Mojo 3 is there oldest bike and most likely to be replaced. Should be much longer with a steeper STA. I expect the HTA and travel will be similar.

    3. A Ripmo HD would be a full on DH bike and that's not Ibis's style. Also HD4 is less than a year old so it's not going anywhere.

    I think Ibis has 2 best options for a new bike.
    1. 100mm race/endurance XC bike. Long, Sharp and Fast. Not a Ripley
    2 Mojo 4.

    Ibis has seen the light with the new Ripmo and all future bikes will have it's design philosophy. This is direct from Ibis.
    Making shit harder than it needs to be isn't awesome, it's just...harder.

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    Hopefully they won't make ALL their bikes with 76+* seat angles. This is great for steep ups and downs but I still prefer 74-75* for more rolling terrain, especially with shorter forks. A Ripley with 74-75* STA and 15-20mm more reach would light my fire yugely.
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  20. #20
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    I love steep STAs, even on a HT. You can get a post with an offset head, but a slack STA can't be fixed

  21. #21
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    Someone needs to explain the 'steeper STA' buzz to me.
    Does it mean a more forward position i.e the BB is further back relative to where you sit? If so, just move the seat forward.

    That said. A Ripley with a hair longer reach would do it. It's super short relative to others. The XL id more like a L.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tlechnow View Post
    A cross country bike (short travel) with some downhill characteristics (mainly geometry). Basically an XC bike that doesn't mind getting a little rowdy.
    This is the bike that would appeal to me right now as XC is where I will spend my energy next year.

    PS: please donít turn this thread into yet another theoretical STA / pedal position discussion... please.
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    Quote Originally Posted by motoguru2007 View Post
    Sounds about right there is no advantage to eccentrics. Frame weight for ripmo is listed as lighter than the Ripley on the ibis site.
    My guess is the Ripley as well to better capitalize on the latest 29er hype cycle.

    That said - I'm curious why the eccentrics don't have an advantage? I would still think links with bushings/bearings should be heavier and need more maintenance, but I maybe wrong. Maybe the Ripley carbon layup isn't as dialed as the Ripmo and thus is more heavy? Or we are saying all the extra weight is coming from the eccentrics?

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    According to Ibis wb page the Ripley frame is heavier than the Ripmo. Ripley is not very stiff compared to Ripmo.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BmanInTheD View Post
    Hopefully they won't make ALL their bikes with 76+* seat angles. This is great for steep ups and downs but I still prefer 74-75* for more rolling terrain, especially with shorter forks. A Ripley with 74-75* STA and 15-20mm more reach would light my fire yugely.
    Totally agree.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by GChuckyB View Post
    This is the bike that would appeal to me right now as XC is where I will spend my energy next year.

    PS: please donít turn this thread into yet another theoretical STA / pedal position discussion... please.
    I second this. All of their cousin companies (Santa Cruz, Pivot, Yeti) have something in this category. I realize ibis doesn't typically have as broad of a spectrum of offerings, so it is not super likely, but I'm an ibis fan and I need to replace my xc frame (it's cracked) and I'd love to stick with them, otherwise i'm probably going to end up on a Blur.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by alexbn921 View Post
    Ibis has seen the light with the new Ripmo and all future bikes will have it's design philosophy. This is direct from Ibis.
    Can you elaborate on this?...or better, did whoever you spoke with at Ibis elaborate on what that means:

    1)steeper SA, slacker HA?

    2) Open front triangle vs x-frame?

    3) pivot bushings vs bearings?

    4) no more eccentrics?

    maybe all of the above?

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by C-H View Post
    Someone needs to explain the 'steeper STA' buzz to me.
    Does it mean a more forward position i.e the BB is further back relative to where you sit? If so, just move the seat forward.

    That said. A Ripley with a hair longer reach would do it. It's super short relative to others. The XL id more like a L.
    Part of what makes the steeper STA work is the fact that the front center is long enough that you do not feel over the top of the bars and front wheel. Just moving everything cockpit related forward a bit can make the climbing work much better but having the front center longer and a longer wheelbase makes the center sweet spot bigger and more forgiving. Just my 2 cents' worth, and YMMV.

    ETA: and just to put a point on it, I have a Ripley LS and a Ripmo (just got it a couple of weeks ago). I could/should/would have waited a bit to see if a new Ripley was coming out that took the cue from the new geometry thinking from the Ripmo and put them into what I think is the perfect all-around bike, a Ripley LS with the Ripmo geometry.
    Last edited by DRSpalding; 4 Days Ago at 05:16 PM.

  29. #29
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    1)steeper SA, slacker HA?

    Steeper STA paired with longer reach. HTA is bike dependent.

    2) Open front triangle vs x-frame?

    Open was lighter and just as strong. They want weight optimized frames. If it makes sense to do it one way or the other they will.

    3) pivot bushings vs bearings?

    Yes to both. Again use the best product for the intended use. Ripmo uses a hybrid and I expect to see this on new designs.

    4) no more eccentrics?

    No Info on this.
    Making shit harder than it needs to be isn't awesome, it's just...harder.

  30. #30
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    While I think it's much more fun to consider a new frame release, the fact that it's the EWS team converging on SC suggests it might be something related to that discipline and perhaps a little less frenzy-worthy. A cushcore variant for Ibis rims? Revised HD4 or Ripmo linkage to allow for coil shock (eg: MRP's new progressive springs)? Next version of the Mor-On bars with Dynaplug integrated into the ends?**

    I'd be all over a next-gen Ripley downcountry tho .... perfect complement to my Ripmo!

    **Even if Ibis doesn't make this, someone should. And quick!!
    ***I know Sahmurai makes one... still seems room for improvement
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    edit: wrong thread

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    Thanks, if it is what you say it is, I love it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by budgie View Post
    While I think it's much more fun to consider a new frame release, the fact that it's the EWS team converging on SC suggests it might be something related to that discipline and perhaps a little less frenzy-worthy. A cushcore variant for Ibis rims? Revised HD4 or Ripmo linkage to allow for coil shock (eg: MRP's new progressive springs)? Next version of the Mor-On bars with Dynaplug integrated into the ends?**

    I'd be all over a next-gen Ripley downcountry tho .... perfect complement to my Ripmo!

    **Even if Ibis doesn't make this, someone should. And quick!!
    ***I know Sahmurai makes one... still seems room for improvement
    I'd love to see a full out 29" HD4 for those EWS people, 170/155 monster. Key would be they don't need to update the 27.5 at the same time. Lets call it the HD9

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by C-H View Post
    Someone needs to explain the 'steeper STA' buzz to me.
    Does it mean a more forward position i.e the BB is further back relative to where you sit? If so, just move the seat forward.

    That said. A Ripley with a hair longer reach would do it. It's super short relative to others. The XL id more like a L.
    It only really ďworksĒ on long travel bikes that run higher sag than an XC bike.

    Which one rotates the STA backwards more on a climb: A) the 100mm XC bike at 20% sag, or B) the 150mm bike at 35% sag? B is the answer.


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    The EWS team all seem to be riding their HD4s in the videos they're posting - no further sign of the black forked bike Lewis posted.

    Just to reply to some comments
    - HD4 is 2 years old - I've had mine for 18 months. It's geo is still solid especially for an EWS race bike, so I think it's unlikely that we'll see anything there.
    - I can't see Mojo3 being replaced - they just released new the colours and 650b short travel bikes are becoming a rarity.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Creg View Post
    The EWS team all seem to be riding their HD4s in the videos they're posting - no further sign of the black forked bike Lewis posted.

    Just to reply to some comments
    - HD4 is 2 years old - I've had mine for 18 months. It's geo is still solid especially for an EWS race bike, so I think it's unlikely that we'll see anything there.
    - I can't see Mojo3 being replaced - they just released new the colours and 650b short travel bikes are becoming a rarity.
    HD4 could be happier with a slight seat tube angle adjustment, nothing more as it's still sexy. Maybe drop the seat tube down a tiny bit?

    Same thing with the Mojo3

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    I started reading this thread thinking the Ripley was the only real possibility, but the more I think about it and the more I read, I wonder about a longer travel 29er.

    The question i'm curious about is sales numbers and what is really driving their new bike design. For example, if the EWS team starts mentioning that the Rimpo can get in over its head on steeper,gnarlier terrain (145 rear travel, 66*HA not super-aggressive). Would Ibis say, "hey, go grab the HD4 (27.5) for those tracks" and would the team be happy with no longer 29er option? IF that happens, do they care enough to start developing a new bike? Or do they see off-the-charts Ripmo sales and just smile?

    Then what do current Ripley sales numbers look like? If someone is in the market for a brand new 120mm trail bike, there are about 10 high-end options that are more recently released as compared with the Ripley. Not that they are "better', but they are updated. With no real race team using a Ripley, I'd assume this is based on business more so than racing.

    No answers here, just random thoughts :-)

  38. #38
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    Ripmo sales numbers are all of them. Everyone they can make as fast as they can make them. Ibis has on older demographic and full on DH bike are not something their customers buy.
    Making shit harder than it needs to be isn't awesome, it's just...harder.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlechnow View Post
    A cross country bike (short travel) with some downhill characteristics (mainly geometry). Basically an XC bike that doesn't mind getting a little rowdy.
    It is called the Mojo (3). With a DW-link you do not need (or want) less than 120-130 travel. If you set up your shock correctly you have all the support you need AND enough travel to attack most trails ... build a Mojo light (it can go easily to 24-25 pounds) and you have your "downcountry" bike ready.

    Won;t comment on geometry because I find those discussions borderline distressing

  40. #40
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    You forgot about wheel size.
    I think most people looking in this cat agony of bike (110-130 mm) are looking at 29ers these days. Not that it's right or wrong, just the truth. I'm actually surprised how many shorter riders are on the 29er train.

    Quote Originally Posted by Davide View Post
    It is called the Mojo (3). With a DW-link you do not need (or want) less than 120-130 travel. If you set up your shock correctly you have all the support you need AND enough travel to attack most trails ... build a Mojo light (it can go easily to 24-25 pounds) and you have your "downcountry" bike ready.

    Won;t comment on geometry because I find those discussions borderline distressing

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    The average rider doesn't need a race bike. I think one thing Ibis has always done is appeal to the average rider. They don't design on the extreme edge of things. It seems to work well for them.

    Maybe with a Ripley redesign they can offer two travel settings. Now with metric shocks several bikes Co.s are doing this; SC Blur, Intense Sniper, Scott, GG, etc.

    If Ibis came out with a "downcountry" bike I would jump on it. I'm looking for a bike I can trail ride all day, have fun on, and occasionally race an Xc event or endurance race (50 mile+). With a metric shock maybe they could have a 110 and 125 version of the Ripley. Run a 120 fork with 110 travel and a 140 fork with 125 travel.

    Quote Originally Posted by Yupstate View Post
    I started reading this thread thinking the Ripley was the only real possibility, but the more I think about it and the more I read, I wonder about a longer travel 29er.

    The question i'm curious about is sales numbers and what is really driving their new bike design. For example, if the EWS team starts mentioning that the Rimpo can get in over its head on steeper,gnarlier terrain (145 rear travel, 66*HA not super-aggressive). Would Ibis say, "hey, go grab the HD4 (27.5) for those tracks" and would the team be happy with no longer 29er option? IF that happens, do they care enough to start developing a new bike? Or do they see off-the-charts Ripmo sales and just smile?

    Then what do current Ripley sales numbers look like? If someone is in the market for a brand new 120mm trail bike, there are about 10 high-end options that are more recently released as compared with the Ripley. Not that they are "better', but they are updated. With no real race team using a Ripley, I'd assume this is based on business more so than racing.

    No answers here, just random thoughts :-)

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    Quote Originally Posted by G-AIR View Post
    I'm actually surprised how many shorter riders are on the 29er train.
    After 6 years on 29ers I got off the train when I picked up an HD3 this year on closeout. Now, I'm looking to replace my V1 Ripley with a Mojo 3 for endurance racing/distance training. Contrarian maybe, but they are more comfortable and agile for my height (67"). Despite the Ripley being a revelation over my prior Niners and no doubt the roll-over saved my ass a few times when i was in over my head, it alway felt like I couldn't get the bike over in high speed turns or when I needed agility like I can with the HD3. I did always wonder about the Evil Following. Something about the frame shape and look came across and a bike that would have given me a better 29er experience than the Ripley. A lower stand over Ripley might appeal to me. I don't really need that agility for endurance racing, but when training I always mix in some downs that are fun and I've like to have it.

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    Can someone explain the actual benefit of metric shocks? All the hype makes it seem like the second coming, but on a DW bike with no appreciable shock rotation I don't see the perks.

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    I don't see it as a performance benefit at all. I see it as an attempt at standardized shock spacing and an ease on manufacturers and frame builders. They now have fewer sizes to produce and can use adjust the stroke length, i.e. the same i2i is used for several different travel lengths.

    The Trunnion mounts are the shocks claiming better performance.

    Quote Originally Posted by gondezee View Post
    Can someone explain the actual benefit of metric shocks? All the hype makes it seem like the second coming, but on a DW bike with no appreciable shock rotation I don't see the perks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by G-AIR View Post
    I don't see it as a performance benefit at all. I see it as an attempt at standardized shock spacing and an ease on manufacturers and frame builders. They now have fewer sizes to produce and can use adjust the stroke length, i.e. the same i2i is used for several different travel lengths.

    The Trunnion mounts are the shocks claiming better performance.
    Thanks. Makes sense that frame builders would be more stoked on this, but it's not something I see end-users really needing to care too much about at the end of the day.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by G-AIR View Post
    You forgot about wheel size.
    I think most people looking in this cat agony of bike (110-130 mm) are looking at 29ers these days. Not that it's right or wrong, just the truth. I'm actually surprised how many shorter riders are on the 29er train.
    Yes, right, I forgot the other rather distressing "debate" 27.5 vs 29 ... but besides that, agonizing about 110 vs 120 vs 130 on a DW bike is really missing the point of this type of suspension ...

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    That might be true for your location, terrain, and riding style but for me the rear travel is going to dictate the way the rest of the bike is built up. Fork travel and tires are the two biggest things that come to mind. I would put a 150 fork and beefier tires on the 130 mm bike. With a 110 DW bike I would put a 120 fork and something like an Ardent Race/Ikon combo. The sum of all parts would be a much different bike.

    I imagine DW would tune these suspension curves and shock tunes differently. At 110 I think it would be snappier and a bit firmer. Rember, all DW links don't feel the same. Pivots ride different than Ibis rides different than Turner and so on.



    Quote Originally Posted by Davide View Post
    Yes, right, I forgot the other rather distressing "debate" 27.5 vs 29 ... but besides that, agonizing about 110 vs 120 vs 130 on a DW bike is really missing the point of this type of suspension ...

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    A flip-chip Ripley is interesting idea. I don't think Ibis wants to maintain too many models or molds. That said - how many people actually flip their flip chip bikes, changes wheels, and change forks? Still it gives Ibis 2 segments to sell into with one set of carbon molds. And Ibis's semi-custom order configuration/upgrade process can probalby be extended for "2 bikes in 1" ordering.

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    HD4 had a long enough run on the current colors. Needs a color update.

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    They're already updated from OG launch. Mojo3 just got updated from OG.

  51. #51
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    608
    Hoping for an uber-lightweight Ripley update (and a 140mm Fox34 SC option this year).

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