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  1. #1
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    New England Mojo Owners

    I need some testimonials from other New England ( or any one else) trail riders that a mojo sl hold up in the rocky retain. I am not a crazy aggressive rider but I do crash on occasion on trails with rocks. I don't think this is uncommon to most of us.

    I have read the good and the bad about carbon and I am a believer in the durability of the mojo sl but would like some input from others that ride similar trails before I drop 2150 on a frame.

  2. #2
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    I have a new-to-me 2006/2007 Mojo (not SL). Previous owner was goes by ecibis on these forums, and put it to good use around Boston and NH. I've been riding it and loving it in CT. I fall just about every other time I go out, but not on crazy stuff. A few slow speed tip-overs on rocks, and a fast OTB moment. I'm light, though (140lb loaded). I don't worry about the bike any more than any other bike.

    I'm impressed with the durability of the frame, and resistance to scratching, chipping, cracking, etc. If you're close to southeastern CT, you're welcome to come see it. Otherwise if you really need more convincing, I can post pictures of the battle scars when I'm not lazy.

  3. #3
    Got A Lust for Life...
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    I've got a Santa Cruz Carbon LT in Maine. Same story...rocks are no problem for carbon. The stuff is strong.
    I am immune to your disdain.

  4. #4
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    I got clobbered by a teenage girl on a monster trek a few weeks ago. Blindsided me while riding in manhatttan, knocked me to the ground, knocked me out for a few seconds, gave me a concussion and barely scratched my frame.
    She t-boned me-I can see the spot where her bike contacted my frame-the thing is just a mere scratch.

    I also went awol over the bars in shindagin hollow ny on a moderate downhill-loose broken rock bed. Broke my clavicle and threw the bike pretty hard onto the trail. Again, not a scratch.

    Any bike will break if you abuse it hard enough-but apparently carbon is pretty solid and allegedly 'easier' to fix if you do total it.
    Ibis 2012 SL-R
    Ibis 2010 Mojo SL
    Fat City Cycles 93' Yo Eddy!
    Fat City Cycles 91' Wicked Fat Chance
    DB 89' Ascent EX

  5. #5
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    I ride pretty rocky stuff here in CO, and I have had a lot of rocks kick up and hit the downtube/bb, and crashed and dropped the bike on a lot of rocks as well, nothing but scratches. I hit the bb once hard enough to bend the outer shell of the bb where the tool fits over it, frame is fine.

  6. #6
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    This is all music to my ears. Thanks for the info not much more convincing needed here.

  7. #7
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    IMHO if you crash it's down to a bit of luck - I had a minor crash on my mojo which resulted in a cable stop getting pulled out of the frame when it fell sideways onto a rock. Needed a new front triangle as the holes were enlarged and couldn't be fixed :-( but the frame where the rock initially hit just before the cable stop just had a scratch on it. No other issues with the bike though.

    I know others who have broken carbon bikes on rocks and others who have ridden them for a while with no issues.

    I was really bummed out when it happened and was really wondering if a carbon bike was right for me, but I love it and am glad I stuck with it.

  8. #8
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    Hi,

    I've had my Mojo SL for about 2 years. As you observe, there are lots of rocks. I don't crash (much), but so far there have been no issues, including a pretty hard tumble when I burped NoTubes on a large slab of granite in Vermont. On some of my rides, I have to scramble through narrow spaces between rock, and the Mojo seems to do fine with scraping the rear triangle. After going to Mountain Bike Oregon a couple of times and comparing the condition of my bike with similar vintage Mojos from the West Coast, it is pretty apparent that mine is getting more contact with the trail elements.

    I have three other friends who I ride with who have had Mojos anywhere from 4 years to a few months. No issues so far. Here is a list of parts I have broken on the Mojo in my two years of ownership - the frame is holding up just fine, BTW...
    - front and rear disc brakes (Magura Marta SL)
    - rear derailleur cage (XTR)
    - rear wheel (ok - I sat on it after a crash...)
    - fork (Manitou Minute MRD)
    - pedal spring (Crank Bros 4xTi)
    - multiple chains (two XTR, two SRAM PC-991)
    - saddle - broken rails - not from crashing... (San Marco Aspide)

  9. #9
    mdc
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    I've got a Mojo 2009 Mojo Sl and ride mostly around South Central Mass. So far I've ridden the Mojo out in Moab ( 2 snapped frames on the trip- Mojo was fine), Stowe, VT, Waterbury VT, Millstone, VT, Vietnam, Harold Parker, Rayburn, Arcadia etc. etc. The bike is awesome and I have no fear of breaking the frame. I weigh around 175, ride pretty smooth and try not to fall TO often :-)

  10. #10
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    New Hampshire

    Quote Originally Posted by hani1
    I need some testimonials from other New England ( or any one else) trail riders that a mojo sl hold up in the rocky retain
    My Mojo classic just turned 4 years old. I average about 15 hours/week, 10 months/year here in SW NH where it's granite drop after drop, babyheads, rock gardens, roots, leaves, up and down, jumps, etc. A better all-around ride is difficult to imagine (although I've been drooling over the HD 160 lately.) A ding in carbon is safer than aluminum - carbon can't crystallize and spread a crack through tubing like aluminum or titanium does. I also fly out West 3-4 x/year with Mojo, seeking out technical rides, like Mr. Toad's (Lake Tahoe), Santa Barbara Front & Back country, Downieville, Mt. Diablo, Sedona, South Mountain (Phoenix), etc.

    Carbon is the best, imho, and the SL is supposed to be as good as the classic in stiffness & durability. Btw, a non-warranty, rear triangle breakage replacement is very reasonable - $250. or thereabouts, I think.

  11. #11
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    The added feedback is much appreciated. The best testimonial I have is the 3 year old demo bike I took out on Monday. As with most demo bikes it had not been treated kindly over the years. I not being one to change trends rode it as hard as I could and much harder than I would my Kona The King. The bike performed great I was very impressed with how nimble it was it the tight twisty single track but also how fast it was on more open trails.

    Thanks again firths input can't wait till I actually have the bike.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by hani1
    Thanks again firths input can't wait till I actually have the bike.
    your Kona will soon be gathering dust. I highly recommend:

    Fox 32 Talas 150 RLC (or 36 Talas 160, which I don't have but want)

    650b front wheel (I have a Nevegal 650b 2.35 tire)

    Gravitydropper.com 4 or 5 inch adjustable seatpost

    those, in no particular order, are the very best changes I've made in last couple years, and I wouldn't want to ride my Mojo without.

  13. #13
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    Thanks for the input. I am definatley looking into a dropper post. But I have written off the travel adjust fork at this point. Inhabe ridden several 140 forks in the are and think I can get by on the climbs.

    Where do you ride that you feel the travel adjust is that helpful. I only ask because your comment has made me reconsider my decision.

  14. #14
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    2 different reasons for adjustable fork (and my first two were not adjustable):

    1. I go out West 3 or 4 times/year - places like Santa Barbara, CA -- several of the front country trails there climb steeply and technically for 3,000 vertical feet (what a blast those are to descend!) The lowered fork is much easier for this kind of riding.

    2. because I have a 150 mm fork, and I love every mm of its travel (I had 140 originally and wondered why anyone would want more, but after 3 seconds descending w/150 it was obvious (for that matter, before Mojo, I had gone from 66 mm front travel to 100 mm on a SC Blur, and I thought going to 140 when I was waiting for my Mojo was going to be way more travel than I'd need, again, it was immediately obvious why, here in land of granite, roots, jumps, manuals, etc., more travel was better.) Anyway, I also have a 650b front wheel, when entering and climbing a slow, technical trail (rocks, roots) with tight turns, lowering the fork gives significantly better handling. I noticed this before I put the 650b on, and even moreso with 650b. The new 32-Talas (FIT), since 2010, is nearly 1 lb lighter than the pre-2010, so why not?

  15. #15
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    i've ridden my white mojo sl for two seasons in greater boston area. i rode last night at NTF. no problems with frame durability (though I think the paint quality is below average for an mtb). I agree with rshalit about the 650b front wheel. DO IT! i wouldn't ride mine without it, especially in new england where you get that little bit extra on bb height and improved rolling in the rocky areas without feeling over sized like on a 29er.

    i would also recommend a 15 or 20mm front axle. i went with a standard QR because i had nice King hubs to use and QR roof racks but I wish I went a little stiffer on the front end.

  16. #16
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    Thanks for the advice. I think I will wait a bit on the 650b b/c it is easy enought for me to build up the new wheel if I want to give it a shot. And I converting my CK hub to 15mm.

    I am now pretty torn on the travel adjust question. I will have to try together some time in on either the Talas or a new Revelation dual position before buying.

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