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  1. #1
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    Mojo HD vs Knolly Endorphin

    These are the two frames at the top of my list.

    Anyone ridden both?

    I demo'd a HD yesterday and really liked it....really wish I had more time to set it up though. It is seriously the best-feeling bike I've pedaled on moderate tech xc trails. There was something that I just didn't love about the bike on jumps and drops. Again, it might have been a setup issue.

    But I am wondering if anyone's ridden both the HD and Endorphin. I want something that will take a beating for 4-6 years and both these should fit the bill. Thanks for any info!
    Taking it easy for all you sinners.

  2. #2
    nocturnal oblivion
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    Somebody mentioned in AM bearing service thread that the Knolly bearings are $200 to replace. Something to consider. How about a Canfield ONE on sale for 1200 right now.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by stumblemumble
    Somebody mentioned in AM bearing service thread that the Knolly bearings are $200 to replace. Something to consider. How about a Canfield ONE on sale for 1200 right now.
    Knolly uses German made INA bearings, which are expensive. I've got a couple friends who have been on Knollys an upwards of 3-4 years with no bearing issues...in sloppy PacNW weather. Even if I had to replace $200 bearings every 2 years on a bike I loved, that would be okay.
    Last edited by jubilee; 08-08-2010 at 10:39 PM.
    Taking it easy for all you sinners.

  4. #4
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    Ive got a Endo and just bought a Mojo but not the HD. I think either one would last for that amount of time, I definitely know the Knolly would! What kind of terrain do you normally ride? Both bikes are very capable rides and for a 5.5" travel bike the Knolly is bullet proof but that also comes at the cost of its weight.

    The HD is going to be a shinning star to people who are caught between a 140mm and a 160mm bike. A simple shock mount, different size shock, then you have both bikes in one. I really dig the idea of that.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Magsrgod
    Ive got a Endo and just bought a Mojo but not the HD. I think either one would last for that amount of time, I definitely know the Knolly would! What kind of terrain do you normally ride? Both bikes are very capable rides and for a 5.5" travel bike the Knolly is bullet proof but that also comes at the cost of its weight.

    The HD is going to be a shinning star to people who are caught between a 140mm and a 160mm bike. A simple shock mount, different size shock, then you have both bikes in one. I really dig the idea of that.
    I've pretty much decided on the Knolly, mainly due to its reputation of durability. I've no doubts as to the customer service excellence of both Ibis and Knolly, but I think for the type of riding around here the Knolly is the better pick...and it's only approx 1 lb heavier than the HD with the same shock.

    Also, I suspect Ibis might still be ironing out some details with the HD (mainly referring to rear tire/seat tube rub).

    All that said, I still have yet to demo the Endo so I may very well be off in my thinking.
    Taking it easy for all you sinners.

  6. #6
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    Such a terrible dilemma your facing You would love the Knolly, they take a bit to get used to but once you nail them down it's a great bike. It's probably hands down the best descending trail bike I've ever ridden.

    I bought the Mojo because after Demoing one I had to have one. It climbed great, sprinted great and went down hill pretty dam well. GF is getting into biking so I needed an extra bike, that lucky little ... Never owned a dw link bike and I've always been very intrigued by them. Give me a few months and I'll really be able to nail down a solid comparison between them

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Magsrgod
    Such a terrible dilemma your facing
    I know. Ha ha!
    Taking it easy for all you sinners.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by jubilee
    I've pretty much decided on the Knolly, mainly due to its reputation of durability. I've no doubts as to the customer service excellence of both Ibis and Knolly, but I think for the type of riding around here the Knolly is the better pick...and it's only approx 1 lb heavier than the HD with the same shock.

    Also, I suspect Ibis might still be ironing out some details with the HD (mainly referring to rear tire/seat tube rub).

    All that said, I still have yet to demo the Endo so I may very well be off in my thinking.
    i've had an endo and really liked it. i switched to a banshee rune just to try something different. have to say i like the mini link design of the rune better overall. i would love to try an hd. i like the idea of being able to drop it down to 140mm even though it means having a separate shock and link to do so. i also like the fact it has a 1.5 headtube as you can run the cc angleset on it. i wish knolly would update the headtube on the endo to tapered or full 1.5".

    both bikes are nice but i did feel the short chainstays on the endo hinder its climbing ability a bit. great descender though for a 5.5" bike

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by qbert2000
    both bikes are nice but i did feel the short chainstays on the endo hinder its climbing ability a bit. great descender though for a 5.5" bike
    Thats where the learning curve for me came with the Knolly, climbing on it took awhile to get used too. Climbing on the Mojo is pretty easy, but suspension aside the geometry on the Mojo is much more climbing friendly.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by qbert2000
    i also like the fact it has a 1.5 headtube as you can run the cc angleset on it.
    I am pretty sure the HD has a tapered headtube.
    Last edited by smithrider; 08-11-2010 at 05:01 PM.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by jubilee
    These are the two frames at the top of my list.

    Anyone ridden both?

    I demo'd a HD yesterday and really liked it....really wish I had more time to set it up though. It is seriously the best-feeling bike I've pedaled on moderate tech xc trails. There was something that I just didn't love about the bike on jumps and drops. Again, it might have been a setup issue.

    But I am wondering if anyone's ridden both the HD and Endorphin. I want something that will take a beating for 4-6 years and both these should fit the bill. Thanks for any info!
    Aside from set up, the weight of the bike may have made it jump different if your used to a beefier bike. I know it's taking me some time to adapt.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by scepticshock
    Aside from set up, the weight of the bike may have made it jump different if your used to a beefier bike. I know it's taking me some time to adapt.
    I was thinking that as well. The HD was snappy as hell on a stand up sprint, and pedaled phenomenally thru tech. The rear tire just stayed glued, great traction. It did feel awfully light in the air.
    Taking it easy for all you sinners.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by smithrider
    I am pretty sure the HD has a tapered headtube.
    still will take a cc angle set. 1 1/8" standard headtubes should be going the way of the dinosaur. having the ability to change your head angle opens up a lot of possibilities for the end user. also keeps headtube height shorter giving the end user more options as well

  14. #14
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    If your used to a Highline, the weight seems to lend a level of stability. The HD feels like it's filled with air. For me there was a 10-12 lb difference between the bikes.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by scepticshock
    For me there was a 10-12 lb difference between the bikes.
    10-12 lbs difference!!! WOW!
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by scepticshock
    If your used to a Highline, the weight seems to lend a level of stability. The HD feels like it's filled with air. For me there was a 10-12 lb difference between the bikes.
    I'm going to keep the Highline. Sold the 04 Spot frame last week.

    My Spot was built up pretty burly though...about 33 or 34 lbs I think.

    Yes, the highline does feel stable as hell....mine is build like a brick $hithouse.
    Taking it easy for all you sinners.

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