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  1. #1
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    Mojo HD on the Shore?

    Anyone here ride an Mojo HD on the North Shore (Vancouver), or at the Whistler Bike Park? I'm looking for some feedback as to the performance in the slower more technical trails we have here, as well as trails in the Garbo zone of whistler. I figure the bike will rip on trails like A-line, and anything smooth that goes downhill.
    My potential build would include an RC4 with a Fox Van(or float) 180, or lyric DH. I would try and keep it sub-34 lbs. I currently have a nomad and a V10, and this would replace both.

    Thoughts? Opinions? Am I crazy?

  2. #2
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    It won't replace the V10. It won't be that much different than your Nomad since the numbers are so similar.
    Keep the Country country.

  3. #3
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    I know we all love new bikes, but maybe just throw an RC4 and a 36 Van or Float 180 on the nomad and save some money and keep the V10 for the true DH days ?
    2013 Medium Santa Cruz Blur Trc in Matte/Silver, full XT kit, 1x10 with 32T wolftooth ring, 25 pounds 7 ounces

  4. #4
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    I don't expect to 'replace' the V10. 10 inches vs. 6 is huge as far as how the bike will handle.

    Last season I did about 8 full DH days, and 4 other lift access where a V-10 would be overkill. I would say I rode 7 days on the nomad and probably 65-70 on my rocky mountain altitude. I work weekends so I don't have many folks to ride with on my days off, so it's pedal access for me.

    I have the ability to buy and sell these bikes without too much concern over the financials(within reason of course), so I am unlikely to loose money on the sale of the V10.

    Any riding experiences to share?

  5. #5
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    I spent about 10 days in the Squamish/Whistler area in August.
    Trails I rode (that I remember)
    Marc my words
    Half Nelson
    Plunge
    Powersmart
    IMBAsmart
    River runs through it
    Comfortably Numb
    Danimal
    1 day at bike park. Would have done more but it was super dusty and my girlfriend doesn't like that kind of riding

    I absolutely LOVED the HD there. I'm not a fan of big drops and jumps (no GLC for me), but it easily handled everything else I put it through.

    Rb should be chiming in on this thread. He's got HD experience in that area as well.

  6. #6
    Rb
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    You're definitely not crazy.

    I did about 90 laps over a week @ Whistler with my HD about a month and a half ago. I hit everything, short of the Boneyard.

    I have mine built pretty stout with a 180mm fork and DH tires/tubes. Weighs in a smidge under 34lbs. In short, the bike absolutely kills it. With an Angleset and an RC4, the HD would be in my opinion the perfect "Mini-DH" bike. Top-to-bottom Garbo runs is where you'll definitely benefit from the coil shock, specifically the RC4's air spring effect.

    I would post a more detailed "review" and pictures/videos to get you stoked, but I'm slammed at work. Hope this helps!!



    EDIT:

    Oh yeah, one more thing. My HD replaced an Intense M6 and a Turner DHR.

  7. #7
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    Sweet - Thanks so much for the words!

    It's not something I can pull the trigger on right away, so I can be patient for some video of your HD

    That sounds like the type of build I would be putting together. I've found with the V10 I just don't have the body english to make it do what I want. I get that's it's rider error, but still. When I have that much money tied up in a machine that I can't seem to find the time to ride, I'd rather have something I can pedal up local mountains.

    It seems that I like to finesse my way down the trails, rather than point and shoot, which is why the HD appeals over the V10.

    One nice thing I found with the V10 was that my hands never got sore. I am wondering if this is because of the Code brakes, or the Fox 40 I have on it. What 180mm fork to you have on there? Can you give a point of reference vs. a fox 40(besides the obvious stiffness and 1 inch less travel?). I weigh 150 lbs, so I have a feeling I can get away with a fox 36 van/float....

  8. #8
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    Effortless brakes and a plush fork definitely keep your arms and hands fresh. You'll give up a little comfort with the shorter travel bike but with 7" The One brakes and a Fox 180 RC2 it shouldn't be a problem to run a lot of resort laps. You'll probably be going a little slower and smoother than on the DH bike too.
    Keep the Country country.

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    If any of you have ridden Silverstar, that's my preferred lift access mountain. I'll shuttle the likes of Cypress, but as previously mentioned that doesn't happen much anymore. I think the 180 up front with 160 in the rear would be fine for silverstar - just run a bigger set of tires to deal with the braking bumps when the arrive.

    I think that all the riding I've done on my altitude has gotten me used to have a nice light bike underneath me. It's a bit of a problem

    Holy zoikes - i just looked at the comparison weights between elixir cr's and the one's... it's substantial. Doesn't look like too huge a price difference either....

    Anyone have any experience with a float vs. a van? Quite the weight savings going with the float....

    I've got to admit, I'm getting pretty excited about the concept of running a 30ish pound 'park bike'.

  10. #10
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    I think the new TALAS forks feel good so I'm sure I'd be happy with the Float. The weight you save and the infinitely adjustable spring rate out weigh the slightly added stiction over the Van. Just keep it clean and lubed.
    Keep the Country country.

  11. #11
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    I second the Talas 180...that's my plan. 180/160 on lift access days...140/140 for the rest of my riding.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by hypokondriak
    I second the Talas 180...that's my plan. 180/160 on lift access days...140/140 for the rest of my riding.
    If you plan on riding most of the time with the fork at 140, you may want to consider just getting the float. As per the fox site:
    INTERNAL
    Travel is adjustable down to 100 mm in 10 mm increments

    If it's anything like the Fox 40, it'll be an incredibly quick switch...
    Depending on how much of a weight weenie you are, you'll save 200ish grams

  13. #13
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    Based on Fox's published weights I see 180 Talas RC2 listed at 5.37 and 180 Float RC2 listed at 5.18. I'd rather have the on-trail adjustment...used it quite a bit on my 2011 talas 150.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevinrj
    If you plan on riding most of the time with the fork at 140, you may want to consider just getting the float. As per the fox site:
    INTERNAL
    Travel is adjustable down to 100 mm in 10 mm increments

    If it's anything like the Fox 40, it'll be an incredibly quick switch...
    Depending on how much of a weight weenie you are, you'll save 200ish grams
    how does it work ?
    by adding some special plastic part into ?
    that's interesting instead of two forks...

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by lucash290
    how does it work ?
    by adding some special plastic part into ?
    that's interesting instead of two forks...
    from here: fox service manual
    Remove the blue air cap from the top of the left fork leg. Let the air out of the fork. Remove the left top cap with a 32 mm (or 1.25") 6-point socket wrench.
    Loosen the bottom nut 3-4 turns with a 10 mm wrench. With a plastic mallet, gently tap the bottom of the shaft to disengage it from the lower leg. Allow oil to drain into a bucket. Remove the bottom nut and crush washer.
    Compress the fork as much as possible. The air piston will be visible about one inch below the top of the upper tube. Push the bottom of the air shaft upwards to push the air piston out of the top of the upper tube. Use a long, thin shaft screwdriver to push the bottom of the air shaft up through the hole in the bottom of the lower leg.
    Pull the air shaft assembly from the fork. Refer to the Travel Spacer Orientation image below, and add or remove a 10 mm spacer to decrease or increase your travel length.
    Note: Spacers snap onto the air shaft between the negative spring guide and topout plate, as shown in the travel spacer orientation drawing below.

    Lubricate the U-cup seal on the air piston with FOX FLOAT Fluid and re-install the air shaft assembly into the upper tube. Be sure to orient the U-cup seal as shown in the Seal Orientation drawing below.
    Push the shaft until it approaches the bottom hole of the fork. Do not push the shaft all the way through the bottom hole.
    Turn the fork upside down. Measure and pour 40 cc of FOX Suspension Fluid through the bottom hole.
    Push the air shaft assembly up until the shaft comes through the bottom hole. Install the crush washer and bottom nut. Torque to 50 in-lb.
    Turn the fork right side up. Pour 5 cc of FOX FLOAT Fluid on top of the air piston.
    Lubricate the o-ring on the air topcap with FOX FLOAT Fluid.
    Re-install the topcap and tighten to 220 in-lb torque.
    Pump up the fork to the desired pressure and cycle it several times to check for proper operation.
    Re-install the blue air cap.
    You’re done. Go ride.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevinrj
    from here: fox service manual
    Remove the blue air cap from the top of the left fork leg. Let the air out of the fork. Remove the left top cap with a 32 mm (or 1.25") 6-point socket wrench.
    Loosen the bottom nut 3-4 turns with a 10 mm wrench. With a plastic mallet, gently tap the bottom of the shaft to disengage it from the lower leg. Allow oil to drain into a bucket. Remove the bottom nut and crush washer.
    Compress the fork as much as possible. The air piston will be visible about one inch below the top of the upper tube. Push the bottom of the air shaft upwards to push the air piston out of the top of the upper tube. Use a long, thin shaft screwdriver to push the bottom of the air shaft up through the hole in the bottom of the lower leg.
    Pull the air shaft assembly from the fork. Refer to the Travel Spacer Orientation image below, and add or remove a 10 mm spacer to decrease or increase your travel length.
    Note: Spacers snap onto the air shaft between the negative spring guide and topout plate, as shown in the travel spacer orientation drawing below.

    Lubricate the U-cup seal on the air piston with FOX FLOAT Fluid and re-install the air shaft assembly into the upper tube. Be sure to orient the U-cup seal as shown in the Seal Orientation drawing below.
    Push the shaft until it approaches the bottom hole of the fork. Do not push the shaft all the way through the bottom hole.
    Turn the fork upside down. Measure and pour 40 cc of FOX Suspension Fluid through the bottom hole.
    Push the air shaft assembly up until the shaft comes through the bottom hole. Install the crush washer and bottom nut. Torque to 50 in-lb.
    Turn the fork right side up. Pour 5 cc of FOX FLOAT Fluid on top of the air piston.
    Lubricate the o-ring on the air topcap with FOX FLOAT Fluid.
    Re-install the topcap and tighten to 220 in-lb torque.
    Pump up the fork to the desired pressure and cycle it several times to check for proper operation.
    Re-install the blue air cap.
    You’re done. Go ride.

    thank you

  17. #17
    Rb
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevinrj
    Sweet - Thanks so much for the words!

    It's not something I can pull the trigger on right away, so I can be patient for some video of your HD

    That sounds like the type of build I would be putting together. I've found with the V10 I just don't have the body english to make it do what I want. I get that's it's rider error, but still. When I have that much money tied up in a machine that I can't seem to find the time to ride, I'd rather have something I can pedal up local mountains.

    It seems that I like to finesse my way down the trails, rather than point and shoot, which is why the HD appeals over the V10.

    One nice thing I found with the V10 was that my hands never got sore. I am wondering if this is because of the Code brakes, or the Fox 40 I have on it. What 180mm fork to you have on there? Can you give a point of reference vs. a fox 40(besides the obvious stiffness and 1 inch less travel?). I weigh 150 lbs, so I have a feeling I can get away with a fox 36 van/float....
    Kevin -

    I have the 2010 Marzocchi 66 RC3 Ti on mine. It's a great fork, in my opinion. Build quality is very good, torsionally/laterally very stiff (I have the straight 1-1/8" version), and the stock damping/adjustments are perfect for me. The 3-year warranty, and Marzocchi re-gaining market presence definitely helped convince me to buy this fork.

    As a point of reference, both my downhill bikes have/had Fox 40's on them. (last generation, pre-Kashima coating). I also had a Boxxer World Cup on my DHR for a month or so earlier this year, but ultimately sold it for the new 888 RC3. Comparing any of these to a single-crown is kind've a moot point, but to be completely honest, I do not miss having a dual-crown fork and still ride comfortably at the same speeds, or faster, on my HD.

    Unfortunately, I haven't spent any extensive time on the new 180mm Fox 36's, but initial reviews from my friends who have are generally positive. The revamped FiT damper is supposedly much, much better than the last iteration (meaning, you actually get usable compression damping).

    Hope this helps!!

  18. #18
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    Hey RB
    Thanks for the feedback. I've got a 2010 55 RC3 ti on my nomad right now, and it seems to be OK. I have nothing amazing to say about, but I also have no complaints either. I rode a 2010 boxxer race earlier this season and I had absolutely nothing good to say about it, and plenty negative... which is in stark contrast to the Fox 40 that's on my V10.

    The videos you have hiding somewhere, are they helmet cams? Or do the perhaps show the bike working it's way down the trail? I did a search on youtube and on vimeo for some footage of the HD but there really seems to be a lack of it. I get that whatever I see on there will be impacted by the rider style, but it's still an interesting way to see things. I did see Brian Lopes helmet cam of A-line, which was rather impressive, but certainly not in line with the type of riding I am hoping the bike can handle. The north shore is a great place to live, but sometimes the slow techy DH we have is challenging to buy a bike for

    Quote Originally Posted by Rb
    Kevin -

    I have the 2010 Marzocchi 66 RC3 Ti on mine. It's a great fork, in my opinion. Build quality is very good, torsionally/laterally very stiff (I have the straight 1-1/8" version), and the stock damping/adjustments are perfect for me. The 3-year warranty, and Marzocchi re-gaining market presence definitely helped convince me to buy this fork.

    As a point of reference, both my downhill bikes have/had Fox 40's on them. (last generation, pre-Kashima coating). I also had a Boxxer World Cup on my DHR for a month or so earlier this year, but ultimately sold it for the new 888 RC3. Comparing any of these to a single-crown is kind've a moot point, but to be completely honest, I do not miss having a dual-crown fork and still ride comfortably at the same speeds, or faster, on my HD.

    Unfortunately, I haven't spent any extensive time on the new 180mm Fox 36's, but initial reviews from my friends who have are generally positive. The revamped FiT damper is supposedly much, much better than the last iteration (meaning, you actually get usable compression damping).

    Hope this helps!!

  19. #19
    Rb
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevinrj
    Hey RB
    Thanks for the feedback. I've got a 2010 55 RC3 ti on my nomad right now, and it seems to be OK. I have nothing amazing to say about, but I also have no complaints either. I rode a 2010 boxxer race earlier this season and I had absolutely nothing good to say about it, and plenty negative... which is in stark contrast to the Fox 40 that's on my V10.

    The videos you have hiding somewhere, are they helmet cams? Or do the perhaps show the bike working it's way down the trail? I did a search on youtube and on vimeo for some footage of the HD but there really seems to be a lack of it. I get that whatever I see on there will be impacted by the rider style, but it's still an interesting way to see things. I did see Brian Lopes helmet cam of A-line, which was rather impressive, but certainly not in line with the type of riding I am hoping the bike can handle. The north shore is a great place to live, but sometimes the slow techy DH we have is challenging to buy a bike for
    Unfortunately, my buddy who I went on this epic vacation with has all the helmet-cam footage (about 175GB worth) and he's slowly going through it all and editing it down to something entertaining. (He says it's absolutely tormenting re-watching our vacation in 1st person........)

    Soon-ish, though!!

    My fave run down the mountain would have to be Original Sin >> In Deep >> Fatcrobat >> Too Tight >> pedal across mid-mountain >> Schelyer >> D Rock City >> Heart of Darkness

    I have admittedly never ridden in the North Shore, but on paper alone, the Mojo HD's geometry seems like a surprisingly good fit (shorter chainstay, BB height not too low, not too slack of a H/A). In the park, the HD handled all the slower, technical features very well. If I couldn't ride a particular feature (read: CLOWN SHOES... ugh), it certainly wasn't the bike's fault.

  20. #20
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    did he ever turn the helmet cam off??? that's a lot of footage.

    that's a good run down, pretty similar to my tastes, except I'd sneak goats gulley into the list somehow. Crack addict is also a gooder...

    on paper it's pretty simillar to the nomad, but from what I keep reading, people say the DW-link feels like a lot more travel than 160mm. This appeals to me... If I had a nomad with a 1.5 steer tube, i'd run it with and angleset in it to get 65/66 degrees, and that would probably make me pretty happy, although it has a fairly high bb(if my memory serves correctly).

    I guess part of the problem up here is that all the local mountains are so diverse, you almost need a bike for each one. The new SX trail would be pretty much perfect, except that my store doesn't carry Specialized

    Cypress demands at least a 6inch travel bike, and really could use a full DH sled as you can find yourself in some pretty precarious situations, Fromme prefers something between 5 and 7 inches, depending on how fast you feel like descending, and how strong your legs are for going up (altitude is awesome up, but a smidge under gunned going down - nomad is very good, v10 is essentially a no go), and seymour can be xc or shuttle high speed dh.

    I also factor in who I ride with as I know certain bikes will help us 'keep in a rhythm" better. ie: if riding with wife, I don't need a v10 as I would be waiting at the bottom, where as instead I can pick more entertaining lines and 'play' on the nomad.

    this is why the ibis appeals. if it were a 180mm rear travel my decision would have been made ....

    for what it's worth, i'm thinking a Giant Reign 0 for my all mountain/xc days, and the HD for the dh/freeride days. If i found myself seeking an even lighter beast for all mountain xc, maybe the new rocky element. That being said - the Glory and Faith are rather interesting as well, and certainly more friendly to the wallet....as is the trance....and the new Rocky slayer and the........ i'm going koo koo ... where the "oh the drama" smiley face?

    and to those who are reading this thinking I may be a bit undecided and perhaps a little insane..... i completely agree. don't worry, i'll be riding in the morning!

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