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  1. #1
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    Mojo climbing issues

    Hi all, I bought my Mojo in Spring '08. I like it on x/c trails and downhills. But, this year I've been doing some steeper uphill riding and am having problems with it. On steep uphill grades, I find it very hard to keep my weight forward and low enough with this bike. As a consequence, my front wheel gets terribly light and bouncy. In fact, in more extreme conditions, I've done a few backwards endos. I put a longer step on as well as climbing bar-ends but the seeming imbalance remains. I feel to high off the ground.

    I've been riding standard x/c bikes since the beginning of time (1987) and am still finding the more upright and high Mojo tough to get used to. Even in x/c conditions, I feel higher off the ground than I would like.

    Has anybody had similar experiences climbing steep grades. Any suggestions for what might help? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Trail Rider
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    What fork?

    You might try an adjustable fork. The Mojo climbs very steep hills well, at 130mm. Talas or Revelation...
    Don

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quattro
    You might try an adjustable fork. The Mojo climbs very steep hills well, at 130mm. Talas or Revelation...
    does 130 mess with the geo too much?

  4. #4
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    riding position...

    Your riding position and bike set up are other aspects you might want to examine (I think it may be a little hasty to say that the Mojo has "climbing issues"). In addition to the fork travel as mentioned by the previous post, the following could cause your front to unweight:
    - stem length: I think some people suggest a little longer may prevent unweighting
    - stem height: I think some people suggest a little lower may prevent unweighting
    - fore/aft seat position
    - rider strength and climbing technique

    I live in the Rockies and enjoy very steep climbs. When I purchased my Mojo I was very concerned about unweighting of the front end, thinking that the 140mm travel was much taller than the xc oriented rides I'd had before. I've had absolutely no problems climbing with my Mojo. Try experimenting with some of 'cockpit dimensions' and see if that helps.

  5. #5
    Trail Rider
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    I only use the middle setting of the Talas on very steep climbs. The Mojo climbs very well at 140 for 99.9% of climbs. The rest of the time, I'm in the tall setting. As suggested,maybe tweak your cockpit (try a longer stem). That gets your weight up forward. You could also flip your stem over and try that. That would be easiest thing to do. It is also the cheapest.
    Don

  6. #6
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    Another thing to check is the sag on the rear shock. If you are running a lot of sag (more than 30%) it can effectively slacken the geometry and allow the front end to wander on steep climbs. Had a buddy with the same issue, added some air to his rear shock, and that fixed the problem.

  7. #7
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    All my riding includes very steep climbing and I have never had a problem on the Mojo. I ride a 150mm fork. I guess I can imagine a bad fitting Mojo getting a bit light in the front, but somersaulting backwards?!?- No. Along with other suggestions of checking bike fit and adjustments (seat, stem, handlebar), I wonder if your bike might be too large - like by two sizes? Or, if you are new to riding up steeps, perhaps it is a combination of poor fit and lack of practice/skills. I'm sure it can be worked out. There is nothing inherent to the Mojo causing it too be too light in the front on climbs.

    "I must not be crazy because I'm seriously questioning my sanity"

  8. #8
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    Thanks. These are great suggestions. I will look into all of them. I was up for hours last night thinking about this problem and how I can't seem to ride this bike as well as my older bikes (last was an old Turner XC). I was thinking of stripping the frame and building up a Scott Sparc frame. But, I will try these suggestions. I already tried lowering and lengthening the stem and adding the bars as I mentioned. As for the fork, it is what came on my Mojo in '08 (Fox float?).

    Another idea I had was to position the riser handlebars forward to reduce height and increase length forward. Any thoughts on that? Thanks.

  9. #9
    aka dan51
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    I agree with what everyone else has said, the Mojo does not have any problems climbing steep stuff.
    Take a side pic of your bike so we can check it out.
    I recently lowered my stem, and the bike climbs better, and generally handles better too.

  10. #10
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    Something must be messed up with your set up as you've been riding a long time.I ride in the Canadian Rockies, so lots of steep climbs & the Mojo is the best climbing bike i've ridden in my 25 years of MTBing.Get the stem as low as possible.If you are running a high rise bar switch to a low rise.Check the sag in the shock & if its correct still try a little bit extra air.I'm assuming you didn't put a offset seatpost on the bike, because that will hinder your climbing.Saddle position is very important, make sure its far enough forward so you can move up the saddle on steep climbs.If the cranks are to long for you thats going to hinder steep climbs as well.I rode with the 140 float then switched to a 150 DT fork,the bikes climbs so well, sometimes I don't even lower the front end on steep climbs.
    Hope you get it figured out, you'll love it when you do.

  11. #11
    Turn off the TV
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    I have not read every post so some of this may be redundant. I have a 140 fork no travel adjust. Here is how I climb. Sit forward on the seat, keep upper body low and leaned forward, KEEP ELBOWS LOW like you driving them into the ground, forarms should be at least parallel or below to the incline and keep the cadence high. The front end does tend to get very light I agree and it is very easy to lift it or even flip if you leaned back. Contrary to what some say I find the design is inherent to a light front end, It's much harder to get the front to lift on my Epic for sure, but that in no way makes the design bad. I Have my stem as high as possable at the very top of the tube, it's light as hell up front but I still climb, my only hinderence is my skill and stamina. It's all about tecnique. Good luck. I'd like to see the backward endo it sounds like it would be great to watch.

  12. #12
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    Wow, What a day! First of all, you guys are great. I took all of your suggestions and went to my shop/Ibis dealer here in Santa Fe, New Mexico (riding in the Rockies...). The shop went to town and were on the same page as you all. First off, we switched out the stock very-high rise Ibis bars with very-low rise Easton bars. Next, we moved the seat forward about .2 inches; adjusted its angle slightly; cranked up the pressure in the front and rear shocks to reduce sag; sped up the fork's rebound; increased the fork's slow-speed compression; tweaked the rear shock some more; angled the bar-ends forward; and, I took to the trails. It's like I have a new bike!! The climbing is sweet. I'm now over the bars with my weight right in the sweet spot: low and forward when I want it to be and centered or towards the rear when I want that. And for XC riding, the handling is really tight. I made several switchbacks that usually knock me off. The cockpit now has that high performance feel that I crave. It's so freakin awesome. It now rides like a mountain bike should! The only other suggestion made by the shop was made in this thread as well: replace the fork with a Talis for the height adjustments.

    All that and the shop didn't charge me any labor (Bike N Sport, Santa Fe). Thanks to Brian and Dave and you all. Now, I just hate to say this because it's so proscribed but, "I got my Mojo back".... Cheers!

  13. #13
    flow where ever you go
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    Great to hear. Glad you found the sweet spot for your riding.

    "I must not be crazy because I'm seriously questioning my sanity"

  14. #14
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    This thread could be an ad for Ibis
    功夫大师喜欢骑着他的自行车在山上。

  15. #15
    Founder: Dirty3hirties
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    I ride with a Lyrik 160 and although it had the U-turn feature, I never use it and I have cleaned steeper, more technical climbs on the Mojo than on my previous bike (HH100X). I run a 70 mm stem with mid rise bars AND platform pedals. I also use quite a bit of sag....25%-30% or so. Compared to my old bike which is categorized as "XC", I should have much more difficulty with the Mojo....not so...the complete opposite. I'm not more fit than I used to be because I only ride 1-2X/week vs before I would do 2-3 rides and they were much longer....same trails. I was just never as good of a climber as I am on the Mojo.

    However, recently I moved the seat further forward on the rails....maybe 1/4" or so....made a big improvement as I was able to perch mu butt right on the nose and power up the steeper climbs that gave me a little more trouble before.

    The Mojo coupled with a bit more experience and technical ability has made me a better climber than before even when on paper, I should not.

  16. #16
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    Great. I flew over the bars and landed on my hand and now the pad of my hand below the thumb is growing larger and becoming more painful by the moment. Seems like crossing streams with a steep drop in is my issue, keep the weight back and don't aim for the large rock, thats my lesson for the day. Have a great day and enjoy the climbing.

  17. #17
    YRTRNRSHVY
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    I rode my new Mojo SL with a 140mm Vanilla on the front for the first time today. Even though I had the bars a bit high it climbed great. I thought it was a big improvement over my old 4" travel Ventana El Saltamontes.

  18. #18
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    I ride a std med mojo with a 50mm stem and non adjustable Lyriks at 160mm. Better technique solves most of my un weighting issues. For really steep tracks I would love an adjustable fork but I would undoubtedly forget to pt it back to full travel for descents. I am interested by the on-the-fly travel adjust of Wotans and Thors but so far the ones I have tried have not had the same damping performance of my Lyriks, so again too much of a compromise.

    Suggestions

    Get you weight further forward by sitting on the nose of the saddle and tucking your elbows in. Also put your thumbs on top and over the bars rather than std grip (amazing how much this improves climbing on its own).
    Make sure the sag front and rear matches. It is very common to have soft(er)rear and harder front (to avoid dive under breaking) with little or no compression ( because we get told by the mags that compression damping is bad...must run as little as poss)

    Result wandering fork with little or no traction with too much weigh over the rear.
    Balance is the key word here

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