Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    12

    know your bike builder, not just the shop

    Long story short -
    I love my Mojo. I've logged about 400+ miles on since purchase last May and it's exceeded expectation both on my local Marin rides and on several more serious DH rides (North*, Tahoe, Downiville, etc). Took to the shop I bought from for a post brake-in tune and informed them that it recently started creaking a lot, mainly while hammering out of the pedals. As it turns out, it was built with no grease/lube. The headset and BB were bone dry along with everything else. We blame the indivial builder and the shop itself is rebuilding it now. I'm shocked to find that someon would cut corners like that, especially at a shop of this stature (which shall remain nameless).

    The point behind the thread -
    Should I be concerned about any perminant damage being done?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: getbusyliving's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    417
    Strange. I mean using grease actually makes it easier to build a bike IMO. Not to mention it would just feel wrong, even if it was someone else's bike. Anyway, I bet you'll be OK...just keep your eyes/ears on the headset and BB for a while. And I would make it clear to the shop that if anything goes wrong with those parts in the next 6 months, they know who will be flipping the bill.

    See ya up on the Marin trails...

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    450
    And this is why:

    1) The shop I worked at in my youth would completely disassemble every bike that came 'pre-assembled' from the manufacturer and build it correctly. Most of the time these things come un-greased/incorrectly assembled from the manufacturer, and the mechanic at the shop doesn't bother to check.

    2) I do all my own work on my bikes including assembly, I don't trust anyone to work on my bikes except me. After I got my mojo, I broke it completely down and built it to my standards.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: doismellbacon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    2,349
    Quote Originally Posted by Coloradoxj13
    And this is why:

    1) The shop I worked at in my youth would completely disassemble every bike that came 'pre-assembled' from the manufacturer and build it correctly. Most of the time these things come un-greased/incorrectly assembled from the manufacturer, and the mechanic at the shop doesn't bother to check.

    2) I do all my own work on my bikes including assembly, I don't trust anyone to work on my bikes except me. After I got my mojo, I broke it completely down and built it to my standards.

    +1 x 2

  5. #5
    holding back the darkness
    Reputation: subliminalshiver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,734
    Yep. Build your own.
    **** censorship

  6. #6
    aka dan51
    Reputation: d-bug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    6,010
    Quote Originally Posted by Coloradoxj13
    And this is why:

    2) I do all my own work on my bikes including assembly, I don't trust anyone to work on my bikes except me. After I got my mojo, I broke it completely down and built it to my standards.
    I know my mechanic too, I look at him in the mirror every day.

  7. #7
    Proud lame eBiker
    Reputation: Internal14's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,665
    That's just plain laziness on their part. IBIS bikes arrive to the shop with the frame/fork in one box, wheels in a box of their own, and another box that contains the kit. So it's not like the shop can blame 'those bike assemblers in taiwan' for not properly assembling the BB cups and HS bearings into the frame. I mean how long does it take to grease the threads with a proper anti-seize grease?
    (Side note: as the cups are pulled out of their plastic bag, they do have a very small amount of green Fish Grease as we call it(Shimano grease) on the threads. But that alone will do nothing for you the assembly process).

    Colorado-I too 'grew up' with proper guidance at a great shop that tore each and every bike, even the $200 Hardrocks, down to frame and rebuilt.
    www.velocitybicycles.comWhere customers become friends, not simply a dollar sign.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    450
    Quote Originally Posted by Internal14

    Colorado-I too 'grew up' with proper guidance at a great shop that tore each and every bike, even the $200 Hardrocks, down to frame and rebuilt.
    Critical when shops offer free lifetime tuneups, you do it right the first time, you never see them again.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.