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  1. #1
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    Ibis Mojo SL SX -- Squeaky Brakes

    Any tips for taming the incessant noise of my new brakes? Maybe they'll become quiet with time? I've put over 200 miles on my Mojo, with no noise abatement.

    While I don't feel any additional resistance, I do hear the pads touching the rotor ever-so-lightly while I'm not braking.

    Maybe I should try a different kind of pad?

    -B

  2. #2
    Has a cycling disorder
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    Don't use your brakes... :0)

    If that's too extreme you could go here for some proper advice http://www.bikeradar.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=12534963
    Last edited by fishboy2807; 09-01-2008 at 10:43 PM.
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  3. #3
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    Brakes only slow you down! ;-)

  4. #4
    No dabs.
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    Yes, you are onto something with swapping out pads. Try my EBC pad solution.

    I've always had continuous noise problems with disc brakes, usually only with the rear. People have suggested they're not installed right, the pads are not bedded in, use the stuff on the back of the pads, have a shop check the setup, sand the pads, sand the rotors, clean rotors with rubbing alcohol, blah, blah, blah. Bottom line always was, they were installed and aligned perfectly, but the noise on the rear never went away with any of these tricks, although sometimes the sanding of the pads helped for one ride.

    With my Hope Mono Minis, Avid Juicy 7s, Avid Ultimates and Magura Marta SLs, all I needed to do was replace the stock pads on the rear with EBC red or green pads. Red is preferred, but for the Martas only green is available. BeyondBikes.com has a large stock of these. I also tried Kool Stop pads based on one suggestion, but those did not stop the problem.

    However, if your pads are rubbing your rotor, you might need to work on the setup a little more. I've never had Hayes brakes, so can't say for sure if there are any brand-specific issues, but judging from my history with a variety of brands, this may help you out. It's a mystery to me why more people don't have this same issue!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by briantd
    Any tips for taming the incessant noise of my new brakes? Maybe they'll become quiet with time? I've put over 200 miles on my Mojo, with no noise abatement.

    While I don't feel any additional resistance, I do hear the pads touching the rotor ever-so-lightly while I'm not braking.

    Maybe I should try a different kind of pad?

    -B
    wd40 or a silicone spray

    mx

  6. #6
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    So cruel...

    I was really excited about finally getting disc brakes, and yet everyone is telling me not to use them.

  7. #7
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    i use this:


  8. #8
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    Try realigning your brake calipers? What brakes are you running anyway?
    07 Giant Anthem 2 (Int'l Edition) | omartan.co.cc
    Im a MOJO Fanboy

  9. #9
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    I've had periodic squeak problems with my Hayes 9's, and in my experience if it doesn't go away after 40 or so miles of riding, it ain't going away on its own. If you're getting any rotor rubbing, definitely fix that first. Then try pulling the pads, check for uneven wear, and sand them a bit.

    It is very easy (for you or your LBS) to foul a set of brake pads by accidentally getting a drip (or oily finger) of chain lube on your rotor or pad. Once they are fouled, they will sqeak until the end of time in my experience, so at that point you might as well just clean your rotor with alcohol to remove possible oil residue and then install a new set of pads.

    I've learned to minimize brake squeaks by getting anal:
    - Never touch the pad or even rotor surface with fingers or anything oily/greasy.
    - When you lube your bike, take care to wipe off the excess everywhere you use it to avoid splattering, and apply carefully to avoid errant drips.
    - Don't use spray lube at all, since it can easily ricochet into areas where you don't want it.

    p.s. Someone above suggested WD40 or silicon spray, but that sounds sketchy to me. Maybe they were just kidding, or maybe I'm missing something, but I don't think you want any type of lubricant anywhere near your brakes.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by getbusyliving
    It is very easy (for you or your LBS) to foul a set of brake pads by accidentally getting a drip (or oily finger) of chain lube on your rotor or pad. Once they are fouled, they will sqeak until the end of time in my experience, so at that point you might as well just clean your rotor with alcohol to remove possible oil residue and then install a new set of pads.

    I've learned to minimize brake squeaks by getting anal:
    - Never touch the pad or even rotor surface with fingers or anything oily/greasy.
    - When you lube your bike, take care to wipe off the excess everywhere you use it to avoid splattering, and apply carefully to avoid errant drips.
    - Don't use spray lube at all, since it can easily ricochet into areas where you don't want it.
    terrible advice.

    mx

    ps...well not totally sarcastic. but this is sort of like people on here telling others about water and washing bikes
    Last edited by mx_599; 09-09-2008 at 07:43 PM.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mx_599
    terrible advice.

    mx
    So you're saying taking care not to get lube/oil on your pads is bad advice? Better tell that to the brake manufacturer. From Hayes website: "No power could also be caused by the pads being contaminated with oil. Once the pads are contaminated, there is no way to clean them. To fix this, replace the pads, and clean the disc with alcohol."

    http://www.hayesdiscbrake.com/support_faq.shtml

  12. #12
    aka dan51
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    Quote Originally Posted by getbusyliving
    So you're saying taking care not to get lube/oil on your pads is bad advice? Better tell that to the brake manufacturer. From Hayes website: "No power could also be caused by the pads being contaminated with oil. Once the pads are contaminated, there is no way to clean them. To fix this, replace the pads, and clean the disc with alcohol."

    http://www.hayesdiscbrake.com/support_faq.shtml
    I'm guessing, and hoping, that mx was being sarcastic. But without one of these it's hard to tell.

    To the OP. If you are running metallic pads get rid of them, and replace them with something resin/organic based. In my experience whenever I hear squeaky brakes, the pads are always metallic.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by getbusyliving
    So you're saying taking care not to get lube/oil on your pads is bad advice? Better tell that to the brake manufacturer. From Hayes website: "No power could also be caused by the pads being contaminated with oil. Once the pads are contaminated, there is no way to clean them. To fix this, replace the pads, and clean the disc with alcohol."

    http://www.hayesdiscbrake.com/support_faq.shtml
    this should be obvious to people. if they are going to get over spray on their rotor and do nothing about it they have a lot to learn...or it is possible that they are dumb.

    recommending no spray products is bad advice too...at least for the reason you stated.

    you act like you need to be in a germ free environment with a full body suit in order to come within 2 feet of a brake system.

    please, i'll touch my rotor with greasy potato chip fingers in a couple places....just for you. i will even take a picture and post it.

    i don't care what hayes says. i don't like their brakes.



    mx
    Last edited by mx_599; 09-09-2008 at 07:44 PM.

  14. #14
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    Having worked in a shop for the past 7years as a mechanic I can say that most of the squealing brakes we saw were from one of two things. Most commonly it was from pad contamination which can happen rather easily. Second and also easy to do was improper bedding in when the brakes were first used. The small number of squeals that were not solved by replacing the pads and cleaning the rotors and then properly bedding in the new pads, were often more a function of some manufacturing flaw. Switching pad compounds and in some cases rotors can often solve these problems too. Be diligent, and if you are not super skilled when it comes to disc brakes I would see if your lbs can give you some advice, or there's good info on the web if you have the time to search for it.

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