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  1. #1
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    How do I make my Mojo handle better!!!

    I have recently been riding an Orange Patriot 66 alot mainly as a winter bike over here in the uk, and on a recent trip to the alps. The Frame was a 18" and it was coil sprung so was heavy on the climbs, but I loved it on the downs felt I could throw it about much more. However this was stolen last week, and is now my 5th bike to be stolen, so I am planning on either keeping the Mojo as my only bike or swapping the frame for an Orange Five.

    I do love the Mojo, looks great and climbs lovely, and for those all day rides with nothing too technical it's great. But at trail centres, the riding I am currently doing most of it feels very big and I struggle to get off the back, plus on descents I feel like i'm going over the bars. I'm 6 2" and was advise by the dealer to get a Xlarge, it runs with a 90mm Thomson stem at 10%, and Pikes at 140mm.

    So I am wondering if the frame is just too big for me, but the best solutions would seem to be a smaller stem 50 or 60mm and a gravity dropper type post so I can get off the back. Has anyone got any experience's of these, can recommend a seat post, and or any other suggestions to help improve the feel. I'm up for spending a few quid as have a settlement on a full bike at my disposal.

    I am very reluctant to get rid, as I think it is the nicest looking bike I have ever owned.

    Cheers..

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quentinfarquar
    ....but the best solutions would seem to be a smaller stem 50 or 60mm and a gravity dropper type post so I can get off the back. Has anyone got any experience's of these, can recommend a seat post, and or any other suggestions to help improve the feel....
    Cheers..
    I'm about the same height and went with the XL too. I originally started with the Thomson 90mmX10 and always felt the bike was too big. I started wishing I got the Large. I decided to try the 70mmx0 stem. This stem change made a HUGE difference in how the bike handled for me. I also lowered it a little too.

    When looking at the Mojo, I demoed the Large twice, but always felt like I was going to go over the bars on it, which ultimately led me to the XL.

    The adjustable seatpost is the third best thing you can get for a mountain bike IMO. 1st is a suspension fork, second is disk brakes. I have never been able to successfully get behind the seat of any bike I have ever owned. Some may say it's a fit issue, but I doubt it. My legs just don't get wide enough to get around the seat, plus I like a wider seat. I've actually gotten stuck behind the seat a few times. That's a quick way to ruin your experience.

    Do you ever manually drop the seat before going downhill? If so and you still feel like you're going to go OTB then you might have some other issue. Drop it at least 3" and see how it feels.

  3. #3
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    What post do you recomend dan?

  4. #4
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    It is much better dropping the seat, but tend not to as it takes too long and ruins the flow of the ride.

  5. #5
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    What post do you recomend dan?
    One that fits

    Quote Originally Posted by Quentinfarquar
    It is much better dropping the seat, but tend not to as it takes too long and ruins the flow of the ride.
    Too long? Takes me all of about 4.34 secs. Seriously, if that is going to nag at you, then get a joplin/rase/commandpost, etc.

  6. #6
    Mojo0115
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    AMP Post has been excellent for me. So much easy and predictable than the Joplin post was and has an extra 1" of drop. It is not adjustable to any height like the Joplin was.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by dan51
    I'm about the same height and went with the XL too. I originally started with the Thomson 90mmX10 and always felt the bike was too big. I started wishing I got the Large. I decided to try the 70mmx0 stem. This stem change made a HUGE difference in how the bike handled for me. I also lowered it a little too.

    When looking at the Mojo, I demoed the Large twice, but always felt like I was going to go over the bars on it, which ultimately led me to the XL.

    The adjustable seatpost is the third best thing you can get for a mountain bike IMO. 1st is a suspension fork, second is disk brakes. I have never been able to successfully get behind the seat of any bike I have ever owned. Some may say it's a fit issue, but I doubt it. My legs just don't get wide enough to get around the seat, plus I like a wider seat. I've actually gotten stuck behind the seat a few times. That's a quick way to ruin your experience.

    Do you ever manually drop the seat before going downhill? If so and you still feel like you're going to go OTB then you might have some other issue. Drop it at least 3" and see how it feels.
    Exactly

  8. #8
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    Get a Gravity Dropper IMO it is the best post out there. I have owned the Joplin and a Specialized command post. None compare to the Gravity dropper, The GD can be custom built. Like for instance you can get different lengths of post to accomodate any frame, and you can also get different drop lenghths from 2" all the way to 4". I'm currently riding a GD turbo on my Mojo right now. But another cool thing about the GD is that if you ride any other bikes you can move it from bike to bike. The Mojo has a 31.6 seat tube where my Ventana has a 27.2, The GD comes in 27.2 size but it fits my Mojo with a sleeve adapter that fits a 31.6.

  9. #9
    aka dan51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quentinfarquar
    What post do you recomend dan?
    I recommend the Gravity Dropper Turbo.
    There are about 10 adjustable posts between all the guys I ride with. One of the guys has 4 of them. The original GD, the GD Turbo, the Joplin, and the AMP. Of those 4, he likes the GD Turbo the best, and the AMP has been sitting in a box for quite some time due to it being a POS. I went from the GD to the GD Turbo and prefer the Turbo model.

    Here's my personal experience pros and cons
    GD Turbo and original GD
    Pros
    • easy maintenance
    • easy to use
    • has a distinct click so I know it's engaged or not
    • all mechanical


    Cons
    • (Turbo)the actuator wire comes into the body at a right angle, making install interesting on some bikes.
    • the lever is not aesthetically pleasing, but works great.
    • the seat mounting mechanism never seems to hold a seat in place. replace it with a Thomson seat clamp and the problem goes away.
    • (original) you have to tap the seat to get it to come back up. This reason alone got me to move to the Turbo.
    • butt ugly


    Joplin
    Pros
    • looks great
    • lever is nice and easy to use


    Cons
    • hydraulic based. 2 guys didn't have theirs at a race yesterday due to them blowing up and needing an overhaul. I can overhaul the GD in a few minutes.
    • (minor)when the post is down, you can pull up on the seat and raise the post. when you let go the seat goes back down. I could see this being a problem with shorts or backpacks getting caught.
    • no audible noise to know if it's up or down. Personal preference for me.


    AMP
    Pro
    • nice lever


    Cons
    • much more finicky to operate. Wouldn't lock into a down position as easily. This was a 3 year old model, so hopefully they have improved on that.


    Specialized command
    I used this on a friends bike to test a section of trail we just built, so my time is limited to about 1 minute. But in the one minute of time, I could not get the seat to stay down. After messing with it for a while I popped the quick release and manually dropped the seat. This was also a while ago and one of the original ones, so hopefully that has been fixed. Could be user error, but hard should it be to click a lever and move the seat?

  10. #10
    aka dan51
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    Quote Originally Posted by ddraewwg
    Too long? Takes me all of about 4.34 secs. Seriously, if that is going to nag at you, then get a joplin/rase/commandpost, etc.
    I use to have the exact same thinking, until I tried one.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by dan51
    I use to have the exact same thinking, until I tried one.
    I can see how on certain trails it would make more of a difference than others. For instance, rolling terrain. However with certain trails that pretty much climb the whole way then descend the other, I (as well as the other riders I go with) basically stop and rest for a bit anyways....shoot the $hit, enjoy the views, nature break, eat, etc. In those instances, an adjustable seatpost is irrelevant. Probably the biggest reason though is I normally ride with friends and none of us use an adjustable post.

    To me, adjustable seatposts are purely personal taste/preference. Offers no technical advantage like upgrading/changing other components like tires, wheels, forks, shock, drivetrain, etc.

  12. #12
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    Hi Mate, I ride a mojo in the UK. Forget the long stems. Go for a 50-70max. I think there is a lot of miss information about stem lengths. Check out leelikesbikes.comand you will see some very well articulated articles about cockpit setup.

    Pike dive. So unless you have a set of pushed ones you will feel some dramatic geo changes if you can't get your weight back. Also consider running a little more sag in the rear.
    If you have the budget or can beg borrow.... try a set of bigger forks.

    The Patriot is a solid performer but I like my Mojo better

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by ddraewwg

    To me, adjustable seatposts are purely personal taste/preference. Offers no technical advantage like upgrading/changing other components like tires, wheels, forks, shock, drivetrain, etc.
    Couldn't disagree with you more. Although unreliable, my Joplin made the biggest change to my enjoyment of my bike and the trails I ride. Optimized saddle position and the ability to keep going no matter what. Not everyone will feel the same I'm sure but I really miss mine. Waiting for the new KS 950's to arrive in the UK. Anyone who has altered their saddle mid-ride should at least try one.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by nzl62
    Hi Mate, I ride a mojo in the UK. Forget the long stems. Go for a 50-70max. I think there is a lot of miss information about stem lengths. Check out leelikesbikes.comand you will see some very well articulated articles about cockpit setup.

    Pike dive. So unless you have a set of pushed ones you will feel some dramatic geo changes if you can't get your weight back. Also consider running a little more sag in the rear.
    If you have the budget or can beg borrow.... try a set of bigger forks.

    The Patriot is a solid performer but I like my Mojo better
    I have just ordered a 70mm 25 degree stem, and a joplin.

    The Pikes have been pushed by TF, I did consider some Lyriks when I built the bike, but was advised against it. Budget isn't an issue as have had a bike stolen, and am sticking with the one, so I can spend on getting it right.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by nzl62
    Couldn't disagree with you more. Although unreliable, my Joplin made the biggest change to my enjoyment of my bike and the trails I ride. Optimized saddle position and the ability to keep going no matter what. Not everyone will feel the same I'm sure but I really miss mine. Waiting for the new KS 950's to arrive in the UK. Anyone who has altered their saddle mid-ride should at least try one.
    I "optimize" my saddle position all the time.

    1) Pull quick release lever
    2) Lower seat
    3) Engage quick release lever.

  16. #16
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    I'll chime in on the adjustable seatpost: Best money I have ever spent on a bike accessories. I am ultra-paranoid about my seat height. Nothing f's up my flow like the sensation of my having seat wedged up in my a$$. I have a joplin with the remote and use it to raise and lower my seat almost constantly, both on the uphills and downhills.

    If you have the coin for a bigger fork, go for it. Get the Lyrik w/ U-turn and you can always crank it back down to the height of the Pike (but I doubt you will for the downhills)

  17. #17
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    You should buy a stem from your LBS who will let you exchange it so you can try a 50, 60 and 70mm stem. Anything past 70mm feels really awkward. The initial response is numb and delayed, then suddenly the steering responds really fast making it feel twitchy and not linear. You should really try a 50 or 60mm stem, try one with no rise so you can keep your center of gravity lower. try Lowering the the stem also. Try no spacers between the stem and headset, or maybe just one really short one. This will make the steering feel more responsive yet very linear, and will also keep your center of gravity lower.

    I highly recommend the KS seat posts, 5 inches of travel with infinite adjustment. No side-to-side play and it also comes in a setback version that has 30mm of setback. That way you can use a 50mm stem and have more room, and get yourself further back on the rear wheel. I have a friend who has the GD turbo, Joplin and KS i900-r. He loves the KS over the other seatposts. Same goes for a couple of guys who own a bike shop near me, they carry them all and use the KS i900-r on there mojo's.

    Cheers,
    majorbonr

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by ddraewwg
    I "optimize" my saddle position all the time.

    1) Pull quick release lever
    2) Lower seat
    3) Engage quick release lever.
    no need for sarcasm but I assume you first :

    1) Brake and stop.
    2) Get off bike
    3) Steps detailed above
    4) Re Mount bike


    I love the adjustable posts, run shorter stems than advised, 710mm carbon bars, more sag, longish fork and my bike rips.
    Best tail bike I have ever owned.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by nzl62
    I love the adjustable posts, run shorter stems than advised, 710mm carbon bars, more sag, longish fork and my bike rips.
    Best tRail bike I have ever owned.
    Absolutely (with a small addition) - unless you're using your bike for chasing things other than trails... .

  20. #20
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    SunLine AM 65 mm stem, SunLine V-one OS low rise wider bars, and Crank Bros. Joplin made a big difference to me. Also keep the headset stack/spacers lower will help IMO.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by nzl62
    no need for sarcasm but I assume you first :

    1) Brake and stop.
    2) Get off bike
    3) Steps detailed above
    4) Re Mount bike


    I love the adjustable posts, run shorter stems than advised, 710mm carbon bars, more sag, longish fork and my bike rips.
    Best tail bike I have ever owned.
    Sarcasm wasn't meant to be offensive or offputting. I'm very sarcastic in general....most of my comments always have a tinge of sarcasm in it.....just ask my buds....but I know e-dialogue is much different....comes off differently.

    I don't doubt the convenience of the adj. seatposts but to me, that's the only thing it provides: convenience. To others, convenience translates into "more fun". But for those that don't see it as an inconvenience, it's means much less. I still stand my ground sayigd that it offers no real performance advantage. If I swapped out posts and lowered them to the same height, it doesn't make me ride better. You can't argue otherwise. If I was racing, then yes, time becomes a factor and the adj seatpost would make total sense as it is a competitive advantage. Compared to other "upgrades" like wheels, tires, shock, forks, those actually impact the ride. You may say that "convenience" changes your ride, but it only changes your enjoyment of not having to deal with the "inconvenience" of getting off the bike, releasing the lever, etc. etc. I don't see that as an inconvenience. I see it as time to chat with buds, stare at my bike (cuz it's soooooooooooooo purty), take a drink, put on pads, eat a bar, take some pix, rest, etc etc. In that respect, an adj seatpost makes even less sense.

  22. #22
    Mojo0115
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    Quote Originally Posted by ddraewwg
    Sarcasm wasn't meant to be offensive or offputting. I'm very sarcastic in general....most of my comments always have a tinge of sarcasm in it.....just ask my buds....but I know e-dialogue is much different....comes off differently.

    I don't doubt the convenience of the adj. seatposts but to me, that's the only thing it provides: convenience. To others, convenience translates into "more fun". But for those that don't see it as an inconvenience, it's means much less. I still stand my ground sayigd that it offers no real performance advantage. If I swapped out posts and lowered them to the same height, it doesn't make me ride better. You can't argue otherwise. If I was racing, then yes, time becomes a factor and the adj seatpost would make total sense as it is a competitive advantage. Compared to other "upgrades" like wheels, tires, shock, forks, those actually impact the ride. You may say that "convenience" changes your ride, but it only changes your enjoyment of not having to deal with the "inconvenience" of getting off the bike, releasing the lever, etc. etc. I don't see that as an inconvenience. I see it as time to chat with buds, stare at my bike (cuz it's soooooooooooooo purty), take a drink, put on pads, eat a bar, take some pix, rest, etc etc. In that respect, an adj seatpost makes even less sense.
    Convenience is a big part of the benefit of an adjustable seatpost.

    However, for me, there is genuine performance improvements as well as I ride substantially better when I can maintain my flow and being able to drop my seat and raise it again on many trails I ride lets me just flow through tough technical down and a point of the seat climb straight after it.

    That said, adjustable posts do also add another level of complexity to your riding, if you forget to "shift it up" or drop it down it it can be very distracting. Much in the same vein of a bad gear shift (or lack of a good one) .

    It's all about choices and I think I am a better rider with my adjustable post - and pretty much because I think I am - I am. My wife on the other hand hates the idea of the post and I can't convince her to try it and rides the same technical terrain right on my rear tire.

  23. #23
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    biggest Differences

    For me, the biggest change for what you describe was getting a 50mm stem on there. I could get much further off the back when the seat was adjusted correctly. After 2 really bad endo crashes that put me out of commission for a while I decided to change a few things. Another big change was switching to a fox 36 (160mm) and getting Havoc wheels with 28mm rims and 2.35 Nevegals. I instantly improved the techy downhills and surprisingly, I made some rocky techy climbs I hadn't made before. I think this is because the bike became so much stiffer up front with the 20mm thru axle and wider wheels. After a year or so I switched to a 90mm stem, but ideally I would have a 70 on there. It got to the point where techy downhills and small drops were easy, but some of the steep climbs were giving me problems and with the slacker head angle and taller front, the longer stem helped keep the front on track. I still switch stems regularly depending on if I am going to a lift accessed place or more of a xc place like Kingdom Trails. I keep the seatpost on the low side, and with these changes I decided to go without a drop post since I had no problems getting back and low, and spending the cash on pushing my RP23. Good Luck

  24. #24
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    For those who think an adjustable seatpost is a waste of money this is the way I look at it 1)It saves time and is easy to do while riding 2)With carbon bikes you just torque it to the correct spec with a fixed collar and ride. Those that don't have an adjustable seatpost use the quick release collar over and over so they don't actually know the torque specs and how much they are stressing the seatpost tube each time they raise lower the seat. Just my .02!
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  25. #25
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    DD, its all about convenience ( and not stopping the flow of the trail). Arguably there will be a performance loss with an adjustable post due to the slight weight gain. But over the course of any of the trails that I ride the up down post offers a significant performance increase. That is to say, I ride the exact same trail way faster due to not stopping and getting the saddle at the optimal height for any given section (up or down). Indeed one of the main advantages is getting the post back to my best knee friendly pedaling height. If I ride the exact same trail and don't stop and use a fixed post I am still slower. I'm taking between 5 and 10 mins over two hours

    I know that weights bother some riders but the benefits far out weigh the costs in my opinion. Since moving to discs/suspension etc it offered the single best improvement in trail enjoyment. An in the end it is demonstrably faster over a trail where saddle height matters

  26. #26
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    ddraewwg, it's funny that you argue so fervidly against something you've never tried. I totally agreed with your thinking until I actually tried an adjustable post. The only reason I tried one was because so many people in the forums made/make the rather extreme claims that "It's the single best thing I've ever bought for my bike", or "It makes a huge impact on my riding." It got me to thinking, well, maybe there's something to these adjustable post thingies, maybe I'll give one a try. I wasn't keen to add weight to my bike, but maybe I'll just try it out.

    Dude, I am never taking it off. It weighs around half a pound more than my previous post, but...it's never coming off. For me it's much more than a matter of convenience. Like nzl62 and other have said, an adjustable post makes the ride flow! Before, I would only ever adjust my post for really major changes, like a really severe or extended downhill. With an adjustable post I just thumb the release and instantly switch the seat height all-up, all-down, or anywhere useful in between. Little hills, big hills, you just keep flowing on. And for me, this equals more fun.

    The only people that I don't think would really appreciate and benefit from one of these are the people that ride flat-ish, non-technical stuff. It's the non-flat, technical stuff where this thing makes all the difference.

    Everybody rides in different conditions, which is why my perfect tires/shock/fork/etc. setup may be totally different than what works best for anyone else, right? All I'm saying is that these posts work awesome for myself and many others.

    You should give one a try, just to check it out. You might like it. And if you don't then at least you'll have a fully informed position that is totally respectable.

    Cheers.
    "I thought you'd never love me without my Mojo." -Austin Powers

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