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  1. #1
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    From Heckler to Mojo???

    I currently ride a Santa Cruz Heckler...a great bike, but it's a little heavy and I know the single pivot doesn't pedal/brake as well as multi-pivot designs.

    I love the Heckler's price, simplicity, and durability...but I have been bit by the endurance racing bug.

    I want a bike that can be built around 26 pounds and will pedal better in XC, 24, 12, and 8 hour races than my Heckler...but I want to be able to do some rough trail riding with it also (not much, probably around 5 times a year, because I rarely get to drive the couple hours required to get to such trails).

    Oh yeah, I weigh around 195-200 pounds naked (so add gear...mostly a camelbak with 50-100 ounces of water).

    Will the "regular" Mojo (not the SL version) meet my needs and will the carbon hold up to my weight and the eventual crash hear and there? If you say, "yes" please be specific in your answer. Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Will the "regular" Mojo (not the SL version) meet my needs and will the carbon hold up to my weight and the eventual crash hear and there? If you say, "yes" please be specific in your answer. Thanks.
    Well, Brian Lopes is riding the Mojo so I think it should not cause any problems. Besides, Ibis has one of the best CS in the market, you can't go wrong by choosing a Mojo.
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  3. #3
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    I need more logic than "Lopes rides one". He gets paid to ride it.

    I want real testimonials that the Mojo can can be the best "one bike" for my weight and riding needs (endurance racing to aggressive trail riding).

    Is it better than the new Santa Cruz Blur LT2? If so, why?

    Anyone else out there?

  4. #4
    MountainGoat aka OldGoat
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    For me itís hard to say for anyone else if this bike or that bike is best. What I did when I purchased my Mojo was to buy a used one so I could check it out for myself. I knew that if I was unhappy with the bike I could resell it for almost no loss of money. Well that is exactly what Iím doing. I loved the Mojo so much that now Iím shopping for a SL WTF new bike. You mention the BLT and I have had lots of saddle time on one that I owned. Unfortunately it was not what I wanted. Itís a great bike but I could never get used to the peddle kick back while climbing. So I sold it and got an Epiphany. Crap now Iím rambling.

    You do know that Ibis has a great domo program and you can take one out a hammer it on your own trails. Check it out.
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  5. #5
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    Lopes can ride practically anything over 3" of travel like a big hit or DH bike. Maybe we should seriously consider not using him as a reference to the capabilities of the Mojo..

  6. #6
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    Thanks for the honest feedback...that's what I'm looking for.

    No, I did not know I could demo a Mojo. I doubt there is an opportunity to demo one in my area (Modesto, CA). No good riding/bike shops around here.

    I'm not very picky. Most of the things riders complain about in these forums are not even noticeable to me. I do know my Heckler is a great bike...which leads me to believe a Mojo or BLT2 would be much better.

    Has anyone out there thrashed (ridden hard/crashed) their Mojo? How does the carbon hold up to "normal" trail riding crashes? How does the carbon hold up to aggressive trail riding on a regular basis? I hardly ever crash or pound my bikes on knarly trails (because I rarely have access to that kind of riding). But when I do, I like to let it all hang out on the descents.

    What is so special about the Ibis customer service (that I've heard so much about in this forum)? What if I did crack the carbon frame? What if the warranty was expired? What would Ibis do for me?

  7. #7
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    I'm not saying Lopes is not legit. I'm just saying I need more specifics than just, "Lopes rides one."

  8. #8
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    I rented a Heckler for a few days whilst on holiday in Scotland. I was pleasantly surprised compared to my Mojo. The mojo climbs better (not as much as i expected though), and feels lighter and would i think be ideal for endurance racing.

    I would have liked to try the same forks on Mojo and Heckler, as the Heckler with a Pike 454 felt a lot tighter/stiffer down hill than my mojo with a Fox 32. My guess it's the fork though.

    The Mojo is a very flexible bike, choose the build and components according to your riding and you'll be happy.

  9. #9
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    Heck, the title of this thread says "INCREDIBLE CUSTOMER SERVICE". read it, love it. http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=426322

    btw, I own a '02 Heckler and am contemplating either a Mojo or BLT. One thing I don't worry about with Ibis is CS... not that I worry about it with my Santa Cruz either. The Mojo really is under a microscope when it comes to frame failure, and I've not heard one bad remark about their CS. Of course, the best CS is not having to need it....I have 3 friends that have Mojo's, and we are all trail riders with occasional shuttle or ski-lift runs. No big gaps or drops to flats or hucking, just berms and rock gardens and logs. No problems on their Mojo's.

    Both Mojo and BLT bikes seem great and are very similar. You really have to try them both out to see which one feels better for you. Make a weekend out of it and come to someplace in the Bay Area where you can probablly get one of the shops to show you around some of the trails. Trailhead Cyclery in San Jose and Passion Trail Bikes in Belmont (near San Mateo) are both great shops and demo both Santa Cruz and Ibis. Not sure if they both have the BLT, so you might want to call to check. I think it would take you about 100 minutes to get to either shop from Modesto, and you'd get some great riding too. Well, a lot better than what you'd get in Modesto (I used to live there so I know what its like).

  10. #10
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    my tonage is 220 # and i hit a few jumps (small/med) impacts with no problems. feels pretty sturdy. never had a big crash though. my skill level is far to superior good luck worth every penny

  11. #11
    Founder: Dirty3hirties
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    I've only owned 2 dualies (HH100X and the Mojo). The Mojo is fairly new (Oct. '07) but I have put on enough miles to know exactly the differences between the HH and Mojo.

    Climbing: Although the Mojo has longer travel, slacker angles, it climbs better. I have the same wheelset, same tires, same pretty much everything so I'm able to attribute the differences to the frame/design/etc. You will notice more pedal strikes climbing through rock gardens/roots, etc but you'll adapt to that. It's not a deficit in my book. On really steep inclines (30+ degree slope/grade), I would have expected the Mojo to wander more. It doesn't . The HH would actually squat making the bike's front end feel lighter than the Mojo. I'd have to concentrate more and scootch up on the saddle to keep the nose down. No pedal feedback. The HH is a great climbing bike.....the Mojo makes it easier on the steeper stuff, holds traction better. Winner: Mojo.

    Flatish singletrack riding: I ride mostly singletrack descents....nothing extremely difficult. Just "normal" norcal stuff. Honestly, if the trail is pretty smooth, you don't really notice the difference....you're not demanding too much from the bike. The bike is still quick through the twisties....I would have suspected it to be more difficult to manage, but I could have adapted to the "feel" as well. However, switchbacks either up or down are easier on the Mojo. On really tight uphill switchbacks, I do notice the longer wheelbase but because the front end doesn't wander as much, I can feel comfortable on the tight turns whereas on the HH, I would feel like the tire was going to lift up and flop around, dropping me on my arse.
    It could be technique obviously but I don't think so...not for this particular maneuver because the bike feels better balanced. Winner: Mojo

    Steeper descents: The slacker angles, longer travel make the Mojo a hands down winner. Not even a comparison. Heavier riders report flex issues with the rear, especially in rocky terrain or high speed off camber turns. I don't see it/feel it but I'm not a clydesdale (155 lbs). I ride the Mojo much faster on any technical terrain....but this should be obvious. It suits my needs fine and I know that I'm not at the limit of what the bike is able to handle. I do take some smallish drops to flat (no more than 3 ft. or so), small jumps, logs, etc. The bike is plush for a 5.5" bike. Braking action is superb...feels very planted. The longer travel has something to do with this too though. The bike is also very "quiet"....and I'm not referring to the chain slap. There is definitely some very noticeable damping qualities. I did a write up when I swapped my carbon bar for an AL bar and the differences were HUGE....I was shocked at how distinct the differences were. Now just imagine changing your whole bike from AL to carbon. I think that is the main reason whenever someone rides my bike when they say "It's really smooth"

    I have ridden a friends Heckler and the new Spot and neither feel as plush as the Mojo. The Heckler was also outfitted a 160 TA fork....didn't feel nearly as nice....just felt "harsher" to me....and this was on the descents. Granted it was not set up specifically for me and every bike is going to "feel" different but my buddy is basically the same size as me. The Spot also felt unbalanced in some weird way to me.....like the rear was riding high and over driving the fork. Our kits are the exact same pretty much so again, most of this has to be attributed to the frame/suspension.

    IMO, the Mojo makes a great choice as an endurance racer. You can race it competitively if you wanted to but for the days when you're just out kickin' it with your buds, it's just a complete blast to ride. 26 lbs is definitely a realistic weight as well....you don't need the SL frame to get it either. I say realistic because people quote their bike weights and some of them are highly suspect With the Mojo....it's the real deal.

    Sorry, I don't have an exact long term comparison with the Heckler and the Mojo.....but my bud (bstyle74) rode my Mojo when I was on his Heckler....and he really likes the ride. If you don't have a distaste for carbon, the frames unique look (let's face it, some people hate it, some love it), you should definitely try it out. Modesto isn't too far from the bay area. You owe it to yourself to look into it. A lot of bay area stores have Mojo's to demo. Check out other rides too.

  12. #12
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    well I cant tell you from personal experience cuz I dont own a Mojo but there are many riders here form varying riding background that Im sure don't mind giving their opinion.
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  13. #13
    It's the axle
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    In my experience, the Mojo is anything but flexible. I recently marveled while hammering up a fire road and trying to pedal with the bike angled, trying to flex it, that I realized just how stiff this bike really is.

    But that is only my experience. I've only had several bikes to compare with. But I really don't like flexible frames, so there is a pretty good chance that if I like it so will you.

  14. #14
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    I have my name down for a demo of a $9K Cannondale Moto this weekend. That should be closer to the Heckler in general terms than the Mojo - longer travel and more big hit oriented. Don't they say the Heckler is a retired downhiller bike? Unless the demo fails to come through I will post up my thoughts when I can. I am really keen to compare something new and flash with the mojo, but I am still buzzing after a couple of great rides last WE. The harder I push it, the more it gives out.

    BTW I caught a big rock hit on the last ride. On a particularly nasty fast rocky line the front wheel threw a 25cm round boulder into the BB or the crank (no idea cause I can't find any marks from that or a later hit on the downtube) and it bounced back into a large standing stone and then into my shin. Shin looks and feels not so happy, but bike is fine.

  15. #15
    Mojo0115
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    Quote Originally Posted by historeeteacher
    I currently ride a Santa Cruz Heckler...a great bike, but it's a little heavy and I know the single pivot doesn't pedal/brake as well as multi-pivot designs.

    I love the Heckler's price, simplicity, and durability...but I have been bit by the endurance racing bug.

    I want a bike that can be built around 26 pounds and will pedal better in XC, 24, 12, and 8 hour races than my Heckler...but I want to be able to do some rough trail riding with it also (not much, probably around 5 times a year, because I rarely get to drive the couple hours required to get to such trails).

    Oh yeah, I weigh around 195-200 pounds naked (so add gear...mostly a camelbak with 50-100 ounces of water).

    Will the "regular" Mojo (not the SL version) meet my needs and will the carbon hold up to my weight and the eventual crash hear and there? If you say, "yes" please be specific in your answer. Thanks.
    I ride a "fat" mojo with coil front and rear and take it up long climbs in the Colorado rockies. With the riding it sounds like you have you could very easily keep it very XC oriented and then after you have had it a while invest in another wheelset for the "rough" trail riding or more easily (and cheaply) just switch the tires out to a more burly 2.35" set and run lighter 2.1" foe all of your other riding.

    The bike itself is almost a definition of versatility. A number of people here on the forums race theirs in endurance oriented events while a number of others of us use it for more aggressive all-mountain style riding. I also race mine in Super-D events.

    Bottom line - try and get a test ride to see how it feels but if you have to buy it blind I can't think of a more risk free bike than the mojo. Since you probably won't have a shop to service it you will just have to make do with self repairs and then rely on the freaking awesome Ibis Customer Service for anything in the frame itself.

  16. #16
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    Thanks...a lot of good feedback...

    It sounds like I will have to demo the Mojo...and the BLT2...

    I wonder which one will be better for my mostly "endurance" diet of riding?...I'm guessing the Mojo...

    I'm warming up to carbon...just recently converted to a 31.8 Easton Monkeylite XC carbon bar...the real test for the carbon bar will be the Downieville XC race in 2 weeks...I hope it makes it down the mountain in one piece...

    Any other thoughts/advice is greatly appreciated...keep it coming!

    P.S. Will I regret going from a single pivot to a multi-pivot frame? Is there going to be a lot more lateral flex/maintenance involved? How often do you have to replace the bearing kits on the Mojo?

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gregg K
    In my experience, the Mojo is anything but flexible. I recently marveled while hammering up a fire road and trying to pedal with the bike angled, trying to flex it, that I realized just how stiff this bike really is.

    But that is only my experience. I've only had several bikes to compare with. But I really don't like flexible frames, so there is a pretty good chance that if I like it so will you.
    I think he meant versatile flexible not flexy flexible.

  18. #18
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    I was also worried about the carbon, and aside from the dings and stuff on the clearcoat the mojo is running just fine. I'm 150lbs, and have biffed a few good times on the mojo and nothing went wrong aside from my body scars. I've done small jumps (10ft to transitions, and to flat) on it and it's totally fine and feels great in the air too (my bottom bracket is feeling it again tho)...I tested the blur 06, and the mojo geometry just fit me better, so try them out like others have suggested. Being a lighter rider, I love the lighter weight bike with the ability to toss it around unlike a tru xc ride.

    I came off of a kona dawg, and had the mojo for a year and no maintenance...i did take the pivots apart just to do it and check it all out a few months back, and it was pretty easy and I'm a tech tard.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by historeeteacher
    ...the real test for the carbon bar will be the Downieville XC race in 2 weeks...
    If you're going to be in Downieville, swing by Ybua Expeditions since they have BLT2 for demo.

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