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  1. #1
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    HD demo ride thread

    What's your impression after demoing a Mojo HD?

    My impression: Totally solid, light weight, ideally balanced rock climber and downhill flyer.

    After a 20 mile singletrack ride of familiar rock and rooty climbing and downhill with interludes of rollers, whoops, berm railing, and trail side jumps. I saw a lot of people demoing the HD last Sunday at Santa Rosa's Annadel multi-use (bike) park.

    I see the Ibis demo tour is heading to Moab in September after Eurobike, via Bootleg Canyon for Interbike, Hurricane, Red Canyon, and Outerbike in Moab.

    Details: http://ibiscycles.com/demo_time/



    ...
    Last edited by derby; 09-01-2010 at 09:26 PM.

  2. #2
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    I'll repost my demo report from another thread This was posted before the HD140 was announced...I think I would actually consider getting an HD now, with a Talas so I could lower the travel to 120f/140r for normal riding, and keep an extra set of heavier wheels around for bumping it up to 160 for those sorts of days. Again...if I won the lottery.

    So I'll weigh in as someone who owns a Mojo, and rode an HD for about 1.5 hours on a trail that I frequently ride on my Mojo, which includes lots of technical climbing and descending, twisty fast singletrack, and rhythm sections.

    I love my mojo first and foremost, the suspension makes me both a better climber and descender. I really like climbing, and I think the mojo's suspension actually helps me in the technical and steep stuff. I find the riding position a little odd compared to the longer-top tube bikes I have ridden in the past, but I am getting used to it.

    Rode this HD this weekend, can't say I would buy one for my type of riding, especially the way this one was set up. The 160mm fork was too much, the front end was way too high for climbing and the slacker head tube angle (both on the HD and due to the 160mm fork) made tight switchbacks (both up and down) more difficult than on my 140 equipped mojo. I didn't really feel much difference in the suspension between my mojo and the HD, but the extra travel became evident going down the technical bits. The bottom bracket felt higher on the HD (I smashed my pedals less than usual) but that may have just been because I was babying the demo bike.

    For stiffness, hard to compare as the setups were totally differrent (My mojo has Crossmax ST wheels with 9mm QRs, and the HD had Crank Brothers Iodines with a 20mm front and a 12mm maxle rear) but the HD seemed way way stiffer when putting power down and through the corners....but...and a BIG BUT...I don't find the flex in my mojo at all a problem, I rail it through corners and know how it responds, and I love the way it rides.

    I think what you need to ask yourself in choosing the bike (and again, I haven't ridden any of the other bikes you mention...my friend has a Firebird which I have not ridden yet) is what type of riding you do. After finishing the demo, I concluded that I wouldn't buy a HD unless I was doing more freeride/AM type riding. In Colorado, we have way too much climbing to make these types of bikes necessary or useful for an every day bike. If I was building a bike for resorts (and I won the lottery) I would definitely buy a HD, it is super light for what it is and very fast handling, way better than the true downhill bikes I rode at a resort a few weeks ago (Spec Demo 8, Yeti 303, Kona Stab Supreme) and would kick ass over tabletops and in the rough.

    If you want a Freeride/AM type bike, I think the HD would be great, I don't think it would handle any better or worse than the Firebird I have seen ridden, it is a sweet bike....again though, I think my Mojo is a much better bike for the type of riding I do every day.

    In any case, I am a total Ibis fanboy, the people, the ethos, and the bikes are great...based on my experience with the company (since the mid-90's) i'd go with the Ibis on that alone.

    I also rode a tranny that day...wow, sweet bike....if they made a 29'er tranny in a couple years, I might have to get one of those for the less bumpy rides I do.

  3. #3
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    I was very surprised how closely the Mojo HD felt to my Mojo when I demoed it at Mountain Bike Oregon. I took it on a 25 mile ride that had about 2500 feet of climbing and 4500 of descending. My regular mojo has a 120 stem, Ibis dh bars, and a 150 fork. I actually thought the front end of the the HD felt lower with the 60mm stem and monkey lite xc bars. I noticed the most difference by far on the descents (on climbs, I felt almost no difference at all--that's a really good thing!). The mojo is quicker and more responsive (perhaps I am just more used to it) and therefore better in the switchbacks and tight turns, but those same qualities make it much more squirrely in the really rough stuff and landing drops and jumps. On the other hand, the HD is supremely stable and smooth at speed, especially when things get rough. There are several big divots on the ride I did that would really shake the mojo, but the HD just gobbled them up like they weren't even there.

    If I were just starting out, I would definitely buy the HD unless I was going to only own one bike and I intended to XC race. My ideal setup now would be an HD for all riding and super-d racing and a hardtail or short travel xc bike for xc racing. But since I already own a mojo, it might be a year or two...

  4. #4
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    When I got my HD the first thing I really noticed was the longer wheelbase and slacker HA. Switchbacks I'd make no problem on my Mojo felt weird and difficult. Fast forward 2 months and I have fully adjusted to the feel of the HD and those switchbacks are once again easy.

    When I demo'd it several months ago I was surprised at how well it ate up trails I ride my Mojo on all the time.

    The Mojo is going on a diet and will be the long ride and XC race bike, the HD will remain a fat pig and will be my weekend warrior.

  5. #5
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    pedaled one around a parking lot. couldn't make it flex like a regular mojo, and this made me happy.

    The bike feels incredibly SOLID.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coloradoxj13
    In Colorado, we have way too much climbing to make these types of bikes necessary or useful for an every day bike.
    I disagree. As I have posted elsewhere I think this bike is an excellent climber. Not an excellent climber for a 160mm bike, but an excellent climber in general. If you're into fast and furious fireroads... maybe not. But In Colorado where the trails are just as techy going up as going down, where baby heads and chunder are always on the menu, a bike with the incredible traction properties of the Mojo HD is very favorable.
    Excuse the repeated posting, but a little shot from 13,222ft.
    It climbs just fine.
    <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/subliminalshiver/4895708266/" title="IMG_1249 by subliminalshiver1, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm5.static.flickr.com/4140/4895708266_82db577abb.jpg" width="374" height="500" alt="IMG_1249" /></a>

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by subliminalshiver
    I disagree. As I have posted elsewhere I think this bike is an excellent climber. Not an excellent climber for a 160mm bike, but an excellent climber in general.
    Let me try this another way...

    I think my WRX is an excellent car. Not an excellent off-roader for a car, but an excellent car in general.

    Doesn't make it the best car for going up nasty jeep roads, but it will make it. There are better cars for the purpose, and better bikes for the purpose.

    I'd rather ride a regular mojo to the top of A-Basin or wherever your shot is taken. I rode the HD up the rock garden at Hall Ranch, believe me, I clear a lot more on my mojo than I did on the HD.

    If you look at my post I did say I would buy one with some modifications. My WRX made it to the top of Rollins Pass a couple weekends ago, doesn't mean I should have taken it there, or that a jeep might have been a better option...I could ride a huffy to 13,222 if I wanted to, doesn't make it a bad ass climber.

    Anyway, this is just a thread for opinions, we all have opinions, ours are just different, I think a 160mm bike is overkill for most of the riding I have done in CO.

  8. #8
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    I think maybe we ride different places...
    The Rock Garden at Hall is fairly technical... though I wonder how much of your experience was based on having limited experience on the HD... not being used to it. Personally my technical skills are a little haywire when I transition from my hardtail SS to my HD for a few minutes while my muscle memory adjusts. So.. while the post that you originally posted that got sent to my email suggested that a HD owner like myself is not the best source of demo information on the basis that
    Quote Originally Posted by Coloradoxj13
    "better demo-opinions come from people that don't need to justify spending $5k on the bike they bought, even if that bike is awesome".
    I would argue the opposite, that the only valid opinion is one that has actually spent some time on one, versus a quick spin up the Rock Garden. If I felt that I had to "justify" my purchase that badly I think that my HD would sell very quickly, very close to retail. I have nothing to gain by singing the praises of a lackluster bike. I have no sponsors, no coercion, no one I am beholden to. If my bike didn't live up to expectation it wouldn't be my bike for long.
    Quote Originally Posted by Coloradoxj13
    My WRX made it to the top of Rollins Pass a couple weekends ago, doesn't mean I should have taken it there, or that a jeep might have been a better option...I could ride a huffy to 13,222 if I wanted to, doesn't make it a bad ass climber.
    Sure... but I that's not really what we're going on about. This would make more sense:
    Quote Originally Posted by subliminalshiver
    My Mojo made it to the top of Rollins Pass a couple weekends ago, doesn't mean I should have taken it there; a Mojo HD might have been a better option...I could ride a HD to 13,222 if I wanted to, because it's a bad ass climber.

  9. #9
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    A nice guy at the bike park let me hit a drop on his burly HD. 180mm talas, mtx rims, atlas cranks. Not a weenie build. I was dropping on my hardtail, so of course the squish felt good. But where the bike really impressed me was riding back up the trail. Loose dirt with some roots, fork set at 180, felt great. This sucker motors up hills!

    I was really happy to see a burly build on the HD frame. Weight still felt reasonable. I might be sold on this beauty. It's impressive.
    Taking it easy for all you sinners.

  10. #10
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    Come on gentlemen, let's use our common sense.
    The Mojo is the better climber with its steeper head angle and lighter weight, and the HD with more front and rear travel , slacker head angle obviously makes for a better descender.
    Just common sense and physics.
    I actually prefer the feel of the Mojo, as I've never bottomed it and love the way it climbs, and don't feel any flex at all.
    Another bike to consider with longer travel is the Titus El Guapo.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maverick1
    Come on gentlemen, let's use our common sense.
    The Mojo is the better climber with its steeper head angle and lighter weight, and the HD with more front and rear travel , slacker head angle obviously makes for a better descender.
    Just common sense and physics.
    Perhaps...
    I think the main point here to be made is that the HD climbs really well. And since it's worth saying again, I will... that is true not just in the 6+ inch realm, but in general. The bike does great going up and better going down. To be clear: Don't let the travel fool you! We had this debate several years ago when the Mojo came out "Oh I don't know... 5.5 inches seems like a lot.. I don't know if I need it, kinda seems like overkill.... seems like a lot of travel to climb with...". Suspension has evolved tremendously, and the additional travel on the HD really seems to enhance the overall abilities of the bike without sacrifice. Same with the HT angle. Slacker though it may be I really don't think it takes so much away from the climbing ability that it can be seen as a trade-off.

    There seem to be a lot of folks on there here internets setting this bike up for DH and Park use... That's awesome. Personally, This bike really shines as a backcountry bomber. A bike you can climb with all morning long, into sweet, sweet places that are largely untouched; singletrack stashes that the park-bike riders can't typically get to. And then, you eat a nice little lunch you brought with you and take some pictures and drop your seatpost and rip down miles and miles of incredible backcountry trail. Stuff that you see on the map in the wintertime and wonder about, salivate over, ponder. Stuff that has really only seen hikers because it has generally been considered too rocky for bicycle consumption. This is the bike for that my friends. An All-mountain, all-adventure, epic bike.

  12. #12
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    I think the other parameter that one has to consider is the extra weight of the HD in its standard configuration. I am therefore leaning towards the HD in its 140 configurations since by having the 32 front suspension and the shorter rear suspension you loose slightly more than 1 Kg. I think having the HD at ~12Kg should really make is a truly do-it-all perfect bik.

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