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  1. #1
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    Fork feedback on the HD?

    Would love to get more feedback from everyone on their forks (seems I'm not the only one wrestling with Float, Talas, Lyrik DH SA or do they all have tradeoffs and go Lyrik Coil or Van at this point) ????

    Curious as to:

    1) How is the stiction on the 11 Float and 11 Talas? Especially from guys who rode the 09 and 10 36s (especially the 09 or 10 Float). First reviews from industry guys were there is noticeably more with the RLC than the RC2 damper - is it true and has it gotten better/worse as you have ridden it more?

    2) Is the 120mm setting working for you for technical climbs or is it too low to be practical?

    3) Are you using the 120mm setting or does the bike climb so well you aren't bothering?

    4) How is the bike climbing with the 170mm Lyrik

    Understand YMMV but inquiring minds and all ...

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  2. #2
    aka dan51
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    I run a 160 Lyrik uturn and never drop the travel for climbs.

  3. #3
    MPI
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    My HD climbs well 170mm Lyrik. I use 70mm stem with it now. It also climbs reasonably well 50mm stem, but as always you have to adjust your climbing position more.
    http://www.kiva.org - Loans That Change Lives

  4. #4
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    I'm also debating forks for the HD either fox Van 36rc2 kashima coating or a coil lyrik. I'm coming off of a lyrik solo air on my nomad and liked it although I've always felt that the small bump compliance wasn't very good. Any thoughts would be great....

  5. #5
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    c'mon HD owners, help us out here! I'm going to be ordering my HD possibly even this week and am dying to hear some feedback on your forks! I think so far, I'm going for the Talas 160 but I've heard good stuff about the Lyric. I also have been tossing around the idea of a 180 Talas.

    SOOO....
    For Talas users, how often do you use your travel adjust? Any of you leave it at 160 all the time anyways and wish you'd have gone w/ a Float?

    Lyric users, you like the fork?

    Any 180 Talas users have anything to say about your fork?

    Thanks for your insight

  6. #6
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    I'm in the same situation as seleniak and special red so I gave the guys at Ibis a quick call a few days ago and asked what their opinions were regarding TALAS 160 vs 180...

    The guy I spoke to (sorry forgot his name) felt that the 160 will work for the [I]majority[I] of HD owners especially if you do a lot of pedaling/trail rides. He didn't suggest the 180 unless you were doing really gnarly stuff and don't mind the weight penalty.

    Pedaling a 160 all day is fine with me so I could just get a Float but they only come in white (want a black fork for my matte carbon frame) and there isn't that much of a weight difference when you compare a 2011 Talas vs. Float. So for now, I am leaning towards a Talas 160.

    Any extra info to add to this thread would greatly be appreciated...THANKS!!

  7. #7
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    I have the 2010 160 Talas on my HD and expected that it would net me the most versatility out of an extremely versatile bike, and it definitely does. I use the 130 setting for pretty much every climb and find pedaling efficiency and head angle greatly improved by it. I let it out to 160 for everything that's not going right up a hill. Fortunately most of the rides here in CO delineate climbing and not climbing pretty specifically and I don't have to change modes too frequently during a ride.

    That said, I think next season will find my HD with a 180 Float (and probably a -1 angle-set), as I really really really enjoy this bike's descending abilities on shuttle runs and (especially) on the jumps and berms at Trestle in Winter Park. I think that the HD outclasses most of the "mini-DH" bikes out there, and even some full-on big bikes in its descending abilities (even with 160 in front!). Nurturing its freeride side will only make this bike more fun for me to ride, and will be well worth the cost to its climbing ability, which I still expect will be stellar. 180 Talas would probably be as versatile a setup as I can think of, as this bike would love both 140 and 180. With this fork available, I kind of think that 160 sells yourself short. The 120 mode would be a touch shorter than practical for me; 130 feels sweet and 100 feels too low on my bike. Why not suffer an extra half pound or whatever for even sweeter descending?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ripple220
    I have the 2010 160 Talas on my HD and expected that it would net me the most versatility out of an extremely versatile bike, and it definitely does. I use the 130 setting for pretty much every climb and find pedaling efficiency and head angle greatly improved by it. I let it out to 160 for everything that's not going right up a hill. Fortunately most of the rides here in CO delineate climbing and not climbing pretty specifically and I don't have to change modes too frequently during a ride.

    That said, I think next season will find my HD with a 180 Float (and probably a -1 angle-set), as I really really really enjoy this bike's descending abilities on shuttle runs and (especially) on the jumps and berms at Trestle in Winter Park. I think that the HD outclasses most of the "mini-DH" bikes out there, and even some full-on big bikes in its descending abilities (even with 160 in front!). Nurturing its freeride side will only make this bike more fun for me to ride, and will be well worth the cost to its climbing ability, which I still expect will be stellar. 180 Talas would probably be as versatile a setup as I can think of, as this bike would love both 140 and 180. With this fork available, I kind of think that 160 sells yourself short. The 120 mode would be a touch shorter than practical for me; 130 feels sweet and 100 feels too low on my bike. Why not suffer an extra half pound or whatever for even sweeter descending?
    THANKS man, that's EXACTLY the type of feedback I (and hopefully the others) am looking for. I was originally set on the 2011 Talas 180 because I figured that I could ride 140 all day and open it up to 180 when the going gets rough/bike park time...then the call to Ibis kinda made me think twice. Your feedback confirmed that I should stick to plan "A"...especially since I do a lot of cardio and weight training to help my mountain biking, what's another 1/2 lb for all the extra goodness that's available in return?!

  9. #9
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    I'm happy to have settled on the Talas '11 160mm. Originally I purchased the XT build kit with the non-Kashima Talas. I prefer to keep a bike as simple as possible so spent the first month experimenting to see how much I was using the adjustment and also to see if I could get away with a 1X10 drivetrain. I decided if I could sell the fork for a certain minimum then it would have been a minimal cost to get a Kashima Float or Talas and so eventually got my asking price. I would have prefered to go with a Float for better reliability and less to fuss with when riding but eventually realized the travel adjustment was worth keeping.

    There is one climb locally in particular that I can only clean with both Talas dropped and in the granny. When I'm doing laps at the local bike park(riding up, not lift serviced up) it definitely helps dropping that front as I'm fatiguing after a couple hours riding, steep fireroad up, less wandering and wheelying of the front end. Out on my main riding location where I have a 1 hour climb on singletrack with swichbacks, originally I was not dropping the front end and doing just fine with the ride and this was shifting me towards getting a Float. However once I started playing around with the TA, I enjoyed the quicker handling on the switchbacks and tighter terrain, and also my upper body was feeling less fatigue from keeping the front end down. Again, not absolutely necessary, but nice to be able to drop to keep the front better planted and with quicker handling on the climbs, and appreciating less fatigue in the upper body on long rides. One thing of note, only adjusting on long sustained climbs and never bothering on shorter sections, thats just too much fiddling.

    Couple negatives:
    - BB/Crank/Pedal clearance definitely decreased so more pedal strikes. Have to be a bit more choosy with the line and more ratcheting but I come from a hardtail background so not a big deal.
    - Sometimes forget to raise the front after climb completion but notice quickly once descending, quick fix anyway.

    120 vs 130
    Is it really that much different between the two that some of you are so against the 120? Aren't we only talking about 5mm less clearance at the BB for a bigger difference at the front?

    Kashima vs Non
    I didn't think I would notice a difference but there is an increased performance in the kashima, just smoother and better small bump sensitivity. A very small difference but noticeable.

  10. #10
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    I'll be using a Lyrik coil u-turn for tuning the handling when set up for both 160mm and 140mm rear suspension uses.

    Just a short review. I've been using this fork for over a year on my Mojo C with full satisfaction after trying 4 other forks on it in the prior 3 years. The action is smoother and more plush and tunable than any Talas I've ridden (by far IMO), and not very much weight difference. Not to mention it is very easy to service and work on. I'll probably modify it to 170mm max travel for ski park DH uses, if RS doesn't offer 170mm u-turn springs.

  11. #11
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    Lyrik DH 170mm. Works good.
    As I have mentioned in other posts, I think Travel Adjust is unnecessary.

  12. #12
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    How easy is it to modify a coil U-turn into a 170mm?

    It would be nice if RS offered the U-turn in a 170. If it did that might be the ultimate fork for the HD. I have gotten away without Travel adjust on all my past bikes, but it is nice to have. On some rides it seems to matter more then others.
    That said, a bit more fork or a bit more slack might be nice on the HD.

    As far as the DH damper, for me the jury is still out. It seems almost too progressive. I never tried with with regular mission control, so I can't comment on that. But I in no way miss the lock out.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by scepticshock
    How easy is it to modify a coil U-turn into a 170mm?

    It would be nice if RS offered the U-turn in a 170. If it did that might be the ultimate fork for the HD. I have gotten away without Travel adjust on all my past bikes, but it is nice to have. On some rides it seems to matter more then others.
    That said, a bit more fork or a bit more slack might be nice on the HD.

    As far as the DH damper, for me the jury is still out. It seems almost too progressive. I never tried with with regular mission control, so I can't comment on that. But I in no way miss the lock out.
    The spring's compression rod adjustment perch is like a large screw the coil turns on to adjust travel. That perch has a pin that could be removed and replaced 10mm lower on the perch to raise the perch.

    I saw a post in Suspension or DH forum of a machinist who made a 10mm extension spacer to the lower bolt on end of the compression rod, and used a longer reach bolt. That's another approach.

    The 2010 170mm fix travel Lyric uses the same uppers and lowers as prior years, so no structural problems as long as the modification was well done.

    I won't be doing that right away until I feel I need to slack out the geo more. I'm not used to any slacker geo than the Mojo C with 160mm travel fork (~67.5') so it will be awhile before I get squirly with a 67 degree head angle. Plus the Cane Creek Angle-Set headset can get the HD to 66 degrees with a 160mm travel front and rear.

  14. #14
    MPI
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    Quote Originally Posted by subliminalshiver
    ....I think Travel Adjust is unnecessary.
    http://www.kiva.org - Loans That Change Lives

  15. #15
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    I am running '11 Float 160. No need for travel adjust at all. Climbs w/o wandering or lifting. Weight of 36mm fork is great with this model. Good compromise though i think a coil should always be used by heavier riders or on more frequent riding in rough terrain. Reliability alone.

  16. #16
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    I run the Lyrik coil U-turn and use the travel a just a lot. But I tend to To run my bars and stem higher due to my long legs so, I get more out of dropping the fork them others who run a low stem and bars.

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