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  1. #1
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    Configuring a Mojo SL for Colorado riding

    I demoed the Mojo SL in Moab at Outerbike. I'll be demoing one again on my local trails in the Front Range of Colorado. I'm thinking of getting the naked carbon with the WTF-XX kit along with a Joplin seat post. Couple questions for you.

    What is the benefit of the Cane Creek IS-110 headset? What rear shock would suit my riding best, the RPL or DHX air? I'm an aggressive cross country rider. Most of my routes include significant mountain climbs which I enjoy. I am used to picking lines with care while descending on my 4-inch XC bike. However, I now want increased comfort while descending and the ability to bomb descents. I also plan on doing long distance bike packing in the Rockies. Are the WTF kits durable enough for my style of riding?

    I'm also thinking of switching to tubeless tires. Any other upgrades I should consider?

  2. #2
    Church of the Wheel
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    The SL should be a great choice for you. Adjustable seatpost and tubeless are both smart options that you will appreciate. Benefit of CC IS110 headset is quality of construction and superior sealing = should last for a really, really long time (110 year guarantee).
    "I thought you'd never love me without my Mojo." -Austin Powers

  3. #3
    pooter
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    I ride the Alberta Rockies (very comparable...it's the Rockies!) and my WTF kit has held up very well. Normal chain stretch/cog wear is all I've experienced. If I was doing it again I would upgrade to the IS 110, the headset is a source of ongoing creaks for me.

    No RP23 on your list of shocks?

  4. #4
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    Should I consider the RP23? I don't think I saw it as an option.

  5. #5
    kbk
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    I'm on a Mojo in Colorado. I'm one of about about 4 friends that all seem to have chosen Ibis Mojos to ride. After a few seasons now on everything from the Front Range, to Moab to CB and Fruita - okay it's a great place to ride, enough plugs, I think I've got the plan for setup.

    The big thing is that bikes here take a big beating. Upgrading your wheels is probably not a bad idea if it'll get you more durability. The standard shock on the bike is the RP23. Stick with that. One of my Ibis buddies does 4-5 ft drops with his on that shock and it's sweet! The big thing is that it will help you climb really well without having to "unlock" for descents. Flipping the switch to the setting without pro pedal is great for really doing big downhills, but not necessary. I run a 150mm Talas fork now and would recommend the combination of a 150mm fork and shorter stem. This keeps the bars higher and keeps your weight better suited to not flying over the bars on rocks.

    Yes, run tubeless. Especially here it's a great help! I run Stans wheels on King hubs and they really do reduce flats a lot (pinch and puncture). I know that the Ibis XX comes with Stans hoops so I think you'd do well there. They will wear out after a couple years, but replacing just hoops isn't that expensive.

    I have had a love/hate relationship with my Joplin since I got it. All of my friends saw mine and ran out and got them. We all love the functionality - it really does revolutionize the way that you can ride. But, they are really finicky and need a lot of maintenance. The new 4 model that came out this year is supposed to be a bit more reliable, but I'm still dubious. I am looking at the new Rockshox Reverb that is supposed to be a lot more reliable (and Rockshox seems to get great reviews for customer service). Either way, I would certainly get a seat post that goes up and down. Good for you.

    As far as XX's durability, it certainly seems the SRAM wants us to think that X9 or X0 is more the all mountain package. My buddy has an XX group on this epic 29er and his crank has taken a beating. Other than that though, it's held together for the year + he's been riding it. I'd say go for the XX and then when/if stuff starts breaking because you ram it against a rock, replace with XO or X9 to save $$.

  6. #6
    bike rider
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    Get the RP23, the RPL has harsher compression valving and the DHX isn't noticeably better and is heavier.
    Skip the expensive headset. The cheapy works fine in our dry climate and the integrated design means there is no difference besides the bearings.
    When you get the bike, wrap the rim holes in 2 layers of Gorilla tape, put NoTubes valves in, and mount some 2.3" tires with Stan's fluid. I like Kenda Small Block 8s.
    Get a Rockshox Reverb post instead of the Joplin.
    You're getting a TALAS fork, right? 150mm helps stability on loose downhills and the bike climbs better with a shorter fork.
    Ibis likes to spec really long stems. Try a 70mm and you'll realize what you've been missing on the downhills. Get the right size frame and you won't be too cramped on climbs.
    Keep the Country country.

  7. #7
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    Thanks for all the info. I'm going to demo the Ibis next weekend. I'm going to take Friday off and get the bike for three days since the shop is closed Monday. So I should get an extremely good idea of how the bike rides on local trails. I'll try out a shorter stem. I was going to go with UST wheels. I'm curious what size tires I should go with.

  8. #8
    bike rider
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    Remember how different JeffCo trails are from high mountain trails. A long stem, 140mm fork, and 2.1" tires will feel fast on the Front Range but will not be as fun and confidence inspiring in Summit, Eagle, or Chaffee Counties. Definitely take it on the roughest trails nearby and remember why you're leaving the 4" bike.

    I see no advantage to a UST rim over a normal rim with Gorilla tape. They are heavier and narrower than my NoTubes 355s.
    Keep the Country country.

  9. #9
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    Good points. Any recommendations on rough trails for the demo? I'll have it for three days and don't mind driving or putting on winter riding gear.

  10. #10
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    This is where I put my Mojo thru the paces when I was demoing.

    Apex,
    Walker
    Hall

    Erik

  11. #11
    kbk
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    Tire size is up to you. I've been all over the board and had pretty good luck. I think I'm on 2.2's now. Specialized Captain works really well 'round these parts

  12. #12
    kbk
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    Oh and rough trails - Walker, Apex, Hall (Bitterbrush). Then go flying down Heil Ranch on the main old trail at 20 mph! That'll show you what 140mm travel does to baby heads.

  13. #13
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    In reading about the XX groupo I see it is a compact 2 ring set up. I don't really understand gear ratios but I do understand that there is a lot of redundant or close to redundant gears in a triple chain ring set up.

    I currently run XT. I enjoy climbing Colorado trails. I'm in good shape. However, the reality is I don't race and I am 38 years old. So I do use the small chain ring and largest 3 or so cog combinations frequently. I don't want to be struggling up all the time. My rides almost always include major climbs. Will the XX set up give me those gear ratios? Would I need to ask for a specific cassette? or am I better off going with XTR?

    Also, I read there may be bike frame clearance issues with XX and you need to ask for a specific crank size.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Configuring a Mojo SL for Colorado riding-screen-shot-2010-10-09-9.21.36-am.png  


  14. #14
    Slothful dirt hippie
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2wheelsnotfour
    Uh... should we swap labels on those left hand two options?
    "...Some local fiend had built it with his own three hands..."

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by verslowrdr
    Uh... should we swap labels on those left hand two options?
    No, those 3 red bars to the left are the 3 different crank options available for SRAM 2x10 : 26-39, 28-42, 30-45

    That's actually a nice graphic showing the gear coverage. Thinking about switching now...

  16. #16
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    I assume since I am concerned with lower gears for climbing I would go with the Truvati XX 39-26 crank set and the XG-1099 11-36 cassette . If that is the case, I guess I'm wondering how comparable 26/36 on the Sram 10-speed set up is to 22/34 on the XT triple set up. Here is the gear chart for my XT bike.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by 2wheelsnotfour; 10-09-2010 at 11:44 AM.

  17. #17
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    Here's a little something I found at Competitive Cyclist.

    http://www.competitivecyclist.com/mo...368.455.1.html

    "There are two different chain ring combinations: 39/26 and 42/28. The big ring bolts thread through the arm into the chain ring and the small ring bolts into the spider. SRAM spent hours with a spreadsheet and gear chart trying to figure out ideal shifting patterns for easy shifts up and down and big to small. They arrived at a 3:2 ratio, something that had already been developed and forgotten. For those wondering how small they should go, we did a little figuring; 26x36 combo is just slightly bigger than a 22x32, a 28x36 the roughly the equivalent of a 22x28. Using the 32 as your tallest cog, it goes as follows, with a 26 ring it's the equivalent of a 22x27, the 28 ring it's a 22x26. On the big ring side, the 39x11 is roughly halfway between a 44x12 and 44x13. A 42x11 is bigger than a 44x12. SRAM recommends their 10-speed road chains, 1090 and 1090R to mate this crank to their XX cassettes.

    The XX crankarms are available in 170 or 175mm lengths, and come without SRAM/Truvativ's GXP bottom bracket. You can use your existing GXP BB, go for a standard GXP, or you can reach for the XX GXP BB, which runs smooth-as-silk on BlackBox ceramic bearings. While the cranks are black, the chain rings are Tungsten Grey and Silver. Claimed weight of the SRAM XX 42/28 crankset with the GXP bottom bracket is 754g, and the 39/26 version at 730g."

    Using the gear calculator at http://www.bikeschool.com/ I find that with XX 26/36 is 18.8 gear inches and my XT 22/34 is 16.8 gear inches. So I assume the lowest gear in the XX set up will be harder then the lowest XT gear. How much more difficult I'm not sure.

    In hopes of gaining insight into this I ran the numbers for the three easiest gears on my XT set up. 22/34 yields 16.8 gear inches, 22/30 yields 19.1 gear inches, 22/25 yields 22.9 gear inches. The difference between 22/34 and 22/30 (my two easiest XT gears) is 2.3 gear inches. The difference between XX 26/36 gear inches of 18.8 and XT 22/34 gear inches of 16.8 is 2 gear inches. So the switch to XX means I will probably feel as though loose my easiest gear. I'm not happy about that. However, if I'm buying a new bike I don't want to stick with old technology. I wish they had a larger cog and lost the 11 tooth one in the XG-1099 cassette.
    Last edited by 2wheelsnotfour; 10-09-2010 at 12:45 PM.

  18. #18
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    FWIW I live in CO to... Western Slope... and I'm running the XT 10 speed and just love'n it. I'm definitely staying in the middle ring more than what I used to especially when climbing. The biggest thing I've noticed is the quicker shifting and the ability to stay on cadence easier with the closer ratios.

    Also, I'm going to a Talas 150(it's on order) from a Float 140 as I've gone to a shorter stem and longer bar which has really helped the handling on the bike.

  19. #19
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    What length stem are you moving toward?

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2wheelsnotfour
    What length stem are you moving toward?
    I've been running stems anywhere from 70mm to 90mm with bars around 720mm wide. That said, everyone is different
    and different bikes have different top tube lengths and geometries so each individual should test different lengths to see
    what fits them best.

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