Anyone Switch from a Ripmo to a Ripley V4? Or have time on both?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 71 of 71
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    161

    Anyone Switch from a Ripmo to a Ripley V4? Or have time on both?

    I currently ride a GX Ripmo and love it. I would even call it my dream bike in many ways. That said, I am thinking of trading it in for a Ripley V4.
    I have been a full face, hard-charging enduro-style rider, but several recent injuries have me ready to calm down a bit, and no longer look for the biggest jumps/drops, gnarliest rocks, etc.
    I love big days with long miles and tons of climbing and descending.
    All of that said, I think that switching to the Ripley might fit perfectly with the calmer approach to riding that I am trying to take, as it will be perfect for really long days, and in theory, it should be more poppy and playful on roots and small features that I love boosting off of.
    My main two concerns are 1. Will the Ripley be enough on the descents, I'm thinking descents like what you get a lot of in southern California, Raccoon Mountain in Chattanooga, and Coldwater, AL for reference.
    And 2. at around 180lb kitted out, I am a fairly powerful rider, and I worry that I will feel significantly more flex than I do on my Ripmo.
    Just looking for feedback from anyone who has made the switch, or who at least has time on both bikes to verify that my thinking about the switch lines up with their experience with the bikes, and hopefully to put my fears to rest.
    A demo is unfortunately not an option for me, due to location

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,255
    Currently I'm 205 riding and have a Ripley LS and HD4. I do feel a difference in chunk and rooty runs, but the Ripley shocks me how well it rides. Still takes the odd small to med drop just fine. Don't really notice any flex.

    That being said, there are a couple Ripmo riders that are doing the same big days that like the bigger bike for the geometry. They feel safer on the descents.

    1. Really hard to gauge what you consider a big aggressive descent. The new Ripley will outgun my LS and my LS stacks up pretty good against my HD4 90% of the time.
    2. Don't think you'll notice flex. Just a bit more arm pump, little more reactive, and ride around the big drops.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    161
    The new geo of the Ripley being almost a carbon copy of the Ripmo is what really has me leaning toward it. Currently, I'll do some ~30' jumps and ~6' drops. I'm kind of leaning toward getting the Ripley and an open face helmet, then steering clear of features that I would want a bigger bike and full-face helmet for lol.

  4. #4
    Rollin 29s
    Reputation: isleblue65's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    997
    Ripley V4 wasnít out yet or announced when I got my Ripmo last October, but it may have been the sweet spot Bike I was looking for. I love how the Ripmo rides and handles more than I can throw at it. The fact that it can out climb my old Jet 9, which is closer to an XC bike, but descend and handle chunk like a downhill bike (or close to it) is pretty amazing.

    However, I donít do any of the drops or jumps like you describe. I will hit 2 or 3í drops or flatter riser jumps of 4í or so. Iím 50 with much higher life consequences if a bad crash takes me out for 6 months than When I was 22.

    The Ripmo has allowed me to clean some downhill sections where I ride with the fastest time for the year, which still stands today, and all-time fastest for my age on Strava. Thatís crazy. The Ripmo gets a lot of credit for it.

    I am thinking that my next bike may be the Ripley V4, as I am probably not using the Ripmo to its full potential. Iím also interested in reading what others who have ridden both bikes say.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Whoever invented the bicycle deserves the thanks of humanity.
    - Lord Charles Beresford

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,255
    Quote Originally Posted by Lgmoto356 View Post
    The new geo of the Ripley being almost a carbon copy of the Ripmo is what really has me leaning toward it. Currently, I'll do some ~30' jumps and ~6' drops. I'm kind of leaning toward getting the Ripley and an open face helmet, then steering clear of features that I would want a bigger bike and full-face helmet for lol.
    Yep...I know i'll get shredded for this:

    Ripmo will be phased out and the 29r HD5 and Ripley V4 will be left.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    161
    Quote Originally Posted by canuck_tacoma View Post
    Yep...I know i'll get shredded for this:

    Ripmo will be phased out and the 29r HD5 and Ripley V4 will be left.
    I don't think that sounds too crazy. It is a lot like what Santa Cruz has done with their lineup. The current difference between the Ripmo and the Ripley doesn't quite lead me to feel justified owning both of them, so I can certainly imagine the Ripmo transitioning to full enduro, with the Ripley holding down the trail end of the spectrum. If that happened though, I would expect them to keep the Ripmo name for the new Ripmo.

    I could also see a situation exactly like what SC did, which would include the Ripley as light trail, Ripmo as all mountain, and then the 29er HD4 as the full on enduro brawler.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    266
    I weigh 190 and ride the V4 Ripley in Pisgah several days a week with long epics on many weekends (40-50+ mile days). I also own a GG Smash which is fairly equivalent to the Ripmo capability wise.

    The Ripley does a really amazing job handling most of the Pisgah gnar but I do run a Fox 36 at 140mm on it. If you weigh 180+ and ride aggressive in tough terrain I would recommend a a bit bigger fork.

    The Smash is certainly more capable at high speeds and bigger drops but I ride the Ripley much more and just dial it back and enjoy the long rides. I am 46 with kids that rely on me, also too many injuries over 25 years mountain biking make the Ripley a better fit for me.

    The one problem with the Ripley is it feels really capable and can get you into trouble as it is easy to push it past its comfort zone in really gnarly terrain. Just gotta remind yourself to dial it back a bit and all is good.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    161
    Quote Originally Posted by pryde1 View Post
    I weigh 190 and ride the V4 Ripley in Pisgah several days a week with long epics on many weekends (40-50+ mile days). I also own a GG Smash which is fairly equivalent to the Ripmo capability wise.

    The Ripley does a really amazing job handling most of the Pisgah gnar but I do run a Fox 36 at 140mm on it. If you weigh 180+ and ride aggressive in tough terrain I would recommend a a bit bigger fork.

    The Smash is certainly more capable at high speeds and bigger drops but I ride the Ripley much more and just dial it back and enjoy the long rides. I am 46 with kids that rely on me, also too many injuries over 25 years mountain biking make the Ripley a better fit for me.

    The one problem with the Ripley is it feels really capable and can get you into trouble as it is easy to push it past its comfort zone in really gnarly terrain. Just gotta remind yourself to dial it back a bit and all is good.
    Thanks for the reply, and I do think it is a super useful comparison because from the numbers and ride reports, the GG Smash and Ripmo are very similar bikes.

    Do you find that the Ripley is significantly more playful and poppy off of small features, pumping, and at lower speeds than the smash? The Ripmo is already fun in those situations, but getting even more in those areas would be a key reason for the switch.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    266
    Quote Originally Posted by Lgmoto356 View Post
    Thanks for the reply, and I do think it is a super useful comparison because from the numbers and ride reports, the GG Smash and Ripmo are very similar bikes.

    Do you find that the Ripley is significantly more playful and poppy off of small features, pumping, and at lower speeds than the smash? The Ripmo is already fun in those situations, but getting even more in those areas would be a key reason for the switch.
    Yes indeed the Ripley is much more playful/poppy than the Smash due to less travel, lighter weight, and shorter wheelbase.

    The Smash is into "plowbike" territory while the Ripley is not really that all all. Don't get me wrong, I do like the Smash just fine for its intended purpose but much prefer the Ripley overall for big days out in the woods.

    There are only a couple drops here in Pisgah I won't do on the Ripley but is does really great on everything else. I like picking it down fun lines, popping off successive, natural features... it's perfect for this AND climbing is just incredible up long fire roads or steep technical terrain.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    1,474
    Since I got my Ripley V4, I don't know that I'll keep the Ripmo. They're so similar but the Ripley is just more fun for me most of the time. Poppier, faster, and can still handle most of what I'm willing to do (if not all, lol) at 60 yrs old with 5 kids (including twin kindergarteners). And with a 140mm fork, the difference becomes even smaller. They're REALLY similar bikes except for the travel and progressivity of the rear end.
    Ibis Ripmo V2
    Ibis Ripley V4
    Ibis Mojo HD5
    Pivot Mach 4SL
    Pivot LES SS
    A road bike

  11. #11
    Rollin 29s
    Reputation: isleblue65's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    997

    Anyone Switch from a Ripmo to a Ripley V4? Or have time on both?

    Quote Originally Posted by BmanInTheD View Post
    Since I got my Ripley V4, I don't know that I'll keep the Ripmo. They're so similar but the Ripley is just more fun for me most of the time. Poppier, faster, and can still handle most of what I'm willing to do (if not all, lol) at 60 yrs old with 5 kids (including twin kindergarteners). And with a 140mm fork, the difference becomes even smaller. They're REALLY similar bikes except for the travel and progressivity of the rear end.
    Great feedback. Sounds like you are in a similar situation to me. If I did the switch, would it make more sense to buy the V4 frame and swap components over or buy complete bike? I would probably sell the Ripmo frame or complete bike.

    For 90% of the riding Iím doing, more of a trail bike would be a better fit.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Whoever invented the bicycle deserves the thanks of humanity.
    - Lord Charles Beresford

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    1,474
    Quote Originally Posted by isleblue65 View Post
    Great feedback. Sounds like you are in a similar situation to me. If I did the switch, would it make more sense to buy the V4 frame and swap components over or buy complete bike? I would probably sell the Ripmo frame or complete bike.

    For 90% of the riding Iím doing, more of a trail bike would be a better fit.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    If you like your build components, it makes more sense (financially) to swap over parts and get a new fork and sell the Ripmo as frame and fork. I would imagine that just about everything would transfer over pretty easily. That said, I have an expensive habit of starting over with new everything with each bike.
    Ibis Ripmo V2
    Ibis Ripley V4
    Ibis Mojo HD5
    Pivot Mach 4SL
    Pivot LES SS
    A road bike

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    161
    Quote Originally Posted by BmanInTheD View Post
    Since I got my Ripley V4, I don't know that I'll keep the Ripmo. They're so similar but the Ripley is just more fun for me most of the time. Poppier, faster, and can still handle most of what I'm willing to do (if not all, lol) at 60 yrs old with 5 kids (including twin kindergarteners). And with a 140mm fork, the difference becomes even smaller. They're REALLY similar bikes except for the travel and progressivity of the rear end.
    When you mention the progressivity of the rear end, I'm assuming the Ripley is more progressive?

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    161
    Quote Originally Posted by pryde1 View Post
    Yes indeed the Ripley is much more playful/poppy than the Smash due to less travel, lighter weight, and shorter wheelbase.

    The Smash is into "plowbike" territory while the Ripley is not really that all all. Don't get me wrong, I do like the Smash just fine for its intended purpose but much prefer the Ripley overall for big days out in the woods.

    There are only a couple drops here in Pisgah I won't do on the Ripley but is does really great on everything else. I like picking it down fun lines, popping off successive, natural features... it's perfect for this AND climbing is just incredible up long fire roads or steep technical terrain.
    This is all what I figured, and makes me lean pretty heavily toward trying out the change!

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    338
    Iím making the switch from Ripmo to Ripley, I have a full season on the Ripley LS and 2 seasons now on the Ripmo. I love the Ripmo, so playful and amazing climber. Feels like you can take your hands off the bars in the steep loose stuff itís so stable. But I do miss a bit of the supe quick pop of the Ripley. Ideally if one both, but I bet if I did I would reach for the Ripley 60% of the time

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ReXTless's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    498
    I've owned a Ripmo for two seasons and spent a couple long rides on a Ripley V4. I was stunned by how different the bikes ride/perform. Given the near-identical geo, I thought they would be more similar than different. I was wrong. The difference between the bikes is not subtle.

    The Ripley is a rocket ship. Soooo fast. Much easier to rail corners on XC tracks. Was better working through low-speed tech maneuvers. But, most of all - pop. The Ripley launches off all those little trail features the Ripmo kind of "smooshes" through. I was able to easily clear tabletops and doubles where I can't get enough entry speed on the Ripmo to avoid coming up short.

    The trade off is of course, plushness and capability.

    My Ripmo is a high-end, light build, with fast-rolling tires. I love it. It's still pretty quick on XC-ish trails and I can smash stuff when I'm riding bigger lines. I'll happily pedal it on a 50-mile day. That said, I have considered doing a frame swap for the V4. Ibis backorders have prevented me from seriously considering it during the season. My plan was to ride the snot out of the Ripmo this year and then make a decision come fall or next spring.

    I'll either sell the Ripmo frame and move everything over to the Ripley. Or, i'll keep the Ripmo and add a Pivot Mach 4SL. Need to spend some time on the Pivot before making a decision.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    1,474
    Quote Originally Posted by ReXTless View Post
    I've owned a Ripmo for two seasons and spent a couple long rides on a Ripley V4. I was stunned by how different the bikes ride/perform. Given the near-identical geo, I thought they would be more similar than different. I was wrong. The difference between the bikes is not subtle.

    The Ripley is a rocket ship. Soooo fast. Much easier to rail corners on XC tracks. Was better working through low-speed tech maneuvers. But, most of all - pop. The Ripley launches off all those little trail features the Ripmo kind of "smooshes" through. I was able to easily clear tabletops and doubles where I can't get enough entry speed on the Ripmo to avoid coming up short.

    The trade off is of course, plushness and capability.

    My Ripmo is a high-end, light build, with fast-rolling tires. I love it. It's still pretty quick on XC-ish trails and I can smash stuff when I'm riding bigger lines. I'll happily pedal it on a 50-mile day. That said, I have considered doing a frame swap for the V4. Ibis backorders have prevented me from seriously considering it during the season. My plan was to ride the snot out of the Ripmo this year and then make a decision come fall or next spring.

    I'll either sell the Ripmo frame and move everything over to the Ripley. Or, i'll keep the Ripmo and add a Pivot Mach 4SL. Need to spend some time on the Pivot before making a decision.
    That's funny, I feel like my Mach 4SL is further from my Ripley than my Ripley is from my Ripmo. But I have a 100mm fork on my Pivot. But the Ripmo/Mach 4SL combo would be about perfect, pretty much covering everything except pure DH.
    Ibis Ripmo V2
    Ibis Ripley V4
    Ibis Mojo HD5
    Pivot Mach 4SL
    Pivot LES SS
    A road bike

  18. #18
    No Clue Crew
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    6,788
    Pretty interesting assessment. Where do you spend most of your riding time?

    Quote Originally Posted by ReXTless View Post
    I've owned a Ripmo for two seasons and spent a couple long rides on a Ripley V4. I was stunned by how different the bikes ride/perform. Given the near-identical geo, I thought they would be more similar than different. I was wrong. The difference between the bikes is not subtle.

    The Ripley is a rocket ship. Soooo fast. Much easier to rail corners on XC tracks. Was better working through low-speed tech maneuvers. But, most of all - pop. The Ripley launches off all those little trail features the Ripmo kind of "smooshes" through. I was able to easily clear tabletops and doubles where I can't get enough entry speed on the Ripmo to avoid coming up short.

    The trade off is of course, plushness and capability.

    My Ripmo is a high-end, light build, with fast-rolling tires. I love it. It's still pretty quick on XC-ish trails and I can smash stuff when I'm riding bigger lines. I'll happily pedal it on a 50-mile day. That said, I have considered doing a frame swap for the V4. Ibis backorders have prevented me from seriously considering it during the season. My plan was to ride the snot out of the Ripmo this year and then make a decision come fall or next spring.

    I'll either sell the Ripmo frame and move everything over to the Ripley. Or, i'll keep the Ripmo and add a Pivot Mach 4SL. Need to spend some time on the Pivot before making a decision.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: eysikal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    138
    I made the switch, and Iím happier with the Ripley 90% of the time.

  20. #20
    trailpimp
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    29
    You have to ask the question if the bike will actually make you back it down. Or will you find the limits of the new Ripley frame, and risk overwhelming the chassis. Thereby placing you in a position of going down. With as capable as this new breed of Ripley is, you'll probably need to change your riding area, and not go to the place with 30 foot jumps and 6 foot drops.

    (Although if you just want a new bike, go for it! That's half the fun of this sport is trying all the new gear! You can always get another Ripmo)

  21. #21
    Just a flesh wound
    Reputation: Prophet Julio's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    2,349
    I found the Ripley V4 and the Pivot 429 Trail to be very similar. The Ripmo is not like those, but for what it gives up in Pop or Quickness, I think it is minimal. But what it gains in gnarly descents or chunky rock gardens is huge.

    The Ripmo climbs so much better than it should. I like it more every time I ride it. A one bike quiver for sure.

    I intend to mount a McLeod in the next day or two to the Ripmo. I think it might help with some of the missing Pop.
    My name is Chris and I ride a Ripmo now.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JoePAz's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    5,690
    Quote Originally Posted by BmanInTheD View Post
    That's funny, I feel like my Mach 4SL is further from my Ripley than my Ripley is from my Ripmo. But I have a 100mm fork on my Pivot. But the Ripmo/Mach 4SL combo would be about perfect, pretty much covering everything except pure DH.

    This pretty close to what I have in my stable and one reason why I went Rimpo vs Ripley. Instead of Mach 4SL I have Specialized Epic, but they are pretty close as both are 100/100 XC race bikes. Light, fast, nimble and great to a point. I got Rimpo as companion to the my XC bike. I wanted a bike that could handle bigger terrain, but still be a bike I could climb on. For me climbing is climbing technical trails to ride the tech on the way down. So far my Rimpo has done a great job of climbing tech and descending tech. Next month will be my first Enduro on this bike. I don't hope to win or podium. Just have some fun. That said I don't do gap jump and 6' drops, but I do want to do steep gnar that is on South Mtn in Phoenix, Sedona and other areas. While a Ripley could do this and would be the better bike if I had just one, since I have XC bike too I can indulge on bigger bike for more technical stuff.
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", 19' Vassago Optimus Ti SS 29", '19 Ibis Ripmo, XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    553
    I did a demo on the Ripmo and Ripley the past 2 weekends (Thanks to Velorangutan for the demos).

    I've currently got a stable of 3 bikes - A Spec Epic, a Giant Trance 29, and a Canfield Riot. The Ripley would replace the Epic and Trance. The Ripmo would replace the Trance 29 and Riot. (Also have an SS, but not really factoring that into decisions)

    I decided to go with the Ripmo soon. My experiences:

    Ripley/Ripmo - 76STA takes some getting used to on either bike. I felt like I was using slightly different muscles than usual and had a bit more fatigue, but I imagine I'll adapt to it.

    Ripmo - This bike was a joy to ride on technical trail and soaked bumps superbly. It was a good climber, especially in technical terrain. Flat smooth stuff it was still a decent peddler, but this is where i mostly felt muscles burning a little. It handled drops like a champ. Overall, I could see using it for most of my riding where my Epic wouldn't suffice.

    Ripley - This bike was fast, but not as plush. I could tell it wasn't soaking up the rock gardens as well, whether they were up, down, or flat. It handled descents well, but wasn't as composed as the Ripmo. Anything smooth or slightly bumpy was better than the Ripmo and technical climbs were almost as good. It felt like a long-legged XC bike speed-wise but handled things as well as my Trance 29. It definitely wouldn't replace the Riot, though.

    It basically came down to whether I preferred the Ripley/Riot or the Epic/Ripmo. I felt that the Epic/Ripmo was a better compromise - giving me both an XC bike on the fast stuff and a capable bike when I do harder trails and bike parks (like Spider Mtn). The Ripley/Riot had too much overlap really.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    161
    Quote Originally Posted by ReXTless View Post
    I've owned a Ripmo for two seasons and spent a couple long rides on a Ripley V4. I was stunned by how different the bikes ride/perform. Given the near-identical geo, I thought they would be more similar than different. I was wrong. The difference between the bikes is not subtle.

    The Ripley is a rocket ship. Soooo fast. Much easier to rail corners on XC tracks. Was better working through low-speed tech maneuvers. But, most of all - pop. The Ripley launches off all those little trail features the Ripmo kind of "smooshes" through. I was able to easily clear tabletops and doubles where I can't get enough entry speed on the Ripmo to avoid coming up short.

    The trade off is of course, plushness and capability.

    My Ripmo is a high-end, light build, with fast-rolling tires. I love it. It's still pretty quick on XC-ish trails and I can smash stuff when I'm riding bigger lines. I'll happily pedal it on a 50-mile day. That said, I have considered doing a frame swap for the V4. Ibis backorders have prevented me from seriously considering it during the season. My plan was to ride the snot out of the Ripmo this year and then make a decision come fall or next spring.

    I'll either sell the Ripmo frame and move everything over to the Ripley. Or, i'll keep the Ripmo and add a Pivot Mach 4SL. Need to spend some time on the Pivot before making a decision.
    This is great feedback, and really gets to the heart of the characteristics of the Ripley that have me so intrigued! I get almost as much enjoyment out of the playful jibs along the side of the trail as I do hucking big jumps and sending sketchy lines, and I want to move away from the big stuff. The Ripley seems like the perfect bike for this!

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    161
    Quote Originally Posted by hopalong View Post
    You have to ask the question if the bike will actually make you back it down. Or will you find the limits of the new Ripley frame, and risk overwhelming the chassis. Thereby placing you in a position of going down. With as capable as this new breed of Ripley is, you'll probably need to change your riding area, and not go to the place with 30 foot jumps and 6 foot drops.

    (Although if you just want a new bike, go for it! That's half the fun of this sport is trying all the new gear! You can always get another Ripmo)
    You pretty much hit my situation all around! I will definitely need to stay away from the big stuff, and a lot of my desire is just to try something new. I was an XC racer/roadie once upon a time, and went straight from there to enduro, so I am interested in trying more of the trail/all-mountain style of riding in between. And as you said, there will always be a shiny new Ripmo waiting to lighten my wallet if the Ripley doesn't tickle my fancy.

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    161
    Quote Originally Posted by fontarin View Post
    I did a demo on the Ripmo and Ripley the past 2 weekends (Thanks to Velorangutan for the demos).

    I've currently got a stable of 3 bikes - A Spec Epic, a Giant Trance 29, and a Canfield Riot. The Ripley would replace the Epic and Trance. The Ripmo would replace the Trance 29 and Riot. (Also have an SS, but not really factoring that into decisions)

    I decided to go with the Ripmo soon. My experiences:

    Ripley/Ripmo - 76STA takes some getting used to on either bike. I felt like I was using slightly different muscles than usual and had a bit more fatigue, but I imagine I'll adapt to it.

    Ripmo - This bike was a joy to ride on technical trail and soaked bumps superbly. It was a good climber, especially in technical terrain. Flat smooth stuff it was still a decent peddler, but this is where i mostly felt muscles burning a little. It handled drops like a champ. Overall, I could see using it for most of my riding where my Epic wouldn't suffice.

    Ripley - This bike was fast, but not as plush. I could tell it wasn't soaking up the rock gardens as well, whether they were up, down, or flat. It handled descents well, but wasn't as composed as the Ripmo. Anything smooth or slightly bumpy was better than the Ripmo and technical climbs were almost as good. It felt like a long-legged XC bike speed-wise but handled things as well as my Trance 29. It definitely wouldn't replace the Riot, though.

    It basically came down to whether I preferred the Ripley/Riot or the Epic/Ripmo. I felt that the Epic/Ripmo was a better compromise - giving me both an XC bike on the fast stuff and a capable bike when I do harder trails and bike parks (like Spider Mtn). The Ripley/Riot had too much overlap really.
    Thanks for this! I have heard similar feedback from others as well, and like you, they often opted for a two bike stable that included either A. a Ripmo and a slightly smaller bike than the Ripley, or B. a Ripley and a slightly bigger bike than the Ripmo.

    I'm curious, about when the Ripley started to feel overwhelmed. Was it the front or back end that you felt broke down first? I find the idea of putting a 150mm Lyrik or 140mm Pike on the Ripley, if the case is that it is the Fox 34 that gets overwhelmed. At 180+ in gear, the Fox 34 is the main part of the bike that gives me pause.

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    553
    Quote Originally Posted by Lgmoto356 View Post
    Thanks for this! I have heard similar feedback from others as well, and like you, they often opted for a two bike stable that included either A. a Ripmo and a slightly smaller bike than the Ripley, or B. a Ripley and a slightly bigger bike than the Ripmo.

    I'm curious, about when the Ripley started to feel overwhelmed. Was it the front or back end that you felt broke down first? I find the idea of putting a 150mm Lyrik or 140mm Pike on the Ripley, if the case is that it is the Fox 34 that gets overwhelmed. At 180+ in gear, the Fox 34 is the main part of the bike that gives me pause.
    I didn't really take it anywhere it felt really overwhelmed. It just wasn't as plush on composed on the few short rocky descents that had lots of baby head rocks and maybe a 2-3ish ft drop.

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    1,474
    Here's a really good comparo of Ripley vs Ripmo that pretty much sums up how I feel. Granted, he sells them, but he picks part the differences and compares the similarities pretty much perfectly IMO. (Except for the fact that he says the Ripmo has 140mm rear travel instead of 145. D'oh!)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iK_ghh7Drck&t=120s
    Ibis Ripmo V2
    Ibis Ripley V4
    Ibis Mojo HD5
    Pivot Mach 4SL
    Pivot LES SS
    A road bike

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JoePAz's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    5,690
    Quote Originally Posted by BmanInTheD View Post
    Here's a really good comparo of Ripley vs Ripmo that pretty much sums up how I feel. Granted, he sells them, but he picks part the differences and compares the similarities pretty much perfectly IMO. (Except for the fact that he says the Ripmo has 140mm rear travel instead of 145. D'oh!)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iK_ghh7Drck&t=120s
    This a text version of this comparison. This what impacted me alot

    ....
    Trails like Captain Ahab, The Whole Enchilada and Gooseberry Mesa would be the trails that come to mind when trying to find the perfect trail for the Ripmo. All of these trails include plenty of climbing, some of it technical, and some technical, bumpy descents.

    ...

    Trails like the Wasatch Crest, BST, Mid Mountain and Zen come to mind as perfect for the Ripley. I just finished a Ripley 4 review. If you want to know more about the bike read/watch that one.
    ...
    For me I have my Epic I would ride on Wasatch crest, etc, but feel it would be out matched for Moab. So this where the Ripmo comes in at least for me.
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", 19' Vassago Optimus Ti SS 29", '19 Ibis Ripmo, XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    161
    I watched the review and asked the poster a few questions. I think I am leaning toward the Ripley. Worst case scenario, I wish to be back on my Ripmo, the resale value of the bikes means than I could sell and be back on whichever my heart desires after having an extended rental period .

  31. #31
    Rider On The Storm
    Reputation: crimsontime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    27
    I'm in the market for a Ripmo, but might consider a Ripley instead. How do you guys feel about the Ripley in black diamond terrain? I generally steer clear of double blacks but black is totally on for me, even at 46 years of age. If anything these new bikes allow me to ride even harder than when I was younger. The older bikes just took so much more skill to ride that terrain safely.

  32. #32
    Rider On The Storm
    Reputation: crimsontime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    27
    Quote Originally Posted by JoePAz View Post
    This a text version of this comparison. This what impacted me alot



    For me I have my Epic I would ride on Wasatch crest, etc, but feel it would be out matched for Moab. So this where the Ripmo comes in at least for me.
    Yeah Gooseberry Mesa is one of my favorite trails. If Ripley isn't as good there, it probably isn't for me. I would like a couple corroborating opinions on that statement though.

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    161
    Quote Originally Posted by crimsontime View Post
    I'm in the market for a Ripmo, but might consider a Ripley instead.* How do you guys feel about the Ripley in black diamond terrain?* I generally steer clear of double blacks but black is totally on for me, even at 46 years of age.* If anything these new bikes allow me to ride even harder than when I was younger.* The older bikes just took so much more skill to ride that terrain safely.
    I'm curious to hear the answer to this as well. Mtb Yum Yum felt it was perfect for his terrain, which includes the black Jacob's ladder. Although I think that trail is a black that is more suited to the Ripley, due to being faster as opposed to chunkier.

    Sent from my SM-N950U1 using ****************android_app_mtbr

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    4,798
    My last bike was an Evil Following and my Ripmo is ~3lbs heavier, 1lb+ of which is rotational (wheels, crank, cassette) and Iím setting climbing PRís over times I set a few years ago when I was in much better shape. Even if the ripley climbs faster or is more poppy, the Ripmo is better in every category than the Evil so Iím plenty happy as is. Iím 6í6Ē 240 so the extra stiffness and burliness of the frame is appreciated.

    I originally was going for the ripley but I found a much cheaper twice used Ripmo. Glad I did.

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    161
    I have have the following Ibis bikes(all in size large):
    Ripley LS V2 with pike 130mm(original Ripley LS)
    HD3 with pike 150mm
    Ripmo DPX2 with fox 36 160mm
    Ripley V4 with Pike ultimate 130mm

    I decided to add the Ripley V4 to try to keep up with my son's NICA team rides. I was doing a pretty good job on the Ripmo after my son grew into my Ripley LS and started riding it, but I knew a lighter bike with less travel would be much easier on my midddle aged body. I took delivery of my My Ripley while I was on vacation in SLC Utah at Salt Cycles in Sandy. While I was there I also had my Ripmo with me so I was able to grab whatever bike I wanted each day and had time to ride both at various locations. I agree that the Ripley is better for mellower trails like the Crest, and climbing tech climbs like Cathrine's pass but I was surprised that it also was faster on a long downhill trail like Big Mountain Trail at Snowbird (3K drop over 7.5 miles). Strava confirmed a 90 second faster time descending on the Ripley V4 over the Ripmo one day apart. My Ripmo is set up with Zee brakes vs the 4 piston XTs on the Ripley. I found the shorter wheel base to take the tight switchback berms much easier and faster.

    I have returned back to my home trails in the rocky and rooty NE and I continue to be amazed at what the Ripley V4 can handle. I originally planned on running the Ripmo at rockier locations to get the max comfort, speed, and control but now I find myself grabbing the Ripley consistently. I was able to find the limits of the Ripley but it took a lot of nerve to go that fast in chunk and I won't be looking to repeat that experiment. The difference between the two bikes is quite astonishing to me with the Ripley being quicker laterally, more playful and jibby, able to pop off of roots and little rocks much easier than the Ripmo. The Ripmo can smooth out bad line choices and has more room to send bigger hits. If I was racing enduro or going to a gravity park I would grab the Ripmo but I think I'll be using the Ripley a lot more than I originally intended, even in the rough rocky areas. I would be hard pressed to pick between the Ripmo and Ripley for a trail like the Whole Enchalada that has some areas of chunk but plenty of pedaling as well.

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    161
    Quote Originally Posted by pking View Post
    I have have the following Ibis bikes(all in size large):
    Ripley LS V2 with pike 130mm(original Ripley LS)
    HD3 with pike 150mm
    Ripmo DPX2 with fox 36 160mm
    Ripley V4 with Pike ultimate 130mm

    I decided to add the Ripley V4 to try to keep up with my son's NICA team rides. I was doing a pretty good job on the Ripmo after my son grew into my Ripley LS and started riding it, but I knew a lighter bike with less travel would be much easier on my midddle aged body. I took delivery of my My Ripley while I was on vacation in SLC Utah at Salt Cycles in Sandy. While I was there I also had my Ripmo with me so I was able to grab whatever bike I wanted each day and had time to ride both at various locations. I agree that the Ripley is better for mellower trails like the Crest, and climbing tech climbs like Cathrine's pass but I was surprised that it also was faster on a long downhill trail like Big Mountain Trail at Snowbird (3K drop over 7.5 miles). Strava confirmed a 90 second faster time descending on the Ripley V4 over the Ripmo one day apart. My Ripmo is set up with Zee brakes vs the 4 piston XTs on the Ripley. I found the shorter wheel base to take the tight switchback berms much easier and faster.

    I have returned back to my home trails in the rocky and rooty NE and I continue to be amazed at what the Ripley V4 can handle. I originally planned on running the Ripmo at rockier locations to get the max comfort, speed, and control but now I find myself grabbing the Ripley consistently. I was able to find the limits of the Ripley but it took a lot of nerve to go that fast in chunk and I won't be looking to repeat that experiment. The difference between the two bikes is quite astonishing to me with the Ripley being quicker laterally, more playful and jibby, able to pop off of roots and little rocks much easier than the Ripmo. The Ripmo can smooth out bad line choices and has more room to send bigger hits. If I was racing enduro or going to a gravity park I would grab the Ripmo but I think I'll be using the Ripley a lot more than I originally intended, even in the rough rocky areas. I would be hard pressed to pick between the Ripmo and Ripley for a trail like the Whole Enchalada that has some areas of chunk but plenty of pedaling as well.
    Thanks for that rundown! I really wish that I had the option to test ride one. For reference how much do you weigh, and how aggressive would you say that you are on chunkier features/drop? I already blow through my Ripmo's dpx2, so I am just nervous about the dps on the Ripley.

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    161
    Quote Originally Posted by Lgmoto356 View Post
    Thanks for that rundown! I really wish that I had the option to test ride one. For reference how much do you weigh, and how aggressive would you say that you are on chunkier features/drop? I already blow through my Ripmo's dpx2, so I am just nervous about the dps on the Ripley.
    I'm about 175 ready to ride and ride fairly aggressively for a 49 y/o. I really like the Ripley for everything except a local 4 foot drop that definitely bottoms out my fork and shock on the Ripley but is super composed on the Ripmo. My Ripmo seems to go through the travel just slightly slower than the ripley but the extra 25mm travel really helps on big or repeated hits.

  38. #38
    No Clue Crew
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    6,788
    I find myself more and more interested in this topic. I'm coming back to the Ibis fold and am torn. I have owned a Ripmo previously and feel it was probably the best bike I've ever owned.

    My LBS has both bikes in my size in stock. I am down to a one-bike stable at this time, riding mostly in Phoenix, but throughout Arizona. The solid move is to buy another Ripmo. But the Ripley is appealing. I drove it around the parking lot today and it feels super-light and snappy. I like that.

    I'd run it with a 140 Lyrik and real tires to survive Phoenix rocks, so more like a mini-Ripmo. It doesn't seem like enough travel for some of the bigger stuff on South Mountain and Sedona, but I've had pretty good success going fast on shorter bikes (Giant Trance, Banshee Phantom, etc.).

    DVO will do a custom-stroked Topaz for it, too.

    Love to hear more input.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    161
    Quote Originally Posted by Blatant View Post
    I find myself more and more interested in this topic. I'm coming back to the Ibis fold and am torn. I have owned a Ripmo previously and feel it was probably the best bike I've ever owned.

    My LBS has both bikes in my size in stock. I am down to a one-bike stable at this time, riding mostly in Phoenix, but throughout Arizona. The solid move is to buy another Ripmo. But the Ripley is appealing. I drove it around the parking lot today and it feels super-light and snappy. I like that.

    I'd run it with a 140 Lyrik and real tires to survive Phoenix rocks, so more like a mini-Ripmo. It doesn't seem like enough travel for some of the bigger stuff on South Mountain and Sedona, but I've had pretty good success going fast on shorter bikes (Giant Trance, Banshee Phantom, etc.).

    DVO will do a custom-stroked Topaz for it, too.

    Love to hear more input.
    This is very similar to the type of setup that I think I'd really like on the Ripley. That said, the going advice seems to be that if you want to build up a Ripley with an Enduro fork, you're probably better off just building up a lightweight Ripmo. The custom Topaz does seem like a pretty nice upgrade though, especially with the bigger fork. But it does take me back to wondering if I'd just be better off with the Ripmo.

    Will you be able to take the Ripley out for a full-blown test run? If so, I would love to hear your thoughts on it compared to your Ripmo review, which incidentally helped me choose my Ripmo.

  40. #40
    No Clue Crew
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    6,788
    Nah, a parking lot ride is the best I'm going to get.

    I understand the thought process, but I have a certain attraction to a slightly beefier Ripley. I'm not really sure how I could have lightened up the Ripmo. I guess I could have saved a few grams in wheels. But in this environment, the biggest weight target would be tires and light tires die a quick death in Phoenix.

    I'm not much of a weight weenie, but I was a little shocked at how light even a cheap NX build Ripley seemed to be. I earn all my turns, so the idea of not humping a 32-pound bike up the mountain appeals.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    161
    I am from the Southeast, so I definitely feel you on earning your turns and wishing for a lighter bike on the ups. According to Fanatik, there is only about a .2lb weight difference between the Ripley and Ripmo frames without the shock in a size large. That is really what I think drives the line of thinking that weight savings aren't really a significant advantage of the Ripley, and that its all a part of how it's built up.

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    1,474
    Quote Originally Posted by Lgmoto356 View Post
    I am from the Southeast, so I definitely feel you on earning your turns and wishing for a lighter bike on the ups. According to Fanatik, there is only about a .2lb weight difference between the Ripley and Ripmo frames without the shock in a size large. That is really what I think drives the line of thinking that weight savings aren't really a significant advantage of the Ripley, and that its all a part of how it's built up.
    Yep. When I put my bigger wheel/tire set on my Ripley, itís less than a pound lighter than my Ripmo. Same build, only difference being the fork (Ribbon SL vs Ribbon) and shock (DPS vs DPX2). Frame weights are almost exactly the same.
    Ibis Ripmo V2
    Ibis Ripley V4
    Ibis Mojo HD5
    Pivot Mach 4SL
    Pivot LES SS
    A road bike

  43. #43
    Rider On The Storm
    Reputation: crimsontime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    27
    I demoed a Large Ripley last weekend so I have now ridden both bikes on 20+ mile demo rides. I can say hands down I will not be buying a Ripley. I could not really notice a difference in climbing ability, but for descending the difference is by far in favor of the Ripmo. To me, it wasn't primarily about the travel, it was that the Ripmo felt a lot more stable on the descents.

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    161
    Quote Originally Posted by crimsontime View Post
    I demoed a Large Ripley last weekend so I have now ridden both bikes on 20+ mile demo rides. I can say hands down I will not be buying a Ripley. I could not really notice a difference in climbing ability, but for descending the difference is by far in favor of the Ripmo. To me, it wasn't primarily about the travel, it was that the Ripmo felt a lot more stable on the descents.
    Ah, thank you so much for weighing in with your experience after the test ride! Could you tell me how the Ripley felt as far as being poppy and easy to jib off of small features, in relation to the Ripmo?

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JoePAz's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    5,690
    Quote Originally Posted by Blatant View Post
    I find myself more and more interested in this topic. I'm coming back to the Ibis fold and am torn. I have owned a Ripmo previously and feel it was probably the best bike I've ever owned.

    My LBS has both bikes in my size in stock. I am down to a one-bike stable at this time, riding mostly in Phoenix, but throughout Arizona. The solid move is to buy another Ripmo. But the Ripley is appealing. I drove it around the parking lot today and it feels super-light and snappy. I like that.

    I'd run it with a 140 Lyrik and real tires to survive Phoenix rocks, so more like a mini-Ripmo. It doesn't seem like enough travel for some of the bigger stuff on South Mountain and Sedona, but I've had pretty good success going fast on shorter bikes (Giant Trance, Banshee Phantom, etc.).

    DVO will do a custom-stroked Topaz for it, too.

    Love to hear more input.
    What do you want to ride on the the bike? I don't have much time on my Ripmo, but have ridden alot of Phx. I mostly ride XC style so the Ripmo is my big bike for sure. So far I have 1 ride at Papago, 3 rides at south Mtn, and one at Deem hills. I like to climb and I frankly really like to climb on the Ripmo. It just climbs so well in the chunk. I have on climb up Javalina, and 2 up Mormon to National split, I also climbed all the hills at Deem as well. I feel like the bike does well on chunky climbs like Mormon and does well on the descents too. 1 run down Javalina and 2 down lower National. Plus down the rocky hills at Deem. The bike in my mind is great those places. At Papago it was surprisingly nimble through the twisty turns of vigilante, but clearly overkill. Not so much that it was not fun with a slower group, but not XC rocketship fun and if I was with my fast XC group it would have held me back.

    I guess I feel that if the most "XC" you plan to do is Javalina and care more about making the climb rather than climbing fast then go with the Ripmo. However if you want to do both National and places like papago or god for bid McDowell park/Browns then Ripley. I have feeling the Ripmo will be total snoozer on trails like that where as the Ripley will be tolerable. For me I just have my Epic or Vassago singlespeed for places like. If you want push fast up techy climbs fast and and don't mike more of a challenge on the DH then Ripley. I think the best way to look at it that the Ripley will probably be more like your Trance that you had for a while.


    In the end I am pretty happy with the Ripmo for my needs. If it was my only bike I would definitely go Ripley as lean more XC in my riding style, but for someone who loves the chunk and only rides flat smooth stuff to get to the chunk I think you can do well on the Ripmo. I could be wrong, but I get the impression you are more of the later.
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", 19' Vassago Optimus Ti SS 29", '19 Ibis Ripmo, XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  46. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JoePAz's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    5,690
    Quote Originally Posted by Lgmoto356 View Post
    I am from the Southeast, so I definitely feel you on earning your turns and wishing for a lighter bike on the ups. According to Fanatik, there is only about a .2lb weight difference between the Ripley and Ripmo frames without the shock in a size large. That is really what I think drives the line of thinking that weight savings aren't really a significant advantage of the Ripley, and that its all a part of how it's built up.
    I agree with this based on my research as well. The Ripmo gains weight due to shock, fork, and wheels/tires. When you look at it drive train is really the same. GX on either bike going to be the same. Also could be some difference in 4 pot brakes vs 2. So when you are looking at beefy wheel/tire combo and a bigger fork the weights normalized. Of course where the rear sits in its travel and how it responds to pedaling will be different. As you know there can be shift in geo over forking at Ripley. That could be good or bad.
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", 19' Vassago Optimus Ti SS 29", '19 Ibis Ripmo, XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  47. #47
    Rider On The Storm
    Reputation: crimsontime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    27
    To be honest, I couldn't tell much difference in how poppy it is. Both bikes felt good. I would go with what others have said. It climbs better and is more poppy, but for the way I ride, the difference is negligible. Every time I pointed the bike down something steep and rocky though, I missed the Ripmo.

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    1,474
    Also, as to the OP, you seemed to be concerned about the stiffness of the Ripley. I find no difference in flex between the Mo and Ley. I'm a lightweight, but have never felt ANY flex in either bike. My Mach 4SL is the only bike I have where I can occasionally feel a hint of flex.
    Ibis Ripmo V2
    Ibis Ripley V4
    Ibis Mojo HD5
    Pivot Mach 4SL
    Pivot LES SS
    A road bike

  49. #49
    No Clue Crew
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    6,788
    Yeah, up and down National would be an average trail ride. Probably the easiest system I commonly ride would be Hawes. I never ride Browns Ranch or Papago.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Posts
    89
    I had a Ripmo, swapped many parts over to Ripley v4 when it came out but didn't sell Ripmo frame and gradually built it back up with budget parts from Pinkbike buysell and I'm really glad I did.

    I'd say if you're totally honest about avoiding chunk, bike parks, and bigger features, sure the Ripley will do exactly what you're looking for. However, if you forced me to make a decision I think I'd pick the Ripmo and put money into a second lighter wheelset/tire combo. IMO, the Ripmo is still really playful and fun. As nimble as the Ripley? No, of course not. But after 1 or 2 rides you just get used to the extra effort to throw the bike around and it'll pop off everything just the same... well, almost.

    Oddly, I find the Ripley much more supportive and bottom it out less frequently where I find the Ripmo really blows through it's travel and has that hovercraft feel. I have some volume spacers on order for the DPX2. I also definitely take it easier on the Ripley though. Now the fork on the Ripley, I blow through the 130 really easily it seems and I'm running 70+ psi on a Fox 34 with 4 tokens. I'm about 160 lbs ready to ride and will hit pretty much anything non bike park in SoCal on either bike, just at different aggression levels. I've never noticed stiffness issues in either but I don't weigh a whole lot.

    On really fast and flowy blue trail singletrack, you'll definitely appreciate the Ripley a lot more. You can really throw it around for being a slack 29er, it's definitely more fun than the Ripmo in that regard but throw in some rocks and anything to flat and the Ripmo feels a lot nicer. As for climbing and long rides, obviously the Ripley will be better but I'm not immune to using the climb switch judiciously so the Ripmo isn't too far behind.

    Oh, one last thing - The bottom bracket on the Ripley with 2.3" tires is really low since it was designed around 2.6" tires I guess. Rocks and techy climbing will require a bit of an adjustment.

  51. #51
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Posts
    89
    I'd add that I really don't want to own and maintain both bikes and it has me looking really hard at the Yeti SB130 as a do everything bike. That just seems a bit tooooo long and slack and not that playful but reports conflict there. I can't get a demo locally but it might be an option for you to consider.

  52. #52
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    1,474
    Quote Originally Posted by yagr68 View Post
    .........Oddly, I find the Ripley much more supportive and bottom it out less frequently where I find the Ripmo really blows through it's travel and has that hovercraft feel. I have some volume spacers on order for the DPX2. I also definitely take it easier on the Ripley though. Now the fork on the Ripley, I blow through the 130 really easily it seems and I'm running 70+ psi on a Fox 34 with 4 tokens. I'm about 160 lbs ready to ride and will hit pretty much anything non bike park in SoCal on either bike, just at different aggression levels. I've never noticed stiffness issues in either but I don't weigh a whole lot........
    That's what I was talking about earlier in the thread. The Ripley has a more progressive curve so will bottom out less, or at least less harshly. The Ripmo is much more linear and a lot of people (mostly heavier than me guys) complained about blowing through the travel with the 2018 DPX2 shock. The '19 version allows for more spacers so it can handle the linearity better from what I understand and have read.
    Ibis Ripmo V2
    Ibis Ripley V4
    Ibis Mojo HD5
    Pivot Mach 4SL
    Pivot LES SS
    A road bike

  53. #53
    xls
    xls is offline
    Eduardo Naranja
    Reputation: xls's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    479
    I demoed both, and ordered a Ripmo. I preferred the Ripmo when descending some gnarlier descents and it did fine for the climbs (Ripley climbs better). Both were relatively high-end stock Ibis builds (carbon wheels, X01).

  54. #54
    Rollin 29s
    Reputation: isleblue65's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    997

    Anyone Switch from a Ripmo to a Ripley V4? Or have time on both?

    This thread has been helpful. I have a Ripmo that over most of my first year of ownership has been challenging to adjust to reduce hand pressure, pedal strikes, and suspension settings. The DPX2 was rebuilt twice under warranty, once by Fox. There is a list of other issues.

    My trails are really rocky, but I wondered if the Ripley V4 would be the better choice because the vertical feet of my local trails is more CX terrain than downhill.

    Iím 50, and still ride aggressively, but Iím not taking the risks or bigger drops that I used to. Comfort is a priority now, and it sounds like the plushness of the Ripmo at the expense of a tighter turning radius and slightly more sluggish climbing ability than V4 is a fair trade off for me.

    After reading this, I feel confident that the Ripmo is a good choice for me.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Last edited by isleblue65; 09-05-2019 at 08:09 AM.
    Whoever invented the bicycle deserves the thanks of humanity.
    - Lord Charles Beresford

  55. #55
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    161
    I concur with sentiment that the Ripley V4 has more mid-stroke support than the Ripmo with a DPX2. I definitely get a lot less pedal strikes on the Ripley V4 which was surprising to me me at first.

  56. #56
    No Clue Crew
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    6,788
    Decision made for me ... back to the Ripmo. Picked it up today.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  57. #57
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    4,325
    Quote Originally Posted by JoePAz View Post
    I agree with this based on my research as well. The Ripmo gains weight due to shock, fork, and wheels/tires. When you look at it drive train is really the same. GX on either bike going to be the same. Also could be some difference in 4 pot brakes vs 2. So when you are looking at beefy wheel/tire combo and a bigger fork the weights normalized. Of course where the rear sits in its travel and how it responds to pedaling will be different. As you know there can be shift in geo over forking at Ripley. That could be good or bad.
    Ditto. So many objective reviews in this thread, surprising it hasn't gone off the rails. I went with Ripley V4 because I climb all day, and putting weight weenie wheel/tires on the Ripmo felt like putting cheap narrow tires on a mega HP sports car. My area doesn't need a 160 fork nor did I want to make myself think it wasn't overkill. My neighbor is same weight and riding ability as I, obviously we ride majority same trails, and he went for a Ripmo because he wanted a "funner" all around bike that blasted descents.

    Perspective buyers truly have a win-win here.

  58. #58
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    467
    tou get it with the Fox x2?

  59. #59
    No Clue Crew
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    6,788
    If that's for me, I did go with the X2 this time.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  60. #60
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,509
    Quote Originally Posted by isleblue65 View Post
    This thread has been helpful. I have a Ripmo that over most of my first year of ownership has been challenging to adjust to reduce hand pressure, pedal strikes, and suspension settings. The DPX2 was rebuilt twice under warranty, once by Fox. There is a list of other issues.

    My trails are really rocky, but I wondered if the Ripley V4 would be the better choice because the vertical feet of my local trails is more CX terrain than downhill.

    Iím 50, and still ride aggressively, but Iím not taking the risks or bigger drops that I used to. Comfort is a priority now, and it sounds like the plushness of the Ripmo at the expense of a tighter turning radius and slightly more sluggish climbing ability than V4 is a fair trade off for me.

    After reading this, I feel confident that the Ripmo is a good choice for me.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I'm not riding either bike, but I wanted to add to your thinking as I quickly approach 50. I had a V1 Ripley and added an HD3 set at 160/150 last year.What I have found is the HD3 climbs great even with the added weight & travel, but it makes the downs that much more fun with the extra travel and what I feel is a margin of error as my skills, reaction time and bravery wane. Longer travel bikes for riders who are aging but still like to take chances are like oversized golf clubs or tennis racquets.....I think they are the way to go if you want to still push it on the downs a little bit.

  61. #61
    Ride On!
    Reputation: NorCalTaz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    962
    Not sure I would ever trade my Ripmo for the new Ripley. I owned a Ripley LS and it was mega fun to ride, poppy, playful and nimble. It seems that the new geometry on the Ripley V4 would make it much more like the Ripmo. I intend to find out someday and stop by Ibis in Santa Cruz for a demo and take it up the long climb at Wilder, followed by riding around UCSC.

    BTW, I am 57 and it does cross my mind that the Ripmo may be more bike than I need right now, time will tell. Thread has got me thinking about getting on of the Ripley LS's somewhere down the road.

  62. #62
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    600
    i wanted to make a switch from 650b to 29" last summer. i have been riding ibis bikes for past 10 years (mojo hd, then hd3) and when ripmo came out it seemed like an ideal bike for the switch. i probably demoed 20-25 different 29ers that summer , including ripmo on 3 occasions. at the end of summer, i realized, i was having more fun on 120-130mm bikes. so i went for local brand and got spot mayhem. at first i liked the bike but eventually i become fed up with its "design features", which turned up being flaws for me and sold it just in time to get ready for new ripley. for me, it is ideal bike for what i have been using it so far this summer, long high country rides with lots of elevation. but it can handle rocky and steep front range trails no problem as well. i actually feel more confident riding slow to mid speed chunk on ripley than my hd3. i can feel ripleys limits on high speed rough descents with lots of repeated hits. it still does fine, it just doesnt handle like having 150 in the rear.
    overall, i am super happy with ripley.

  63. #63
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    161
    There has been a ton of great info in this thread, and I want to give a huge thank you to everyone who weighed in! I think like a couple of others on this thread, the feedback has led me to stay with the Ripmo.

    That said, I do plan to trade in for an XL, so I am selling my Large. If anyone is interested, feel free to drop me a PM!

  64. #64
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    53
    When I was on the market for a new bike, I was seriously considering buying a Ripley LS3, as it was tons of fun to ride..Even though the bike punched way above its weight, I was hesitant because I wanted a little more travel.
    Then came along the Ripmo. Since I bought one almost a year ago, it never ceases to amaze me. Best bike ever!
    One of my friends just got a Ripley V4.
    Beautiful bike, and a rocket ship on climbs, and sure is a very tempting proposition. I guess it depends What one is looking for. For me, the Ripmo is the perfect quiver killer. Fast uphill, and point and shoot downhill.
    In my opinion, if you already own a Ripmo, switching to the Ripley V4 is hard to justify.

  65. #65
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    1,064
    Quote Originally Posted by pking View Post
    I have have the following Ibis bikes(all in size large):
    Ripley LS V2 with pike 130mm(original Ripley LS)
    HD3 with pike 150mm
    Ripmo DPX2 with fox 36 160mm
    Ripley V4 with Pike ultimate 130mm

    I decided to add the Ripley V4 to try to keep up with my son's NICA team rides. I was doing a pretty good job on the Ripmo after my son grew into my Ripley LS and started riding it, but I knew a lighter bike with less travel would be much easier on my midddle aged body. I took delivery of my My Ripley while I was on vacation in SLC Utah at Salt Cycles in Sandy. While I was there I also had my Ripmo with me so I was able to grab whatever bike I wanted each day and had time to ride both at various locations. I agree that the Ripley is better for mellower trails like the Crest, and climbing tech climbs like Cathrine's pass but I was surprised that it also was faster on a long downhill trail like Big Mountain Trail at Snowbird (3K drop over 7.5 miles). Strava confirmed a 90 second faster time descending on the Ripley V4 over the Ripmo one day apart. My Ripmo is set up with Zee brakes vs the 4 piston XTs on the Ripley. I found the shorter wheel base to take the tight switchback berms much easier and faster.

    I have returned back to my home trails in the rocky and rooty NE and I continue to be amazed at what the Ripley V4 can handle. I originally planned on running the Ripmo at rockier locations to get the max comfort, speed, and control but now I find myself grabbing the Ripley consistently. I was able to find the limits of the Ripley but it took a lot of nerve to go that fast in chunk and I won't be looking to repeat that experiment. The difference between the two bikes is quite astonishing to me with the Ripley being quicker laterally, more playful and jibby, able to pop off of roots and little rocks much easier than the Ripmo. The Ripmo can smooth out bad line choices and has more room to send bigger hits. If I was racing enduro or going to a gravity park I would grab the Ripmo but I think I'll be using the Ripley a lot more than I originally intended, even in the rough rocky areas. I would be hard pressed to pick between the Ripmo and Ripley for a trail like the Whole Enchalada that has some areas of chunk but plenty of pedaling as well.
    Nice review. How are you liking the 4 piston XTs? How much difference do they make? Any issues with squealing or otherwise?

  66. #66
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    161
    Quote Originally Posted by EJ_92606 View Post
    Nice review. How are you liking the 4 piston XTs? How much difference do they make? Any issues with squealing or otherwise?
    They have been really boring, great power and modulation makes slowing down pretty drama free. I haven't really had any noise at all so far and I'm not finding much brake fade on long descents. Overall I'm pretty impressed.

  67. #67
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    161
    Quote Originally Posted by Blatant View Post
    Decision made for me ... back to the Ripmo. Picked it up today.
    Any update on how the 2019 X2 compares to the dpx2? I'm sure that it's more plush, but I'm curious about how often you find it bottoming, and if it loses the playful, poppy nature that it had with the dpx2.

    Sent from my SM-N950U1 using ****************android_app_mtbr

  68. #68
    No Clue Crew
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    6,788
    I will have input, but not yet. There was some sort of miscommunication between my shop and Ibis.

    I bought a stock bike off the floor, but Ibis authorized them to pull the DPX2 and would honor the upgrade price to the X2 ($270). However, they demanded the shop return the DPX2 before they'd ship the X2.

    It's been 2.5 weeks and I still have no shock; FWIW, I'm in Phoenix, which is two shipping days from Ibis HQ.

    All that said, I just had eye surgery and haven't been able to ride anyway. So not tripping on the delay.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  69. #69
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    161
    Quote Originally Posted by Blatant View Post
    I will have input, but not yet. There was some sort of miscommunication between my shop and Ibis.

    I bought a stock bike off the floor, but Ibis authorized them to pull the DPX2 and would honor the upgrade price to the X2 ($270). However, they demanded the shop return the DPX2 before they'd ship the X2.

    It's been 2.5 weeks and I still have no shock; FWIW, I'm in Phoenix, which is two shipping days from Ibis HQ.

    All that said, I just had eye surgery and haven't been able to ride anyway. So not tripping on the delay.
    Seems like a bit of a strange situation on the shock swap. I did mention in another thread that it seems like a lot of Ibis's struggle to get bikes out has more to do with components than frames.

    And wishing you a speedy recovery with the eye!

  70. #70
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    2,086
    This weekend we are in Big Bear, WV. The terrain is single track with tons of rocks and roots. Rock gardens are the norm and there are copious drops of a few feet to 5 feet or so. I have the new Ripley and another guy a Ripmo. Both bikes work great here. We are different sizes so I can't compare the two.

    I can see either being the best bike here. I have ridden many times here and it performed flawlessly. Climbing the tech rocks has been stellar and I haven't lost traction yet. Drops (I only did 3 feet or less) are great. The is a lot of varied tech here and the Ripley worked well. I if I was riding here all the time, I would extend fork to 140.

    Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk

  71. #71
    No Clue Crew
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    6,788
    Thanks. Actually had corneal lens implants done in both eyes. Hopefully riding again later this week.

    Again, I didn't make a stink about the shock since I'm not riding anyway and mistakes happen. I've owned multiple Ibis bikes and, previously, had great success calling to ask technical questions.

    This time, I've called multiple times and no one ever answers the phone or returns calls. My shop had the same input that their calls weren't being returned, although their emails were being answered. Don't know if Ibis lost some people or the demand has gotten on top of them.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lgmoto356 View Post
    Seems like a bit of a strange situation on the shock swap. I did mention in another thread that it seems like a lot of Ibis's struggle to get bikes out has more to do with components than frames.

    And wishing you a speedy recovery with the eye!
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

Similar Threads

  1. 2019 Ibis Ripley V4
    By alexbn921 in forum Ibis
    Replies: 3525
    Last Post: 1 Hour Ago, 07:06 PM
  2. Ripley V3, V4, or Ripmo
    By Dr. Dolittle in forum Ibis
    Replies: 40
    Last Post: 02-27-2020, 02:39 PM
  3. Replies: 46
    Last Post: 02-10-2019, 08:43 AM
  4. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 01-02-2019, 02:46 PM
  5. Replies: 10
    Last Post: 03-05-2015, 02:20 PM

Members who have read this thread: 35

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.