need to know a little bit more about haro's- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    24

    need to know a little bit more about haro's

    i have a haro shift R3 i have put a some upgrades on it as i get better should i keep upgrading or should i go to a sonic or something, is there a big difference in the frames of the bikes or should i keep mine? oh by the way the year is a 2007 model.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: downhilljill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    1,820
    The Shift and Sonix frames are two completely different frames that use different suspension technology. Shifts use single pivot suspension which is proven, simple to set up and maintain, and effective. The downfall of sinlge pivot bikes is they can be prone to brake jack (meaning the rear suspension sort of "locks up" a bit when the brakes are applied). Once considered "old school" because the technology has been around forever, recent advances in rear shock technology (better rebound, air springs, compression/pedaling platforms) have sort of breathed a whole new life into single pivot bikes. Not just Haro bikes in particulat, but other companies like Santa Cruz and Cannondale who use it as well.

    The Sonix bikes are based on our proprietary Virtual Link Technology which was designed for us by a former designer for Santa Cruz bikes. If you look at the rear swingarm on a Sonix (or Xeon, our other bike that uses VL technology), you'll see that there's no pivot point between the BB and rear axle, chain growth is impossible (chain growth is what causes that dreaded "bobbing"). So what you have is a bike that pedals uphill and on the flat much like a hardtail, yet descends super plush.

    Whether you should continue to upgrade your Shift or trade it in for a Sonix is really up to you. I rode a Shift for many year and it was a great bike, but I really love my Sonix because it's just so efficient on the climbs and performs better. You might see if your local Haro dealer has a demo bike you can try out. If not, we have a few demo bikes that we can send to dealers for a limited time for customers to try out (ask them about our "Demo in a Box" program...if they are clueless, have them call me).

    I hope that help answer your question or at least gives you a little more info. As always, feel free to hit me back with any additional questions.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    321
    Quick additional question... looking at the animation on the website, the BB is actually moving vertically a small amount through the first bit of suspension travel - did it take any time to get used to this, or did you even notice it when you first started using the VL frames?

  4. #4

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    24

    thanks jill

    i have read alot about the sonix LT and like it a lot i understood a little bit about what i read but you put it in better words and made it a lot clearer, i know the rear shock worked better but didn't understand why thanks now i do.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: downhilljill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    1,820
    There's actually a pivot that moves around the BB; the BB itself doesn't move. You don't even notice it unlike the unified rear triangles of old. In the first 30% of the pivot's rotation around the BB (which is tylically where you'll be when you climb and ride on the flats), the platform ramps up and becomes firm. In the last 70% of the rotation (typically on descents and bigger hits), it allows the rest of the pivots on the frame "free up" and the suspension becomes plush.

    There really isn't a "getting used to" period with these bikes. One of the most common things I hear when I run our demos is people are impressed with just how comfortable and familiar they feel from the get-go. The one thing that has always impressed me about these bikes from the day that I threw a leg over a prototype is that there aren't any "trade-offs". It descends just as well as it climbs. The only little nagging drawback about the VL bikes is they are finnicky about sag set-up...you have to run 10mm on the Sonix and 12mm on the Xeon, no more. It's not hard to do (there are set up guides with the bikes and on our website), but it just needs to be done and maintained from time to time as the air shocks do lose a little air over time.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.