2003 X1 upgrades- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1

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    New question here. 2003 X1 upgrades

    Can anyone give me some advice on beefing up my X1 rear shock (X fusion Glyde Super with 5" travel). I ride a M frame and I am a heavy guy. So what is the beefest and longest travel rear fork that will fit on the bike I have. Any advice would help.

  2. #2
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    I'm in Taipei right now at the bike show, so I don't have my tech sheets with me. If I forget to get back to you on this by the end of the week, please PM me and I can give you some rear shock dimensions.

  3. #3
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    Here are the shock specs for a 2003 X1:

    190mm eye-to-eye length
    50.8 stroke length
    22.1mm frame mount hardware with M6 bolt
    25.4mm suspension mount hardware with M6 bolts

    You'll have 2 choices when you start shopping for rear shocks: air or coil.

    Coil shocks are usually much cheaper and less maintenance than air shocks. There aren't any air pressure settings to maintain and adjust. The drawbacks is they are heavy and you'll have to find the correct spring rate for your weight. Not a hard process, but it can be frustrating since you may end up purchasing a few different shocks until you find the right one for your weight and riding style.

    Air shocks tend to be a little more expensive than coil, but they offer a wide variety of adjustments you don't always find on coil shocks...pressure being the most obvious. They are also much lighter...those damn coils are heavy!

    When you are shock shopping, try to find one that has some type of pedaling platform. Single pivot bikes really come to life with a rear shock that has a little bit of a platform on it.

  4. #4

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    Great, but must I stay with the 190mm length or can I go bigger? I am not sure how a larger shock would affect the ride quality or even if it could be accomplished. Also I a little confused on the pedaling platform thing, I read about it but I still am unsure what shocks have it or don't and how it actually works. Could someone please help explain a little. Finally, what shocks are considered to be better for a larger rider, coil or air? I have only rode on a coil so I am not to familair with the air shocks to much but I have done a bunch of research lately since I have been looking for an upgrade.

    Thanks,
    MP
    Last edited by The Mad Prophet; 03-28-2007 at 02:09 PM.

  5. #5
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    We don't recommend using anything but the 190mm length.

    Pedaling platform is essentially a form of compression damping; it regulates the speed at which the shock compresses. Some rear shocks will have different settings to control the amount of "platform" the shock operates under. For example, the Fox RP23 has a switch where you can turn the platform on or off (they call their platform system ProPedal). In the "off" position, there is very little compression damping, so the shock with operate very freely. Many people will flip their shocks into the "off" position when descending since the shock will be very free and plush, and then switch it to the "on" position once they get down the hill. When the ProPedal switch is "on" you can further adjust the amount of compression via a knob with 3 settings. 1 for the lightest (least) compression setting and 3 for the firmest (most) compression damping. RockShox has a similar system called Motion Control; Manitou calls theirs SPV.

    As far as which would be better for your weight, most of the heavier riders I have talked to seem to prefer a coil shock. You didn't say how heavy you are, but the more weight that sits on the bike, the harder it can be on moving parts, like shocks. The more stress air shocks are subjected to, the more they are suceptible to reliabilty issues. This is the reason why most DH-type shocks are still supported by a coil system...DH and freeride bikes are subject to a lot of stress in that area.

  6. #6

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    That was way more information than I expected. You are on top of your game and this forum really should change its name to DHJill talking about Haros. Thanks for your advice, btw I am ~240 with gear that is why I favor the heavier bike so I can beat on it a little.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Mad Prophet
    That was way more information than I expected. You are on top of your game and this forum really should change its name to DHJill talking about Haros. Thanks for your advice, btw I am ~240 with gear that is why I favor the heavier bike so I can beat on it a little.
    Wouldn't it be, "Downhill Jill writing about Haros?"
    "It is the glory of God to conceal a matter; to search out a matter is the glory of kings."

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by emptybeer
    Wouldn't it be, "Downhill Jill writing about Haros?"
    You got me there!!!!

    Just received my new to me fork today, 2005 Manitou Stance Flow. I can not wait to mount and try them out. They already fell more stiff and they are not even on my bike yet. But by the looks of things, I am going to be going with a whole new front end. I have already ordered my new wheel and that will be ready on Friday, fully equiped with a new Ringle 20mm hub; can't wait to see how it feels. So now I am in the market for a new headset and stem; any suggestions?

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