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  1. #1001
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    I just bought a used PH frame with the raw finish. Of course it looks pretty cool, but surface rust is a real issue. I suppose it could eventually turn into a structural problem. Some custom frame builders are hesitant to do raw finish for this reason. Not too much of a surprise that GG stopped offering this.
    Last edited by kapow!; 10-05-2018 at 12:12 PM.

  2. #1002
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    Got 52 miles of singletrack in over the weekend. Fit was looking real good, and this thing is everything you guys have said it would be! Handles like a dream, hitting some decent sized drops, getting through rock gardens, and blasting down some flow.

    I haven't ridden a hardtail slacker than 69* and this makes a huge difference (that and 29x2.5" tires) on what I was able to tackle on the trail. Stoked to get some more miles on it this weekend as well. Might be goodbye to my Hightower LT for the season.

    The MRP Ribbon was worth the wait as well. Glad I had it built at 140mm!

  3. #1003
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    I canít get my photos to upload, but if anybody is curious I was able to put a 3Ē Highroller II on the rear with plenty of room to spare.
    The only reason I put it on is because the sidewall on my Rekon is shot and I havenít gotten a new tire yet.
    The HRII definitely hooks better than the Rekon on my trails, but I can tell a HUGE difference in pedaling effort with it on there.
    The more Marines I have around, the better I like it.
    -Wesley Clark

  4. #1004
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    I had 3Ē Nobby Nics on mine before I switched over to a 2.8Ē Minion DHF front and 2.8Ē Rekon in the rear. I instantly felt the difference in grip and roll. Huge improvement overall.
    Bring on the snow ⛄️


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  5. #1005
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    Anyone running a reduced offset fork? I got a 29+ fork now, looking to go down to a 27+/29 with more travel, figured I could get two birds by getting a 42mm offset like I run on the Smash.
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  6. #1006
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    Just assembled mine last night. Does anyone have a recommendation on grease vs anti-seize for the dropper post? It's super tight and difficult to slide in and out. I have to remove it to shorten the cable and I'm thinking about using grease instead of anti-seize.

  7. #1007
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy3220 View Post
    Just assembled mine last night. Does anyone have a recommendation on grease vs anti-seize for the dropper post? It's super tight and difficult to slide in and out. I have to remove it to shorten the cable and I'm thinking about using grease instead of anti-seize.
    I had the same issue when I overhauled my dropper. I used Super Lube, hoping that the it's thinner consistency would help. It's still very difficult to adjust or remove.

    The tightness works out, sort of, because it makes it possible to use lower torque on the seat post clamp. This can help with some droppers that tend to get stuck short on return. In many cases this is caused not by a faulty return spring, but because a too-tight seat post clamp deforms the lower a teeny bit- the tolerances between the lower and the inner are very precise, so it doesn't take much to cause sticking, which will disappear, if it's the cause, when less torque is used on the clamp.

    One concern I have is this: Is anti-seize necessary to account for possible corrosive issues due to steel-aluminum contact? EDIT: A teeny bit of Googling shows that galvanic corrosion, resulting from electron exchange between dissimilar metals, is pretty much a non issue in the presence of grease and/or anodizing (and, of course, anti-seize compound). It's also a non-issue if the seat post is removed and cleaned with some sort of regularity, as in once or twice every few of years. (I'd do it more often, just to avoid the dreaded stuck post.) In any case, I couldn't find anything that suggested anti-seize was superior to grease for the purpose. The only advantage I could find was that being purpose-made, anti-seize is better at holding things in place while still preventing seizing.
    Last edited by yrrekr; 10-16-2018 at 08:26 AM.

  8. #1008
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    Thanks. I'll try grease when I remove it later to shorten the cable.

  9. #1009
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy3220 View Post
    Thanks. I'll try grease when I remove it later to shorten the cable.
    I dropped GG a line, and asked about seat post lube, cuz I need to know about this for my frame. I asked about Super Lube, specifically. They said to use anti-seize, but didn't say why. Guess I'd go with their recommendation... in order to avoid finding out why...

  10. #1010
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    Quote Originally Posted by yrrekr View Post
    I dropped GG a line, and asked about seat post lube, cuz I need to know about this for my frame. I asked about Super Lube, specifically. They said to use anti-seize, but didn't say why. Guess I'd go with their recommendation... in order to avoid finding out why...
    Dang, ok thanks. I haven't reinstalled it yet so that's good info to have.

  11. #1011
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    The answer probably has to do with the bike being made from steel and not aluminum. I. E it could corrode.

  12. #1012
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    I found out that the seat tube wasn't just tight but that I physically can't insert my
    OneUp dropper more than 16cm into the seat tube(there's about 80mm sticking out). There's a lip where the top tube intersects the seat tube. I called GG and they said the seat tube can be honed out but I'm not sure how difficult that is or if any local shops know how to do that. Honestly, that's really annoying. I'm 6'5" with a 36" inseam but can't fit a 170mm dropper on this bike.

    Also, they have an option for a 185mm BikeYoke 185. If they intend for anyone with less than a 40" inseam to ride this bike then something is wrong with my seat tube.
    Last edited by jeremy3220; 10-16-2018 at 07:01 PM.

  13. #1013
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Large frame, One Up 170mm dropper inserts to within 20mm of the collar, fits just right for my 33Ē inseam and 165mm cranks.
    Did you have to hone the seat tube at all? Mine will only insert to within about 80mm of the collar on an XL frame.

  14. #1014
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy3220 View Post
    I found out that the seat tube wasn't just tight but that I physically can't insert my
    OneUp dropper more than 16cm into the seat tube(there's about 80mm sticking out). There's a lip where the top tube intersects the seat tube. I called GG and they said the seat tube can be honed out but I'm not sure how difficult that is or if any local shops know how to do that. Honestly, that's really annoying. I'm 6'5" with a 36" inseam but can't fit a 170mm dropper on this bike.

    Also, they have an option for a 185mm BikeYoke 185. If they intend for anyone with less than a 40" inseam to ride this bike then something is wrong with my seat tube.
    Yeah, GG seems to have a little issue with the seat tubes on Pedalheads- there are more than a few stories of super-tight tubes and points of interference at the top tube interface. Honing violates the warranty, unless you talk to GG about it and either convince them you're qualified to do it yourself or find a GG-agreed upon shop to do it.

    I can get my seatpost to fit me -- a KS eTeni 125mm on a med. frame, 33" inseam-- but it's "bottomed out" near the top tube, and fits REALLY tight, to boot. When I replace the dropper, I'll have to be VERY careful about the post, which is too bad; I'd like to go to 150mm drop, but I'm not sure I can find a dropper that'd fit.

    I have to twist the post a fair amount to get it to move, which is kind of a no-no for droppers. I'm considering honing, but haven't talked to GG about it yet.

    Guess I'm a little surprised GG hasn't solved this issue. I know they've also had the opposite issue on some frame, i.e. slipping posts, so they may be erring on the tight side of things. It's really the only thing I'm not quite happy with on what's otherwise a great frame.

  15. #1015
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    Is honing really the proposed solution? I think a reamer might make more sense? The issue will be finding the right size.

  16. #1016
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    Quote Originally Posted by yrrekr View Post
    Yeah, GG seems to have a little issue with the seat tubes on Pedalheads- there are more than a few stories of super-tight tubes and points of interference at the top tube interface.
    The issue on mine is that there's a distinct change in internal diameter near the top tube. There's a clear line all the way around the inner circumference of the seat tube. I'm pretty sure if I had ordered the bike with a 170mm or 185mm dropper they would have reamed the seat tube further in. I think because the bike came specced with a 125mm dropper (I already had a 170mm OneUp to swap in) they didn't bother reaming it out all the way.

  17. #1017
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    Quote Originally Posted by avc8130 View Post
    Is honing really the proposed solution? I think a reamer might make more sense? The issue will be finding the right size.
    Honing is more gentle, and takes less sophisticated tools (Honing tool and a drill). Reaming takes an expensive and very precise tool, and, I hear, it can be a bit sketchy if you don't have a really sharp precise tool and some prior experience. I guess it's pretty easy to do wrong or badly, especially on thin-walled frames. Many bike shops won't ream or hone at all.

    I've read that honing can be done pretty safely and cheaply at home because it can remove metal very gradually. But, it still needs to be done correctly to ensure an even bore. The nice thing, apparently, is that it takes no real precision- hone a bit, fit the post to monitor (gradual) progress, and repeat, stop while it's still a little tight.

  18. #1018
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy3220 View Post
    The issue on mine is that there's a distinct change in internal diameter near the top tube. There's a clear line all the way around the inner circumference of the seat tube. I'm pretty sure if I had ordered the bike with a 170mm or 185mm dropper they would have reamed the seat tube further in. I think because the bike came specced with a 125mm dropper (I already had a 170mm OneUp to swap in) they didn't bother reaming it out all the way.
    That's interesting. Mine doesn't have any sort of clear line. It just gets gradually tighter and tighter. Must be a fair amount of variance in internal tube diameter.

  19. #1019
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    Quote Originally Posted by yrrekr View Post
    That's interesting. Mine doesn't have any sort of clear line. It just gets gradually tighter and tighter. Must be a fair amount of variance in internal tube diameter.
    Yeah, mine has a distinct step in diameter like they only bored it out to that point.

  20. #1020
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    Mine was tight as hell, had to grease the shite outta the post and tube, but it went in and it's tight but will move with some effort. Tight is good as long as it doesn't get stuck ... stuck is very bad.

    Do they really ream the seat post tube? I'd be curious to know how they prep the tube.
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  21. #1021
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post

    Do they really ream the seat post tube? I'd be curious to know how they prep the tube.
    I found this on page 7...

    Quote Originally Posted by mtg7aa View Post
    Every frame has the seat tube reamed and checked before it leaves. The challenge here is NOT that we don't feel like spending 15 seconds to check something. If it was that easy, you'd never hear about it. Check the fit with a seat post? We used to do that on every frame, but since we paid a chunk of change to have a more precise checker tool machined that works better than just a dropper post. And it is used on every frame. We have a pile of reamers that are in use until they wear down 0.001", then they are thrown away and replaced. Even with that, there is still a small tolerance.
    Perfect? No. Always improving? Yes.

    The challenge is that a seat post to seat tube fit means you need a slip fit of 0.002" - 0.004" over a long distance. The seat tube ream itself has a tolerance of several thousandths of an inch, as does the seat post itself. You can see from this that some will naturally be tighter of a fit, and some will have a looser fit. We control ours to the tightest tolerance that is possible given the manufacturing technology available to us. This isn't a situation of frames slipping through the cracks, it's a situation of asking for an extremely tight fit tolerance, and with frame-only sales, we can't check your seat post fit ahead of time.

    On complete bikes, if the post to frame fit is tight, we hone it at assembly. But, if we simply reamed all of them larger, the complaint here would be that the fit is too loose.

    My seat tube is tight but will slide in fine until it reaches that step in diameter. It's not going any further than that. I'm pretty sure mine was just reamed 16cm in.

  22. #1022
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    About two weeks ago I received my complete Pedalhead with a 160 Bike Yolk dropper. It came at the start of my work week.....and than I got shingles. Anyhow, I built it up last night and am kinda alarmed about just how tight that seat tube is: I can't seem to budge the post at all. Luckily it happens to be positioned perfectly, but my spidey senses tell me I should want to be able to move it.

  23. #1023
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy3220 View Post
    The issue on mine is that there's a distinct change in internal diameter near the top tube. There's a clear line all the way around the inner circumference of the seat tube. I'm pretty sure if I had ordered the bike with a 170mm or 185mm dropper they would have reamed the seat tube further in. I think because the bike came specced with a 125mm dropper (I already had a 170mm OneUp to swap in) they didn't bother reaming it out all the way.
    Hey Jeremy, apologies for the fitment concerns with your OneUp post. We ream Pedalheads as far as we can for each frame size, not based off the dropper length ordered. This typically means reaming down to the top tube intersection with the seat-tube.

    With the bend in the seat-tube we find that most riders will run a size shorter dropper on a Pedalhead than they would on any of our full-suspension bikes (which are reamed to 240mm on every size except the XS). Most riders are limited to 125mm dropper posts on Pedalhead frames with the exception of riders who are sizing down to a smaller frame. 150mm externally routed dropper posts work for some riders depending on leg length since they don't require as much insertion depth as a stealth dropper. There are cable guides under the top-tube for external routing if you'd prefer this option.
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  24. #1024
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guerrilla Gravity View Post
    Hey Jeremy, apologies for the fitment concerns with your OneUp post. We ream Pedalheads as far as we can for each frame size, not based off the dropper length ordered. This typically means reaming down to the top tube intersection with the seat-tube.

    With the bend in the seat-tube we find that most riders will run a size shorter dropper on a Pedalhead than they would on any of our full-suspension bikes (which are reamed to 240mm on every size except the XS). Most riders are limited to 125mm dropper posts on Pedalhead frames with the exception of riders who are sizing down to a smaller frame. 150mm externally routed dropper posts work for some riders depending on leg length since they don't require as much insertion depth as a stealth dropper. There are cable guides under the top-tube for external routing if you'd prefer this option.
    Any chance you have the insertion depth for each size frame available?

    I'm trying to find a dropper that works for me. I've tried a Specialized Command Post I had lying around, but even at 125mm I can't get a low enough seat height.

    ac

  25. #1025
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guerrilla Gravity View Post
    We ream Pedalheads as far as we can for each frame size, not based off the dropper length ordered. This typically means reaming down to the top tube intersection with the seat-tube.

    With the bend in the seat-tube we find that most riders will run a size shorter dropper on a Pedalhead than they would on any of our full-suspension bikes (which are reamed to 240mm on every size except the XS).
    So do you use a different reamer for the Pedalhead that only reaches 160mm? I'm not sure what you mean about the bend in the seat tube, it's about 6-8cm below the top tube intersection (on the XL at least). I'd have no problems if I could sink the dropper to the bend; I'd actually be able to run an even longer dropper if that was the case.

    I guess I'm just confused because some people (with shorter inseams) can fit 170mm droppers further into their Pedalhead seat tube. What is different about their bikes?

    You also offer up to 185mm droppers as an option for this bike. At 6'5" (36" inseam) I could run a 200mm dropper on my Hightower if I wanted. Who do you expect to run the 185mm dropper you offer with the Pedalhead? They'd need to have about a 39" inseam if they got my frame.

  26. #1026
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    I have a large pedalhead that fits a One Up 170mm dropper to within one inch of the maximum insertion. It was a PITA getting it inserted, but it was doable.

    I would have liked it to be easier, perhaps reaming the seat posts to the bend would be helpful?

    Even with a hardtail, most folks using droppers want to maximize the dropper length.
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  27. #1027
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guerrilla Gravity View Post
    Hey Jeremy, apologies for the fitment concerns with your OneUp post. We ream Pedalheads as far as we can for each frame size, not based off the dropper length ordered. This typically means reaming down to the top tube intersection with the seat-tube.

    With the bend in the seat-tube we find that most riders will run a size shorter dropper on a Pedalhead than they would on any of our full-suspension bikes (which are reamed to 240mm on every size except the XS). Most riders are limited to 125mm dropper posts on Pedalhead frames with the exception of riders who are sizing down to a smaller frame. 150mm externally routed dropper posts work for some riders depending on leg length since they don't require as much insertion depth as a stealth dropper. There are cable guides under the top-tube for external routing if you'd prefer this option.
    I'm not sure why anyone woild want a shorter dropper on their hardtail. I ride my Moxie on all the same trails as I do my FS bike, and would not give up my 160mm Revives for anything, except a 185 Revive. The Pedalhead was one of the frames I had considered during my hardtail quest, but if I had known this it would have been off the list.
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  28. #1028
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    Quote Originally Posted by avc8130 View Post
    Any chance you have the insertion depth for each size frame available?
    ac
    Depending on your leg length and frame size you might need to run a shorter dropper post than that. We've ordered 100mm droppers for shorter riders on smaller frames or worked out shorter cranks and pedals in order to make the bike fit properly with a 125 mm dropper.

    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy3220 View Post
    So do you use a different reamer for the Pedalhead that only reaches 160mm? I'm not sure what you mean about the bend in the seat tube, it's about 6-8cm below the top tube intersection (on the XL at least). I'd have no problems if I could sink the dropper to the bend; I'd actually be able to run an even longer dropper if that was the case.

    I guess I'm just confused because some people (with shorter inseams) can fit 170mm droppers further into their Pedalhead seat tube. What is different about their bikes?

    You also offer up to 185mm droppers as an option for this bike. At 6'5" (36" inseam) I could run a 200mm dropper on my Hightower if I wanted. Who do you expect to run the 185mm dropper you offer with the Pedalhead? They'd need to have about a 39" inseam if they got my frame.
    Dropper fit has to do with leg length, crank length, and pedal stack height. We have the longer droppers on the builder for people who might be able to run a longer post on a smaller frame.

    Each frame is reamed as deep as possible which is normally just below the top-tube junction with the seat-tube.

    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Bickle View Post
    I'm not sure why anyone woild want a shorter dropper on their hardtail. I ride my Moxie on all the same trails as I do my FS bike, and would not give up my 160mm Revives for anything, except a 185 Revive. The Pedalhead was one of the frames I had considered during my hardtail quest, but if I had known this it would have been off the list.
    This is in comparison to our full-suspension bikes which can fit incredibly long seatposts. Most riders end up running a size shorter dropper on a Pedalhead due to the bent seat-tube on the Pedalhead compared to the straight seat-tube on our full-suspension bikes. Agree on all points on the Revive, it's the best post out there!
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  29. #1029
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guerrilla Gravity View Post


    Dropper fit has to do with leg length, crank length, and pedal stack height. We have the longer droppers on the builder for people who might be able to run a longer post on a smaller frame.

    Each frame is reamed as deep as possible which is normally just below the top-tube junction with the seat-tube.
    Taller people are the ones who need the taller droppers. People expect the bigger bikes to fit the longer droppers. Since the bend isn't the issue on the XL frames you really should get a longer reamer. Most people buying a progressive XL bike expect to fit at least a 170mm dropper and longer wouldn't be abnormal.

  30. #1030
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy3220 View Post
    Taller people are the ones who need the taller droppers. People expect the bigger bikes to fit the longer droppers. Since the bend isn't the issue on the XL frames you really should get a longer reamer. Most people buying a progressive XL bike expect to fit at least a 170mm dropper and longer wouldn't be abnormal.
    It has nothing to do with the length of the reamer, it is about the location of the bend in the seat tube.

    People seem to have forgotten that in order to make bikes ride a certain way sacrifices need to be made, and that proper fit should always trump something trivial like dropper size.

    The biggest problem I see is that most people buying bikes are basing their decisions on the "expert opinions" of a bunch of strangers on the internet.


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  31. #1031
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    Dropper length is not trivial for me on some of the trail I take my hardtail down, and is not something I would compromise on.
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  32. #1032
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    Quote Originally Posted by Little_twin View Post
    It has nothing to do with the length of the reamer, it is about the location of the bend in the seat tube.
    Nope, not on the XL frame. I have about 6cm more in my seat tube it could be reamed before the bend. GG even said it could be honed out further and offered to do it (I'm not local or I would take it to them).

    The biggest problem I see is that most people buying bikes are basing their decisions on the "expert opinions" of a bunch of strangers on the internet.
    You make a convincing argument stranger.

  33. #1033
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Bickle View Post
    Dropper length is not trivial for me on some of the trail I take my hardtail down, and is not something I would compromise on.
    Frame builders aren't building bikes so that YOU can fit the longest dropper available to mankind, they are building bikes that fit the masses.

    Debating the difficulty and steepness of your trails is not something I will engage in as it is pointless, I could tell you that I ride my fixed post xc bike down a local trail that drops 1700' in 1.2 miles, but how would you know if that's true, or how fast I do it.

    It also worth comparing the pedalhead to other similar bikes. Here is a comparison to a spot rocker. If you compare seat tube back you'll notice that the PH has a 1.5" lower standover and shorter chainstays. This doesn't come without some compromise and you don't have to be an engineer to figure out where that compromise is made.

    For the riders out there with freakishly short legs and crazy long torsos I am sorry you're just screwed and probably won't ever be able to get comfortably behind your bike, but for the rest of us I just don't see where slamming the seat damn near to the bb is a necessity, steep trails or not.

    A dropper post isn't like your pedals, bikes function just fine without one.

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  35. #1035
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy3220 View Post
    Nope, not on the XL frame. I have about 6cm more in my seat tube it could be reamed before the bend. GG even said it could be honed out further and offered to do it (I'm not local or I would take it to them
    I've used both flex hones and bore hones to get clearance in frames where the weld or a water bottle boss protruded too far int to the seat tube to allow my post to pass. I would imagine it would be a little time consuming but likely would work in your situation. Both types of hones can be bought for around $20 and attached to any drill. Obviously you should clear this with GG.


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  36. #1036
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    My Pedalhead has been sold!
    Last edited by Nurse Ben; 01-13-2019 at 11:14 PM.
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  37. #1037
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    Looking to possibly add a Pedalhead to my quiver of currently one. Right now, I'm on a Spot Rollik 557 which I friggin love but also am interested in having a 29/27.5+ option just because bikes are fun and variety is the spice of life. Ideally, I'd like a superlight sidekick to the Rollik but I don't have tons and tons of money to throw out. Just enough to have second bike (first world problems for sure). Anyways, if I was trying to keep the cost low, but the fun meter high, what first upgrade would ya'll make to the Ride 1 build? Ribbon fork? Bike yoke or oneup dropper? Lighter wheels? Lighter, stronger drivetrain? Would like to keep the price to 2500-2600 as i plan to buy a 27.5+ wheelset in addition to the stock 29 to use for the soft spring conditions here in Rifle, CO. Interested in anyone's opinion, thanks for taking time to respond. Cheers!

  38. #1038
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    Quote Originally Posted by fids11 View Post
    Looking to possibly add a Pedalhead to my quiver of currently one. Right now, I'm on a Spot Rollik 557 which I friggin love but also am interested in having a 29/27.5+ option just because bikes are fun and variety is the spice of life. Ideally, I'd like a superlight sidekick to the Rollik but I don't have tons and tons of money to throw out. Just enough to have second bike (first world problems for sure). Anyways, if I was trying to keep the cost low, but the fun meter high, what first upgrade would ya'll make to the Ride 1 build? Ribbon fork? Bike yoke or oneup dropper? Lighter wheels? Lighter, stronger drivetrain? Would like to keep the price to 2500-2600 as i plan to buy a 27.5+ wheelset in addition to the stock 29 to use for the soft spring conditions here in Rifle, CO. Interested in anyone's opinion, thanks for taking time to respond. Cheers!
    If you're tall, a dropper. You can get a replacement Pike air shaft for ~$40 if you want to try 130/140 fork. I went econo when I ordered my Smash, but upgraded the bar and crank (happy in retrospect). My PH presently has an alloy bar, but I prefer CF. The M1900 i30 is a good budget wheelset; hard to justify an upgrade for a P/T set, but you know what a fine wheelset can do. In a nutshell, if your fork is covered, cockpit and wheels.

  39. #1039
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    Quote Originally Posted by She&I View Post
    If you're tall, a dropper. You can get a replacement Pike air shaft for ~$40 if you want to try 130/140 fork. I went econo when I ordered my Smash, but upgraded the bar and crank (happy in retrospect). My PH presently has an alloy bar, but I prefer CF. The M1900 i30 is a good budget wheelset; hard to justify an upgrade for a P/T set, but you know what a fine wheelset can do. In a nutshell, if your fork is covered, cockpit and wheels.
    I am not tall, all of 5'7" lol. I do have a carbon RF Next bar at home here that I will slap on whatever bike I get so I'm good there. Looking at the fork right now.... is the extra $60 worth it to have a Ribbon over Pike? Hahaha my mechanic works at MRP so I better not even think of anything other than a Ribbon if I do upgrade the fork!

  40. #1040
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    Quote Originally Posted by fids11 View Post
    I am not tall, all of 5'7" lol. I do have a carbon RF Next bar at home here that I will slap on whatever bike I get so I'm good there. Looking at the fork right now.... is the extra $60 worth it to have a Ribbon over Pike? Hahaha my mechanic works at MRP so I better not even think of anything other than a Ribbon if I do upgrade the fork!
    The separate neg and pos air on the Ribbon is pretty nice for getting exactly the feel you want. Ramp control is awesome as well for. The Ribbon comes with spacers for easily changing travel, too. Considering the minimal price difference, the Ribbon is the way to go. Many MRP riders seem to prefer the Ribbon Coil, so that's a consideration, too.

    One drawback to MRP last winter was lead time-- going MRP instead of something else pushed the bike out an additional 4-5 weeks. Not sure if that's still the case, but it's worth finding out if you think it's an issue for you...

  41. #1041
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    Quote Originally Posted by fids11 View Post
    I am not tall, all of 5'7" lol. I do have a carbon RF Next bar at home here that I will slap on whatever bike I get so I'm good there. Looking at the fork right now.... is the extra $60 worth it to have a Ribbon over Pike? Hahaha my mechanic works at MRP so I better not even think of anything other than a Ribbon if I do upgrade the fork!
    Sounds good. I think most would reco the Ribbon upgrade; I would have gotten one on my Smash at that cost. But I am not unhappy with my Pike RC.

    Good luck in your quest!

  42. #1042
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    Quote Originally Posted by She&I View Post
    Sounds good. I think most would reco the Ribbon upgrade; I would have gotten one on my Smash at that cost. But I am not unhappy with my Pike RC.

    Good luck in your quest!
    Yeah I have a Pike RCT on my Rollik and I really like the feel of it as well. Ribbon is so highly spoken of though plus made only 45 miles away from me, I'd be kind of a gomer for not going with it. Just wanting to know if the Revelation is a good enough fork to upgrade other areas first?

  43. #1043
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    I could use some advice on rear tire pressure and options.

    I'm currently setup with a 29x2.6 Bontrager SE2 on the rear on a 30mm inner width rim. I'm really struggling to find a balance between a bouncy, traction-less ride and constantly bottoming out on the rim. I'm a fat-ass, about 240 riding weight. I know I'm not the "lightest" rider, coming off FS bikes forever.

    20psi seems to be the crossover. 20psi feels pretty good with traction and compliance, but if I ride up a step or through rocks I feel the rim. Much higher and it feels like I'm riding on a balloon.

    Suggestions? Might one of the Cush Core or Nukeproof ARD or other foam thingies help solve my issues?

    ac

  44. #1044
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    I am strongly considering inserts on my similar hard tail. I want to run low pressure for traction, but don't want to clang off of the rocks. Almost went with Cushcore, but installation and tire swaps are a bit of a PITA. I have high hopes for Nukeproof ARD, fingers crossed.
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  45. #1045
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    Quote Originally Posted by avc8130 View Post
    I could use some advice on rear tire pressure and options.

    I'm currently setup with a 29x2.6 Bontrager SE2 on the rear on a 30mm inner width rim. I'm really struggling to find a balance between a bouncy, traction-less ride and constantly bottoming out on the rim. I'm a fat-ass, about 240 riding weight. I know I'm not the "lightest" rider, coming off FS bikes forever.

    20psi seems to be the crossover. 20psi feels pretty good with traction and compliance, but if I ride up a step or through rocks I feel the rim. Much higher and it feels like I'm riding on a balloon.

    Suggestions? Might one of the Cush Core or Nukeproof ARD or other foam thingies help solve my issues?

    ac
    Some of this may just be needing to accept or reconcile the difference in feel between fs and a hard tail. I had to make a little adjustment when I went from an Epic FS to the Pedalhead.

    I ride 15# on my 27.5+ Rekon 2.8's, and I'm 165# or so. I prefer 14#, but I begin to feel the rim, and occasionally burp the bead. On terrain that really pushes the hard tail (for me), I need closer to 20# to protect the rear rim a bit. This makes me think 20# is probably gonna be a little soft for you, at least on hard-edged terrain.

    I haven't used Cushcore or the like, but, as long as you can stand the weight increase, it seems like it'd be a good direction for you. What you're describing is pretty much exactly what Cushcore is made for. If I lived in a region with consistently harsher terrain, I'd probably check out Cushcore myself, if only on the rear.

  46. #1046
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    Quote Originally Posted by yrrekr View Post
    Some of this may just be needing to accept or reconcile the difference in feel between fs and a hard tail. I had to make a little adjustment when I went from an Epic FS to the Pedalhead.

    I ride 15# on my 27.5+ Rekon 2.8's, and I'm 165# or so. I prefer 14#, but I begin to feel the rim, and occasionally burp the bead. On terrain that really pushes the hard tail (for me), I need closer to 20# to protect the rear rim a bit. This makes me think 20# is probably gonna be a little soft for you, at least on hard-edged terrain.

    I haven't used Cushcore or the like, but, as long as you can stand the weight increase, it seems like it'd be a good direction for you. What you're describing is pretty much exactly what Cushcore is made for. If I lived in a region with consistently harsher terrain, I'd probably check out Cushcore myself, if only on the rear.
    Yeah, that's what I meant by not being the "lightest" rider. I know my HT skills need honing. I'm sure I am rougher on the rear than I should be ideally.

    I would definitely only be looking at an insert for the rear. With the fork up front I have no rim strikes at ~15psi in the front.

    Honestly, I'm not a fan of these 2.6" tires. I think they are trying to solve a problem that simply doesn't exist. I think a more aggressive 2.4 tire is a better answer than a faster rolling 2.6.

    ac

  47. #1047
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    [QUOTE=avc8130;13873197
    20psi seems to be the crossover. 20psi feels pretty good with traction and compliance, but if I ride up a step or through rocks I feel the rim. Much higher and it feels like I'm riding on a balloon.

    [/QUOTE]

    That seems like really low pressure. I'm about 215 geared up. I'm running a 2.3 Aggressor at 27 psi and that's probably about as low as I can get away with. I think the main issue is just adapting to not having rear suspension soak up the bumps. A hardtail is going to be bouncy compared to a FS. I'm having to readjust to riding a hardtail myself. Although it's only been a couple months since I had a hardtail, I still noticed I need to be more active to absorb bumps.

  48. #1048
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    Quote Originally Posted by avc8130 View Post
    I could use some advice on rear tire pressure and options.

    I'm currently setup with a 29x2.6 Bontrager SE2 on the rear on a 30mm inner width rim. I'm really struggling to find a balance between a bouncy, traction-less ride and constantly bottoming out on the rim. I'm a fat-ass, about 240 riding weight. I know I'm not the "lightest" rider, coming off FS bikes forever.

    20psi seems to be the crossover. 20psi feels pretty good with traction and compliance, but if I ride up a step or through rocks I feel the rim. Much higher and it feels like I'm riding on a balloon.

    Suggestions? Might one of the Cush Core or Nukeproof ARD or other foam thingies help solve my issues?

    ac
    Iím 270#. I am currentlyrunning Bontrager xR4 2.6 front and 2.4 rear , On reserve 30mm carbon Wheels. Iím running 25psi front and 34psi rear. I do also run the 2.6 in the rear sometimes at around 30psi. Seems to work well without any major issues.

  49. #1049
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    My Pedalhead has been sold
    Last edited by Nurse Ben; 01-18-2019 at 10:21 PM.
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  50. #1050
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    Why are you selling? I thought you liked the Pedalhead better than the Smash?

  51. #1051
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    Quote Originally Posted by cassieno View Post
    Why are you selling? I thought you liked the Pedalhead better than the Smash?
    Ben cycles through bikes a LOT. I dunno how many he keeps around at any one time, but he's owned more bikes in the past 4 years than I think I've owned in 20yrs.

    If I like a bike, chances are I'm going to keep it for a decade or more. I typically only sell it sooner if I hate it.

  52. #1052
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    Yep, I have seen that. Ben has only had the bike for 2 months though and curious what made him go from "Best.Frame.Ever." to looking to sell.

    If it had been 6 months I wouldn't have questioned it . Just doesn't seem like enough riding time is all.

  53. #1053
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    Quote Originally Posted by cassieno View Post
    Yep, I have seen that. Ben has only had the bike for 2 months though and curious what made him go from "Best.Frame.Ever." to looking to sell.

    If it had been 6 months I wouldn't have questioned it . Just doesn't seem like enough riding time is all.
    Everyone needs someone like that, local, and the same size...

  54. #1054
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    My Pedalhead size large is looking for a home.

    Color is beautiful black, no damage, very fresh.

    It takes a One Up 170mm dropper inserted to within 20mm of full insertion.

    PM for details
    Can you quantify that seat height? I have a medium and I wish for more reach, but I already struggle with a 125 dropper.

    Maybe a BB to seat rail measurement?

    Trying to figure out saddle height on a frame with a dropper is mind numbing for some reason.

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  55. #1055
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    Quote Originally Posted by avc8130 View Post
    Trying to figure out saddle height on a frame with a dropper is mind numbing for some reason.
    It's not too bad, actually. Gotta have a starting point, though.

    For me, that starting point is a professional road bike fitting. That gives me the absolute highest my seat should be at full extension. Make sure to include crank length. Most shops should have a tool that will measure from the center of the pedal spindle to the top of the saddle so you can get leg extension where you need it on any bike.

    The critical dimension for droppers is how much exposed seatpost you NEED for the full up position for a given frame, crank length, and saddle height. All the other measurements simply go into that equation to help you control for the other variables. If crank length will be the same between the two bikes, then you don't need to measure it. If you will be using the same saddle, then you don't need to measure it. Leaving the frame and exposed seatpost. If same frame, then you don't need to measure that, either. That gives you just the exposed seatpost.

    You also need to consider the amount of space the particular frame has available for seatpost insertion. So you'll need to measure the inside down to any obstructions like bends, bosses, the end of any honed portion of tubing, etc.

    IME, finding the dimensions of what I NEED is easier than finding the post with the most drop that fits those criteria, has a reasonably good performance/reliability record, and gives me the ability to lower it at least a few mm (since my mtb fit doesn't exactly match my road bike fit).

  56. #1056
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    I just love arm chair critics, you totaally know me but you couldn't pick me out in a crowd, too funny.

    So yeah, I do love it, it rides very well, best hardtail I've had since my Honzo days. I bought the Pedalhead to use for bikepacking and gravel burning, but I just can't tolerate the lack of rear suspension on long rides; I'm a broken down old man dontcha' know

    I have a Smash, it's a great bike, I scored a second set of wheels (27+), so I'll ride it as an only "child".

    If someone wants to buy the Pedalhead as a complete, that's an option too, GX drivetrain, DT Swiss/Duroc wheels, Pike fork.

    Quote Originally Posted by cassieno View Post
    Why are you selling? I thought you liked the Pedalhead better than the Smash?
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  57. #1057
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    You have a 125mm dropper now. How much post base is showing above the collar? If you have 50mm, then you could easilly get a 150mm dropper.

    Keep in mind that you need more inseam space above the collar and more insertion space below the collar.

    Quote Originally Posted by avc8130 View Post
    Can you quantify that seat height? I have a medium and I wish for more reach, but I already struggle with a 125 dropper.

    Maybe a BB to seat rail measurement?

    Trying to figure out saddle height on a frame with a dropper is mind numbing for some reason.

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  58. #1058
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    I just love arm chair critics, you totaally know me but you couldn't pick me out in a crowd, too funny.

    So yeah, I do love it, it rides very well, best hardtail I've had since my Honzo days. I bought the Pedalhead to use for bikepacking and gravel burning, but I just can't tolerate the lack of rear suspension on long rides; I'm a broken down old man dontcha' know

    I have a Smash, it's a great bike, I scored a second set of wheels (27+), so I'll ride it as an only "child".

    If someone wants to buy the Pedalhead as a complete, that's an option too, GX drivetrain, DT Swiss/Duroc wheels, Pike fork.

    Damn Ben, where was this post four months ago? You would have saved me some coin. So it goes.
    Donít let the keyboard pontificaters razz ya. Who the hell keeps a bike for a decade?

  59. #1059
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cozzy View Post
    Who the hell keeps a bike for a decade?
    I do. I have owned 2 different bikes that long, though none of my current ones are (my oldest current one is 4yrs old and will probably own it for at least a decade). I also prefer to keep cars at least that long (my current one is 11yrs old). I have also kept computers for that long. That is a short list.

    I passed no judgement on Ben...just an observation that he buys and sells bikes more often than I do. He can do as he pleases. I can't afford to buy expensive bikes much more often than I do.

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  60. #1060
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    You have a 125mm dropper now. How much post base is showing above the collar? If you have 50mm, then you could easilly get a 150mm dropper.

    Keep in mind that you need more inseam space above the collar and more insertion space below the collar.
    I've got ~1" between the top of the seat tube and the dropper collar, but the post won't insert any more.

    ac

  61. #1061
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cozzy View Post
    Who the hell keeps a bike for a decade?
    So true. I sold my Nomad to a buddy after 9.5 years and was a bit bummed not to get to a full decade with it. Maybe I can get there with my Smash? #BikeGoals
    Safe riding,

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  62. #1062
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    Quote Originally Posted by avc8130 View Post
    I've got ~1" between the top of the seat tube and the dropper collar, but the post won't insert any more.

    ac
    That can be fixed with an adjustable reamer. You'll still be limited by the bend in the seat tube but you can do the math to figure out it that's going to interfere with the dropper based on the insertion depth.

  63. #1063
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    That may be it for your frame.

    Quote Originally Posted by avc8130 View Post
    I've got ~1" between the top of the seat tube and the dropper collar, but the post won't insert any more.

    ac
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  64. #1064
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy3220 View Post
    That can be fixed with an adjustable reamer. You'll still be limited by the bend in the seat tube but you can do the math to figure out it that's going to interfere with the dropper based on the insertion depth.
    Do you have a link to the tool you are suggesting?

  65. #1065
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    Well, that was waaay back in the summer when I was playing a Trek

    Sorry for your loss. Ummm, wait, what?

    You all think I go through bikes fast, you should have been there when I was into tele or whitewater; Iíve slowed down in my old age

    Quote Originally Posted by Cozzy View Post
    Damn Ben, where was this post four months ago? You would have saved me some coin. So it goes.
    Donít let the keyboard pontificaters razz ya. Who the hell keeps a bike for a decade?
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  66. #1066
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    Quote Originally Posted by avc8130 View Post
    Do you have a link to the tool you are suggesting?
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    I believe the shank where the tap handle attaches is 1/2".

  67. #1067
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy3220 View Post
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    I believe the shank where the tap handle attaches is 1/2".
    That's not too bad. The theory here is just cleaning up the weld penetration at the seat tube/top tube junction, right?

  68. #1068
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    Quote Originally Posted by avc8130 View Post
    That's not too bad. The theory here is just cleaning up the weld penetration at the seat tube/top tube junction, right?
    Yeah for the most part. GG reams/hones it as far as their tools reaches (about 16cm). Yet, some people have been able to insert their droppers further than that straight from the factory. So if there's a change in diameter, it's super minimal. It would probably only take one pass of the reamer.

  69. #1069
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    Ok, great. I'm going to pull my dropper and see how far I can insert a straight seat post. If it looks like it's hanging to before getting to the s bend I'll be buying a reamer!
    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy3220 View Post
    Yeah for the most part. GG reams/hones it as far as their tools reaches (about 16cm). Yet, some people have been able to insert their droppers further than that straight from the factory. So if there's a change in diameter, it's super minimal. It would probably only take one pass of the reamer.
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  70. #1070
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    I did some more investigating. I now know that my bike uses a 31.6-30.9 shim for the seat!

    I also think I determined that there is nothing I can do to get more insertion depth. I do think my seat stops at the top tube junction, but looking at how quickly the S turn occurs, I gotta think the dropper actuator assembly is bottoming out on that at just about the same time, no?

  71. #1071
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    Quote Originally Posted by avc8130 View Post
    I did some more investigating. I now know that my bike uses a 31.6-30.9 shim for the seat!

    I also think I determined that there is nothing I can do to get more insertion depth. I do think my seat stops at the top tube junction, but looking at how quickly the S turn occurs, I gotta think the dropper actuator assembly is bottoming out on that at just about the same time, no?
    I believe the older Pedalheads had a 31.6mm seat tube.

    It might depend on your frame size. Mine is an XL which has a significant amount of straight seat tube below the top of the top tube.

  72. #1072
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy3220 View Post
    I believe the older Pedalheads had a 31.6mm seat tube.

    It might depend on your frame size. Mine is an XL which has a significant amount of straight seat tube below the top of the top tube.
    Yeah, mine is an M. Doesn't look like there is much straight tube at all.

    ac

  73. #1073
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    Update 1/11/19

    For Sale:
    -Pedalhead size Large, black frame with red decals, never crashed, in perfect condition, includes a Cane Creek 40 headset.
    -SOLD Pike 29+, 120mm, 51mm offset, 9Ē steerer. SOLD
    -One Up 170mmm dropper post, no remote.

    FRAME ONLY $750
    Dropper and Headset negotiable.

    Send a PM for pics and more info
    Last edited by Nurse Ben; 01-11-2019 at 08:35 PM.
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  74. #1074
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    Guerrilla Gravity - Pedalhead

    I have my XL Pedalhead frame (Lambor GG / Black ) and Chris King headset up for sale. Pm if interested.

    https://www.pinkbike.com/buysell/2480758/
    Last edited by M320; 11-27-2018 at 04:53 PM.

  75. #1075
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    Pedalhead owners, thinking about trying 29x2.6 this summer to offset my 27.5x3.0 tires. Worth the upgrade? With the bike being a hardtail, will I regret it out here out in the Rockies? Im thinking about buying some Ibis alum 29er wheels. The rims are 38mm and throwing on the new Specialized Elminator tires.

  76. #1076
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    Iíve been wanting to try something similar 27.5ó29. Iíd like to hear what others have done as well. Especially in regards to 29er width sizing.


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    stumpynerd, RE "worth" it, I think it just depends what a rider is looking for. I've had/have Rekon, XR4 and SE4 in 29x2.6, and I do think it's a sweet size. I'm on the Front Range a lot but opt for my Smash more often than not, so I may be of limited help. I haven't set my PH up with 275+; might try a 29x3.0 in front first. Your rim choice sounds ideal.

    There is a lot of room with either of the tires mentioned on a rim up to i30.

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    Iíve got a barely used One Up 170mm dropper post that is very fresh, fits the Pedalhead perfectly, shortest dropper insertion of any 170mm dropper post, fit my large Pedalhead with all but 20mm inserted. Post only, no lever.

    Needs a new home, will sell it cheap...
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  80. #1080
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Iíve got a barely used One Up 170mm dropper post that is very fresh, fits the Pedalhead perfectly, shortest dropper insertion of any 170mm dropper post, fit my large Pedalhead with all but 20mm inserted. Post only, no lever.

    Needs a new home, will sell it cheap...
    Sent you a PM.

  81. #1081
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    Hi.

    Is it possible to built Pedalhead with 27.5 non plus wheel set? Thinking of building one with 2.3 - 2.4 tyre and 140mm 27.5 fork. What negative effect will occur if I set it that way?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ompanda View Post
    Hi.

    Is it possible to built Pedalhead with 27.5 non plus wheel set? Thinking of building one with 2.3 - 2.4 tyre and 140mm 27.5 fork. What negative effect will occur if I set it that way?
    You'll drop the bottom bracket quite a bit.

  83. #1083
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    Have been looking around at getting a MTB for my wife.

    Some background:
    • She's about 5'4"
    • She enjoys hiking, but has never really ridden on trails before
    • She has little to no interest in aggressive riding or anything that involves her leaving the ground
    • Most of her riding will likely be sitting down -- standing up in the saddle and using a dropper are too much to ask at this point
    • We live in SE Michigan and most of our local trails are relatively tame (but twisty) singletrack
    • Her current bike is a 700c Schwinn hybrid with a step-through frame (~19" or so from ground to the minimum top tube height). My best efforts to tweak it for comfort resulted in tossing on some BMX bars since the frame is far too small.
    • I took her to a few stores to try out bikes in the fall and we narrowed down the scope to 27.5+ hardtails
    • Standover height, particularly the step-over in front of the saddle was one of her biggest issues with many of the bikes she'd tried (this cut pretty much any FS bike out of the running)
    • Of the bikes we'd tried locally, the Trek Roscoe 8 Women's in 17.5" seemed to be about the best fit. The top tube was higher than she'd have preferred, but she thought she might be able to live with it.
    • Before coming across the Pedalhead, the most likely candidate I was looking at was the 2019 version of the Vitus Sentier W+ in Medium. No announcement yet, but the comments from them on their Facebook page when the rest of their 2019 lineup came out indicated it would be coming sometime in the spring.
    • My primary concerns for her are related to her staying safe and having fun on the bike (stability and comfort)
    • Her primary concerns center around the barriers to entry (standover height and cost)
    • I figure I have one shot at this -- once she has a mountain bike, she's likely to be resistant to the idea of upgrading or getting a new one


    Would it be crazy to consider a budget build centered around a small Pedalhead frame for her?

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    Quote Originally Posted by TimTucker View Post
    [*]She has little to no interest in aggressive riding or anything that involves her leaving the ground[*]Most of her riding will likely be sitting down -- standing up in the saddle and using a dropper are too much to ask at this point[*]We live in SE Michigan and most of our local trails are relatively tame (but twisty) singletrack[*]Standover height, particularly the step-over in front of the saddle was one of her biggest issues with many of the bikes she'd tried (this cut pretty much any FS bike out of the running)[*]My primary concerns for her are related to her staying safe and having fun on the bike (stability and comfort)[*]Her primary concerns center around the barriers to entry (standover height and cost)[*]I figure I have one shot at this -- once she has a mountain bike, she's likely to be resistant to the idea of upgrading or getting a new one[/LIST]

    Would it be crazy to consider a budget build centered around a small Pedalhead frame for her?

    Crazy? I suppose that depends largely on your tax bracket. She'd have a sick bike but it would be spending significantly more than necessary given the goals stated above... Honestly I'd say to look at a used but in good condition FS 26" bike, or an inexpensive HT. Something like this Commencal will have a pretty low standover and come in very well priced.

    Sitting all the time means really buff (and fairly flat) singletrack or gravel paths/roads. There's nothing wrong with that, and unless you dialed in the suspension well an FS bike may be more of a hindrance than a comfort enhancer (spend all the time and money on a good saddle that fits her well, and encourage the use of proper bike shorts with a chamois). Also good gloves.

    [edit] - I forgot to say, don't discount a dropper post. As a short guy I drop the post every time I come to a stop. It's FAR more comfortable that way...

  85. #1085
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    Quote Originally Posted by TimTucker View Post
    Have been looking around at getting a MTB for my wife.

    Some background:
    • She's about 5'4"
    • She enjoys hiking, but has never really ridden on trails before
    • She has little to no interest in aggressive riding or anything that involves her leaving the ground
    • Most of her riding will likely be sitting down -- standing up in the saddle and using a dropper are too much to ask at this point
    • We live in SE Michigan and most of our local trails are relatively tame (but twisty) singletrack
    • Her current bike is a 700c Schwinn hybrid with a step-through frame (~19" or so from ground to the minimum top tube height). My best efforts to tweak it for comfort resulted in tossing on some BMX bars since the frame is far too small.
    • I took her to a few stores to try out bikes in the fall and we narrowed down the scope to 27.5+ hardtails
    • Standover height, particularly the step-over in front of the saddle was one of her biggest issues with many of the bikes she'd tried (this cut pretty much any FS bike out of the running)
    • Of the bikes we'd tried locally, the Trek Roscoe 8 Women's in 17.5" seemed to be about the best fit. The top tube was higher than she'd have preferred, but she thought she might be able to live with it.
    • Before coming across the Pedalhead, the most likely candidate I was looking at was the 2019 version of the Vitus Sentier W+ in Medium. No announcement yet, but the comments from them on their Facebook page when the rest of their 2019 lineup came out indicated it would be coming sometime in the spring.
    • My primary concerns for her are related to her staying safe and having fun on the bike (stability and comfort)
    • Her primary concerns center around the barriers to entry (standover height and cost)
    • I figure I have one shot at this -- once she has a mountain bike, she's likely to be resistant to the idea of upgrading or getting a new one


    Would it be crazy to consider a budget build centered around a small Pedalhead frame for her?
    Not at all. I'm 5'4" and I ride a small Pedalhead. It's a pretty solid bike, and I can get you my measurements if that'll help.

    Also, Khai's right: a dropper post is a life saver.

    Honestly, I think this is a great bike for someone who hasn't been on a full suspension or mountain biking before. There's not a lot to overthink, but it has aggressive enough geometry for when the bike gets pointed downhill.
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  86. #1086
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    Quote Originally Posted by TimTucker View Post
    Would it be crazy to consider a budget build centered around a small Pedalhead frame for her?
    My GF's first real MTB was a $3.5K Santa Cruz Nomad 10 years ago. For her that was KRAZY money to spend on a bike. But, it turned out great for two reasons:

    1. She was on a very capable bike so it made all the harder bits of trail easier for her. That kept her smiling.

    2. She was riding the same bike I had and our buddies' had. That meant she never felt like she was on the beginner POS bike. She also knew the riding challenge was the same for all of us.

    She's involved in a ladies' MTB club and often a new person shows up on a POS bike and suffers like crazy. Then later they get something nice and they are all smiles.

    So it's not a crazy idea to buy your wife a nice bike out of the gate if you can afford it and should it not work out you won't feel financially crushed.

    What I would do is involve her in as much of the decision making process as possible. The more she is involved the more she'll be invested in the end result. That could make or break the situation.
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  87. #1087
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    What I would do is involve her in as much of the decision making process as possible. The more she is involved the more she'll be invested in the end result. That could make or break the situation.
    Vik is a SMART man. I picked up a (very lightly) used Rocky Altitude for my wife for a smokin' deal, and signed her up for lessons (Trek Dirt Series). Riding with people of her own ability and professional instructors had a MASSIVE impact on her riding, and enjoyment of the sport.

    She's ~5'1 and rides an XS. No fit issues whatsoever, but she LOVES that dropper!

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    Thanks for all the feedback -- my wife is the type to be pretty hands-off about decisions once she's made up her mind to delegate, though, so I have to pick and choose where it makes sense to get her involvement.

    A few areas that I'd still had some questions:
    • For anyone running shorter cranks (< 160mm), what are you running? I'm running 152mm direct mount cranks from Trailcraft on my own bike, but they're designed for 49mm chainline with a 6mm offset chainring -- not sure how well those would work with a 0mm offset chainring to get to 55mm chainline or if there are other options that would work better.
    • I've seen a lot of older posts talking about combinations of frame color & decal color, but looking at the configuration options on the GG site for 2019 bikes, I only see decal color as an option. Is frame color no longer an option? (This isn't likely to be a deal-breaker, since her only real criteria on color is "nothing too bright or ugly" -- basically as long as I don't pick something like the old "Glow in the Gnar" color, she'll probably be OK)
    • How much post insertion depth is there on the small frames?

  89. #1089
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    Quote Originally Posted by TimTucker View Post
    Have been looking around at getting a MTB for my wife.

    Some background:
    • We live in SE Michigan and most of our local trails are relatively tame (but twisty) singletrack


    Would it be crazy to consider a budget build centered around a small Pedalhead frame for her?
    I used to live in SE MI, and now live in (similar) WI. While I do not own a long/slack-type bike, of which the Pedalhead is definitely one, I would question whether it's the right geometry for our type of trails. That whole slack head angle, steep seat angle, long TT, is designed around western riding where you have long climbs followed by long downhill sections. I'd really question how that's going to work at a place like Island Lakes for example.

    My comment is that "Local" companies like Trek/Salsa/Lynskey, as dull as they sound, use the geometry they do because it suits our terrain. Also, 1lb of extra frame weight matters for a small person. I learned the hard way to not buy for someone else the bike I wanted. Something like this is what I'd be looking at:
    https://salsacycles.com/bikes/timber..._nx_eagle_27.5
    whatever...

  90. #1090
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    Quote Originally Posted by TimTucker View Post
    Thanks for all the feedback -- my wife is the type to be pretty hands-off about decisions once she's made up her mind to delegate, though, so I have to pick and choose where it makes sense to get her involvement.

    A few areas that I'd still had some questions:
    • For anyone running shorter cranks (< 160mm), what are you running? I'm running 152mm direct mount cranks from Trailcraft on my own bike, but they're designed for 49mm chainline with a 6mm offset chainring -- not sure how well those would work with a 0mm offset chainring to get to 55mm chainline or if there are other options that would work better.
    • I've seen a lot of older posts talking about combinations of frame color & decal color, but looking at the configuration options on the GG site for 2019 bikes, I only see decal color as an option. Is frame color no longer an option? (This isn't likely to be a deal-breaker, since her only real criteria on color is "nothing too bright or ugly" -- basically as long as I don't pick something like the old "Glow in the Gnar" color, she'll probably be OK)
    • How much post insertion depth is there on the small frames?
    GG now only does black frames with various label colors. If you want completely not bright, you can do black on black

    I can measure mine for the insertion depth. I have a small Pedalhead, and I think the max post I can fit in is a 125mm Lev, but I'll double check for you if you'd like.

    I run 165mm cranks, but I run 6mm offset chainrings (standard for boost bikes, like all the GG bikes). Not sure why that would change based on the cranks alone, but feel free to let me know what I'm missing on this.
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  91. #1091
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    Quote Originally Posted by steadite View Post
    I used to live in SE MI, and now live in (similar) WI. While I do not own a long/slack-type bike, of which the Pedalhead is definitely one, I would question whether it's the right geometry for our type of trails. That whole slack head angle, steep seat angle, long TT, is designed around western riding where you have long climbs followed by long downhill sections. I'd really question how that's going to work at a place like Island Lakes for example.

    My comment is that "Local" companies like Trek/Salsa/Lynskey, as dull as they sound, use the geometry they do because it suits our terrain. Also, 1lb of extra frame weight matters for a small person.
    Long / slack is something I'm not 100% sure of either. I got my mtb (a 2009 Niner emd 9) before we got married and it's definitely more traditional XC geometry. I did make a switch over the summer to a 40mm stem and 800mm bars and found it to be a huge improvement, so at least some of the current geometry trends work here.

    In what ways would you see longer / slacker being an issue somewhere like island lake?

    For frame weight, her current Schwinn is somewhere around 33lb, so most anything she gets will feel lighter than what she's been used to.

  92. #1092
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    The slack HTA is for high-speed bombing descents, of which we have none, and the steep STA is to compensate for the HTA on extended climbs, of which we have none.

    I'd be concerned the long bike would get in the way in twisty, low-speed, trails with trees everywhere and the slack HTA would make the front end of the bike floppy at twisty trail speeds. Also, low BB isn't the best for eastern riding where we have tons of roots and rocks to pedal strike on.
    whatever...

  93. #1093
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    Quote Originally Posted by steadite View Post
    The slack HTA is for high-speed bombing descents, of which we have none, and the steep STA is to compensate for the HTA on extended climbs, of which we have none.

    I'd be concerned the long bike would get in the way in twisty, low-speed, trails with trees everywhere and the slack HTA would make the front end of the bike floppy at twisty trail speeds. Also, low BB isn't the best for eastern riding where we have tons of roots and rocks to pedal strike on.
    Meh, overblown, IMO.

    These are things you can adapt to easily enough with some tweaks to riding style.

    And I say this as a rider who cut my teeth on midwestern riding. OH, IN, MI.

  94. #1094
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    Tim, I would not be concerned about the PH riding like some tweaked out gravity sled. I took mine on the AZT on all sorts of XC terrain and never felt I made a bad choice. Iíve ridden the most tech ST I ride also on it, including with tight maneuvering (and 175 crank arms). As a savvy rider wrote in these boards, you adapt to geo.

    A forgiving steel frame that can take some big, soft tires with a comfortable position and low stand over makes it a sporty choice for your lass, can be set up in a range of flavor. Too heavy? Iíll happily take on weight for a bike I can comfortably pedal forever. I reco the same for my wife. Donít skip the dropper; itís not just for getting rad.

    Cheers, have fun tooling up.

  95. #1095
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    Guerrilla Gravity - Pedalhead

    Quote Originally Posted by steadite View Post
    The slack HTA is for high-speed bombing descents, of which we have none, and the steep STA is to compensate for the HTA on extended climbs, of which we have none.

    I'd be concerned the long bike would get in the way in twisty, low-speed, trails with trees everywhere and the slack HTA would make the front end of the bike floppy at twisty trail speeds. Also, low BB isn't the best for eastern riding where we have tons of roots and rocks to pedal strike on.
    I live and ride in PA The only thing I did not 100% care for was long flat pedal type rides. Up and down the bike rips. But the steep seat tube for me on long peddling type trails was not the greatest. Always felt weighted on the bars. I went back to a full suspension (Hightower) with some older school geo (74.3 STA) and body position feels much better on the longer rides. Overall the Pedalhead is a amazing All Mountain hardtail when used for its intended purpose. Just my .02.
    Last edited by M320; 03-12-2019 at 11:46 AM.

  96. #1096
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    FWIW - I use a 1" setback dropper on my GG as my body prefers the slacker STA.
    Safe riding,

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  97. #1097
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    Quote Originally Posted by M320 View Post
    its intended purpose
    XC 11
    Trail 7
    Enduro 5
    Gravity 1

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    Quote Originally Posted by She&I View Post
    XC 11
    Trail 7
    Enduro 5
    Gravity 1
    Thatís the great part about opinions, I donít prefer this geo for cross country type riding. I see it a bit different after riding one for 8 months in the northeast.

    XC 5
    Trail 7
    Enduro 5
    Gravity 1

  99. #1099
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    Quote Originally Posted by steadite View Post
    The slack HTA is for high-speed bombing descents, of which we have none, and the steep STA is to compensate for the HTA on extended climbs, of which we have none.

    I'd be concerned the long bike would get in the way in twisty, low-speed, trails with trees everywhere and the slack HTA would make the front end of the bike floppy at twisty trail speeds. Also, low BB isn't the best for eastern riding where we have tons of roots and rocks to pedal strike on.
    Something with a steeper HTA would be better in the really tight twisty low speed stuff. I'm not sure what you mean about the BB being low, feels a bit high to me. I mostly ride in TN and the Pedalhead does really well but it does require really aggressive riding to make the most of the geo.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy3220 View Post
    I'm not sure what you mean about the BB being low, feels a bit high to me. I mostly ride in TN and the Pedalhead does really well but it does require really aggressive riding to make the most of the geo.

    Pedalhead is 318mm The Ibis DV9 and Chameleon are 300/315. Although, both the Ibis and Chameleon are on the XC side of trail. The Pedalhead is on the trailer side of trail.

    edit: I originally had 340 because I was looking at a TP. Don't know why I adjusted it. Pedalhead seems to be "lower" but not slammed.

    I am currently riding a hardtail with a 300mm bb, it's pretty damn low. 318mm seems like a nice sweet spot.

  101. #1101
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    Quote Originally Posted by TimTucker View Post
    [*]For anyone running shorter cranks (< 160mm), what are you running?
    I built my XS SD/MT with 150mm Canfield cranks, but I think I went too short (was coming off 175mm cranks on my '07 Titus Racer X). I have difficulty keeping them spinning when climbing over rooty/rocky/ledgy terrain, or if it's really loose - particularly while standing. For seated spinning they're pretty good but I think a little longer would be better - so for my small SD/MT that's replacing the XS I went with 160s. (I'm 165cm for reference, with a 75cm inseam)

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    Guerrilla Gravity - Pedalhead

    Quote Originally Posted by Khai View Post
    I built my XS SD/MT with 150mm Canfield cranks, but I think I went too short (was coming off 175mm cranks on my '07 Titus Racer X). I have difficulty keeping them spinning when climbing over rooty/rocky/ledgy terrain, or if it's really loose - particularly while standing. For seated spinning they're pretty good but I think a little longer would be better - so for my small SD/MT that's replacing the XS I went with 160s. (I'm 165cm for reference, with a 75cm inseam)
    I rode 160mm cranks on both my small pedalhead and XS Megatrail. Iím now on 165mm because my knees and hips felt that it was too short for me.

    I have 29.5inch biking inseam, so I go by that for my crank measurement (which is ideally 163mm).

    How did you guys figure to run 150mm cranks?
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  103. #1103
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    Quote Originally Posted by stripes View Post
    How did you guys figure to run 150mm cranks?
    I started with Lennard Zinn's 21-21.6% of leg length, but he used to have an FAQ section on his website that I couldn't find just now that talked about mtb bike lengths specifically, and how a little shorter was better for off road application (and not purely for ground strikes). 21% of my leg length gives 157.5mm, so I was leaning toward 155s. I also had talked with a certain mtb guru/"fit expert" who claimed that even shorter might be optimal. At that point I'm pretty sure I just said "**** it, let's try 150s"

  104. #1104
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    Quote Originally Posted by stripes View Post
    How did you guys figure to run 150mm cranks?
    I'm around 5'10" and used to have a bike with 165mm cranks that felt better than 175mm cranks. After seeing lots of talks about crank arm length while hanging out in the riding with kids forum, I figured I'd start experimenting on my own bike.

    I have an old Trek 830 with square taper BB that I use as an around town bike, so I picked up a set of Suntour XCT Jr cranks in 152mm to try. Figured for $30 it was a pretty cheap experiment. I liked how it felt, so I switched to 152mm cranks on my mtb as well.

  105. #1105
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    Got my Pedalhead out for its first taste of dirt (and rock) yesterday. Wheeee!


    0331191500a by Nate, on Flickr

  106. #1106
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Got my Pedalhead out for its first taste of dirt (and rock) yesterday. Wheeee!


    0331191500a by Nate, on Flickr
    About damn time!! I thought you were waiting for winter ... like next winter

    So, how was the wheel building? Think you'd do it again?
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  107. #1107
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    About damn time!! I thought you were waiting for winter ... like next winter

    So, how was the wheel building? Think you'd do it again?
    Wheel building class was definitely useful but I was waaaay slow. I went back to the instructor's shop in the boonies and spent more time, only to still need to work more on them. At that point, scheduling another visit started getting to be rough and the instructor finished the rear wheel the next day.

    It's definitely the sort of thing I am good with just sitting down and working on at my own pace, but I need my own stand at home so I'm not at the whims of someone else's schedule.

    I'll do it again for sure, but I am getting my own stand first.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  108. #1108
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    Anybody have frame resonance issues under braking? I've tried new pads and two other rotors (Level T brakes btw). I'm going to try Squeal Out next. Everything looks aligned.

  109. #1109
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy3220 View Post
    Anybody have frame resonance issues under braking? I've tried new pads and two other rotors (Level T brakes btw). I'm going to try Squeal Out next. Everything looks aligned.
    I'm getting some resonance with Hayes Dominions on the semi-metallic pads once I hit a certain amount of pressure on the rear lever. It's been super consistent with when it occurs to the point that I could just lighten up the pressure on that brake a little to make it go away.

    Just switched over to metallics to see if anything changes.

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    Hmm... mine is driving me nuts with the noise and losing power in that resonance band. I did bungee the chain and seat stay on one side and the band of resonance narrowed which makes me think it's a frame thing.

  111. #1111
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy3220 View Post
    Hmm... mine is driving me nuts with the noise and losing power in that resonance band. I did bungee the chain and seat stay on one side and the band of resonance narrowed which makes me think it's a frame thing.
    I don't get loss of power from the brakes, but the noise and vibration are irritating.

    I honestly think that the actual vibration is pad/rotor and that it resonates in the frame. I get similar behavior from just about any high resin content pads on any bike I've ridden. Only exception here is that it's only happening on the rear brake, not the front. Usually it's both.

    I won't be riding again to test out the different pad compound until tues, but I'll be at a trail system that doesn't have long downhills so I'm not sure how solid of a test it will be. Maybe Thursday I will have better test conditions.
    Last edited by Harold; 04-07-2019 at 11:24 AM.

  112. #1112
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    I replaced the OE pads with semi-metallics but the front, which are perfectly silent, have organics still.

    I tried Squeal Out and it made no difference. However, this mod worked great...


    So I'm pretty sure this is a resonant frequency issue. I'm thinking about ordering bigger rotors to see if that fixes it.

  113. #1113
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    Lol. That's pretty great. Have you considered welding on a tuning fork? Sing while you ride.

  114. #1114
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    Iím 5í7Ē going to build another hardtail soon I want a long dropper. So the PH might be out. I switched on my calling from 175mm cranks to 165 mm I like them way better. Rode 175s for years thought I needed the torque . Nope. I was starting to get some hip pain/ t band pain in my old age and friend recommended shorter cranks, pain gone
    Last edited by movingmountain; 04-08-2019 at 06:48 PM.
    Four wheels move my body Two wheels move my soul

  115. #1115
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    Has anyone tried 3.0 x 27.5 tires on Duroc 50 rims?

    I found a set of rims local for a price I am willing to afford and I'm "plus curious" :-)

  116. #1116
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    My new whip



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  117. #1117
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    Anybody running 27.5 x 2.6 on this bike?

    I started out with 2.8s, got tired of pushing the extra weight around, and switched to 29 x 2.3. I've come to the conclusion I like the bike better with the smaller diameter wheels. I feel like it's more fun and responsive with the smaller wheels for my north GA trail conditions. I don't feel I'm sacrificing much in the way of traction with the skinnier tires now that I've gotten used to them. I miss the squish of the bigger tires a little, but I really miss the flick-ability of the bike with the smaller wheels and I feel like I'm fighting the bike with the big hoops on it. Sure, it climbs a little better with the lower rotating weight, I get it. But climbing is a means to an end for me and I like going fast downhill and in the twisties.

    I'm thinking the happy medium might be stretching the fork from 120 to 140 and running 27.5 x 2.6. I'm hoping the longer ATC will raise the BB enough to make it rideable, but I'd like to see if anyone has gone before me.

    Any thoughts appreciated.

    -Stoaks

  118. #1118
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    Dude,

    That's a great looking bike and the dog seems to agree!

    -Stoaks

  119. #1119
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stoaks View Post
    Anybody running 27.5 x 2.6 on this bike?
    I'm running a DHF 27.5x2.6 up front and I can't say I love it - it's a little vague and less than 100% predictable when tipping into corners at less than full speed. I've been told that the 2.5 has a better tread distribution on the shoulders, so it transitions better. I'm cheap & lazy enough to run it 'til it wears out, but I won't be replacing it with the same...

  120. #1120
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    Khai,

    Do you feel like the bike is too low with the 27.5 x 2.6? What's your fork travel?

    Thanks.

  121. #1121
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    Sorry, I forgot to include that it's a metal MT/SD. Fork travel is 160 and the height feels good. I think it's just that particular width of that particular tyre.

  122. #1122
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    Khai,

    Got it.

    I'm trying to run smaller than recommended tires on the Pedalhead. It was tolerably low with 27.5 x 2.8 and 120mm fork, but I wouldn't have wanted it any lower. I'm trying to figure out if it should be roughly the same BB height with 27.5 x 2.6 and a 140mm fork.

    I only know one way to find out...

  123. #1123
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    Quote Originally Posted by Khai View Post
    I'm running a DHF 27.5x2.6 up front and I can't say I love it - it's a little vague and less than 100% predictable when tipping into corners at less than full speed. I've been told that the 2.5 has a better tread distribution on the shoulders, so it transitions better. I'm cheap & lazy enough to run it 'til it wears out, but I won't be replacing it with the same...
    I felt the same way about the DHF and replaced it with a WTB Vigilante and have been really liking it a lot. In our region, you can't really lean hard into side lugs without smashing your face into a tree and so having transition lugs seems to work better here. I mean, we really have more low-speed corners to contend with and having transition lugs seem to be a better option.
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

  124. #1124
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stoaks View Post
    Khai,

    Got it.

    I'm trying to run smaller than recommended tires on the Pedalhead. It was tolerably low with 27.5 x 2.8 and 120mm fork, but I wouldn't have wanted it any lower. I'm trying to figure out if it should be roughly the same BB height with 27.5 x 2.6 and a 140mm fork.

    I only know one way to find out...
    Khai:

    I am intrigued and would like to subscribe to your newsletter.

    The bike felt too tall for me with 29in tires, so Iím curious to how it feels with slightly less plus tires.

    Iím running 2.8s front and rear for summer (right now HR2 front and Rekon in the back), and in the winter I have 3.0 studded wrathchilds.

    Iím still figuring out its summer treads, and curios if 2.6 makes it too low.
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  125. #1125
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    Use the bike frame and fork as your stand. Zip tie on franebor fork to help with true and to check for hops.

    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Wheel building class was definitely useful but I was waaaay slow. I went back to the instructor's shop in the boonies and spent more time, only to still need to work more on them. At that point, scheduling another visit started getting to be rough and the instructor finished the rear wheel the next day.

    It's definitely the sort of thing I am good with just sitting down and working on at my own pace, but I need my own stand at home so I'm not at the whims of someone else's schedule.

    I'll do it again for sure, but I am getting my own stand first.

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  126. #1126
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    I tried it, didnít like it, bike rides great as a 29er, 27.5 drops the B.B. too much, also you end up with super long chainstay for that wheel size.

    There are better frames for 27+, just saying ... Chromag would be my first pick.

    Maybe GG will build a 27+ hardtail 😊

    Quote Originally Posted by Stoaks View Post
    Anybody running 27.5 x 2.6 on this bike?

    I started out with 2.8s, got tired of pushing the extra weight around, and switched to 29 x 2.3. I've come to the conclusion I like the bike better with the smaller diameter wheels. I feel like it's more fun and responsive with the smaller wheels for my north GA trail conditions. I don't feel I'm sacrificing much in the way of traction with the skinnier tires now that I've gotten used to them. I miss the squish of the bigger tires a little, but I really miss the flick-ability of the bike with the smaller wheels and I feel like I'm fighting the bike with the big hoops on it. Sure, it climbs a little better with the lower rotating weight, I get it. But climbing is a means to an end for me and I like going fast downhill and in the twisties.

    I'm thinking the happy medium might be stretching the fork from 120 to 140 and running 27.5 x 2.6. I'm hoping the longer ATC will raise the BB enough to make it rideable, but I'd like to see if anyone has gone before me.

    Any thoughts appreciated.

    -Stoaks
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  127. #1127
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    Chromag just released an 29+ hardtail. Will GG follow through on a revised Pedalhead? I still love my bike.

  128. #1128
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    Quote Originally Posted by stumpynerd View Post
    Chromag just released an 29+ hardtail. Will GG follow through on a revised Pedalhead? I still love my bike.
    29 x 2.8 on 30i fits with plenty of room.

  129. #1129
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    Quote Originally Posted by stumpynerd View Post
    Chromag just released an 29+ hardtail. Will GG follow through on a revised Pedalhead? I still love my bike.
    I think they're plenty busy with getting out the Revved frames right now.

    Why would they revise it? It fits a pretty big 29er tire, and a pretty big 650+.
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  130. #1130
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    Quote Originally Posted by stripes View Post
    I think they're plenty busy with getting out the Revved frames right now.

    Why would they revise it? It fits a pretty big 29er tire, and a pretty big 650+.
    Not to mention, not everybody needs to make every thing out there. Especially something nichey. You'd think we'd have learned from fatbikes. The market didn't just saturate. It oversaturated.

  131. #1131
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    Just got mine built up after having the frame replaced under warranty (cracked brake mount tab). Thanks to GG for the great customer service 

    Before and after...
    Guerrilla Gravity - Pedalhead-20181125_a.jpg

    Guerrilla Gravity - Pedalhead-img_20190514_190423.jpg

  132. #1132
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy3220 View Post
    Just got mine built up after having the frame replaced under warranty (cracked brake mount tab). Thanks to GG for the great customer service 

    Before and after...
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Click image for larger version. 

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    Sweet!

  133. #1133
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    I tried it, didnít like it, bike rides great as a 29er, 27.5 drops the B.B. too much, also you end up with super long chainstay for that wheel size.

    There are better frames for 27+, just saying ... Chromag would be my first pick.

    Maybe GG will build a 27+ hardtail 
    Thanks for the input. Apologies for my lack of clarity.

    My Pedšlhead came with 27.5 x 2.8s. I switched to 29 x 2.3. I like the bike better with the 27.5s.

    Looking to run 27.5 x 2.6 and stretch the fork to 140 (mine is 120) to keep the BB from dropping any lower than it was with the 27.5 x 2.8s. As you point out, the bike is plenty low. But I'm with Stripes -- for me the bike feels clumsy with the 29s and is more fun on the smaller hoops.

    -S

  134. #1134
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stoaks View Post
    Thanks for the input. Apologies for my lack of clarity.

    My Pedšlhead came with 27.5 x 2.8s. I switched to 29 x 2.3. I like the bike better with the 27.5s.

    Looking to run 27.5 x 2.6 and stretch the fork to 140 (mine is 120) to keep the BB from dropping any lower than it was with the 27.5 x 2.8s. As you point out, the bike is plenty low. But I'm with Stripes -- for me the bike feels clumsy with the 29s and is more fun on the smaller hoops.

    -S
    My Pedalhead has 27.5 x 2.8s and a Pike @ 140. I was worried the BB was to low when I measured it, but it really has not been an issue. Iím guessing itís because thereís no rear suspension to drop lower. I also ride a Megatrail V1, so perhaps Iíve adjusted to low BBís. Iíve been having a blast on the Pedalhead. Itís so capable, Iím considering getting rid of my backup bike (Trail Pistol).

  135. #1135
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    Quote Originally Posted by cytoe View Post
    Iíve been having a blast on the Pedalhead. Itís so capable, Iím considering getting rid of my backup bike (Trail Pistol).
    It's a great bike. I got mine 3 years ago and haven't been able to come up with a plausible excuse to get another bike. Oh well, I guess I'll just pimp out the Pedalhead.

  136. #1136
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    Ride for Rwanda Action Shot!

    Ride for Rwanda Action Shot!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Guerrilla Gravity - Pedalhead-rh2_6839-xl.jpg  


  137. #1137
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    2015 frame is the same exact as the 2019?

  138. #1138
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tjay View Post
    2015 frame is the same exact as the 2019?
    Found out that itís not same exact. 2017 is when GG changed the frame with 30.9 mm seat tube as opposed to 31.6.

  139. #1139
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    Anyone have a GG Pedalhead size Large frame or complete build they'd like to part with? Looks like a fun bike! I think it would be a nice complement to my FS bike on mellower trails.

  140. #1140
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    Any XL frames for sale??

  141. #1141
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    How about a long term review/update on the Pedalhead experience? Anything you still like, something you don't now? Still running 27.5+ or gone to 29er? What else?

  142. #1142
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    Quote Originally Posted by Major Glory View Post
    How about a long term review/update on the Pedalhead experience? Anything you still like, something you don't now? Still running 27.5+ or gone to 29er? What else?
    After 1.5 years, which includes 2 summers of mountain-bike specific travel here in the northern mid-west (think Duluth and Copper Harbor, so there's been some chunk), there's nothing I'd change about the Pedalhead. I'm still running 27.5+ (Rekon 2.6's, but only cuz I couldn't get 2.8's when I tore a side-wall in Marquette this summer).

    The only real complaint I have is pedal strikes, but this is pretty ubiquitous, I guess, for this style hard tail when running 27.5's. It's been little more than an annoyance, but 29" would probably help a lot. Not enough of an issue to force me to change.

    One of the things I really like about this bike is that there just aren't any of the quirky engineering/manufacturing errors/issues that I've seen on other bikes-- they were all removed in production long ago because each frame is/was pretty much a one-off.

    Seatpost length can be an issue- there's not a lot of extra insertion, which limits the dropper lengths that'll work on this frame. That's the penalty, though, for the short chainstay afforded by the curved seat tube. This limits me to around 130mm of seatpost travel, but this hasn't been much of a limiter.

  143. #1143
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    Quote Originally Posted by yrrekr View Post
    After 1.5 years, which includes 2 summers of mountain-bike specific travel here in the northern mid-west (think Duluth and Copper Harbor, so there's been some chunk), there's nothing I'd change about the Pedalhead. I'm still running 27.5+ (Rekon 2.6's, but only cuz I couldn't get 2.8's when I tore a side-wall in Marquette this summer).

    The only real complaint I have is pedal strikes, but this is pretty ubiquitous, I guess, for this style hard tail when running 27.5's. It's been little more than an annoyance, but 29" would probably help a lot. Not enough of an issue to force me to change.

    One of the things I really like about this bike is that there just aren't any of the quirky engineering/manufacturing errors/issues that I've seen on other bikes-- they were all removed in production long ago because each frame is/was pretty much a one-off.

    Seatpost length can be an issue- there's not a lot of extra insertion, which limits the dropper lengths that'll work on this frame. That's the penalty, though, for the short chainstay afforded by the curved seat tube. This limits me to around 130mm of seatpost travel, but this hasn't been much of a limiter.
    I'm running 29x2.6" tires on mine as well as a 140mm Ribbon and I really like this combo on this bike. I ride it in Pisgah, so plenty of chunk. Have done the whole Black Mtn downhill and Laurel/Pilot within a week's time and the bike is great. The larger diameter wheels do make a big difference for pedal strikes. I'm also using 170mm cranks and I get very few pedal strikes on this bike.

    I am also limited to about 130mm of seatpost drop (Oneup V1 dropper) on a medium. I wish I could insert the post a bit farther, but it is what it is. Frame would have to be totally redesigned to make that work.

  144. #1144
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    Iíll echo the two posts above. I have the V1 and itís design/geo/quality of craftsmanship are awesome, even with todayís trends. I was told it will ďsurvive the apocalypseĒ. Iíve had ZERO problems with it. Ridden hard all along the front range of CO with no issues. Itís a size M and Iím 5í9Ē. Out of all my bikes it fits me the best.
    Iím 2 years in with roughly 1100miles. Iíve left it mostly stock (27.5+). Iím running Maxxis DHF 2.8 in the front and a Rekon 2.8 out back.
    Iíd love to try 29Ē wheels. Youíd be hard pressed to find a more fun and capable hardtail.



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  145. #1145
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    Here's my bike that I built this Summer. I've put in 600 miles on it, not much but enough to get the feel of the bike.

    Vertical compliance on this bike is really good. It likes to go highspeed off-the-brakes kinda run, but it will quickly remind you that you're still on a hardtail if you ride it lazy. It's a great bike to compliment my 2019 Stumpjumper 27.5+.

    **Chose these parts for small bump compliance**
    Rocket Ron Rear 2.8 with Vittoria Inserts @12psi
    Butcher 2.8 no inserts @12psi
    Carbon bars
    Carbon crank
    Baron rims (on Silver Hydra Hubs for that quick POE)
    Pike 150 27.5 Boost 46mm
    PNW Cascade 125mm (I chose external route because it's cleaner that the internal route with the cable running on the down tube. I will 150mm fits though. My other bike can fit 170. lol)

    Black and Silver (raw) color scheme with raw Spur Cycle bell and bottle cage

    I'm 142 lbs maybe 150-155 lbs geared.

    Guerrilla Gravity - Pedalhead-gg-ph-jnt.jpg

  146. #1146
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    Here's my V1. Bought the frame used, but all the parts on it were new this winter/spring.


    0730191703 by Nate, on Flickr


    0727191337 by Nate, on Flickr

  147. #1147
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tjay View Post
    Here's my bike that I built this Summer. I've put in 600 miles on it, not much but enough to get the feel of the bike.

    Vertical compliance on this bike is really good. It likes to go highspeed off-the-brakes kinda run, but it will quickly remind you that you're still on a hardtail if you ride it lazy. It's a great bike to compliment my 2019 Stumpjumper 27.5+.

    **Chose these parts for small bump compliance**
    Rocket Ron Rear 2.8 with Vittoria Inserts @12psi
    Butcher 2.8 no inserts @12psi
    Carbon bars
    Carbon crank
    Baron rims (on Silver Hydra Hubs for that quick POE)
    Pike 150 27.5 Boost 46mm
    PNW Cascade 125mm (I chose external route because it's cleaner that the internal route with the cable running on the down tube. I will 150mm fits though. My other bike can fit 170. lol)

    Black and Silver (raw) color scheme with raw Spur Cycle bell and bottle cage

    I'm 142 lbs maybe 150-155 lbs geared.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Nice rides guys! How are pedal strikes? Do you feel the frame weight/overall bike weight? Appreciate all the replies.

  148. #1148
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    Quote Originally Posted by Major Glory View Post
    Nice rides guys! How are pedal strikes? Do you feel the frame weight/overall bike weight? Appreciate all the replies.
    Minimal issues with pedal strikes in 29x2.6 wheel/tire combo (raises the bb) and a 140mm fork (raises the bb) with 170mm cranks (more ground clearance) in lumpy terrain (lots of potential for pedal strikes).

    Mine built up is about 31lbs with heavy tires. Could get under 30 with lighter tires, but the frame isn't built to be an xc whippet, anyway. It's burly for hard riding. My build is no weight weenie build, but it's also not especially porky. Getting substantially lighter would be very expensive and it would compromise the bike, IMO.

  149. #1149
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    Quote Originally Posted by Major Glory View Post
    Nice rides guys! How are pedal strikes? Do you feel the frame weight/overall bike weight? Appreciate all the replies.
    I have Pike 150 27.5 (542mm a2c) with 2.8 size tires. The pedal strike on mine is not bad at all because I have high POE hubs (Hydras) so I have back pedal or rock my pedals on techy stuff. I probably only pedal striked 4 4x in 600 miles.

    The frame is not bad at under 6 lbs for small. My bike weighs in at 28.5 lbs and I can't feel the weight of the bike when I'm going at an easy pace (under <150 bpm). If I keep my HR at 160-180, then I feel all that weight but mainly on the heavy rear wheel with tire insert).

    Just because the frame is steel, doesn't mean it's heavy. My On one 45650b/456/456 Summer Season and Niner MCR weighs in at 5.0 lb in size small/medium.

  150. #1150
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    So I decided it's just too much of a rad bike. I just can't part ways with my beloved Pedalhead.
    Last edited by GarrDogg; 4 Weeks Ago at 08:27 PM.

  151. #1151
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    I'm so excited to be joining the GG PH club!

    Getting a new-to-me Gen 1 frame (tubed seat tube gusset instead of the new solid fin) in Pepto Bismol Pink, Size 2. Wheelset will be 29" x 35mm internal width AL rims with SRAM 900 hubs, gonna run Butcher Grid 29 x 2.6 front and Trail King 29 x 2.4 rear over the fall/winter/spring here and see how that goes for mud shedding and wet traction. Western Oregon loamy steep trails with moist ice-clay shaped trail features that totally clog a DHF tire when wet. 2018 Pike Boost 120/150 mm DPA RCT3 up front, RF Atlas cockpit and Atlas 165mm crankset. GX drive, SLX brakes. I'm hoping my 125mm Reverb (external cable routing, 30.9 diameter with the shim) will fit deep enough into that seat tube for my 30" inseam, as I'd hate to have to downsize to a 100mm post ...

    Most important feature will be a Thule Yepp Next Mini steer-tube mounted seat behind the bars, for my 10 month old daughter to ride with me on flat boring trails, until she's strong enough for not flat fun pump tracks and exciting trails!

    I am BEYOND STOKED! Will post pics of the build once done!

  152. #1152
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    Quote Originally Posted by SchralphMacchio View Post
    I'm hoping my 125mm Reverb (external cable routing, 30.9 diameter with the shim) will fit deep enough into that seat tube for my 30" inseam, as I'd hate to have to downsize to a 100mm post ...

    Most important feature will be a Thule Yepp Next Mini steer-tube mounted seat behind the bars, for my 10 month old daughter to ride with me on flat boring trails, until she's strong enough for not flat fun pump tracks and exciting trails!

    I am BEYOND STOKED! Will post pics of the build once done!
    Congrats! With the externally cabled dropper you'll likely be ok - but if you do need to explore a new dropper, no-one has a shorter insertion depth for a given drop than One Up.

    I'm not familiar with the Thule Yepp, but have heard really good things about the Mac Ride and the Kids Ride Shotgun. Both appear to be a little more minimalist than the Thule which should make for easier/better handling for you - as long as your daughter is strong enough to sit & hold on.

  153. #1153
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    Guerrilla Gravity - Pedalhead

    Yeah my wife isnít on board with the Mac Ride or Shotgun until she is *really* strong, has been crushing the climbing wall etc.

    Right now sheís only 9.5 months and tires quickly so it will be probably another 18 months until I can upgrade from the Yepp.

    Here she is in her Yepp at Crater Lake


    Thanks for the advice about the OneUp!
    Iím optimistic about my Reverb since itís 30.9 so Iíll have some extra wiggle room as this frame was factory reamed for 31.6, and itís external cable. But with an 18Ē seat tube and my 30Ē inseam, itís still gonna be tight.

  154. #1154
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    Quote Originally Posted by SchralphMacchio View Post
    Yeah my wife isnít on board with the Mac Ride or Shotgun until she is *really* strong, has been crushing the climbing wall etc.

    Right now sheís only 9.5 months and tires quickly so it will be probably another 18 months until I can upgrade from the Yepp.

    Here she is in her Yepp at Crater Lake


    Thanks for the advice about the OneUp!
    Iím optimistic about my Reverb since itís 30.9 so Iíll have some extra wiggle room as this frame was factory reamed for 31.6, and itís external cable. But with an 18Ē seat tube and my 30Ē inseam, itís still gonna be tight.
    That's totally fair, and always smart to err on the side of caution with little ones. Love that helmet of hers!

  155. #1155
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    I can tell you the Mac Ride is absolutely amazing once your kid can handle it. You can basically go mountain biking WITH your child. We were doing rock gardens and log overs. I would say it is perfect for a kid that can sit up and hold on. My little man was so into it, he'd stand up on the stirrups when he saw bumps and obstacles. We even crashed a few times. As long as the kid has a helmet, and you remember to hold onto the bars, the kid is very well protected.

    ac

  156. #1156
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    Quote Originally Posted by SchralphMacchio View Post
    Iím optimistic about my Reverb since itís 30.9 so Iíll have some extra wiggle room as this frame was factory reamed for 31.6, and itís external cable. But with an 18Ē seat tube and my 30Ē inseam, itís still gonna be tight.
    I tried using a shimmed 30.9 post in my older PH frame and it did not gain me any additional insertion (test fit of a rigid post at my LBS) because the reaming basically stops at a bend in the seat tube. Given you've got shorter legs on the same size frame I have, I am pretty sure you'll have to run less drop.

  157. #1157
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    Donít discount the 165 cranks and low profile Selle Italia saddle and external cable routing

    /blindoptimism

  158. #1158
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    Quote Originally Posted by SchralphMacchio View Post
    Donít discount the 165 cranks and low profile Selle Italia saddle and external cable routing

    /blindoptimism
    True, the shorter cranks will help. I am on 170's. I have my doubts on how much extra room you'll realistically get with that saddle, though. Also don't think the external routing will make a difference, either. Most internal actuators don't make that much difference with insertion depth on droppers.

    I mean, I'm 5'8 with a 32" cycling inseam on a med Pedalhead. I've got a Oneup dropper slammed all the way to the max insertion point (on this frame, I measured it at 190mm deep, fwiw). With the rest of my setup, I adjusted my dropper height to 130mm so I could maximize the amount of drop I could get. I MIGHT gain a few mm with a lower profile saddle than the SDG I use now which is already pretty low profile. And I could gain 5mm from using 5mm shorter cranks. But then I'd also lose some leverage. As it is, I notice the loss of leverage with the 170mm cranks as compared to the 175's on my other bike.

    Your legs are already 2" shorter than mine, and that puts you in a bit of a hole comparatively speaking.

  159. #1159
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    Guerrilla Gravity - Pedalhead

    Sorry, to clarify 30Ē is my pant inseam. My bad.

    I just did a quick yardstick measurement, standing with legs slightly apart, and my sit bone appears to be roughly 32Ē from the ground.

    Fingers crossed!!!

  160. #1160
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by SchralphMacchio View Post
    Sorry, to clarify 30Ē is my pant inseam. My bad.

    I just did a quick yardstick measurement, standing with legs slightly apart, and my sit bone appears to be roughly 32Ē from the ground.

    Fingers crossed!!!
    Did you do it like this?

    Stand with your back against a wall and spread your feet 6-8" apart.
    Place a book between your legs and up against the wall, spine up; raise it until snug against your crotch (this mimics your bike seat).
    Have another person measure from the top of the book (spine) down to the floor.

  161. #1161
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    Nah, it was a rough measurement. Point is, I'm in the ballpark to your leg length ... and instead of further pontificating on numbers I went to measure my current bike setup (which is donating the Reverb) and I think I am golden:

    i) I have *roughly* 18.5" from center of crankset nut to seatpost collar, and exactly 34mm of exposed post between top of seat tube clamp and bottom of seatpost collar. This is with older Selle Italia Flite saddle (that is thicker than what I'll be using on the PH) and 170mm crankset on my Bronson. And supposedly the PH seat tube length is 18" long compared to my medium Bronson at supposedly 17" long (25mm difference).

    The 31.6 shim will eat about 1.5mm and the plastic cable guide will eat 3mm, so I should have about 5mm slack to spare here, plus more from the crank and saddle ...

    ii) My Reverb post has exactly 185mm below the collar, compared to your 190mm max insertion measurement, so I should be able to slam it if needed, especially knowing I'm at 30.9mm width so I shouldnt need to worry about tolerances/reaming.

    Thanks all for the measurement beta!!!

  162. #1162
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    Question for the PH collective: is 160mm too slack for downhill on steep trails?

    The 120/150 Pike 29 DPA fork I bought was advertised as 15 x 110 boost but was actually a 2016 Pike A2 with 15x100 29Ē CSU, DPA Air spring, no torque caps. My SRAM 900 front hub is boost so it just wonít work with that fork; it doesnít offer down sizable end caps. I also want to keep the flexibility of being able to drop a 27+ wheelset in there at some point down the line.

    I *did* just find a deal on a Lyrik 29 DPA Boost which is 130/160 ... and I donít think you can get a shorter dual position air spring (120/150) on a Lyrik 29 due to the larger negative air chamber.

    Sooo, thoughts on running 130/160 on a PH?

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