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  1. #1
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    The GNARVANA

    YES!!!!

    Fork ordered last week CHECK.
    Shock same size as Megatrail CHECK.
    Wheels....waiting for them to ship....
    Seatstay kit.....couple week lead time
    Short lower cup for the 29er...need to order
    Tires.....need to order....

    This is awesome!

  2. #2
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    Yep for those with Smashes or Trail Pistols, it’ll be an easy conversion.

    Anyone with 650b, just as easy but some extra wheels too.

  3. #3
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    Looks like a great compliment to GG's existing bike lineup.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  4. #4
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    Ripping trails and tipping ales

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    Smash to Gnarvana

    Quote Originally Posted by stripes View Post
    Yep for those with Smashes or Trail Pistols, it’ll be an easy conversion.

    Anyone with 650b, just as easy but some extra wheels too.
    So, will you be able to run the Smash shock at 230x60mm with the Gnarvana? Or will you need a true 230x65mm shock?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by tvcraig75 View Post
    So, will you be able to run the Smash shock at 230x60mm with the Gnarvana? Or will you need a true 230x65mm shock?
    You can always run a shorter stroke shock on a longer travel GG bike, but you'll lose out on some travel. With a coil shock you may be able to get away with one shock and a removable 5mm spacer behind the bumper.
    Safe riding,

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    Quote Originally Posted by tvcraig75 View Post
    So, will you be able to run the Smash shock at 230x60mm with the Gnarvana? Or will you need a true 230x65mm shock?
    I would think you would be in the same situation like a short stroked Megatrail, just a bit of reduced suspension travel with the 60mm travel instead of the 65mm travel shock. Maybe make it a 15x mm travel bike.

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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    You can always run a shorter stroke shock on a longer travel GG bike, but you'll lose out on some travel. With a coil shock you may be able to get away with one shock and a removable 5mm spacer behind the bumper.
    So if you lose some travel, not sure the advantage over a Smash at 145mm if you are only going up to 155mm. I have a Push 11-6 on my Smash, but I don’t want to fully commit and have Push change it to 230x65.

    Either way, very cool of GG to push the mod frame to another level of stoke!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by tvcraig75 View Post
    So if you lose some travel, not sure the advantage over a Smash at 145mm if you are only going up to 155mm. I have a Push 11-6 on my Smash, but I don’t want to fully commit and have Push change it to 230x65.

    Either way, very cool of GG to push the mod frame to another level of stoke!
    For sure. I wouldn't upgrade to the Gnarvana from a Smash if I wasn't going to put the full stroke shock on it.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  10. #10
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    I think this may appeal mega owners who can do a straight swap of the shock, but will need to track down 29 wheels/fork.

    On the other hand, for TP and smash owners, they technically might not need anything new, just a new airspring for a longer fork, and a restroke of the shock to get full travel. That shock service is probably in the $150-200 range at a local shop with some experience doing full damper service. When I restoked mine, I just used it as an excuse to do a damper service. I was just going from 65 to 62.5mm (dpx2 uses 2.5 mm spacers, not sure about others) and after having some convos with Fox service and GG the conclusion was a revalve was not necessary. Valving might not be perfect, but will probably be fine. who knows? I agree that the real world differences between a 230x60 in this bike and a stock smash will be small-ish, and possibly not worth it. For obvious reasons, not my place to knock someone for tinkering with random crap to limited benefit.

  11. #11
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    Good gawd that bike looks awesome


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  12. #12
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    Really cool bike, terrible name.

    Both the Vital and Pink Bike reviews mention super long chainstays, 17.7 seems resonable to me for this type of bike.

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    I was waiting for this to come out but dislike long chainstays so I'll pass. Maybe the New Sentinel will be better.
    2 wheels

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    Quote Originally Posted by artnshel View Post
    I was waiting for this to come out but dislike long chainstays so I'll pass. Maybe the New Sentinel will be better.
    I’m hoping too. You can soon buy linkage to make the OG Sentinel 155mm This new GG bike to too long for a aggressive trail bike

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    It was just a matter of time. Good on GG!

    I like the idea that you can choose your weapon with either 27.5 or 29" wheels.

    I swing toward the small wheels, but for some others this a cool ride.

    I'd be curious to see how it rides differently than a Smash. I have ridden a Revved Smash and previously owned an aluminum Smash. I'm not a big fan of how the Revved Smash rides, but I love my Megatrail, so if this rides like a big wheeled Mega, now that would be interesting.
    GG Megatrail (Frameset for sale)
    GG Trail Pistola 27+/29 (speedy)
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    Pivot Shuttle 27.5 (wifeys)

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    I wonder if your going to have to have a longer chain from the Gnar to a Mega with the longer chain stays?

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    Quote Originally Posted by jakerfreese View Post
    I wonder if your going to have to have a longer chain from the Gnar to a Mega with the longer chain stays?
    I'd plan on it if you're making a switch, yea. I am glad to hear reviews that the bike is quiet. the longer the chainstays, the more potential for chainslap. seems the new guards are doing their job well.

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    A quick calculation gives me that a 60mm stroke shock will give 148mm of rear travel so close to the Shredd Dogg. However, it should be noted geometry is still a lot more aggressive so that may appeal to some people.

    I am very tempted to run this rear end on my Megasmash as I really would like to try it with longer chain stays. Guess I could call it the MegaGnar.

  19. #19
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    Damn.. my Tellis seat post on my Smash makes the same noise.. anyone know if there is a fix.. or warranty issue?
    BBZ

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  20. #20
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    It looks fun, but at almost 50, I stay out of the park and find 140mm of frame travel just fine for both trail and enduro racing. I had to have a heart to heart with myself when I bought my Smash eventhough I thought I needed travel of the MT. Quality vs quantity when it comes to travel.
    Ripping trails and tipping ales

  21. #21
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    One thing I've learned over the years riding various bikes of vastly differently geometries is that you adapt quickly to change, and the thing you thought were important gets overshadowed by things you didn't even consider.

    When I bought my first GG, I decided to stop worrying about the goofy name, or the fact that it might be a littler heavier than ideal, or that I hadn't actually ridden the exact frame size I was ordering or that it might be too much bike or not enough...

    ...and I was just happy to be riding a bike manufactured in the USA by American hands at a rad company that supports its employees and its customers.

    I do know a few people who moved on from GG bikes to other brands, but it was because either they were offered some sort of sweet sponsorship or employee discount, had partnered with a team or shop in partnership with another brand, or because they were outside of the US and getting parts was difficult. I know some folks have been disappointed with the BAMF program but I honestly don't know of anyone is disappointed with the bikes themselves, or the warranty/service of the company.
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  22. #22
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    GG seem cool as a company. Their products and designs are very appealing. For years I've watched them closely and have really wanted to confidently buy one of their frames.

    It would be really great if a reviewer actually spent time reviewing the _suspension_ traits of the full _suspension_ bike. Telling me about the components GG hangs on their frames work is a waste of time. Already know that. Knowing how a long, slack bike handles. Already know that. Rehashing what is already on their website - I know that. How a steep STA pedals, already know that.

    What is hard to tell is how does their suspension feel. How does it feel under power, under braking, with a coil, with an air spring; on big, fast chunk; on techy climbs; on sit and spin efforts....

    So many bikes have been hit or miss for me because of how their suspension behaves. It one of the biggest, most potentially variable, things I need to know before buying a bike. Yet reviewers are notorious for skimming on this part of the review.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    GG seem cool as a company. Their products and designs are very appealing. For years I've watched them closely and have really wanted to confidently buy one of their frames.

    It would be really great if a reviewer actually spent time reviewing the _suspension_ traits of the full _suspension_ bike. Telling me about the components GG hangs on their frames work is a waste of time. Already know that. Knowing how a long, slack bike handles. Already know that. Rehashing what is already on their website - I know that. How a steep STA pedals, already know that.

    What is hard to tell is how does their suspension feel. How does it feel under power, under braking, with a coil, with an air spring; on big, fast chunk; on techy climbs; on sit and spin efforts....

    So many bikes have been hit or miss for me because of how their suspension behaves. It one of the biggest, most potentially variable, things I need to know before buying a bike. Yet reviewers are notorious for skimming on this part of the review.
    I should have the rest of my parts in the next 3-4 weeks, and back to a normal schedule in about 4. I will do my best to give it hell and report back.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    GG seem cool as a company. Their products and designs are very appealing. For years I've watched them closely and have really wanted to confidently buy one of their frames.

    GG offers free shipping to you and a 30 money back satisfaction guarantee. Since you are admittedly very picky about your bikes why not see for yourself and if you don't love it send it back? All you'd be out is return shipping.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    GG seem cool as a company. Their products and designs are very appealing. For years I've watched them closely and have really wanted to confidently buy one of their frames.

    It would be really great if a reviewer actually spent time reviewing the _suspension_ traits of the full _suspension_ bike. Telling me about the components GG hangs on their frames work is a waste of time. Already know that. Knowing how a long, slack bike handles. Already know that. Rehashing what is already on their website - I know that. How a steep STA pedals, already know that.

    What is hard to tell is how does their suspension feel. How does it feel under power, under braking, with a coil, with an air spring; on big, fast chunk; on techy climbs; on sit and spin efforts....

    So many bikes have been hit or miss for me because of how their suspension behaves. It one of the biggest, most potentially variable, things I need to know before buying a bike. Yet reviewers are notorious for skimming on this part of the review.
    Check out the blister reviews of the TP and Smash. they are pretty thorough and on point. Also enduro-mtb.com did a mush more in depth look into Gnarvana than the american sites.

    also check out linkage design bit on the revved TP. Not fully representative of all models, but if you want a general sense of how the fsr/horst link on these works, this is at least a starting point. Linkage Design: Guerrilla Gravity

    If you are sitting and pedalling, all these bikes are efficient, as the antisquat is generally at or near 100% at sag. As with most Horst link applications, out of the saddle efforts can create bob, more with more suspension. Between a good climbing position and reasonably efficient horst link application, these are not race bikes going uphill, but perform at least as good as most of the competition. I find my megatrail to be an awesome tech climber even in gravity mode. I will get dropped by my nordic ski buddy riding a yeti sb130 on the road climbs. I experience brake jack, but not to a concerning degree. Anti rise is as low as possible without losing other benefits of host/fsr design. Suspension will work well with air/coil, matter of preference, i've stuck with air, others go with coil. With coil, these bikes will feel very sensitive, and produce enormous traction. I only like some traction and a bit more play, which is what I get with a dpx2. Once you start to think you need an actual dh bike on descents, these bikes take off. there's a lot more, but I have dinner to make.

  26. #26
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    Seriously, if you are picky about how you want your bike to ride, you have two choices:

    Demo it or Fix it.

    I could ride the same bike as you and we would come away with different impressions, esp if we like different ride qualities.

    I found that with proper suspension tuning, I can get most any bike to ride well, but there will always be bikes that make you smile more.

    Reviews are like opinions ...

    So yeah, you should demo.

    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    GG seem cool as a company. Their products and designs are very appealing. For years I've watched them closely and have really wanted to confidently buy one of their frames.

    It would be really great if a reviewer actually spent time reviewing the _suspension_ traits of the full _suspension_ bike. Telling me about the components GG hangs on their frames work is a waste of time. Already know that. Knowing how a long, slack bike handles. Already know that. Rehashing what is already on their website - I know that. How a steep STA pedals, already know that.

    What is hard to tell is how does their suspension feel. How does it feel under power, under braking, with a coil, with an air spring; on big, fast chunk; on techy climbs; on sit and spin efforts....

    So many bikes have been hit or miss for me because of how their suspension behaves. It one of the biggest, most potentially variable, things I need to know before buying a bike. Yet reviewers are notorious for skimming on this part of the review.
    GG Megatrail (Frameset for sale)
    GG Trail Pistola 27+/29 (speedy)
    RSD Middlechild 27+ (punky)
    Pivot Shuttle 27.5 (wifeys)

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    Yes !!!

    Quote Originally Posted by planetx88 View Post
    If you are sitting and pedalling, all these bikes are efficient, as the antisquat is generally at or near 100% at sag. As with most Horst link applications, out of the saddle efforts can create bob, more with more suspension. Between a good climbing position and reasonably efficient horst link application, these are not race bikes going uphill, but perform at least as good as most of the competition. I find my megatrail to be an awesome tech climber even in gravity mode. I will get dropped by my nordic ski buddy riding a yeti sb130 on the road climbs. I experience brake jack, but not to a concerning degree. Anti rise is as low as possible without losing other benefits of host/fsr design. Suspension will work well with air/coil, matter of preference, i've stuck with air, others go with coil. With coil, these bikes will feel very sensitive, and produce enormous traction. I only like some traction and a bit more play, which is what I get with a dpx2. Once you start to think you need an actual dh bike on descents, these bikes take off. there's a lot more, but I have dinner to make.

    Good job planetx88.

    My point is why can't guys whose job it is to review bikes generate a review like this ^^^?


    Yeah, I like looking over the Linkage Design stuff, and also like the reviews from Blister, which I did review on those rigs in the past.

    Not sure how accurate the Linkage Design stuff is.

    Cool - will check out the enduro-mtb review.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    GG offers free shipping to you and a 30 money back satisfaction guarantee. Since you are admittedly very picky about your bikes why not see for yourself and if you don't love it send it back? All you'd be out is return shipping.
    Hmmmm.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    GG seem cool as a company. Their products and designs are very appealing. For years I've watched them closely and have really wanted to confidently buy one of their frames.

    It would be really great if a reviewer actually spent time reviewing the _suspension_ traits of the full _suspension_ bike. Telling me about the components GG hangs on their frames work is a waste of time. Already know that. Knowing how a long, slack bike handles. Already know that. Rehashing what is already on their website - I know that. How a steep STA pedals, already know that.

    What is hard to tell is how does their suspension feel. How does it feel under power, under braking, with a coil, with an air spring; on big, fast chunk; on techy climbs; on sit and spin efforts....

    So many bikes have been hit or miss for me because of how their suspension behaves. It one of the biggest, most potentially variable, things I need to know before buying a bike. Yet reviewers are notorious for skimming on this part of the review.
    I have never been an excellent descriptive writer....but I'll try.

    I had a Transition Scout V1 and a Transition Scout SBG, both Horst link style suspensions. These bikes were among my all time favorites. Transition is a great company that is very rider focused. I enjoyed the way they designed their bikes, shorter travel in the back, longer up front.....a bike that always punched above its weight. The fit was always good, the geo was very good, and with only a few upgrades I would ride them mostly stock and felt absolutely fine with the Horst suspension. They never really wowed me with great climbing, or where the most plush.

    The V1 Scout was the most playful bike. I could catch air off an acorn cap. It was flickable, poppy, insert any catch phrase here that describes your ultimate bike experience. With only 125mm of travel out back the only time I ever felt I needed more suspension travel was at the bike park. Braking bumps, and poor jumping skills made it a teeth rattling experience.

    The SBG on the other hand offered tons of traction with its SBG design, but it lost the playful character of the V1 Scout. It was much more at home at speed and needed some momentum to get real playful. The rear was only 130mm but it had more progression. It was much better at the bike park...not ideal, but for the few times a year I go it was manageable.

    Right now I have a Shred Dogg, so its not exactly gonna be the same as the Gnarvana, however, GG's interpretation of the Horst Link is worlds different then Transitions. Could be different now they have dropped V3. The first thing I noticed was the mid support. You definitely sit and stay higher in the travel when pedaling. Not sure if the even steeper STA helps with this but it climbs much better than either of my TR's did. Front doesn't get floppy, and there is very little rear wheel spin.

    Shred Dogg in 130mm Trail modes pedals with a certainty. Each pedal stroke feels efficient and has purpose. Maybe not XC race efficiency, but I am surprised how immediate it moves with each pedal stroke. I leave it in Trail mode most of the time......this is where the bikes playful nature really comes alive.

    140 Gravity mode is traction/plush mode. The bike stays glued to the ground. It still is playful, but you lose that certainty you get in trail mode. It gets moving, but you can feel a little loss in the power. It doesn't wallow around with no mid support, but it does loose a little zip.

    Now all of this may mean little to you depending on where you live. I am from Upstate NY and ride here and NE. High speed trails are few and far between, and the Gnarvana would be overkill for 90% of my trail systems.

    I realize that the Gnarvana does not have a trail and gravity mode, but the fact that they have two different suspension kinematics on the two modes to me speaks volumes on GG's understanding of the Horst Link.

    Not that TR does not know how to effectively utilize the Horst, it's just GG's interpretation so far to me works better. It's surprising how each company takes and interprets the suspension kinematics....but I like the GG interpretation so far.

  30. #30
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    Nice. Thanks.

    A bit chilly for riding in April the last day or so, huh?


    Where you ride?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    Nice. Thanks.

    A bit chilly for riding in April the last day or so, huh?


    Where you ride?
    Was getting ready to go out today for a quick spin and we got a random snow event. 50 degrees is my comfort zone, but with the stay at home thing I will try to get out in the 40's.

    I'm in the Albany, NY area. Locally Daniels Road State Forest, Gurney Lane, Schenectady Central Park, KP, Colony Town Park. In VT Pine Hill, Killington.

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    Was 34 up here during the day and snowing while I was doing trail work. My feet get too cold to ride at that temp. Much farther north than you. North of Whiteface, where I ride often. Never made it down to that part of NY, but usually get a dh pass at Killy as well. Stay safe.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    Was 34 up here during the day and snowing while I was doing trail work. My feet get too cold to ride at that temp. Much farther north than you. North of Whiteface, where I ride often. Never made it down to that part of NY, but usually get a dh pass at Killy as well. Stay safe.
    We've been going to the Wilmington MTB Festival for the last two years and plan on going this year as well. Can't wait to hit the Poor Mans Downhill on the GG. Hit me up if you wanna ride the Shred Dogg.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    Was 34 up here during the day and snowing while I was doing trail work. My feet get too cold to ride at that temp. Much farther north than you. North of Whiteface, where I ride often. Never made it down to that part of NY, but usually get a dh pass at Killy as well. Stay safe.
    You do anything with BETA?

    Whiteface is GNARLY on a MTB.....downhill bikes only.

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    Quote Originally Posted by billybobzia View Post
    Damn.. my Tellis seat post on my Smash makes the same noise.. anyone know if there is a fix.. or warranty issue?
    Mine too. The bike is very quiet except for that seat post. Much more noisy when in the up position. I don’t think it’s warranty.....maybe just it’s design?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    Was 34 up here during the day and snowing while I was doing trail work. My feet get too cold to ride at that temp. Much farther north than you. North of Whiteface, where I ride often. Never made it down to that part of NY, but usually get a dh pass at Killy as well. Stay safe.
    Real bummed Plattekill closed for lift served biking, other than races. Up there with whiteface for oh sh!t factor. Great place to ski too. You could ride the Gnarvana down Gnarville! Full brake lock shale surfing over drops!

    The Tellis is a keyway guided dropper. Little things that look like long metal mouse turds, or miniature baguettes that slide in corresponding channels cut into the outer tube and stanchion tube. Wild guess, never ridden a tellis, but either the keys, the channels, or both can wear and create that wobble. Common in lots of different droppers that use keyways, which is most.

    One up makes three sizes of key for their droppers to address this wobble by getting the tightest fit that still slides. I'd be curious if any of these sizes could work with a tellis?

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    Quote Originally Posted by planetx88 View Post

    The Tellis is a keyway guided dropper. Little things that look like long metal mouse turds, or miniature baguettes that slide in corresponding channels cut into the outer tube and stanchion tube. Wild guess, never ridden a tellis, but either the keys, the channels, or both can wear and create that wobble. Common in lots of different droppers that use keyways, which is most.

    One up makes three sizes of key for their droppers to address this wobble by getting the tightest fit that still slides. I'd be curious if any of these sizes could work with a tellis?
    My Tellis did this from day one. Brand new never ridden it rattles. That’s why I think it’s inherent in the design. Haven’t really dug to deep into it but it seems to make the most noise when unweighted.....standing up or if your off the bike like in the video. Seated it doesn’t makes that much noise. You can actually hold the seat in one hand and hit the bike in the video and it doesn’t make as much noise. I think your right about key ways, in this case they are just too small causing the noise. Just a little too much play.

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    Hey guys.

    Yeah, WF is gnarly even with a full on dh rig. I'm north of BETA's turf, so no.

    Thanks for the offer on the Shred Dog.


    Shame Platty closed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    Hey guys.

    Yeah, WF is gnarly even with a full on dh rig. I'm north of BETA's turf, so no.

    Thanks for the offer on the Shred Dog.


    Shame Platty closed.
    dang it guys I can't seam to go anywhere without seeing/hearing about northern NY riding... I miss my time in the LP/ wilmington area and now E-town. I am very happy to see GG riders in the area.

  40. #40
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    I had to google it. Didnt know it was a bike. Thought you were talking a state of mind!....


    Either way i like it.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2zmtnz View Post
    dang it guys I can't seam to go anywhere without seeing/hearing about northern NY riding... I miss my time in the LP/ wilmington area and now E-town. I am very happy to see GG riders in the area.

    Wilmington area is really growing. The whole vibe up there is so welcoming for MTB’ing. I wish we could get that kind of support here in Daniels Road State Forest. Can’t wait for the Wilmington MTB festival...just a great community up there!

  42. #42
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    I just put my order in yesterday for a Gnarvana to replace my 4 year old Hightower. Still waivering a bit between the RS Superdeluxe coil and the Fox DHx2. For an additional $220 GG will upgrade from the RS SD to the DHx2 with the orange coil. Considering the coild is $120 it seems like $100 more for the fox is worth it. Cannot wait to build this up and ride it!

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by backinmysaddle View Post
    I just put my order in yesterday for a Gnarvana to replace my 4 year old Hightower. Still waivering a bit between the RS Superdeluxe coil and the Fox DHx2. For an additional $220 GG will upgrade from the RS SD to the DHx2 with the orange coil. Considering the coild is $120 it seems like $100 more for the fox is worth it. Cannot wait to build this up and ride it!
    Or put that $220 towards a Avy or Vorsprung tune for the RS SD. I have the SD, but without a tune it's fine as a placeholder until EX Storia starts shipping again from Italy
    Ripping trails and tipping ales

  44. #44
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    I had the RS SD but found the old version of 11-6 on super sale over the holidays, definite difference in the two. Either way, you are going to love that bike over the original Hightower, that's where I came from and have never looked back. Climbs better, descends much better!

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    Quote Originally Posted by backinmysaddle View Post
    I just put my order in yesterday for a Gnarvana to replace my 4 year old Hightower. Still waivering a bit between the RS Superdeluxe coil and the Fox DHx2. For an additional $220 GG will upgrade from the RS SD to the DHx2 with the orange coil. Considering the coild is $120 it seems like $100 more for the fox is worth it. Cannot wait to build this up and ride it!
    I put the Manitou Mezzer and Mara Pro on my Mega Trail and it has been really really good. I have not co completed tuning and testing.

    If the Gnar is remotely close to the Megatrail it's going to be a winner, suspension has been supple with plenty of support, I had one off line excursion from a bad decision that put me through some big square edged rocks, the suspension just soaked it up like it was no big deal. I'm looking forward to the rest of my parts getting here.

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    After a demo last summer back in NY (hardy road trails) on a Yeti130 I have been itching to get a 29er from GG. But, since I am now living in the PNW and racing enduro I was looking for a little more rear travel than The SMASH offered so the Ganrvana is exactly what I had been waiting for. So I placed my order for a Garvana earlier today. Only down side to this purchase is now I have to choose between the 2017 megatrail or the 2020 Gnarvana.... a truly difficult decision to make.

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by backinmysaddle View Post
    I just put my order in yesterday for a Gnarvana to replace my 4 year old Hightower. Still waivering a bit between the RS Superdeluxe coil and the Fox DHx2. For an additional $220 GG will upgrade from the RS SD to the DHx2 with the orange coil. Considering the coild is $120 it seems like $100 more for the fox is worth it. Cannot wait to build this up and ride it!
    Manitou Mara Pro shock, best shock you can get off the shelf and as good as any custom shock, but it's an air can so you gotta be satisfied with that. I run the Mara on my Megatrail and it's awesome.
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  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Manitou Mara Pro shock, best shock you can get off the shelf and as good as any custom shock, but it's an air can so you gotta be satisfied with that. I run the Mara on my Megatrail and it's awesome.
    I am so wedded to the coil after a bit of time on a RS superdeluxe, and when GG told me it was the same spring rate as my existing bike, I knew coil was the only option for me...

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by backinmysaddle View Post
    I am so wedded to the coil after a bit of time on a RS superdeluxe, and when GG told me it was the same spring rate as my existing bike, I knew coil was the only option for me...
    Gotcha. Have you consider a coil fork? I like me a good coil fork, mmhmm
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  50. #50
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    I have my Gnarvana stays for my smash but waits in shock and fork from Fox.

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    Does anybody know if the Gnarvanna requires a longer chain VS a Megatrail?

    I am kinda starting to think about just having another chain to keep with the wheelset instead of using the same chain on multiple cassettes and possibly creating an accelerated wear condition.

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by TXrocks View Post
    Does anybody know if the Gnarvanna requires a longer chain VS a Megatrail?

    I am kinda starting to think about just having another chain to keep with the wheelset instead of using the same chain on multiple cassettes and possibly creating an accelerated wear condition.
    I would say yes you will need 2 chains, a chain for the Gnarvana and another for the Megatrail. since the Gnarvana has a 450mm chainstay while the Megatrail have a 432 chainstay.

  53. #53
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    Yep definitely will, well at least I'll have cassettes and chains matched up so that should be better on chain and cassette wear.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    GG seem cool as a company. Their products and designs are very appealing. For years I've watched them closely and have really wanted to confidently buy one of their frames.

    It would be really great if a reviewer actually spent time reviewing the _suspension_ traits of the full _suspension_ bike. Telling me about the components GG hangs on their frames work is a waste of time. Already know that. Knowing how a long, slack bike handles. Already know that. Rehashing what is already on their website - I know that. How a steep STA pedals, already know that.

    What is hard to tell is how does their suspension feel. How does it feel under power, under braking, with a coil, with an air spring; on big, fast chunk; on techy climbs; on sit and spin efforts....

    So many bikes have been hit or miss for me because of how their suspension behaves. It one of the biggest, most potentially variable, things I need to know before buying a bike. Yet reviewers are notorious for skimming on this part of the review.
    I can give you that feedback for both the 27.5 bikes if you want but this is a 29er thread

  55. #55
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    I did notice today that there is a different chainline dimension from the Megatrail to the Gnarvanna. Does anybody have some insight on if this is going to cause an issue swapping from the Megatrail to the Gnarvanna and leaving chainline set for the Megatrail?

    Does anybody know how many chainlinks are supposed to be on the Gnarvanna also?
    I am going to change chains on the swap too. Hopefully next year I will end up just building another and get a size 4 frame so I would have both bikes ready to roll. Maybe even buy Trail Pistol parts once I can have two complete.

  56. #56
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    I'm not sure where you saw that, but seeing as the Mega and Gnarvana share the same chainstay I dont believe there is a difference, I didn't see any difference on the website, and they still only have one owners manual for all of the revved frames. They call the chainline 52-55mm. With many wider q-factor cranks in the last two years and wide range cassettes, paired with chainstay clearance issues for chainrings and heels, many people will end up at 54 or 55 mm, but youre safe at 52 sounds like. Changing seatstay kits won't impact chainline, but you will need a longer chain on the Gnarvana, as you know. How long exactly depends on cassette size, chainring size, and manufacturer.

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    I will have to find where I saw the chainline differences, if you found where its 53mm-55mm I should still be good to go. I did not see any reason it would be different. I am still going to have the same SRAM X01 cassettes on both wheelsets, same DT240/XMC1200 wheels on both, same chain rings.... I sent GG a message to see how long that chain is also. Takes the measuring out of the equation if I can just count and cut....

  58. #58
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    Does garvana rides like specialize bikes?

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  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Picard View Post
    Does garvana rides like specialize bikes?
    Please. Don't make us ban you.
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  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    Please. Don't make us ban you.
    Oh come on guys. I am asking a real question

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    If it rode like a Specialized, we’d tell you to buy a Specialized, even then, which Specialized?

    So no, it rides like a GG bike, supportive through the mid strike, plush initial stroke but not soft, fairly linear, my tuner called it digressive.

    Find a local GG rider and get a demo.

    Quote Originally Posted by Picard View Post
    Oh come on guys. I am asking a real question

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  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Picard View Post
    Does garvana rides like specialize bikes?

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    I cant speak to that as I have never ridden speshy bikes. There is a valid comparison here between two brands that use Horst link suspension. In some ways, GG bikes are more similar to the traditional FSR bikes like stumpy than some other horst bikes like transition or Norco. But that says very little about how the bike rides in comparison. I think the most direct comparison would obviously be the Speshy Enduro, which does look cool, and is aimed at a very similar buyer to the Gnarvana.

    With all that said, buy a GG, save a good chunk of change, get an excellent bike, support an awesome company doing amazing things.

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    If it rode like a Specialized, we’d tell you to buy a Specialized, even then, which Specialized?

    So no, it rides like a GG bike, supportive through the mid strike, plush initial stroke but not soft, fairly linear, my tuner called it digressive.

    Find a local GG rider and get a demo.
    What is diressive?

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  64. #64
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    you can always watch AndreXTR videos to understand suspension better. This is his rear suspension fundamentals video-https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A1dUV6pYztg.
    The over-simplified version is-
    -progressive means your suspension requires more force to compress the shock as you move into the travel.
    -Linear means your suspension requires roughly the same force as you move through the travel.
    -Regressive, or Digressive means your suspension requires less force as you move through the travel.

    Horst link bikes range from mildly progressive to wildly progressive, but I dont think there are any examples of truly linear, and certainly regressive horst links. The GG bikes are mostly in the middle of the progressive zone for modern bikes.

    Also check out Antonio Osuna's site Linkage Design (Linkage Design: Resultados de la búsqueda de guerrilla), associated with the Linkage software and Bikechecker.com.

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Picard View Post
    What is diressive?

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    Sorry, digressive.

    I think the tuner was differentiating between the more common progressive designs.

    Even with an air shock, I don't notice ramp up, so it seems to be less progressive than most which makes sense since a coil shock works well.

    It's really hard to compare suspension designs, rarely is one better than another, it's all personal preference, though if like one design you might find one that is similar ....

    I don't think GG bikes are all that similar to Specialized, but then it's been a while since I rode a big S bike.

    Within reason, any bike can be tuned to ride within a broad range of needs, so a GG bike could probably work well for most riders, though in my experience the GG bikes are more supportive than plush, and more damp than poppy.
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    I have a question on insertion length for the Gnarvana and the GG folks haven't answered me this week and I need to put in an order for a dropper post this weekend.

    I want to get the dropper with the most "drop" or extension, but since I am at a point where my inseam and the standover height of the bike are close, I really want the dropper inserted all the way in, so the seat is as close to the standover height as possible. Assuming on a size 3 that this number is close to what it is on other GG frames, so wondering if anyone has this number?

    BTW, the GG site has some info on dropper post sizing, but it is for recommended extension, which is silly because that is really not dependent on frame size or mfg'er at all. I like a 150-170 dropper on pretty much every bike I ride, but I also want to have my feet flat on the ground when I drop the post all the way and stop, so I go as big as I can with the dropper post fully inserted to the collar.

  67. #67
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    I've got a 33" inseam and I measured my post in anticipation of a new dropper - I could run nearly 210mm of drop.

    I'd suggest just getting an adjustable travel post like the OneUp v2. You could give a 210mm and shim it down to 190 if neccesary for maximum drop.
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  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by PHeller View Post
    I've got a 33" inseam and I measured my post in anticipation of a new dropper - I could run nearly 210mm of drop.

    I'd suggest just getting an adjustable travel post like the OneUp v2. You could give a 210mm and shim it down to 190 if neccesary for maximum drop.
    Thanks, that gives me lots of options and room for error then. I dont need anything near that much total extension, I actually dont pop up as high as most people do when climbing due to a knee problem, so I will have no problems.

  69. #69
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    Once you go 200mm + dropper there’s no going back.

    I’d take 250mm if I could get it 🙄
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  70. #70
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    Well I am going to get the gnarvana. Used but still going to be rad!


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  71. #71
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    Anyone go 29/27.5 on this? And does it cost more?


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  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew8404 View Post
    Anyone go 29/27.5 on this? And does it cost more?


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    If you are looking to go 29F and 27.5R that is referred to as the megaSMASH. I think it is 40$ (or was it 60) more than if you speced a stock SMASH (remember the front triangles are all the same across their lineup just different seat stay kits, so you can run up to a 170mm 29er fork on the front no problem).

    check out video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=617N2bH6N4k&t=614s for a rippers thoughts on the megaSMASH

    Since I am just someone on a message board I will suggest you contact Nikki over at GG and talk with her about that and any other questions you may have have.

  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2zmtnz View Post
    If you are looking to go 29F and 27.5R that is referred to as the megaSMASH. I think it is 40$ (or was it 60) more than if you speced a stock SMASH (remember the front triangles are all the same across their lineup just different seat stay kits, so you can run up to a 170mm 29er fork on the front no problem).

    Since I am just someone on a message board I will suggest you contact Nikki over at GG and talk with her about that and any other questions you may have have.
    Good to know thanks.


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  74. #74
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    Yea the Gnarvana would end up with a very low, almost too-low bottom bracket it were ran as a mullet.

    The MegaSmash (Megatrail with 29er front end setup) would have a slightly higher than stock BB, but otherwise pretty close to the most "purpose built" mullet design.
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  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2zmtnz View Post
    If you are looking to go 29F and 27.5R that is referred to as the megaSMASH. I think it is 40$ (or was it 60) more than if you speced a stock SMASH (remember the front triangles are all the same across their lineup just different seat stay kits, so you can run up to a 170mm 29er fork on the front no problem).

    check out video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=617N2bH6N4k&t=614s for a rippers thoughts on the megaSMASH

    Since I am just someone on a message board I will suggest you contact Nikki over at GG and talk with her about that and any other questions you may have have.
    As a BAMF, I'll answer. You're correct

    This. Basically, you need the Megatrail stays to run a Megasmash. I believe the Gnarvana already has the 230x65 shock, so you'll just need the stays.

  76. #76
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    Got an update email from GG, my Gnarvana was ordered on May, they are doing final painting now. I was told it would ship in 3-4 weeks, it's coming up on 6 weeks tomorrow. They say they have some supply chain issues and so some delay in the build process. Thankfully I am just getting a frame only and so it wont be much longer for them to put suspension pivots on and pack up/ship to me...

  77. #77
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    Here's how to look at this:

    With larger companies, they order hundreds of frames all at once, and the factory builds them in the big bulk shipments for pennies on the dollar. They are shipped in a container by the hundreds, then arrived and are distributed to dealers right about the same time the brand announced "THE ALL NEW 2020 SPECIANTORCRUZEETEEDALENCAL!"

    That allows the consumer to rush out and buy them immediately only hindered by stock.

    Buyers of GG product need to remember that in reality, they manufacture more similarly to a custom builder. They don't want to pay to build a bunch of bikes they can't sell.

    You order, they weld/build. If you happen to order at the same time as 20 other people, that's going to create a backlog. The same time as 50 other people? That'll create some supply chain issues (especially right now with COVID.)

    Only once the backlog/waitlist is filled do they start to make some extra stock for immediate order fulfillment and warranty stock. Until then, it's a first-come-first-save basis.

    I know this pisses off some folks, especially when GG claims a 3-4 week wait, then changes it to 6-8 weeks. I waited 11 weeks for my Trail Pistol because I ordered when the big rush happened in 2019. I just reconciled that with the fact that I'm getting an American made, welded by ColoRADans, affordable carbon bike that is in demand.
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  78. #78
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    YAY, my Gnarvana frame shipped today and should arrive on Saturday. Can't wait to build it up.

    I know I need to supply the 8mm mounting kits for the shock, but I assume that GG supplies the bolts, is that correct?

  79. #79
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    Loving it!!!

    Ribbon coil 160 (no 170 yet)
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    Hope tech 3 e4
    Hope 35mm stem
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    Spec roval sl wheelz
    A seat
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    Weight ????


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  80. #80
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    FedEx rang the doorbell nice and early yesterday so I had a good chunk of time to get the build going. All bolted up now, just have lines to trim, fine tuning and one glitch, wrong chain ring came from Wolftooth. Off to the LBS now to see if they have a SRAM DM in stock which will do with a SRAM chain until I get the WolfTooth HG+ ring tomorrow afternoon.

    XTR 12 speed, Mezzer fork, 2021 DHX2 shock, TRP EVO DH brakes, SRAM X01 DUB Cranks, OneUp 210mm dropper, EIE Carbon i30 wheels w 28h DT 240 hubs, going to be a nice ride.

    The GNARVANA-gnarvana1.jpg

  81. #81
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    For you folks with the Gnarvana, or even better those that have ridden the Gnarvana and the Smash; is the Gnarvana so big that it just trucks over everything and erases bad line choice and other mistakes? I am looking at both as my next all-around bike, and I believe my normal riding is steep/chunky enough to justify either of them, but I don't want one so big and capable that it will make me stop me from progressing as a rider if that makes sense.

    I would be coming off of a 2018 AL Megatrail for comparison

    Any thoughts are appreciated, and congrats to you that have gotten this bike!
    Last edited by burkawitz206; 6 Days Ago at 11:44 AM.

  82. #82
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    Having ridden 120 and 165mm bikes, the bigger bike will certain inspire more confidence and help to smooth out the roughest of trails. However, this just allows for you to focus on the skills and moves you might normally avoid due to already being beat up on a smaller travel bike. My local trails in Northern Arizona arent really super rock, either, but back in the Northeast I think the extra travel would be nice when its near constant babyheads. If you come from a BMX/DJ background the Gnarvana is going to feel like a truck, but trucks are nice when the terrain is rugged.

    Personally, having owned a Smash, now a Pistola, if I my daily ride was more “winch up, plummet down”, Id have a Gnarvana. Instead, 90% of my time is spent on more XC/TR trails (aside from downhills that are still legit), and the Pistola holds its own on the big mountain stuff, so Im in no hurry to upgrade.
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    Thanks PH that is very helpful. I am very fortunate to live in a location in the PNW where nearly all of my rides are of the “winch up, plummet down” type that you mentioned. Climbs are dedicated climbing single track or semi-horrible to fully-horrible fire roads, and my preferred descents are rooty, rocky, and steep.

    Another thing I was wondering about was running the Gnarvana with a 160mm fork. It would steepen/lower things slightly but I was thinking a 160mm fox36/lyrik would be lighter and I am not sure I need the newer large forks like the 38/Zeb (I am only 160lbs). It would also make changing to a Smash less work as I could leave the fork alone.

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    I agree with less is more, esp when you compare two bikes with similar geometry.

    However, I have found short travel bikes get overwhelmed on repeated big hits and I think there is a handling difference depending on the amount of travel and how the bike uses it’s travel.

    Riding the Pistola as a 29er I felt undergunned on jump trails, whereas the Shred running 29” in Trail Mode felt more capable in similar scenarios. I’m not sure if this is due to the leverage ratio, both bikes were set up as 130mm travel, Pistola in Plush, SD in Trail.

    When riding a bigger bike like the Megstrail, I definitely felt like the bike was more capable, could straightline scary stuff, bulldoze through chunder, but I lost some fine control and it wasn’t as capable in slow tight tech.

    I prefer short chainstays and I never felt like they were a disadvantage, never felt like my control was lessened; if anything I had more control and greater agility.

    So if I was looking at a longer travel 29er, I’d get the Smash. Consider some mild over shocking, increasing fork travel, or even running a tall lower cup.
    GG Megatrail (Frameset for sale)
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  85. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by burkawitz206 View Post
    Thanks PH that is very helpful. I am very fortunate to live in a location in the PNW where nearly all of my rides are of the “winch up, plummet down” type that you mentioned. Climbs are dedicated climbing single track or semi-horrible to fully-horrible fire roads, and my preferred descents are rooty, rocky, and steep.

    Another thing I was wondering about was running the Gnarvana with a 160mm fork. It would steepen/lower things slightly but I was thinking a 160mm fox36/lyrik would be lighter and I am not sure I need the newer large forks like the 38/Zeb (I am only 160lbs). It would also make changing to a Smash less work as I could leave the fork alone.
    You can run a tall lower cup to compensate for less fork travel, but reducing the fork and running a short lower cup is going to cause pedal strike issues.

    So to be clear, the only thing that is different between each GG bike is the seat stays, which position the wheel differently relative to the bb. Front triangle is the same. So think about how moving the wheel up/down and forward/back will change the bike. The longer chainstay is typically a work around to gain clearance from the seat tube when increasing travel.

    You can also run a Megatrail as a 29er or mullet, I’ve done this, the bb is high but you can tweak the geo in a variety of ways to bring it down. I posted some impressions on the Megatrail thread.

    I’d look at a Gnarvana if I was running downhill/park, DC fork kinda stuff, for PNW riding like BC, I’d get a Smash or Megatrail.

    Where do you ride?
    GG Megatrail (Frameset for sale)
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  86. #86
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    Hey Ben,

    Thanks for the detailed feedback, I was hoping you might wander by this thread as you seem to be the resident mad scientist when it comes to taking full advantage of the GG modular platform

    I live in and ride mostly around Western Washington, I have included a couple of sample links (not my videos) of the trail types I favor which are definitely not the lift-served buffed out and smooth jump line kind.

    Regarding the Smash, I had already asked GG about over-shocking it with a 62.5 stroke shock and they said it *should* be ok with a 2.4" tire which is what I run. That would be good for about 150mm travel and I would definitely want to run a 160mm fork on it. I think between the Smash and Gnarvana I guess my main decision point is the chainstay length, if I am prioritizing stability and traction I don't want to get the Smash only to immediately want the Gnarvana stays.

    These are all about 15 min drive from my house, I am spoiled


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ba0US90Tdpk

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xme_qkZKEF4

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ze01li-4C9E

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    That mostly looks like tight tech to me. I'd definitely go for a Smash there as I'd be able to gain/hold more speed through the corners and it doesn't look super rocky. I'm getting a Smash and plan on running the shock at 62.5 stroke as well, but will also probably pick up some Gnarvana stays for trips with lots of wide open chunk where I can't use my DH bike as I'd still need to pedal (Teton Pass etc).

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    Quote Originally Posted by djjohnr View Post
    I'm getting a Smash and plan on running the shock at 62.5 stroke as well, but will also probably pick up some Gnarvana stays for trips with lots of wide open chunk where I can't use my DH bike as I'd still need to pedal (Teton Pass etc).
    Are you running a coil shock by chance? I have the SD Coil, and it looks like that and the Fox DHX2 could feasibly have an easy way to adjust the stroke if someone made a kind of spacer that snapped onto the shaft under the bottom out bumper but I cannot find such a thing. Not having to take the shock apart to change travel or have multiple shocks between the bikes would obviously be nice. I realize that other coil variants and air shocks are a completely different ballgame in this regard though.

    Thank you for your feedback!

  89. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by burkawitz206 View Post
    Are you running a coil shock by chance? I have the SD Coil, and it looks like that and the Fox DHX2 could feasibly have an easy way to adjust the stroke if someone made a kind of spacer that snapped onto the shaft under the bottom out bumper but I cannot find such a thing. Not having to take the shock apart to change travel or have multiple shocks between the bikes would obviously be nice. I realize that other coil variants and air shocks are a completely different ballgame in this regard though.

    Thank you for your feedback!
    I ordered it with a DHX2. I recently learned that you can easily change stroke on the 2021 version. There's spacers that you can add/remove under a cap at the end of the body. The spacers are pairs that split down the middle so you don't need to tear the shock apart at all to change them. On the 230 shock you can go between 60, 62.5 and 65.


  90. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by burkawitz206 View Post
    I don't want to get the Smash only to immediately want the Gnarvana stays.
    You are doomed for certain, no matter the descision. The "other choice" gremlins will haunt you for all eternity. Bwahahaha!!

    Every time I ride my megatrail, i still wonder if it can be better. I also bought a GTI in 2016 and immediately wondered if I should have bought an R as I was driving it off the lot.

    Which is the best long travel 29 option- an overstroked smash, and understroked megatrail 29, a gnarvana?

    I think the answer is "yes." my $.02 would be to go for whatever frame you think might have the best geo for you and tinker from there. Since the Granvana has a more rearward "tilted" front triangle, It does have relatively shorter top tube and reach compared to the smash, though overall it is a "bigger" bike. For me, being a bit more stretched and higher on the size 3 frame with the mega works well so I started from there and am still tinkering.

  91. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by planetx88 View Post
    You are doomed for certain, no matter the descision. The "other choice" gremlins will haunt you for all eternity. Bwahahaha!!
    Reading this is like my soul laid bare! I don't know what the cause but I have never had this level of obsession or analysis paralysis over any of my other hobbies!

  92. #92
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    It's far easier to add some pressure to the rear shock (if air) than it is get an added 15mm of travel out of the Smash.

    As Ben mentioned, you could utilize the 15mm lower cup with the fork at 150mm and 230x57.5 shock if you were really worried about being over-biked.

    Having owned the Smash, it felt very Trail-Bike compared to my 160/170 Commencal Meta AM.

    The Pistola at 130/150 is so close to the Smash that I would never consider upgrading "just" for an added 15mm of rear travel. The Gnarvana, however, would be worth it, IMO.

    The only downside of the Gnarvana is it's added chainstay length. Personally, even the Trail Pistol with its short chainstays feels pretty big. A product of both the wheelsize and chainstay length. Again, the "winch and plummet" terrain would really favor the longer chainstays. Banshee's new Titan and Prime both have chain-stays in the 450ish range, and they are smaller travel than the Gnarvana. Even the 115mm Phantom has 445mm chainstays!

    I think Chainstay length and Rider Height can also influence one another. A taller rider (6'+) might love 454 chainstays and a shorter rider might love 415mm chainstays.

    In theory, you could run the Gnarvana as a 275x2.8 setup with 15mm lower cup and 180mm fork to raise the BB (which is actually decently high relative to the rest of the lineup).

    Finally, if you got the Gnarvana and decided "whoa this is too much bike" it's gonna be easy-peasy to sell the Gnarvana chainstays (and keep/shorten the fork/shock) than it would be the Smash chainstays.
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    Just to add to your indecision options, you could also run a MegaSmash mullet.

    I drew it up, and played around with numbers for different shock strokes. It should turn out something like this:
    60mm shock: trail mode = 143mm, gravity mode = 152mm
    62.5mm shock: trail mode = 149mm, gravity mode = 159mm
    65mm shock: trail mode = 155mm, gravity mode = 165mm

    On all of those:
    150mm fork: trail mode = 64.2 HT, 76.2 ST. gravity mode = 63.7 HT, 75.7 ST
    160mm fork: trail mode = 63.8 HT, 75.9 ST. gravity mode = 63.3 HT, 75.4 ST

    I want to convert my Smash this winter to try this, haven't decided on which. Kinda leaning towards the 62.5 / 160 option, with most of my riding in Trail.

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    Hey, I know those trails!

    I used to live in Wenatchee, so I've ridden Tiger and I know about the new place. Never rode Predator, but loved riding Off The Grid.

    So for going big and fast at Tiger, I'd ride a Smash or Megatral, the only reason I'd upgrade to a Gnarvana in your neck of the woods is if I was riding Stevens Pass a bunch, even then I'd fret over the climbing prowess of those long stays. I could ride a Shred at Tiger, maybe a Pistola too.

    I've always ridden short stays other than my brief flirtation with the Foes Mutz, I don't think short stays cause instability but I do believe they help with agility.

    I'm mostly riding a Shred Dogg now, 130mm out back, Trust Message up front, it's a great trail bike and quite capable, and I'd happilly ride it at Tiger on everything, but at Stevens I would get worked. If I was to get one bike for everything and I was at Stevens a few times a month, I'd get a Smash or a MT.

    It looks like you enjoy earning your turns, so maybe the high Cascades is a thing you do, something like Angels Staircase … for sure that's a Smash or MT kind of ride, SHred or Pistola too.

    But hey, some folks don't mind long chainstays, so there's that.

    Not to sound critical, but in those three videos your linked, I don't really see how having 165mm vs 145mm will change much since you didn't take big enough hits use all of your travel.

    But then I'm in the less more camp right now

    Quote Originally Posted by burkawitz206 View Post
    Hey Ben,

    Thanks for the detailed feedback, I was hoping you might wander by this thread as you seem to be the resident mad scientist when it comes to taking full advantage of the GG modular platform

    I live in and ride mostly around Western Washington, I have included a couple of sample links (not my videos) of the trail types I favor which are definitely not the lift-served buffed out and smooth jump line kind.

    Regarding the Smash, I had already asked GG about over-shocking it with a 62.5 stroke shock and they said it *should* be ok with a 2.4" tire which is what I run. That would be good for about 150mm travel and I would definitely want to run a 160mm fork on it. I think between the Smash and Gnarvana I guess my main decision point is the chainstay length, if I am prioritizing stability and traction I don't want to get the Smash only to immediately want the Gnarvana stays.

    These are all about 15 min drive from my house, I am spoiled


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ba0US90Tdpk

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xme_qkZKEF4

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ze01li-4C9E
    GG Megatrail (Frameset for sale)
    GG Trail Pistola 27+/29 (speedy)
    RSD Middlechild 27+ (punky)
    Pivot Shuttle 27.5 (wifeys)

  95. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Hey, I know those trails!
    ...
    Not to sound critical, but in those three videos your linked, I don't really see how having 165mm vs 145mm will change much since you didn't take big enough hits use all of your travel.

    But then I'm in the less more camp right now
    You are 100% right Ben, and sorry if I didn't make it more clear before but the amount of travel isn't really a decision point for me for moving to a new bike or between the Smash or Gnarvana, it is more a matter of wanting more traction and stability and that feeling of "being in the middle of the bike" that reviewers talk about on these bikes with the longer stays. Perhaps I get those things just moving from a 27.5 to a 29er and I shouldn't obsess so much over chainstay and overall bike length.

    I have ridden all of the local trails on an AL Shred in trail mode, sure some of them were a little more work but as you indicate it is certainly doable with less travel. For what it is worth the newer natural-type trails around here are a lot different than OTG. If you ever get the chance to come around this way definitely let me know and I would happy to give a tour

    I run my MT at 170F/150R (trail mode) all the time now and I really only upped the fork to 170 to get a bit more BB clearance. Though I use it all up at times, it is more than fine and I really don't see needing more travel. Something in me just wants to experiment with the longer stays of the Gnarvana; I was even thinking of a Gnarvana with a 160mm fork and possibly down-stroking the shock to 62.5 might make it slightly more tame; 160F/150R Gnarvana maybe?

  96. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by djjohnr View Post
    I ordered it with a DHX2. I recently learned that you can easily change stroke on the 2021 version. There's spacers that you can add/remove under a cap at the end of the body. The spacers are pairs that split down the middle so you don't need to tear the shock apart at all to change them. On the 230 shock you can go between 60, 62.5 and 65.
    That looks like a pretty beefy spacer setup. I was thinking to have someone 3D print me a spacer like that for my SuperDeluxe coil would snap onto the shaft similar to how the Fox DPX2 volume spacers work; but maybe that is a bad idea.

  97. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andeh View Post
    Just to add to your indecision options, you could also run a MegaSmash mullet.
    A buddy of mine is considering a MegaSmash I will definitely send him the numbers you provided as they will probably help his decision some, thank you Andeh.

    I am not sure I would want to start with a mullet setup, maybe it would be something I could come back to try out after riding a true 29er for a bit.

  98. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by burkawitz206 View Post
    That looks like a pretty beefy spacer setup. I was thinking to have someone 3D print me a spacer like that for my SuperDeluxe coil would snap onto the shaft similar to how the Fox DPX2 volume spacers work; but maybe that is a bad idea.
    I think if the fox engineers thought they could adjust stroke without a full teardown then I assume they would. Save the poor soul with the 3d printer the work and just get a dhx2, sweet shock anyways.

  99. #99
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    Aside from potentially reaching bottom out more quickly due to the lack of progression in earlier part of the stroke, there isn't really any reason why adding spacers to a coil shock is a bad thing. For a long time, that was pretty much the only way to control stroke of coil shocks.

    The reason Fox did it is because they finally realized people were doing that, and with a wide range of stroke options on 230mm shocks, they wanted to make it easier for OEMs.

    Push even has different sized bumpers for different strokes.

    Maybe you could change the depth of the IFP to assist at bottom out or something, but I wouldn't be too worried about it.

    I absolutely despise this idea that we should constantly go get new parts because of incremental changes that really make very little difference. Consumerism at its worst.

    On an air shock, yea, different story, kinda. Although people get by ok. I pulled the stroke spacer out of my 210x50 shock to get 130mm out of my Pistol. Haven't died yet, and I was doing some nice sized drops 3'-4' in my neighborhood.

    This is part of the reason I advocate for the longer travel bike, so long as you can shorten the stroke of the shock. It's easier to make a longer travel bike shorter travel with small changes than it is to make a shorter travel bike have the tire clearances necessary to get much more travel.
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  100. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by burkawitz206 View Post
    Hey Ben,

    Thanks for the detailed feedback, I was hoping you might wander by this thread as you seem to be the resident mad scientist when it comes to taking full advantage of the GG modular platform

    I live in and ride mostly around Western Washington, I have included a couple of sample links (not my videos) of the trail types I favor which are definitely not the lift-served buffed out and smooth jump line kind.

    Regarding the Smash, I had already asked GG about over-shocking it with a 62.5 stroke shock and they said it *should* be ok with a 2.4" tire which is what I run. That would be good for about 150mm travel and I would definitely want to run a 160mm fork on it. I think between the Smash and Gnarvana I guess my main decision point is the chainstay length, if I am prioritizing stability and traction I don't want to get the Smash only to immediately want the Gnarvana stays.

    These are all about 15 min drive from my house, I am spoiled


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ba0US90Tdpk

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xme_qkZKEF4

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ze01li-4C9E
    Hey, I'm just a bit farther away at 30 min., but that's my kind of riding right there. I love our steep tech.
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

  101. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by burkawitz206 View Post

    I run my MT at 170F/150R (trail mode) all the time now and I really only upped the fork to 170 to get a bit more BB clearance. Though I use it all up at times, it is more than fine and I really don't see needing more travel. Something in me just wants to experiment with the longer stays of the Gnarvana; I was even thinking of a Gnarvana with a 160mm fork and possibly down-stroking the shock to 62.5 might make it slightly more tame; 160F/150R Gnarvana maybe?
    I also run 170 mm on the front of my MT. Although I will often switch to gravity mode if it's a steep and rooty trail because then it's less progressive and sticks to the roots better. It's so quick to do with a multi-tool, I figure why not? I don't enjoy climbing in gravity mode though.
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

  102. #102
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    I can wait to see the tear down of that shock and how the spacers fit in.

    Erik

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