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  1. #1
    Chris Bling
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    Canfield Riot vs GG Trail Pistol

    Hey everyone,

    I have had quite a few folks express interest in a Riot vs. Trail Pistol comparison. I am going to try and be as neutral on the subject as I can and just present the facts and my experiences with both bikes. In short, they are both killer bikes with key differences that will benefit certain riders differently.

    I hope you can find this helpful. Please ask any questions you might have and I will do my best to answer them.

    To start things off, I want to throw up some key measurements of both frames. I have the large Riot and the medium Trail Pistol (TP), so that is the geo numbers that I am going to use. Also worth noting is that they are both with a 140mm Fox 36

    ------ Riot-- TP
    HTA-- 66.5-- 66.2
    STA-- 77 -- 75.8
    TT-- 23.6-- 24.3
    Reach -- 18 -- 18.3
    Stack-- 24.8-- 25
    CS-- 16.2-- 16.9
    WB -- 46.2-- 47.5
    BB -- 13.7 -- 13.4

    With the numbers out of the way, the other key differences is that the Riot has 140mm rear travel while the TP has 120. Also worth noting is that the Roit uses a Virtual Pivot style linkage while the TP uses a Horst link.

    One last detail to get out of the way is my setups for each bike.

    Both bikes had 785mm bars and 35mm stems.

    Both used a combo of X01, X1 and GX drivetrain.

    Both used Sram X1 175mm cranks.

    The Riot has Shimano Zee brakes while the TP has Hope Tech 3 E4.

    Both use the same Sram Reverb dropper post, and both use the Ergon SME 3 small saddles.

    For forks, both have a Fox 36 with Avalanche cartridge.

    For rear shock, the Riot has an Avalanche Chubie coil while the TP has the Super Deluxe shock.

    For wheels, the Riot has Onyx hubs laced to NOBL TR36 carbon rims. The TP had Hope Pro 4 hubs laced to Easton ARC30 rims.

    Tires on the Riot were DHF 2.3 front and WTB 2.25 Trailboss with enduro casing. The TP had a Magic Mary 2.35 up front and Rock razor 2.35 in the rear.

    I guess what I am trying to do with giving you all the specs is to help you realize that I tried to build both of these bikes very similar. I know there are some main differences, but I don't think that has much to do with the overall ride and feel of the bike.

    THE RIOT

    Here are a couple phone pics. Once I get some better pics, I will update the thread

    Canfield Riot vs GG Trail Pistol-hubsessed-cycle-works-canfield-riot-side.jpg

    Canfield Riot vs GG Trail Pistol-hubsessed-cycle-works-canfield-riot.jpg

    First up, lets talk about the Riot since I have had it for over a year and have become very familiar with how it handles the trail. The Riot is a bike that loves steep, technical and gnarly trails. It also is happy to climb 5000 feet in order to get to that steep, technical and gnarly trail. Yes, my current build on the Riot is heavy. I have not weighed the bike, but suspect that its in the low 30 pound range. The coil shock alone is 2 pounds which doesn't' help matters. Regardless, it feels much lighter when you are pointed uphill, but you probably wont be setting any KOM's.

    One the DH, the bike is a hoot. With the nice short rear end, it manuals easily and really does a good job and handling any technical parts of the trail. Its very playful and rewards people who like to do more than just go fast in a straight line. It will do that too, but really comes into its own when its in the chunk.

    For the key pro's for the bike, we'll start with the short chainstays. It makes the bike very playful and easy to throw around on the trail. I am stoked that they left it 142x12 instead of going to boost (although I hear the new carbon Riots will be boost). The steep 77 degree seat tube angle really helps keep the front tire planted on steep climbs around switchback or up technical punches. The head tube angle is slack enough, but not too slack where it causes the bike to wander on the climbs. The wheelbase is long enough to be stable at speed, but not too long where it makes the tight switchbacks overly hard. Lastly, the bike pedals extremely well. When I look down at the shock when I am riding, its barely moving. Granted, that is a testament to Craig over at Avalanche, but also a testiment to Canfield and nailing the pedaling characteristics of the bike.

    As far as cons about the bike, there are a few. First off, the rear end is not as stiff as I would prefer. Sometimes you can feel the rear end kick out when you hit something off camber. Its not something that has ever caused me to go down, but I wish it was a little stiffer. If they used a link similar to their Balance, it would probably fix the problem. Its porky at 7.25 pounds without the shock. Its built like a tank, which gives me nice piece of mind! Regardless, it's not a carbon whippet. The seat tube is way too long! Granted, I sized up frame size due to my monkey arms, but still, I can only run a 125mm dropper on it. I would love to see a 17 or even 18 inch seat tube so I could use a 150. It has a fairly short top tube for its size, but this is primarily due to the 77 degree seat tube. For me, I felt cramped on a medium, but feel perfect once I sized up to the Large. Granted, I am 5'8" with a 6'4" wingspan, so I appreciate the extra room. When I was on the medium, it was a little squirly when the going got fast, but now with the Large, I feel very comfortable at the higher speeds.

    As far as an overview, the Riot really is going to be for someone who likes technical, rocky trails that is not afraid dropping into the unknown. Its a heavy bike, so its not going to be for someone looking to set KOM's on the climbs. If you have the legs to push the bike, it will pretty much go anywhere you want it to go. You have to keep in mind that it still only has 140mm of travel and you can get yourself in a bit of a pickle if you overextend yourself.

    Trail Pistol

    Here are a few shots of the build

    Canfield Riot vs GG Trail Pistol-hubsessed-cycle-works-guerrilla-gravity-trail-pistol-front.jpg

    Canfield Riot vs GG Trail Pistol-hubsessed-cycle-works-guerrilla-gravity-trail-pistol-head-badge.jpg

    Canfield Riot vs GG Trail Pistol-hubsessed-cycle-works-guerrilla-gravity-trail-pistol.jpg

    Canfield Riot vs GG Trail Pistol-hubsessed-cycle-works-guerrilla-gravity-trail-pistol-linkage.jpg

    Canfield Riot vs GG Trail Pistol-hubsessed-cycle-works-guerrilla-gravity-trail-pistol-super-deluxe.jpg

    While I understand that my time on the TP has not been as extensive as the Riot, it doesn't take too long to figure out a bikes personality and what it likes, and what it doesn't like. In short, the TP loves to go fast!! i was able to hit higher speeds on the same sections of smooth, wide open trails compared to the Riot. It was scary how stable the bike was, and with a wheelbase of 47.5 inches it makes sense. I set a bunch of new climbing PRs on some of my favorite climbs. Between the light frame and great pedaling characteristics, this thing moves uphill in a hurry.

    The frame is listed at 6.5 pounds which is a full 4 pounds lighter than the coiled Riot. This was much appreciated on the climbs! The build quality of the frame is amazing. I love the industrial look and how beefy everything looks. They did a great job and the bike looks killer.

    For the key pros of the bike, we are going to start with the bike is made right here in the great USA!! I called several times when my frame was being made and they just walked back to the workroom to see where it was in its progress. Thats awesomein my book. For being an alloy bike, its a very respectable weight and its instantly noticeable when you pick it up next to the Riot. Like I said, I set a number of new PRs on the climbs. Next is the stability at speed. With the generous 47.5 inch chain stay, this thing eggs out on to go faster and not touch the brakes. I really appreciate steeper seat tube angles, and the TP has one of the steeper STA's in the industry. No, its not the 77 degree like the Riot, but it still puts you in a very comfortable position for climbing and keeps the front end down and from wandering . One cool thing that GG did was offset the frame to give the bike a better chainline and to give your wheels more dish. Right now, I have nearly the same spoke tension on the drive-side of the wheel as I do the non-drive! I couldn't believe how stiff the wheels built up. It has almost zero dish like a Single Speed wheel would have. Lastly, the rear end of the bike is extremely stiff. Its quite burly, and I realize that some of this has to do with it being a boost rear end. The other part is just how they built the frame. Great job guys.

    As far as the con's, there are a few. In my opinion, the biggest con is that the bike really didn't like it when the going got chunky. No matter what I did, the bike seemed to slow down through the chunk and feel out of its element. Even with running 30% sag and using all of the travel, the bike felt uneasy and the suspension felt on the harsh side. As far as pedaling went, as long as the bike was in Trail mode, it scooted right up the trail with little to no bobbing. I climbed with it in the Open mode for some time, but kept finding myself wanting to reach down and flip the switch. Lastly, its very hard to get the front end off the ground. You really have to work on it to perform any type of manual. Whether off of jumps, rollers, off trail obstacles, that front tire liked to stay where it was....on the ground.

    As far as an overview, this bike is made for someone who likes climbing as much as they like going downhill, as long as that downhill isn't filled with chunk and gnar. It excels in less demanding terrain and will push you to not touch the brakes. This bike will reward that person who is less concerned about popping off of rocks and roots, and more concerned about speed and getting to the bottom faster than the next guy.


    Final Thoughts

    Overall, you have to realize that the Riot and TP are vastly different bikes, despite their relatively similar geometry. Each bike is going to excel in different types of trails.

    Which bike should you buy? That is going to depend on what is more important to you. If you are someone who loves technical, loose and chunky trails, the Riot is going to be a better bet. If you like trails with less tech features and the option to go mach 3, the TP is going to be better.

    Like I said before, I am trying to approach these 2 bikes with just the facts and give you guys/gals some of my personal experience. If you have any questions, please just comment below.

    For what its worth, I have had time on the Process 111 and the Evil Following too if anyone needs to know how they compare to the Riot and TP.

    Pics to come.
    Last edited by dustyduke22; 10-03-2016 at 11:47 AM.
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  2. #2
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    Great write up Dusty. The Trail Pistol is on my watch list but I was wondering how it would handle chunk with the 120mm rear end compared to my Riot. My old Evil Following used to slow down in the chuck and the Riot was the answer to that. Plus I found the Riot climbs more comfortably than the Evil. I guess my excitement over the Trail Pistol was it's lower weight and having that drink bottle in the front triangle, something I sorely miss on the Riot.

    I would love to take one for a spin but it looks like the Riots saying a keeper for the time being, it loves chunk way too much!

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  4. #4
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    I would certainly be interested in your thoughts on the Trail Pistal VS The Following.

    I've been riding my Following for a season & while I love it there are certainly a few trail characteristics I don't get along with. First, it has the worst brake jack of any bike I've owned. After several months of riding I'm finally adapting to it. Obviously horst will do better here but curious on how the TP brakes, squat etc.

    The other main issue with the Following is rear sus performance. While it is awesome at popping off stuff & soaking up big hits damn well, high speed repetitive hits SUCK. It seems if I set the sus up to not bottom out it skips around on highish speed stuff instead of soaking it up. Combined with brake jack=no bueno. I'm guessing the high psi/short stroke is a factor here & also why it's so poppy. I plan to have the monarch avy'd during the winter in an effort to help here.

    At 6'2" on a large I have the seat slammed all the way forward. While I don't really have any gripes on pedaling position I wouldn't mind a hair steeper ST*. I love the whippet like playfulness of the wheel base and chain stays & have no stability issues flying on this thing. How much playfulness would the Following give up to the TP? How's the TP jump?


    The Following pedals awesome. About the most neutral pedaling bike I've tried. It especially excells at standing pedalling, seated to standing, & getting on the gas out of a corner are awesome. Slow speed climbing on square edge hits not so good. How's the TP compare?

    Trail pistal is on my radar...looking for something similar but just a little bit better.

    Excellent write up...thanks!
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    Thanks Dusty !! Really helpful...

  6. #6
    WillWorkForTrail
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    That's the best bike to bike comparison/review I've read in a long time. It makes it clear which of the two bikes I should buy if I boiled it down to those two (both were on a still relatively long list). Thanks for taking the time, and putting in the effort to put that up for us.

  7. #7
    Chris Bling
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    As far as the TP vs the following, they are also pretty different machines.

    Like you mentioned Whalenard, the Following is an excellent pedaler both sitting and climbing. I only used the climb mode if I was doing long (8 mile 4000+) climbs that were just a grind. However, if there was not a climb switch on the Following, I could totally live with it.

    As far as the DH, the Following felt much closer to the Riot than the TP. It kept up reasonably well through the chunk, but not as good as the Riot. The first DH run I took the Following down, I was very impressed with how well the rear end kept up with the chunk. If felt like there was way more than 120mm out back.

    There are 2 main downside to the following in my min. First is the is the slack STA. It has a decently long TT measurement which feels very roomy, but you are sitting quite a ways back over the BB, especially with the 140mm fork I was running. To help counter this, I scooted my seat quite a bit forward to help the effective STA, but then the cockpit wasn't quite so roomy. Looking back, I should have sized up with the Following and slid my seat as far forward on the rails as I could. That way, I would have had a steeper effective STA, and would still have a roomy cockpit.

    Second is the shock options. For short descents, the Following was able to keep up with the rocks and chunk really well. It seemed over the longer (5-8 mile) descents, the shock couldn't keep up with what has happening on the trail. Possibly due to it heating up and not working as well as it should. The inability to run a piggyback shock on the Following is a bummer.

    Hope this helps.
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    Like Phil I was wondering how the TP would compare to my Riot. Thanks Dusty for the review. You saved me some money!

  9. #9
    Chris Bling
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    I updated the post and threw on some pics.
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    Thanks for the write up Dusty

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    Btw - I'm surprised your Riot would be in the mid 30's. Mine is built up similarly with Nobl wheels and onyx hubs, Avalanche woodie and XTR and weighs 32.5

  12. #12
    Chris Bling
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    Quote Originally Posted by wooly88 View Post
    Btw - I'm surprised your Riot would be in the mid 30's. Mine is built up similarly with Nobl wheels and onyx hubs, Avalanche woodie and XTR and weighs 32.5
    Like I said, I haven't weighed it, just guessing. Since ours are almost the same, I will assume I am in the 32 to 33 pound range.

    Thankfully for the input!

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    I have a Process 111 right now. I'd love to here how it compares to the others.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    I would certainly be interested in your thoughts on the Trail Pistal VS The Following.

    I've been riding my Following for a season & while I love it there are certainly a few trail characteristics I don't get along with. First, it has the worst brake jack of any bike I've owned. After several months of riding I'm finally adapting to it. Obviously horst will do better here but curious on how the TP brakes, squat etc.

    The other main issue with the Following is rear sus performance. While it is awesome at popping off stuff & soaking up big hits damn well, high speed repetitive hits SUCK. It seems if I set the sus up to not bottom out it skips around on highish speed stuff instead of soaking it up. Combined with brake jack=no bueno. I'm guessing the high psi/short stroke is a factor here & also why it's so poppy. I plan to have the monarch avy'd during the winter in an effort to help here.

    At 6'2" on a large I have the seat slammed all the way forward. While I don't really have any gripes on pedaling position I wouldn't mind a hair steeper ST*. I love the whippet like playfulness of the wheel base and chain stays & have no stability issues flying on this thing. How much playfulness would the Following give up to the TP? How's the TP jump?


    The Following pedals awesome. About the most neutral pedaling bike I've tried. It especially excells at standing pedalling, seated to standing, & getting on the gas out of a corner are awesome. Slow speed climbing on square edge hits not so good. How's the TP compare?

    Trail pistal is on my radar...looking for something similar but just a little bit better.

    Excellent write up...thanks!
    I seriously doubt the Following has any brake jack, if anything, it squats.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    I seriously doubt the Following has any brake jack, if anything, it squats.
    I'm not sure how one comes to that conclusion. Many comment on it's exaggerated brake jack. Personally had to completely rework braking into turns. I would prefer some squat for shure.
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  16. #16
    Chris Bling
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    Quote Originally Posted by richulr View Post
    I have a Process 111 right now. I'd love to here how it compares to the others.
    Here is a pic of me on my 111 on one of my favorite trails. 8 miles and nearly 4000 feet of chunky goodness.

    Canfield Riot vs GG Trail Pistol-hubsessed-cycle-works-kona-process-111-ben-lomond.jpg

    The Process 111 was really one of the Pioneers in the aggressive 29er category, and its still a killer bike.

    I still have DH PR's on my 111 that I have not beat on my other bikes. That is a testament to just how good the 111 really is. These trails were a mix of rocks, chunk and straightline speed. With the center of gravity being so low, paired with the short rear end and long reach, the 111 was a game changer for the bike industry.

    There are a few things that seem to be holding the 111 back. The first one is that it only has 111mm of travel! Yes, it used that 111mm extremely well, but it can't really keep up with bikes in the same class, but with 10 to 30 more mm's of travel. I found this especially apparent when hitting the St. George and Moab style trails. The rear end would get overwhelmed fairly fast once the bumps got tightly spaced and consecutive. You can feel the rear end start getting bucked around and you know that you have reached the limit.

    To help with this, I purchased a Cane Creed DBInline that seemed to help considerably. But after blowing 3 in a single month, I threw in the towel and went back to the stock Monarch. CC seems to have sorted out some of their QC issues now, so if I had another 111, that DBInline would be one of the first upgrades I would make. Either that or send my Monarch to Avalanche to have Craig work his magic. I also bumped up the fork to 130mm which seemed to help some, but did not magically make the rear travel grow.

    The 111 climbs reasonably well, not as good as the Following or Riot, but probably right in line with the TP. Using the climb switch really firms things up and it pedals like a champ. The one thing that really stood out to me with the 111 was how well it did in challenging technical climbs. It almost felt like I was cheating with how well it scooted right up the chunk. It was just as good if not better than the Riot and Following.

    In short, the reason I no longer have the 111 is I was able to take it to its limit fairly quick. The trails I love are extremely technical, already pushing a bike to the edge doesn't leave much room for error. Yes, the bike is extremely fast and really does such a good job with the 111mm of travel it has.

    It they came out with a 140mm version of the 111, it would be on my short list.
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    I'm not sure how one comes to that conclusion. Many comment on it's exaggerated brake jack. Personally had to completely rework braking into turns. I would prefer some squat for shure.
    He comes to that conclusion because he's Jayem, suspension guru to the stars. You don't know, you better ask somebody. He doesn't have to actually own or have ridden a bike to tell you how its suspension works.
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    Thanks for the thorough thoughts on the 111.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    I'm not sure how one comes to that conclusion. Many comment on it's exaggerated brake jack. Personally had to completely rework braking into turns. I would prefer some squat for shure.
    Brake jack on The Following is way overstated just as pedal kick back is. Your problem is your that you're braking when you don't need to. Kind of kidding but braking late and using a larger front rotor helps with most bikes.
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    I had a chance to ride the Trail Pistol at Outerbike. Like Dusty I also have a Riot (plus a 111 too). In the short time I rode the Trail Pistol, my thoughts mirror Dusty's. The Trail Pistol was extremely stable and a great climber. I also found it somewhat hard to manual, it wanted to stay planted to the ground which gave added to it's stability. The welds and craftsmanship of the frame are very impressive. Great bike but altogether a totally different ride and feel than the Riot.

    Also, I took my Feedback Sports digital scale and weighed all the bikes I demoed. The trail pistol I demoed was 31.75 pounds with pedals. It was a medium, had a pike fork, 2.3 DHF on the front and a 2.3 Minion SS on the back. Similar build to my riot. My Riot has carbon wheels but I'm running a 2.5 DHF on the front and a 2.3 DHR II on the back. My Riot weighs 31.17 pounds with pedals, so just a little over half a pound lighter than the Trail Pistol.

    Strange how all the bikes I thought would be significantly lighter than the Riot really were only about a pound lighter at most...the Yeti 5.5 was only 1 pound lighter with similar build.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blatant View Post
    He comes to that conclusion because he's Jayem, suspension guru to the stars. You don't know, you better ask somebody. He doesn't have to actually own or have ridden a bike to tell you how its suspension works.
    Unless it's an old Horst link or lawill, it's almost impossible with a simple single pivot like the following. Running through the linkage program shows high brake squat.

    You may be getting a lot of weight transfer, maybe due to poor LSC on the fork, but it's not "brake jack". The tangent of the braking force would have to extend the suspension for that to happen, and it's not possible on that bike/suspension.

    Linkage Design: Evil Bikes

    On a Horst link (not all, mostly early bad examples), the braking force with the the caliper mounted on the seat stay attempts to collapse or push down on the stay, via a walking beam link, pushing down on this end pulls the shock apart, resulting in jack. Another great example was the rim brake version of the GT LTS design, same basic idea, braking tries to extend the shock. In contrast to this, Being mounted on a beam that is from the rear axle to a pivot on the mainframe, the brake will rotate the suspension and compress the shock, to varying degrees depending on leverage and whether a complex linkage arrangement (which the following doesn't have) exists on the design to defeat it.

    The riot has less brake squat (79%) than the following (95%).

    Edit: I see Blatent has just bought a new 2017 E29 and is defending his most recent purchase. Makes sense now.
    Last edited by Jayem; 10-03-2016 at 10:22 PM.
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    OP, what region do you ride? In my price rage the riot and suggler are options. The TP is a bit too long for the trails I ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cerberus75 View Post
    OP, what region do you ride? In my price rage the riot and suggler are options. The TP is a bit too long for the trails I ride.
    I live in Northern Utah but frequent southern Utah. Lots of technical, challenging trails.

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    Nice job on the comparison write up. I have not ridden either of these, but know which one would suit me better based on the information presented.
    Last edited by bubba13; 10-03-2016 at 07:08 PM.
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    Nice write up Dusty, thanks for taking the time

    Personally I would find it a bit more apples to apples if both bikes had same wheels/tyres and shocks. Maybe the TP did not do as well in the chunk because it did not have an Avalanche tuned shock, would love to hear your thoughts with one installed.
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  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    Nice write up Dusty, thanks for taking the time

    Personally I would find it a bit more apples to apples if both bikes had same wheels/tyres and shocks. Maybe the TP did not do as well in the chunk because it did not have an Avalanche tuned shock, would love to hear your thoughts with one installed.
    I agree. A custom tunes shock could help for sure. Even if they went with a different base tune, that Super Deluxe would do wonders.

    To add to that, both the 111 and Following are very plush in yhe chunk. Perhaps it had to do with the TP base tube.

    Even with the same shock and wheels, the bikes would still be vastly different.



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    Excellent comparison, thanks Dusty. Gives a real good idea about each bike, and what would be best for what rider depending on intentions. Sounds like it's ideal to have both in the quiver.

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    Chris Bling
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    Quote Originally Posted by Erock503 View Post
    Excellent comparison, thanks Dusty. Gives a real good idea about each bike, and what would be best for what rider depending on intentions. Sounds like it's ideal to have both in the quiver.
    In a perfect world with endless $$, yes
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    Quote Originally Posted by dustyduke22 View Post
    In a perfect world with endless $$, yes
    But in a real life, which one will be your choise?

    p.s. Thanks for the perfect review

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    Not speaking for Dusty but he did end up deciding to keep the Riot and sell the TP.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vadim0791 View Post
    But in a real life, which one will be your choise?

    p.s. Thanks for the perfect review
    For me, the Riot is a better match for my riding style and location. If I didn't have mountains filled with rocks and chunk, the TP would have been a better choice.



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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by dustyduke22 View Post
    For me, the Riot is a better match for my riding style and location. If I didn't have mountains filled with rocks and chunk, the TP would have been a better choice.



    Sent from my SPH-L720T using Tapatalk
    So which bike would pick for more flowy pump like single track without a ton of elevation?

    Which would you pick for twisty rooty singletrack without much elevation change?

    Which would you pick to just put the miles in on all terrains?
    The most freeride like fat bike I could make with available parts...

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    Of course a different animal in itself, but no comments here on the TP with 27.5+ setup. I ride on the front range of Colorado. (GG territory). We have everything here; from chunk to flowy, but all goes up in a hurry. I've been running my TP with 27.5+ (3.0's) It's a great riding bike that does everything well. I wouldn't choose to shuttle it or race Enduro on it, but it's exactly what it's built for: all day single-track shredding! Don't discount the Trail Pistol, its that one bike that can do it all well and put a huge smile on your face. Look at your local riding spots and take that into consideration first and foremost. Cheers!

  34. #34
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    You are right, nothing was mentioned about the B+ setup for either bike. That was on purpose.

    With the B+ setup on the Riot, the bike is quite a different machine.

    The bigger rubber allows you to push the limits a little bit more and take it that much faster. Overall, the Riot is a ton of fun to ride with either wheel size. 2 bikes in one.

    If there could only be one reason of why I kept the Riot over the TP, it would be it's playful disposition on the trail. With its super short rear end, it makes every dip in the trail an opportunity to manual and have a little fun.

    No wheel size or shock tune is going to change that for the TP. It's a stable descender that isn't very lively or playful compared to the Riot. Not a bad thing, just a different personality.

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    Thanks for the reviews/comparisons, especially about the suspension systems and Boost aspect from a wheel builder. I personally was looking for 142 spacing of the Following or Riot just to be able to recycle my extra wheel sets. Now I'm thinking of Boost.
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    Joining thread

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    Dustyduke did you get a chance to ride the TP with plus sized mounted? I haven't ridden the TP as a 29 yet so not sure how that rides, been happy with the big tires so far.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hardmtnbiker View Post
    Thanks for the reviews/comparisons, especially about the suspension systems and Boost aspect from a wheel builder. I personally was looking for 142 spacing of the Following or Riot just to be able to recycle my extra wheel sets. Now I'm thinking of Boost.


    There are Boost conversion kits for some hubs.
    Safe riding,

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  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by PattD View Post
    Dustyduke did you get a chance to ride the TP with plus sized mounted? I haven't ridden the TP as a 29 yet so not sure how that rides, been happy with the big tires so far.
    I didn't. Just as a 29er.

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  40. #40
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    The Santa Cruz Hightower was the first long travel 29er that I rode that didn't make me immediately hate that it was a long travel 29er.

    The Canfield Riot was the first long travel 29er that I rode that made me seriously consider buying a long travel 29er.

    Unfortunately, my body proportions are completely wrong for the Riot and it simply doesn't fit me.
    I like 'em long, low, slack and playful

  41. #41
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    Is the Riot good for 5'6" guy. I'm looking to buy but I won't get to demo. I'm ok with long reach and usually buy a small frame for most brands. My Trek Remedy is a medium but it's 26er.
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  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by hardmtnbiker View Post
    Is the Riot good for 5'6" guy. I'm looking to buy but I won't get to demo. I'm ok with long reach and usually buy a small frame for most brands. My Trek Remedy is a medium but it's 26er.
    I am 5'8" on a Large. If you like a longer reach the medium would do you well.

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    They do have a short reach but also the shortest wheelbase and chain stay so it adds up.
    Did you get it with the CK DB or the custom PUSH shock?
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  44. #44
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    "Lastly, its very hard to get the front end off the ground. You really have to work on it to perform any type of manual."

    Dusty, why do you figure the front end was hard to lift? 17" CS is pretty typical for this class of bike, and the reach is only 0.3" longer than the Riot per your first post. I can see it being harder to manual than the Riot, but compared to other bikes, I would expect it to be on par. Would you agree?

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by hardmtnbiker View Post
    They do have a short reach but also the shortest wheelbase and chain stay so it adds up.
    Did you get it with the CK DB or the custom PUSH shock?
    18" reach for a large is now considered short?

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nevada 29er View Post
    "Lastly, its very hard to get the front end off the ground. You really have to work on it to perform any type of manual."

    Dusty, why do you figure the front end was hard to lift? 17" CS is pretty typical for this class of bike, and the reach is only 0.3" longer than the Riot per your first post. I can see it being harder to manual than the Riot, but compared to other bikes, I would expect it to be on par. Would you agree?
    I would fully have expected it to manual fairly easy like you said. Perhaps partly the suspension, coupled with the longer reach and chainstays. I just know it was a beast to get up

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    I think the ability to manual the TP might be more rider specific. I just got a TP and have had no trouble getting the front end up, either on climbs to get over obstacles or on descents to manual a small whoop section or stream. I fully expected it to feel glued down after coming from a Kona process (very short CS) but that hasn't been my experience.

  48. #48
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    I'm gonna go out on a limb and say a medium TP for a guy 5'8 was a bit to big- which would result in a heavy front end. I'm 6ft on a med. TP and it fits perfect. Never had an issue.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by mdc View Post
    I'm gonna go out on a limb and say a medium TP for a guy 5'8 was a bit to big- which would result in a heavy front end. I'm 6ft on a med. TP and it fits perfect. Never had an issue.
    I would agree with you for most guys that are 5'8". Most don't have a 6'4" wingspan and ride a large in most sizes.

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    I'd just get a new hub. I'm not a fan of conversion kits.
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  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fluidworks View Post
    I think the ability to manual the TP might be more rider specific. I just got a TP and have had no trouble getting the front end up, either on climbs to get over obstacles or on descents to manual a small whoop section or stream. I fully expected it to feel glued down after coming from a Kona process (very short CS) but that hasn't been my experience.
    How would you compare it to the Process (111?) for manualability (I just created a new word)? That is another bike I'm considering.

  52. #52
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    Hey guys
    I know this thread is a bit dated but I was wondering if someone could chime in and help me decide.
    I'm looking at a TP or MegaTrail. I ride mainly front range CO. I'm planning to hit up Utah.
    I would love something that I could take to the bike parks and shuttle as well. I know it's a crazy comparison but I really want something that can handle well.
    TP 29er or MT???

    Thanks

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nevada 29er View Post
    How would you compare it to the Process (111?) for manualability (I just created a new word)? That is another bike I'm considering.
    I would take a 111 to be honest if you are looking for easier manualability. Super easy to manual and get the front end up. It's a very capable bike, especially if you spent a little to get the shock modified by Craig at Avalanche.

    I am sure a custom shock tube would do wonders on the TP as well

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  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by 6280 View Post
    Hey guys
    I know this thread is a bit dated but I was wondering if someone could chime in and help me decide.
    I'm looking at a TP or MegaTrail. I ride mainly front range CO. I'm planning to hit up Utah.
    I would love something that I could take to the bike parks and shuttle as well. I know it's a crazy comparison but I really want something that can handle well.
    TP 29er or MT???

    Thanks
    You could take the TP in the park, because I've taken mine, but there's no question the megatrail would be more fun for that level of terrain

  55. #55
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    Thank you

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by 6280 View Post
    Hey guys
    I know this thread is a bit dated but I was wondering if someone could chime in and help me decide.
    I'm looking at a TP or MegaTrail. I ride mainly front range CO. I'm planning to hit up Utah.
    I would love something that I could take to the bike parks and shuttle as well. I know it's a crazy comparison but I really want something that can handle well.
    TP 29er or MT???

    Thanks
    Why not take a weekend trip and go see GG? Aren't they based in CO in the Denver area?

  57. #57
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    I have both. I have never had an opportunity to take the Pistol to the bike park, and I'm sure it would be fine for most park laps, but I agree you'd have more fun on the MT. If I had to choose, I'd go V2 Megatrail. Mine ( V1) is 31# on the nose with Maxxis rubber and a dropper. The Trail mode v Gravity mode has to be demoed to believe. It really does turn a trail bike into a DH bike. It climbs great. Either way a great problem to have.

  58. #58
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    I am currently looking for a mid travel 29er as my everyday rig. I have a freerider (propain spindrift) for shuttling duties. So the new bike will be mostly used up- and downhill.
    The trail pistol and riot were both on my shortlist so it was nice to read this comparison. However, the banshee prime I find most alluring. Can anyone draw a comparison from the prime to the trail pistol or the riot?

  59. #59
    Chris Bling
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raptor-30 View Post
    I am currently looking for a mid travel 29er as my everyday rig. I have a freerider (propain spindrift) for shuttling duties. So the new bike will be mostly used up- and downhill.
    The trail pistol and riot were both on my shortlist so it was nice to read this comparison. However, the banshee prime I find most alluring. Can anyone draw a comparison from the prime to the trail pistol or the riot?
    I know ColinM had a prime and a Riot

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  60. #60
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    I owned a Prime and a Riot. And I've owned a Megatrail but not a TP.

    Depends on your environment. I liked the Canfield, fun bike, snappy, handled well. Easily overwhelmed in big chunk (Phoenix). Prime was an excellent bike, better climber than you'd think. Great suspension performance. Not as "fun" as the Canfield, but faster overall for me.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  61. #61
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    Which bike does climb better, the riot or the prime? And is there any significant weight difference between the two?

  62. #62
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    Excellent climbing performance on each given the weight. Neither is light. I'd call it a push.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

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