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  1. #1
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    Making sense of the Ď19 GT Sensor 29

    The new Sensor has good value, good initial reviews and seems to fit in perfectly next to other exciting new short travel 29ers like the SBG Transition Smuggler. Except for one important geo figure: bb height. Even in the low geo setting the Sensor bb is about 17mm higher than the Smuggler. This might be a welcome change for some with really rocky climbs or tall people who need to run 175mm cranks. Itís also a golden opportunity for those who like to experiment with wheel sizes, specifically mixed wheels sizes: 29 front 27.5 rear. I have played around with the reverse mullet a bit and really really liked it. You get the incredible 29er stability and traction you need through the bars and front end, but the snappy, playful rear 27.5ers are know for.

    I started this thread hoping to get some input from knowledgeable ppl on this idea and maybe to inspire some others to try it. Correct me if Iím wrong: the overall wheel diameter difference between 29 and 27.5 is 38mm when running the same tires. If you run a 27.5+ that number goes down a bit. So youíre looking at a 19mm drop in the rear axle height, which will net about 10mm drop in bb height and -1 degree slackening of the hta and sta. The seat can be slid forward to help counteract the slacker sta, making the tt length a bit shorter.

    Reverse mullet GT Sensor geo changes:
    64.5 hta
    75 sta
    346 bb height

    Sounds like a pretty incredible trail bike to me. Iím in the market for a bike like this and just might pull the trigger when frame sets become available next month.

  2. #2
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    This sounds awesome, I currently have a '16 carbon sensor that i'm wanting to swap frames out of. I'm 6'0 tall running 175mm crankarms and hit everything I pedal over. I have some really awesome gravity based trails(which is the riding I prefer) around here but you have to pedal to the top, and sometimes pretty steep, to get there.

    I really love this idea you have. I really would like an AM/enduro type bike because I want a capable descender that I can reasonably pedal to the top of the trail. I think that is what a lot people want, and the 2019 market is reflecting that. Everyone is trying to make the "One bike". Problem with GT though is they're 2-3 years behind the big names, nothing innovative coming out of GT unfortunately, ya know stuff like switchable geo, remote lockouts etc..and the lower price tag for top tier bike reflects that. They probably have ZERO money in R&D because they are now owned by a conglomerate that buys a company for its valuable name and GUTS it for money, they invest minimum dollars to get out every penny they can. That means NO money goes to R&D.

    sorry for that lol. None the less, I like new sensor and am interested in a frame set for the right price.

  3. #3
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    But now, after reviewing the new bikes, why not just get a Force? The framesets cant be that much different in price. If that is in fact a deciding factor..

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Asend2Desend View Post
    But now, after reviewing the new bikes, why not just get a Force? The framesets cant be that much different in price. If that is in fact a deciding factor..
    The force has a lot more travel and smaller wheels than the sensor. I already have a wreckoning for my big bike. I hear bikes like the sensor or transition smuggler, that is short travel 29er with aggressive modern geo, pedal much better and are more poppy/playful on your average trail when compared to longer travel enduro bikes. This makes them more fun than a big bike on most trails. I also hear theyíre more fun than normal (shorter wb/reach) bikes in the trail/xc category because theyíre more stable, easier to ride fast and are more capable in steeper rougher conditions. The last thing I heard was Giant will be releasing a new bike in August that falls into this category. So Iím going to wait to check it out before I decide. But Iím sold on one of these types of bikes for my next one.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by PurpleMtnSlayer View Post
    The last thing I heard was Giant will be releasing a new bike in August that falls into this category. So Iím going to wait to check it out before I decide. But Iím sold on one of these types of bikes for my next one.
    The new Trance 29er is a bike I've been waiting on for a couple of years. Unfortunately, it seems it's not actually the bike I was waiting for. The rear will have 115mm of travel, while my current FS bike (an older Anthem 29er) has 100mm of travel - in other words, the new Trance 29 has 5mm less travel than the Trance 29 that was on the market when I bought my Anthem. I will say the geometry numbers look pretty good though. Still not sure about the rear end of the bike. It will merit riding at least, but I suspect I'm going to end up elsewhere, maybe the Sensor, maybe a Hightower, maybe a Smuggler. Too bad, because I really like doing business with my local Giant dealer (who is actually my local GT dealer as well) but I'm not interested in compromising on a bike.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cotharyus View Post
    The new Trance 29er is a bike I've been waiting on for a couple of years. Unfortunately, it seems it's not actually the bike I was waiting for. The rear will have 115mm of travel.
    Can you drop a link with the new trance 29 specs? I canít find any solid info on it.

    Have you looked at the stump jumper evo? Iím
    Not sure exactly what youíre looking for. I think itís going to be more of a plow and farther from the XC spectrum than the sensor or smug. But itís still a shorter travel 29er with progressive geo. And itís a great value build.

    Maybe Giant will offer a ďbc,Ē ďltĒ or ďevoĒ version of the trance?

  7. #7
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    There is some information on the Trance 29 in the Giant forum, but it's still under embargo, so there isn't anything official I can link you to otherwise:

    http://forums.mtbr.com/giant/giant-b...1073341-2.html

    Just take my word that I got my information from someone who has ridden the bike.

    I don't want to sound like "one of those people" but I've never ridden a Specialized bike that I really liked. At this point, unless they happen to be having a demo somewhere I already happen to be, it's not even worth my while to go out of my way to ride one. I do have a friend with a new stumpy who really likes it. But he's more than a little weird. I mean. He's a friend of mine.

    I wouldn't look for Giant to suddenly offer a version of a bike with more rear travel than the standard version. Traditionally, they'll do an SX of something with another 10-20mm of fork travel, but that's about it. The best I can offer is this:

    The same person who rode the Trance told me if I didn't like that, wait til after Jan 1 2019, that something else was in the pipeline.

  8. #8
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    I wasnít aware of that thread. Definitely doesnít sound like the trance 29 is in the same category as the sensor.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by PurpleMtnSlayer View Post
    Definitely doesnít sound like the trance 29 is in the same category as the sensor.
    Exactly. Interestingly enough, my wife is on a ...2015? Sensor 27.5. I've long said if they'd made that bike in a 29 I'd have one. Net result, at this point I'm much more interested in the new Sensor than I am the Trance. I have to admit though, I've ridden some terrible Horst link bikes, but I've ridden some great ones too. We'll have to see what category the Sensor falls into.

  10. #10
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    It isn't often you see two different bike models that have exactly the same head tube length, seat tube length and chainstay lengths. The huge difference being fork offsets, travel and shock stroke. I'd venture a guess, without going too deep into it, that the force and sensor are the same front triangle and maybe rear? just the axle to crown and wheel size that are causing that bb height to be high for the 29'er trail category.

    55mm stroke shock and some checking, you might have a 150mm 29'er.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by pajak View Post
    It isn't often you see two different bike models that have exactly the same head tube length, seat tube length and chainstay lengths. The huge difference being fork offsets, travel and shock stroke. I'd venture a guess, without going too deep into it, that the force and sensor are the same front triangle and maybe rear? just the axle to crown and wheel size that are causing that bb height to be high for the 29'er trail category.

    55mm stroke shock and some checking, you might have a 150mm 29'er.
    Interesting theory. It might pay to keep an eye on that.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cotharyus View Post
    Interesting theory. It might pay to keep an eye on that.
    I am looking at this today and tend to agree there may be something to this theory. Whether you want to toy with overstroking the Sensor, or, more simply, just after some different colors, this would be rad for sure.

    Would be curious what GT thought of this (esp not overstroking, but just going after a different colorway) in regards to warranty.

  13. #13
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    https://www.vojomag.com/presentation...-presentation/

    This article mentions they might be the same. It also has some great photos of both.

  14. #14
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    Response from Fanatik:
    "It is very similar geo numbers, but they are in fact different bike frames and rear triangles."

  15. #15
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    Making sense of the Ď19 GT Sensor 29

    I agree that at least the seat stays are different based on the tire clearance in photos. Ie no way a 29er is fitting in the force rear.



    But Iím still not convinced the front triangles are different. When you look at the geo tables everything matches up with what you would expect by swapping wheel sizes and up forking. I really really like Fanatik and the people working there. But these numbers were pulled off their site and theyíre obviously wrong: they show the head tube growing or shrinking with the flip chip...



    If they are indeed different and someone had both bikes in person they could probably definitively answer. Which looks like wonít be possible for another month as Fanatik recently pushed the eta back to 9/15 from 8/15.
    Last edited by PurpleMtnSlayer; 08-16-2018 at 10:00 PM.

  16. #16
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    I like the look of that black Sensor Carbon Elite - and I swore I never liked 29'ers....
    Less isn't MOAR

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sideknob View Post
    I like the look of that black Sensor Carbon Elite - and I swore I never liked 29'ers....
    I agree. $2999 for a complete carbon bike with a dropper and 1x12 drive train is pretty awesome. But that Sektor fork is not great.

  18. #18
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    My LBS is getting one in, will be interested to have a look.
    Less isn't MOAR

  19. #19
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    I put my order in for the expert build. Eta is 9/22. I hope this bike pedals at lot better than my wreckoning. Excited to throw a 27.5 wheel on the back for some experimentation.

  20. #20
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    Will probably be my next bike....the Sensor that is. The Zaskar is great but ready for more travel, front and rear, slacker geo and a bit longer base. Also experimented with 27.5 rear, almost had the room, but the 2.8 NN rubbed and just slowed the bike down. Settled with an Ikon 2.35 and it raised the bike up and added a ton of speed and handling to the bike. Could be different on the new Sensor with boost and all. Be tempted to try out a 29 x 2.6 before going mid sized though....just my .02.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails -img_0622.jpg  

    -img_0303.jpg  

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  21. #21
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    Anyone seen one in the flesh yet? Any about? My LBS is getting one in but I'm in Australia so will be behind the US.
    Less isn't MOAR

  22. #22
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    I'm waiting on a local shop to get one in, but they are currently on BO with no clear date on when one is showing up. The sensor caught my eye as a great budget FS bike that could grow with a rider. Getting the base model and upgrading parts as you outgrow/break them would make getting into the sport a lot easier for most folks.

    Also, GT was my first bike. So i have a soft spot for them.

  23. #23
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    Been checking the gram, only posts so far have been from journalists or GT employees. My red wine is supposed to get here 9/29. My first real trail bike was a GT also, a 2011 Distortion, such a fun bike!

  24. #24
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    LBS has a Sensor Elite in. Had a quick look today.

    Looks real good in the flesh. Plenty of room out back around the 2.35 NN tyre. 2.6 clearance I would guess. Semi matte black and the decals are more or less aqua blue. The Groove Tube is neat.

    Certainly not a light bike, felt typical trail bike weight, I'd guess around 30lbs for the large just by hefting it.

    This is the only one they have and it's for sale not demo or I'd have taken it out briefly, even tho it's too big.

    A very neat, no bullshit looking bike.
    Less isn't MOAR

  25. #25
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    Did it come in? Any first impressions or pixs?

  26. #26
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    Making sense of the Ď19 GT Sensor 29

    Yea I got it. Havenít been able to put enough time in to dial the suspension and get a true emic perspective. First off this is a burly trail bike, definitely not a light mellow trail ripper. Holy hell the frame is stiff. Pushing hard with my hands against a carbon wheel I could barely get the seat tube to flex. Itís like 5x stiffer than my Wreckoning. The ride is fun and confident. Despite having 5% more sag than recommended in the front and rear it felt firm and rode high. Iíll have to ride something chunkier to see if itís harsh, but it felt good on the flow trail behind my house. I felt confident to hit a few good sized doubles on the first ride. I think the handle bar to pedal height aka stack is a bit short. I had a semi odd semi perched feeling when pedaling on the first ride. It comes with 175 mm cranks, which were not as comfortable for me as the 170s Iíve been running. Even though the seated climbing position felt a bit odd I think the geo is really good for this type of bike. In the low setting with the saddle slammed forward the STA felt just about perfect. The seat tube is superlong, my 32Ē inseam just barley fits with the 150 lev slammed on the large size.

    It was basically fully assembled out of the box, but the lines and cables were not trimmed at all and look laughably long. The derailleur was not adjusted, the clutch seems super weak, oddly the cage bolt was half way out and thereís still a lot of play I havenít been able to sort out. Thereís a rubber protector on the down tube and a few small pieces of clear bra on the seatstays and chainstays. The paint quality is really nice. Thereís a few disappointing quality control things. The worst is the through hole on the frame for the rear axle is not concentric with the threads on the hanger, so you really have push hard on the axle to thread it all the way from the start. Really feels like cross threading it every time. The ugly is a the paint filed off in the lower shock mounting standoffs, quarter sized. And the annoying is the head tube ornament is off center by a cm. The stem is 40mm on the large, not 60 like the specs say. The rear hub has 18 poe. The wheels with tape but no valves weight 2259g. Theyíre set up with tubes, which are 290g each. Tires are 720g. Theyíre LiteSkin casing which are laughably thin for a burly trail bike. This was a major let down, no way theyíd last one ride without tubes and ridiculous pressure. I put my enduro wheelset and xt brakes on before I rode it.
    Last edited by PurpleMtnSlayer; 10-08-2018 at 06:19 AM.

  27. #27
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    Oh and 31.6 lbs out of the box.

  28. #28
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    Interested in more impressions as you ride some more. Do you think the feeling that it rode high is because of the high bottom bracket?

  29. #29
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    No I mean the suspension has nice mid stroke support off lips and pushing into turns. It would be nice if the bb high setting was the low.

  30. #30
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    Weight sure is up there.
    Less isn't MOAR

  31. #31
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    So, I haven't done the reveal video yet, but for my part-time YT channel I picked up a large Sensor Sport after selling my Yeti SB5+. I figure it's unlikely I'll spoil the surprise talking about it here, but man I'm excited to show what the bike can do!

    I want to put a focus on this as a budget bike because I feel new riders are getting a bad impression that you need to dump no less than $3k to even try and ride out on the trails. Just so not true! Over the next year, I'll be slowly upgrading the bike to help new riders know where to spend their money and how it will help the bike preform better. I know that it's best to just spend a little extra and get the next trim package, but I think a lot of people will want to get the Sport to start and then upgrade after 6mo-1yr. $1,800 + pedals to get out on the trail is hard to beat for a new rider!

    My impressions of the Sensor Sport so far:
    • #1 upgrade will be a dropper. Man I miss having one!
    • The stack height is stupid short for such an aggressive trail bike. It doesn't help they only give you 15mm of spacers to play with. The next model needs some stack added to it to help balance the bike a bit better.
    • The shocks are basic, but good enough for some hard trail riding if you pump them up. Plenty for a beginner to learn the basics of suspension tuning and smashing through rough single track.
    • There is some pedal bob when you stand up on the bike, but I think it's more the shock than the linkage. I will be interested to hear from others with higher trim.
    • The brakes are surprisingly good. Not sure how they will hold up long term, but for now they keep me from flying off the trail!
    • The bike tips the scales at 36lbs+... I'm going to be striping down the bike to figure out what parts are adding the most mass so people can figure out what is the best $/lbs upgrade.
    • The stock wheels have a bit of heft for sure. Likely one of the best places to shave weight and make the bike preform better.
    • The WTB Ranger tires are great XC rubber, but does have problems in lose trails here in CO. They don't list the compound used in the tires so I'm going to assume whatever was cheapest.
    • Even with all that heft, the bike climbs like a freaking goat, and loves to carve up the flow. I can't wait to get this bike out on some sump lines and see how it gets on!


    As a side note, the GT Sensor has a ton of tire clearance! I put my custom Ibis 938 wheelset in with 29x2.5 Aggressor and have over 8mm of side clearance and 11mm on top. You can also run 27+ on this bike, though I'd flip the chip to high mode just to get some extra BB clearance.

    I did slap a 150mm fork on it for the lulz, but would not recommend this. Besides putting a lot of stress on the headtube, it really brings the front up and back, making it a bit of a handful on steep climbs. That said, I think 140mm on this bike would make it an epic bike to carve up the ST!

    Here's a photo of it all decked out with 27+ tires and a 150mm fork.
    -img_20181004_201711.jpg
    Last edited by Trail Features; 10-09-2018 at 03:34 PM.

  32. #32
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    Neat. But 36lbs.....jeez.
    Less isn't MOAR

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sideknob View Post
    Neat. But 36lbs.....jeez.
    No doubt it's a heavy bike. The good part is it climbs super well so if anything I only really notice the heft when I lift the bike off the ground. less weight = more better, so I'll be interested to see what's adding all the dang weight!

    It's interesting to go on Fanatikbike.com and using their bike builder to see the weight on the carbon frame. A large GT Sensor Carbon frame is 6.51lbs (without shock). For $1,899.00, not that bad when you look at $/lbs. I'm interested to see how much the alloy frame is when I strip it down.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trail Features View Post

    I did slap a 150mm fork on it for the lulz, but would not recommend this. Besides putting a lot of stress on the headtube, it really brings the front up and back, making it a bit of a handful on steep climbs. That said, I think 140mm on this bike would make it an epic bike to carve up the ST!

    Here's a photo of it all decked out with 27+ tires and a 150mm fork.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    You should get an angle set so you can keep the 150 fork without increasing the BB height so much. (though it's odd you called out the low stack height, but then say it was harder to climb with a higher front end?)
    Quote Originally Posted by the_owl
    Everytime you ride in mud, god kills a kitten.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by stiingya View Post
    You should get an angle set so you can keep the 150 fork without increasing the BB height so much. (though it's odd you called out the low stack height, but then say it was harder to climb with a higher front end?)
    I thought about that also... May just be getting used to the bike as a whole and need to try it again with the 150mm fork. When the weather clears up I'll try it again and see if I'm talking out my butt.

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    Your wreckoning is already one of the best peddling long travel bikes out there. I don't know what you'd be gaining with the Sensor

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    Hope that didn't come off as dickish, just my thoughts. A Wreck is a gnarly bike for sure

  38. #38
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    Youíre totally right there isnít much difference climbing, especially with the same enduro tires and cushcore. I hope with a lighter wheel set and tires itíll climb moíbetter. Iíve only had two short rides but I think after the two hour mark the shorter travel and steeper steep tube will be enough to make me want to keep going, usually thatís when I get over pedaling the wreck. The travel is a lot more noticeable going down and less is just more fun on mellower trails.

  39. #39
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    I measure the static bb at 341 mm in low position with a 29 x 2.5 dhf and 29 x 2.3 dhr. Pretty happy itís a lot lower than the 349 mm listed on the geo chart.

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    Good to hear. The high bottom bracket was unappealing for sure. Can anyone else verify the online chart is wrong?

  41. #41
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    A higher BB appeals to me.

    My 27.5 Stumpjumper whacks pedals something chronic.
    Less isn't MOAR

  42. #42
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    This thread needs more pics and ride impressions. Hopefully we'll see more as more people are able to get their hands on one.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by richulr View Post
    This thread needs more pics and ride impressions. Hopefully we'll see more as more people are able to get their hands on one.
    Funny you mention that...


  44. #44
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    Nice video Joseph!

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    What a great video. Bike prices have become insane, and this is an experiment I can totally relate to. Recently I bought a chepo bike as a backup/2nd bike for when my main ride goes down. I discovered I like the cheapo bike just as much as the more expensive main ride. I'm just not good enough rider to tell the difference between the entry level bike and components and the pricier components. The budget bike works for me. Now I'm thinking of selling the main ride and keeping the budget.

    I do like having two bikes though in case one goes down. This GT is the exact model I was considering picking up. I can't wait to see your full review of it. I'm also looking at the new Norco Fluid. I'm not seeing a ton of other options in this range with modern geometry. Do you know of any others?

  46. #46
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    Whyte S-120 and Fezzari La Sal have sweet geo and relatively low price entry points.

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by PurpleMtnSlayer View Post
    Whyte S-120 and Fezzari La Sal have sweet geo and relatively low price entry points.
    The Fezzari La Sal looks like an amazing bike. I went with the GT because I wanted a very steep STA, long(er) reach, and a slack front, a geo that is very much in vogue right now thanks to the Pole Evolink and Ibis Ripmo. The fact you can get a frame with this geo for less than $2000k is awesome. It lets people get into the frame for a relatively low cost and then upgrade it as needed. Though, I'm not saying you need to rip the bike apart first chance you get. THe stock parts are plenty for an intermediate rider on a budget. Most I would do is install a dropper and maybe swap for SLX brakes.

    The Sensor is an oddity in a way. The 65* HA with only 130mm fork and a lower than average stack makes the bike climb stupidly well while still having good leverage to blast through chunk going down. It is easy to blow through that 130mm on the stock RS Recon, but not in a harsh way. I do think that 140mm on a good mid range fork would be plenty for people looking at this bike for all day trail riding. The force would be what I'd push people towards if they were looking for a more enduro/park friendly rig.

  48. #48
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    The La Sal is awesome but it starts at $3599. Wish they had a budget alloy version. I'm looking in the $2000 range. A bike that I can get cheap and upgrade later as stuff wears out.

    Also looking for a 29er so the Whyte 130 is out. I did talk to Whyte and they said a budget model 120 will be released. Look forward to seeing that when it comes out, but I'm guessing it will be around $2300.

    People are guessing the Jeffsy redesign will be more expensive, so that's probably out.

    Right now I'm looking at the GT, Norco Fluid, Abajo Peak, Cannondale Habit, and maybe the Whyte 120. Polygon Siskiu looks interesting too. Maybe something else new will come out also.

    Looking forward to hearing more on the Sensor for sure.

  49. #49
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    I think the sensor geo is pretty mint. The bike itself can be built anywhere on the trail bike spectrum. Light tires, stock suspension and itís a very peddaly ride. Burly tires, 140 fork and coil shock and itís an enduro race bike. The frame is so damn stiff, makes a great chassis to complement with your preferred suspension and wheels.

    For my expert build I swap to slx brakes, carbon high riser bar and a hub with better engagement.

    After having a bike like this I think more traditional trail bike geo, like the sc 5010 or jeffsey v1, just isnít as fun (even though itís supposed to be more playful).

    In that price range keep an eye out for a new diamondback short travel 29er.

  50. #50
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    When buying cheap and looking to the future, geometry is definitely the most important thing I look to. That's a huge plus for the GT. The low stack would be my only concern. Don't know if I've ridden a bike with low stack before, so I don't know what to think of that.

    A stiff frame is also a big thing to me. I'm a clyde and a burly frame is a must. Really happy to hear the GT is solid.

  51. #51
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    Sadly Iím already selling the GT. The bike is basically brand new, unregistered, with fully transferable warranty.

    I planned to own this bike for a long time. But my idiot friends all bought ebikes. I originally purchased this bike to help me keep up with them as theyíre all pro level riders, I am not. Needless to say Iím still trying to keep up so Iím forced to buy a lame ass ebike.

    https://m.pinkbike.com/buysell/2475195/

  52. #52
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    That's a bit defeatist mate.



    Less isn't MOAR

  53. #53
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    Haha the power is a very bad robot. But Iíve done the math and I canít afford three bikes. I need the enduro for park and races, and friends to ride with, so...

  54. #54
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    Friends are over rated bro.

    Your non e-bike is your friend.
    Less isn't MOAR

  55. #55
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    -46498155_10156715913914326_5811680781210222592_o.jpg

    Played around with some long exposures. I think it came out well.

    Really digging this bike!

  56. #56
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    Gorgeous!

  57. #57
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    That's a great picture. You may another career option if needed!

  58. #58
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    Do you guys think a riser handlebar is a simple solution to the low stack height?

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by richulr View Post
    Do you guys think a riser handlebar is a simple solution to the low stack height?
    Yep. That and a 140mm debonair spring. But I guess if you are trying to make it more of a climber you might dislike the stack.

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    Not really thinking of making it a better climber. I thought the low stack height would result in feeling like you were leaning forward too much. Does it have a different effect that I'm not realizing? I don't think I've ever had a bike with a really low stack height, so I don't know what to expect.

  61. #61
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    Making sense of the Ď19 GT Sensor 29

    Low bars are easier to weight so they might help you corner better on flatter ground and they help you keep your line climbing and keep the front wheel down while climbing. High bars help you feel ďin the bike,Ē help you keep your weight back on steps and perhaps help you leverage your front wheel up for manuals and bunny hops.

    When riding with the stock set up (come with 15mm of spacers under the bar). I had a semi-perched ďon top of the bikeĒ sensation and my knees felt pretty close to the bars (saddle all the way forward) for a bike with a long reach. But that sensation largely went away after the first ride. I didnít get any over the bars sensations when riding steeps. I really like the geo and fit of the bike overall.

    I did buy the nukeproof carbon 38mm riser bar on crc for $65. Itís pretty nice for the price. For my second and third ride I used a sixc carbon bar, same shape as stock, and really noticed the vibration absorption compared to the stock bar.

  62. #62
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    Great information. Thanks for breaking it down for me. Pretty sure I would get a riser bar also.

  63. #63
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    Making sense of the Ď19 GT Sensor 29

    No prob! If youíre looking at a large expert pm me. Iím debating selling the sensor or my wreckoning to help fund an ebike. If I keep the sensor Iíll probably remove the travel spacer in the shock for an extra 15mm or so of travel and a 140 air spring. I still want to experiment with a 29 front and 27.5 rear set up if I keep the sensor.

  64. #64
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    Wait, you can increase the travel in the shock just by removing a spacer? Will the tire still not rub with the extra travel?

  65. #65
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    Ya itís a common thing with metric shox. The bike has a 185x55 shock with a 5mm reducer to net a 185x50 shock. The spacer is located on the base of the damper shaft. RS uses plastic while fox uses alloy. Iíve hear of people just nipping the plastic spacers off easily. Not sure if the other shock options are the same. Also not sure about interference with the seatstay bridge or rear tire on the sensor yet. Assuming a 3:1 leverage ratio 5mm of shock travel is about 15mm axle travel.

    Iíd only do this for racing if I keep the bike. I was really enjoying the shorter travel for the snappy ride.

  66. #66
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    Turns out my LBS no longer does trade-ins on used bikes. I was hoping to part trade my 2017 Stumpy back in part payment for the Sensor Elite. This has never been an issue in the past. Not real impressed TBH....
    Less isn't MOAR

  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by PurpleMtnSlayer View Post
    Gorgeous!
    Quote Originally Posted by richulr View Post
    That's a great picture. You may another career option if needed!
    Thank you! I was pretty stoked with how it came out. Stood out in the cold for an hour getting it after a few failed exposures.

    Quote Originally Posted by richulr View Post
    Do you guys think a riser handlebar is a simple solution to the low stack height?
    Yes, I'll be putting a riser bar on my sensor to give me a bit more room to move back on the really steep stuff. While I haven't felt like I was about to go OTB, I did feel like a cartoon character with the front of the bike diving down and my arms stretching before my body got pulled forward.

    Quote Originally Posted by PurpleMtnSlayer View Post
    Ya itís a common thing with metric shox. The bike has a 185x55 shock with a 5mm reducer to net a 185x50 shock. The spacer is located on the base of the damper shaft. RS uses plastic while fox uses alloy. Iíve hear of people just nipping the plastic spacers off easily. Not sure if the other shock options are the same. Also not sure about interference with the seatstay bridge or rear tire on the sensor yet. Assuming a 3:1 leverage ratio 5mm of shock travel is about 15mm axle travel.

    Iíd only do this for racing if I keep the bike. I was really enjoying the shorter travel for the snappy ride.
    I won't lie, I tought about it also. seems like there is enough room for the linkage to move without hitting the seat tube. However, I'll let those who are more bold to experiment since I'm putting myself on a tight budget.


    Speaking of rear shocks and budgets. Did you happen to notice the Evil Calling uses the same size shock at the GT? A lot of Calling owners pulling off Super Deluxe shocks and selling them for cheap. Looking at that triangle in the GT? Well, may be more room in there than you'd think...


    ...Just thought I'd mention that.

  68. #68
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    I pulled the the shock and checked clearances for long stroking. The seat stay bridge on the rear triangle hits the back of the seat tube well before the tire would hit the seat tube. Eye to eye with the bridge resting against the seat tube is 127mm. So you can run 185x55 damper, obviously it needs 130mm of clearance.

  69. #69
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    So that means it's possible? How much travel do you gain?

  70. #70
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    Making sense of the Ď19 GT Sensor 29

    Yea so you will have 3mm clearance between the seat stay bridge and the seat tube after you nip out the travel reducer.

    Roughly:
    130mm total travel/50mm stroke = 2.6 ave leverage ratio

    5mm extra stroke x 2.6 lr = addíl 13mm rear wheel travel.
    Last edited by PurpleMtnSlayer; 12-04-2018 at 09:17 PM.

  71. #71
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    You'd have to increase the fork travel to balance the bike. Wont that slacken the head angle and seat tube angle more? I would hate to lose the steep seat tube angle.

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by richulr View Post
    You'd have to increase the fork travel to balance the bike. Wont that slacken the head angle and seat tube angle more? I would hate to lose the steep seat tube angle.
    removing the 5 mm spacer will only increase the amount of travel on the compression. Since the eye to eye distance does not change, it should not negatively impact the geometry.

    Edit: Thought about that for an extra ten seconds and realized you're right.

    Putting on a 140mm up front shouldn't change the STA too much. Plus, that's what most of the folks over at GT are running anyway. If/when I upgrade the fork, it'll be to a 140mm.

    As a side note, I've recently discovered that GT recommends running 25% sag at most in the rear. I found myself bottoming out pretty hard running 25% sag like I did on my Yeti. After reading some reviews were the GT engineers talked about the best sag settings I decided to try it at 15%. Night and day difference. Pedals a lot better and was not harsh considering how much pressure it was running.
    Last edited by Trail Features; 11-30-2018 at 06:05 PM. Reason: I'm a dumb butt

  73. #73
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    Wow. Only 10% sag? That's pretty interesting.

  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by richulr View Post
    Wow. Only 10% sag? That's pretty interesting.
    15 (corrected), but yeah. I should probably put a few things in perspective.

    1. this is with the base x-fusion. Not really much tuning options on that shock. The only way to add more progression is to fill the air can with more grease. On a more tunable shock, you would definitely be able to get closer to that 25% sag.

    2. I've been really trying to push this base model to its limits. Taking it off of some 2-3ft drops and really thrashing it around. Maybe I'm just compensating for poor technique. ;-p

  75. #75
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    Making sense of the Ď19 GT Sensor 29

    If you remove the spacer it wonít alter the geo until you bottom out the rear, at which point it will get a little slacker. Pretty sure you (a) wonít be on the saddle when that happens and (b) will appreciate the slacker geo. That said Iím not opposed to increasing the fork to 140mm, but that will slacken things by about 0.5 degrees. For the saddle thatís about 7mm rearward, which would be fine.

    The bike is plush thatís for sure. The engineers said they focused on making a smooth progressive low leverage ratio, eliminating pedal kickback and minimizing brake jack. They needed to lower the anti-squat below 100% to achieve that. So ya itís not going to have the firmest pedal feel. But itíll be great going down and you can always use the damper to firm up the shock or jack up the psi. Youíll also get a ton more life out of your drivetrain because it wonít be wrestling pedal forces vs. the rear suspension movement.

    These anti-squat and LR graphs are for the new force, but should be very similar to the sensor. Found in the French mag Vojo. As you can see anti-squat is very low compared to other trail bikes and the LR is a very nice progressive 0.5.

  76. #76
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    @trailfeatures I like your style! Get a budget bike and try to brake it! Donít worry about what the bike/spec isnít. Just ride it and do what you got to do to make it work for you. I work for my bikes too much I think.

  77. #77
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    Yeah, it's pretty plush, but I actually like that about the bike. Running it at higher PSI means it pedals really well, but then doesn't ramp up super hard. While I do wish I had the ability to run tokens in that X-Fusion, I don't think I would want to run the bike at 25% sag. Maybe 20-22% to get a little more small bump compliance.

    I like riding steel HT bikes for that great pedaling feel and getting rowdy, but don't like how much it beats me up at the end of the day. The GT lets me pump up the shock for a better pedaling platform without rattling my teeth out. Not going to say it's like the Switch-Infinity or any other linkage known for climbing, but for the cost of the bike paired with it's geo I have a hard time finding issue with the bike.

  78. #78
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    Here's a new vid of some guy riding some pretty cool trails on a sensor carbon:

    https://youtu.be/qQzoC71jdLY

    These trails are way more gnarly than anything I have around here.

  79. #79
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    What do you guys think about this color shift paint job? It was fun and easy. Definitely adds some flare to the stock black stem. I did the DMR death grip clamps and the cheap but excellent sram 900 hubs.

  80. #80
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    Looks good! But I thought you were selling the GT? ;P

  81. #81
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    Ha I love the bike, I might keep it. Either way I started the paint job, bought the riser bar, grips and wheel components before I found out I need to buy an ebike. But I wonít be buying any new bikes for awhile: turns out my little picky fracture was also a ruptured flexor tendon. Which requires two surgeries and 6-16 months of no activity

    So all of my bikes and components are currently for sale.

  82. #82
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    Pinkbikeís review is up and itís an absolute joke! Thereís a ton of comments, ok mostly me, but several other who have one and all of us disagree completely with their review. Theyíve now updated the review with a disclaimer at the bottom that theirs was equipped with an over damped shock. That combined with the low stack will, of course, make for a sketchy ride. Itís sad because they label this as an xc riders trail bike, which is way off. If someone buys it expecting an xc ripper they will be disappointed. And people who ride rough trails will be missing out on a great bike. Iím so disappointed in pinkbike, but thatís my bad for believing in them in the first place.

  83. #83
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    Well, I was set to buy a Commencal TR 29er frame for a build but once they posted the weight I started my search again and came across the Sensor. This will be my build, sadly Fanatk is showing Feb for the frame option. The Pinkbike review is very dissappointing but with all the research I've done and from this thread I'm sure I won't be making a bad choice. I'll be running it with a 140 fork to start and at some point see about pulling the shock apart to run 140 at the back and bump the fork up to 150. Long wait for Feb now. Also, I'm liking the cable routing, I wasn't looking forward feeding cables through a frame to build one up.

  84. #84
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    Cool, you wonít be disappointed! PB has now added a small disclaimer that the shock on their test bike was over damped from the factory. So their review is basically invalid. I donít even get why they left the review up? Itís no wonder why they felt like they were tipping forward.

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    I have to admit after watching their review I am leaning more towards the Cannondale Habit but each personal review I have seen on the sensor has been positive so I take what Pinkbike said with a grain of salt. Although when comparing the GT sensor Alloy for $2600 and Cannondale Habit 5 for the same price I do like the build and look of the Cannondale a little more, plus my LBS will actually have the Cannondale in stock to demo.

  86. #86
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    Of the people who have ridden it, can you describe if the bike is playful and fun? How much effort to manual and bunny hop compared to other bikes you have ridden, and what were they? Leverage looks progressive which is a good sign and reasonably short chainstays so it could be playful but its more than those numbers that truly define...

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    review wasn't that great but read to the bottom and they added a note that basically says our bike didn't have the right damper and the different damper that gt supplies with the bike fixes the suspension issues we complained about. also gt are shipping with longer steerer tubes to combat the low stack.

    basically gt fixed everything they complained about other than the tires and brakes. so their review is pretty much null.

  89. #89
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    I know I sounds like Iím trying to defend the bike because I have purchase confirmation bias. But that review, when it comes to the rear suspension, is so opposite of reality. I just had my hand surgery, so I had a lot of time to comment on the article and actually quite enjoyed it. Iíve realized most pinkbike commenters and props givers are like idiot cult members. Itís hilarious.

    Iím happy to point out the negatives I have for the expert build: the stack is too low, the steerer is cut too short, the tires wonít last long, the brakes are underpowered and imo the rear is a touch too active. Also my large expert was 31.6 lbs out of the box (included tubes and no pedals), verified on two decent scales.

  90. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by cs84 View Post
    I have to admit after watching their review I am leaning more towards the Cannondale Habit but each personal review I have seen on the sensor has been positive so I take what Pinkbike said with a grain of salt. Although when comparing the GT sensor Alloy for $2600 and Cannondale Habit 5 for the same price I do like the build and look of the Cannondale a little more, plus my LBS will actually have the Cannondale in stock to demo.
    Rad. Super nice to get a demo before you buy. You canít go wrong with either.

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    I looked over the geo numbers for the Sentinel, Meta TR 29, Stumpy Evo, and the Sensor and all of them are pretty similar. I can't see it riding poorly now that GT has the suspension sorted. I'm glad they responded so quickly to reviewers regarding the stack height and rear shock tune.
    What turned me away from the other bikes:
    Sentinel, alloy is heavy, carbon overpriced and terrible tire clearance.
    Meta, frame weight 7.9 lbs, no thanks
    Stumpy Evo, BB just way too low, no frame only option
    The Sensor just checks all the right boxes for me.

  92. #92
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    Look at this custom build 🤯

    IG: CotesloeCycles

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    Quote Originally Posted by PurpleMtnSlayer View Post
    Rad. Super nice to get a demo before you buy. You canít go wrong with either.
    Well I ended up finding a deal on a 2017 GT Force Expert build for $2600 (was like $4300 when it first came out). Has pike fork, fox performance shock, 150/160 mm travel, 1x11 slx components, shimano brakes. When I compared it to the new models (force and sensor) definitely better specs for a similar price so I took the plunge. Plus I have liked my AOS suspension on my helion so new bike day can't come soon enough. Got it online from Americas Bike Company (as no LBS carry GT in stock) so hopefully the shipping goes smooth.

  94. #94
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    Threw some 27+ tires on the Sensor and took it out in the snow. Worked great! Need to spend more time dialing in the psi, but the fact this bike can run 27.5x3 tires as well as 29x2.5 makes it pretty awesome!

    https://www.instagram.com/p/BsHG67Wl...d=jvxfj518tgal

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    2019 GT Sensor Sport mods - 27.5 wheelset

    Got my Sensor Sport about 6 weeks ago and Iím coming from a 2018 Stumpjumper. This all aluminum Sensor weighed in at almost 34 lbs. stock. My first three trail rides in the central Virginia Charlottesville area were just OK. Mostly rocky, hilly stuff with lots of switchbacks and plenty wet. The 29Ē hoops are OK, but not great for me - emphasis on the ďmeĒ. I started my SENSOR PROJECT. Reba 140mm boost fork. Mercury X3 Enduro 27.5 Wheelset. Maxxis Rekon 2.6x 27.5 tires. Syncros 50mm stem with 35mm clamp holding a Easton Haven handlebar. XTR M980 175 crankset. Shimano M8000 XT brakes with 180mm rotors. New weight is 30 lbs. This bike now handles like a slot car on short, rocky turns and the 140mm of travel up front is perfect with the 27.5 wheels. The bike can be taken down to less than 30 lbs. but the current weight is fine and competitive with bikes in and above is price range. I had many of the components on hand from the Stumpy so I didnít have to shell out lots of dollars for the project. With a lifetime frame warranty, this bike has lots of pontential. And Iím still a fan of 27.5 wheels for the terraine I ride. The stock crank, wheels and fork are where the excessive weight was hiding. Iím currently using a Thompson seatpost, so if I change to a dropper Iíll pick up some weight.
    Last edited by gusthedog2009; 4 Weeks Ago at 10:31 AM. Reason: Add components.

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    Mbr.co.uk has a review of the alloy sport up. Looks like they are doing a comparison with the Rift Zone and the Fluid. This is great because those are three of the bikes I'm considering. They gave the Sensor a 7 and the Rift Zone a 9. The Fluid review is not up yet. Maybe tomorrow.

    They seemed to like a lot about the Sensor and even mentioned it has the best suspension of the three. It seems the one thing they don't like, or rather hated, was the high bottom bracket. They can't get over it. What does everyone here who has one think of the bottom bracket height? Is it as big of an issue as they say? Or are they making roo much of this?

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    i don't know where they got the marin bb height. marin lists it as 337.5. so they seem to be basing points off a geo sheet instead of actual ride.

  99. #99
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    I measured the sensor bb at 341 mm with 2.5 dhf and 2.4 dhr2 on 32mm internal rims. I agree the fit is a bit odd stock. And I believe itís due to the flat bar and low stack. I fitted a 38 mm riser bar for the second ride and the fit felt awesome. The geo is perfect.

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    my comment wasn't about the height of the gt since the number they give and what gt say are the same.. they are praising the marin for having a low 327 height bb but marin says its 337.5. which isn't enough lower than the bb on the sensor to make any difference.

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