Are there any SPD power-meter pedals on the horizon?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 22 of 22
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: wgscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    564

    Are there any SPD power-meter pedals on the horizon?

    It would be nice to have a two-bolt cleat version of what Garmin has, for example...

    Anyone know of any rumors, or trade show sightings, etc?

  2. #2
    Sneaker man
    Reputation: mik_git's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    3,250
    All the gear and no idea.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: wgscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    564
    Cool. If he endorses them, I could be tempted.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Lone Rager's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    9,218
    I wonder how they'll hold up to pedal strikes. I'm using a crank based PM on the mtb, pedal PM on road.
    What, me worry?

  5. #5
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    29,323
    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    I wonder how they'll hold up to pedal strikes. I'm using a crank based PM on the mtb, pedal PM on road.
    Yeah, that's my biggest question about a pedal-based power meter for mtb use, too.

    Will the whacks knock out the calibration? Is the spindle compromised at all by shoving ALL of the parts of the power meter into it?

    I suppose if you want direct measurement of power on both sides, going pedal-based is probably the best way to do that.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Lone Rager's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    9,218
    With the power pedals on the road bikes I get all the Garmin "Power Dynamics" stuff. Mtb crank PM is left only. While the PD stuff in interesting, comparing it to the left-only PM shows that, for me at least, left-only is totally adequate. Of course if I only ever had left only, I'd be left wondering.
    What, me worry?

  7. #7
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    29,323
    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    With the power pedals on the road bikes I get all the Garmin "Power Dynamics" stuff. Mtb crank PM is left only. While the PD stuff in interesting, comparing it to the left-only PM shows that, for me at least, left-only is totally adequate. Of course if I only ever had left only, I'd be left wondering.
    what I find odd is that while these pedals will give you right/left balance, no dice on the extra "Power Dynamics" information. could SRM not fit the extra bits needed for that into the spindles? is it a cost saving measure? is it something they might manage to include by the time the pedals actually hit the market?

    I've been tempted by the RaceFace power spindle, since it'll work with my cranks. But no matter how you cut it, a power meter is a really expensive gadget when I'm not actually training for anything.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Lone Rager's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    9,218
    I have a Team Zwatt (Danish company) Yding carbon crank pm which is very similar (same?) to the 30mm spindle RF spindle. Price is $650 with carbon arms, actual weight is 485gm and it fits SRAM dm rings.

    It's definitely a gadget and I rode 50 years without one, but I do find it illuminating. I had a health issue that caused a precipitous drop in fitness. I started working at regaining fitness on a smart trainer with power based training plans. When I started riding outside I wanted to correlate that with what I was doing on the trainer so I got the PM pedals for the road bike. After seeing that, I decided to get one for the mtb as that's what I mainly ride anyway. I like having the data.
    What, me worry?

  9. #9
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    29,323
    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    I started working at regaining fitness on a smart trainer with power based training plans.
    That's one thing that I've considered doing probably more strongly than putting a power meter on my mtb. I got to use a direct drive smart trainer once a number of years ago when I was doing some light training for a century fundraiser ride. It was MUCH more engaging than my magnetic dumb trainer. While my fitness has improved (albeit slowly) from doing regular mtb rides, I do feel like I could get more gains from less time on one of those.

    It's tempting to set up a corner in my garage and get 2 so I can get some company from my wife. When you did your PM training plans, did you have to run through a service like Trainerroad or Zwift (through another device), or were you able to download it into your Garmin so you could be independent from such a service? I think I looked into using dumb trainers for this awhile back and getting 2 people in the same room onto Zwift would have required 2 laptops or something, which is a PITA.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: wgscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    564
    Just to allay a couple of concerns that have been raised:

    1. Pedal strikes: I'd put these on my road bike. (Far better than using 3-bolt cleats.)

    2. Price: I'm counting on shop-lifting.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Lone Rager's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    9,218
    1: Yeah. They'd be good on a road or gravel bike. I use SPDs on the road bike for touring, exploring, touristy type riding.

    2: Most shops keep these sort of things in a locked display case so you'll need to get creative.
    What, me worry?

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: wgscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    564
    I think I could almost justify this if everyone in the family could use them. It would be kind of a cool thing for a bike club or something to get. If 10 or 12 people tossed $100 into a pot ...

    I'm sort of torn between coveting the technology and not wanting yet another device to provide yet another numerical quantitation of how much I objectively suck.

    (My real reason for wanting this is that, after breaking my ankle several years ago, I have a bad habit of favoring one leg. Any dual-power meter option that works would be fine.)

  13. #13
    Sneaker man
    Reputation: mik_git's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    3,250
    Yeah, I'd like a PM on the roadie and the mtb...but only for giggles, I like data, I don't actually use it (or I'd be far too sad).
    It's like those shockwiz tyre pressure things... if they were 10 bucks for a pair, they'd be a handy thing... but 100...that's just silly.
    All the gear and no idea.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    633
    The beauty of pedal based systems is that they can easily be swapped from bike to bike. Note that there was a guy on the Trainerroad forum a couple weeks ago who managed to frankenstine a set of Assioma duo road power meter pedals with x-pedo pedal bodies and testing seemed to show that the power readings were still reasonable.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    1,404
    Do ebikes collect enough information to calculate power (while figuring out how much assistance to give)?

  16. #16
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    29,323
    Quote Originally Posted by andytiedye View Post
    Do ebikes collect enough information to calculate power (while figuring out how much assistance to give)?
    not exactly. I suppose it would be possible for them to use a strain gauge such as power meters use, but they use a simpler (and cheaper) system. If they used a system that actually calculated power, I think they'd be even more expensive than they are. And with all the computers that connect to ebikes to display a bunch of information that IS collected by them, you'd think they'd show power if it was possible to determine the rider's power output from an ebike's systems.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: wgscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    564
    I just saw that Wahoo bought Speedplay.

    This could get interesting...

    I wonder if the idea is to put meters in those huge awkward cleats on the shoes?

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Lone Rager's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    9,218
    ^^^ har! That's always been my issue with Speedplay road pedals. The mechanism is on the bottom the shoe and the "cleat" is the crank so when you put your foot down it's on an aluminum plate and screws and you're sliding around and getting dirt/grit/mud in the mechanism. Forget walking. Then you need either special flat bottomed 4-hole shoes or a 3 to 4 hole adapter plate that that accounts for the normal curved sole and fastens to the "cleat" with really shallow threads. If it's not perfect you have to fiddle with the mounting screw tension so that the mechanism doesn't lock up. The new "walkable" design is an improvement. I've been on Look road pedals for years. IDK about Speedplay Syzr mtb pedals.
    What, me worry?

  19. #19
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    29,323
    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    ^^^ har! That's always been my issue with Speedplay road pedals. The mechanism is on the bottom the shoe and the "cleat" is the crank so when you put your foot down it's on an aluminum plate and screws and you're sliding around and getting dirt/grit/mud in the mechanism. Forget walking. Then you need either special flat bottomed 4-hole shoes or a 3 to 4 hole adapter plate that that accounts for the normal curved sole and fastens to the "cleat" with really shallow threads. If it's not perfect you have to fiddle with the mounting screw tension so that the mechanism doesn't lock up. The new "walkable" design is an improvement. I've been on Look road pedals for years. IDK about Speedplay Syzr mtb pedals.
    I installed plenty of those Speedplay road cleats when I worked in a roadie-focused shop. Didn't like them at all.

    We had a pair of the Syzr pedals that nobody ever expressed interest in. They looked unnecessarily complicated to me.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: wgscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    564
    Funny, after posting this I started looking around the Speedplay website and noticed the Syzr for the first time. I had never heard of it, but I have a leg-length difference, so found the idea of adjustable stack kind of interesting. (Maybe I will try an XT pedal on one side and XTR on the other first, to see if that does anything positive.)

  21. #21
    Armature speller
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3,581

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Lone Rager's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    9,218
    ^^^ that hack has been around at least a year. I have the Assioma pedals on my road bike, and use xpedo spd pedals on mtbs (when not on flats). It certainly works providing you make clearance for the pod by routing out the shoe sole, and are aware of the possibility of hitting the pod on rocks as it sticks out about the same as the crank arm. Then, of course, there is the question of how well the PM part will hold up to pedal strikes. For these reasons, I got a spindle based mtb PM.
    What, me worry?

Similar Threads

  1. Stages power meter cut power reading data by 80% on same ride. Huh?
    By joevdenne in forum GPS, HRM and Bike Computer
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-23-2019, 09:59 AM
  2. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-19-2015, 08:18 PM
  3. SPD cleats are SPD cleats are SPD cleats or are they?
    By far raider in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 11-03-2012, 12:49 PM
  4. Calculating power and power meter operation
    By dstorjoh in forum XC Racing and Training
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 07-23-2012, 08:35 AM
  5. 8 spd shifter, 9 spd derailleur, 9 spd chain?
    By Fastskiguy in forum Drivetrain - shifters, derailleurs, cranks
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-03-2006, 07:40 AM

Members who have read this thread: 3

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.