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  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    looking for computer

    hi to everyone

    i have a gary fisher hoo koo e koo
    i have been looking at the sigma bc14.16 computers and the cat eye pardone

    im not sure how they would fit on my front fork and how long those rubber rings will last before breaking i don't won't to loose my computer after just 1 ride

    dose anybody have any recommendations on a nice computer

    i mainly ride ncr trails i would like a back lite if possible

    thanks for your time
    glen

  2. #2
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    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
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    This might not be helpful, but assuming you have a smart phone, most people just use that.

    if you want a traditional cycle computer, get a wireless one. I have installed dozens of wireless Cateye computers on customers' bikes and they work fine. I don't have any recommendations on a specific model.

  3. #3
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    Reputation: phlegm's Avatar
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    I use a Garmin watch:
    https://youtu.be/zmAa9kfaseY?t=1m16s

  4. #4
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    Reputation: RS VR6's Avatar
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    For about $20 more than the Sigma...you can get a Garmin 20. It's a GPS unit so it does not need a sensor on the fork. Plus you can keep track of your rides on Garmin Connect or Strava...or both.

    eBay has 15% off today. You can get one for just under $80.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    This might not be helpful, but assuming you have a smart phone, most people just use that.

    if you want a traditional cycle computer, get a wireless one. I have installed dozens of wireless Cateye computers on customers' bikes and they work fine. I don't have any recommendations on a specific model.

    How well do the work with shock style front forks
    will the sending unit fit flush on the fork

  6. #6
    Armature speller
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    For the absolute basics, a Garmin 20 or Lezyne Micro.
    Nothing to mount to the fork leg, tiny, get the job done.

    Garmin 25 if HRM/Speed/Cadence sensors needed down the line.

  7. #7
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    Not sure if others have this problem but both my phone GPS ( Strava ) and Wahoo Bolt do not record accurately mountain biking in the woods and can miss 5 to 20% of my ride which is very frustrating.

    I definitly need a wheel sensor with whatever computer I run.
    2016/18 Fuel Ex9 29
    2017 Domane SLR8
    2018 Boone 7

  8. #8
    Rides all the bikes!
    Reputation: Sidewalk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBarn View Post
    Not sure if others have this problem but both my phone GPS ( Strava ) and Wahoo Bolt do not record accurately mountain biking in the woods and can miss 5 to 20% of my ride which is very frustrating.

    I definitly need a wheel sensor with whatever computer I run.
    I personally only care about ride time, vs mileage.

    But how do you know your wheels sensor is correct, and the GPS is wrong?

  9. #9
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBarn View Post
    Not sure if others have this problem but both my phone GPS ( Strava ) and Wahoo Bolt do not record accurately on fast and twisty trails and can miss 5 to 20% of my ride which is very frustrating.

    I definitly need a wheel sensor with whatever computer I run.
    FIFY. It has nothing to do with "the woods" and everything to do with the way GPS data is sampled and the dots are connected. They are connected with straight lines, not curves. The faster and twistier the trails, the more distance gets lost with GPS. Doesn't matter if it's in the woods, or out on the prairie.

    I've been saying for years in this forum that if anyone cares about distance while mtb riding, they need to be using a wheel sensor.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sidewalk View Post
    But how do you know your wheels sensor is correct, and the GPS is wrong?
    wheel sensors can be calibrated. They are also not perfect, but they're closer to it.

    FWIW, distance can be useful for more than just recording purposes. Especially if you're following directions. Your computer might be giving you a "distance until the next turn" or you might have some old school written/printed directions that will say to turn "left at mile marker x.xx" or "turn right in xx.xx miles" or some such. Maybe you're organizing an event and want an accurate distance measurement for the route.

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