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  1. #1
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    Garmin Edge 520

    Following on from the Garmin Edge 20 and 25 announcement Garmin have launched a Garmin Edge 520 as well. This is a replacement for the Garmin Edge 500 and Garmin Edge 510.



    The new Garmin Edge 520: Everything you ever wanted to know | DC Rainmaker

    Garmin Edge 520 launches, featuring Strava Live Segments - BikeRadar

    My first impressions are that this is looking like the GPS cycle computer to buy. It appears to have most of the functionality of the other Edge models in a smaller form factor. Turn by turn navigation is missing but you can load basemaps onto it to see where you are.

    – Added on-device Strava Segment integration
    – Added basemap to device
    – Added ability to download 3rd party detailed maps
    – Added Bluetooth Smart Text & Call Notifications (previously on Edge 1000)
    – Added Recovery Advisor metrics (previously only on some Running/Tri units)
    – Added VO2 Max Estimation (previously only on some newer Garmin units)
    – Added Personal Records
    – Added Cycling Dynamics metrics (previously only on some newer Garmin units)
    – Added ability to control Garmin Varia bike lights
    – Added integration with Garmin Varia bike radar system
    – Added ANT+ FE-C Trainer Control
    – Addition of GLONASS support (was in Edge 510, but not 810 or 500)

    In addition to the above, when compared to the Edge 500, you’ll find these new features that have been added to most Garmin devices as of late. These are all present/added on the Edge 520:

    – Integrated Live Tracking with phone
    – Integrated Bluetooth Smart uploads to your mobile phone (and then sync’d to Strava/Training Peaks/Sport Tracks/etc…)
    – Ability to download courses and workouts from phone to Edge 520
    – Sensor pool concept & Activity Profiles (no bike profiles)
    – Support for Edge Remote Control accessory
    – Support for Shimano Di2 integration
    – Support for Garmin VIRB control/integration
    – Added Training Calendar support
    – Added Auto Sleep option (turns off if not used for a while)
    – Added Lap summary page (seen on Edge 510/810/1000, but not Edge 500)
    – Support for ANT+ sensor types: Cadence sensors, Heart Rate Sensors, Power Meters, Speed Sensors, Speed/Cadence Sensors, VIRB action cams, Weight Scales"
    dcrainmaker

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    Niiice!

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    Still with the dropping battery life. A loss of 5 hours compared to the Edge 510. For me, I think 15 hours is about a minimum, but 20 is strongly preferred.

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    The 520 looks like a pretty good device. With my 510, I would like the ability to overlay my breadcrumb trail over a map. That way, I wouldn't have to use Google Maps on my phone (and hope I have data service!) to triangulate my position and figure out where I missed the turn. Seems like a great feature.

    Price point seems pretty spot on, as well as the size -- I wouldn't want anything larger than the 510 on my bars. Looking forward to seeing real world reviews of this one.
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    It looks like they should be available to buy in the UK by the end of July 2015. At £239.95 GBP for a basic unit without sensors I'm very tempted just to order one.

    My concern is that with Garmin GPS units being an early adopter often isn't a good idea. There have been so many well documented software issues with previous units initially (Garmin Edge 1000 being the notable recent one) that even if the hardware is perfect the device may need several firmware updates to fix any bugs and reliability problems that exist.

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    Real-time Strava segments!? That's not going to turn out well for someone. Why the hell don't they just make the thing orange.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MTBeing View Post
    Real-time Strava segments!? That's not going to turn out well for someone. Why the hell don't they just make the thing orange.
    You can get a Strava bundle with a year's Strava premium subscription included with the Garmin Edge 520:

    https://shop.strava.com/collections/...tent=Garmin520

    The device is still in the same black and white case. I wouldn't be surprised if they did an orange special edition at some point though.

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    One of my only gripes with the 510 is not seeing texts and phone numbers appear on the screen. This will do that when blue toothed to my phone, so I'll know whether or not to stop and answer??

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chippertheripper View Post
    One of my only gripes with the 510 is not seeing texts and phone numbers appear on the screen. This will do that when blue toothed to my phone, so I'll know whether or not to stop and answer??
    Thats easy, don't need no widget to tell me.
    Never.

    Airplane mode that *****.


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    Thanks for nothing.

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    The 20% off at Performance deal pushed me off the ledge to buy my first GPS. I really could have used on last week.

    Question: I don't particularly have a use for a cadence or heart rate monitor so I bought the base Edge 520. Is the speed sensor a worthwhile purchase? I will be using the 520 on a road and mountain bike.

    And oh, Performance showed the unit "in stock" but after my order, I received the back order notice. I was kind of expecting it....

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    Garmin Edge 520

    Quote Originally Posted by bigdrunk View Post
    The 20% off at Performance deal pushed me off the ledge to buy my first GPS. I really could have used on last week.

    Question: I don't particularly have a use for a cadence or heart rate monitor so I bought the base Edge 520. Is the speed sensor a worthwhile purchase? I will be using the 520 on a road and mountain bike.

    And oh, Performance showed the unit "in stock" but after my order, I received the back order notice. I was kind of expecting it....
    It showed as a preorder, avail 7/28


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    A speed sensor is worthwhile on a mtb especially. If you want accurate distance tracking, the sensor will improve distance recording accuracy.

    I was really looking at the spec sheet on the new Garmins, and I noticed that the Edge 520 does NOT have a touchscreen. I actually like that feature, but I think it's important to note. It's not really mentioned on Garmin's website, but it was on the product literature Garmin sent to my shop because they're a Garmin dealer.

    Also worth noting, when doing a feature comparison on Garmin's website:

    https://buy.garmin.com/en-US/US/cata...Product=112912

    The Edge 520 is NOT listed as being shock resistant. I dunno, but that sorta feels to me like it should be an important feature for the mtb. Also, the Edge 520 does not have an expandable memory card slot. And while it looks like the ability to add maps has been added, it's not a feature that's listed on Garmin's website yet. And, there's really no mention of memory capacity for the extra maps you're supposed to be able to load.

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    By giving it the edge 520 name I think Garmin wants you to believe it is a slightly better unit then the 510.

    Which I think it is.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Learux View Post
    By giving it the edge 520 name I think Garmin wants you to believe it is a slightly better unit then the 510.

    Which I think it is.
    If you consider "number of features" as being "better" then yeah, I see that. With that said, Garmin has created some expectations with their other models that can accept maps. Storage space for those maps, for one. The Edge 520 differs from previous mapping models in that respect. You have to rely exclusively on the internal memory for maps. And Garmin's not saying how much there is at this point.

    I also think that if this model truly isn't shock resistant, that's a step backwards. That has long been one of the reasons to use a Garmin instead of mounting a smartphone on your handlebars. We know ejected Garmins happen from time to time, especially in crashes. I think that shock resistance is important, and I think some smartphone manufacturers get it, too. There are sports-associated smartphones out there now that are shock resistant.

    I also think the reduction in battery life associated with all of those extra features is a downgrade.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    If you consider "number of features" as being "better" then yeah, I see that. With that said, Garmin has created some expectations with their other models that can accept maps. Storage space for those maps, for one. The Edge 520 differs from previous mapping models in that respect. You have to rely exclusively on the internal memory for maps. And Garmin's not saying how much there is at this point.
    The dcrainmaker article goes into detail about this. Around 50mb of internal memory is available on the Garmin Edge 520. If you load a third party map onto the device that takes up around 40mb, leaving 10mb free space for recording rides and anything else. That 40mb of maps consists of your local region, a few hundred miles. There isn't enough space to have a larger area, such as an entire continent, on the Garmin Edge 520. The map file size would be too big for the device.

    That is quite low. You'd think that they could have easily and cheaply expanded that onboard memory, for more future proofing, without it costing much more.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304 View Post
    The dcrainmaker article goes into detail about this. Around 50mb of internal memory is available on the Garmin Edge 520. If you load a third party map onto the device that takes up around 40mb, leaving 10mb free space for recording rides and anything else. That 40mb of maps consists of your local region, a few hundred miles. There isn't enough space to have a larger area, such as an entire continent, on the Garmin Edge 520. The map file size would be too big for the device.

    That is quite low. You'd think that they could have easily and cheaply expanded that onboard memory, for more future proofing, without it costing much more.
    Yeah, 40mb is not much. To be fair, that will probably suit most people most of the time, but if you travel much, you'll have to be installing new maps pretty frequently. It is better than nothing, but it's important for people to understand before buying this model that their expectations for mapping should not be the same as for the Edge 810, 1000, or any of the hiking models. But of course there will be people who didn't do their research before buying this, who will wind up being disappointed. I'll say we'll see our first one here in the forum within 2 weeks of first availability of this model.

    On a side note, it looks like I lost my Oregon 450 on my recent trip to TN and GA. Though my contact info is in the startup screen, chances are small that it'll get returned to me. Which means I'll be needing to replace it with another mapping GPS at some point.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    I also think that if this model truly isn't shock resistant, that's a step backwards. That has long been one of the reasons to use a Garmin instead of mounting a smartphone on your handlebars. We know ejected Garmins happen from time to time, especially in crashes. I think that shock resistance is important, and I think some smartphone manufacturers get it, too. There are sports-associated smartphones out there now that are shock resistant.
    I checked with Garmin after ordering and it is shock resistant. Just an omission in the specs.

    Thank you for contacting Garmin International.

    The Edge 520 is shock resistant. I am not sure why it doesn't show it on our specs page.

    With Best Regards,

    Aaron

    Customer Care - Fitness Team
    Garmin International

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    this is a nice unit

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    I am especially curious about accuracy and how this works with the sensor. I had a Garmin unit before but returned it to REI because the mileage was always off. I understood that this was the satellite losing visibility due to tree cover, and/or not enough data points on tight, twisty trails.

    Will the sensor fix these problems?

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    it will provide you more accurate reading if you put a speed sensor since it communicates the reading directly to the GPS unit and will not rely on satellite.

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    Thank you. I didn't realize that the sensor did this. I may try one of these again.

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    np.very handy tool, use it on my road bike and for indoors as well. mtb should benefit big time on this if you want more accurate mileage (i use to have it on my mtb but took it off)

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    I use one of the newer hub-based magnetless speed/distance sensors with my Forerunner 310XT. It works very well, and definitely maintains distance tracking in poor GPS reception. I had a ride shortly after I installed it where the GPS satellites were absolute crap. I had signal for awhile, and actually lost it for at least half my ride. First time that's happened in years. I tracked the problem down to poor satellite visibility using some online tools from Trimble that give you that information. Canopy cover was a relatively small factor. Regardless, no signal.

    You can see the ride here.

    https://www.strava.com/activities/323628395

    The distance is accurate because of the sensor.

    I have changed my opinions on GPS use for mtb's a little since using this. A couple of things are essential.

    For accurate tracking of distance, a wheel sensor is most essential. This is new for me. This is somewhat adjusted by the fact that you can get JUST a wheel sensor, without the addition of cadence. I'm just not sure how useful cadence is for the mtb. I suppose if you race and you truly train, knowing your cadence can help you get up climbs faster.

    The ability to record at 1 second intervals is secondarily important. What I don't know is just how the two features play together. I probably should do a test with a speed sensor and without, both with 1 second recording and with "smart" recording. I know that "smart" recording by itself on a twisty mtb trail is the least accurate option. But, for example, with the new Edge 25 that only does smart recording, but can accept a wheel sensor, will that wheel sensor make it just as accurate as 1sec recording plus a wheel sensor? Or is it still somewhat less accurate? The wheel sensor won't help the GPS track (which is still crap with "smart" recording), but fewer people care about the accuracy of the GPS track - most care about the recorded METRICS associated with the GPS track.

    With the rain we've had locally over the past 2 months, though (and the worst basement flooding I've had in the years I've lived where I do now), the local mtb trails won't be worth much for quite some time. I won't be able to do such a test for awhile. Running such a test on straight roads isn't going to be informative, as "smart" recording does perfectly fine in that situation. I'd need to do this on actual twisty trails.

    As for the shock resistance of the unit, I can't say I'm surprised by Garmin's website spec sheets having a typo. I've seen them before on there. It's usually in the later descriptions, though, and not on the feature checklist. I have to wonder if they have interns updating the product descriptions on the website at times. I've also noticed that they don't go back on there and update the spec sheets when they change something with a firmware update. That can be pretty frustrating when you're looking at the software features and they have an outdated list. It's already the case with this model (related to the downloading of 3rd party maps) and it's not even available yet.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    I use one of the newer hub-based magnetless speed/distance sensors with my Forerunner 310XT. It works very well, and definitely maintains distance tracking in poor GPS reception. I had a ride shortly after I installed it where the GPS satellites were absolute crap. I had signal for awhile, and actually lost it for at least half my ride. First time that's happened in years. I tracked the problem down to poor satellite visibility using some online tools from Trimble that give you that information. Canopy cover was a relatively small factor. Regardless, no signal.

    You can see the ride here.

    https://www.strava.com/activities/323628395

    The distance is accurate because of the sensor.

    I have changed my opinions on GPS use for mtb's a little since using this. A couple of things are essential.

    For accurate tracking of distance, a wheel sensor is most essential. This is new for me. This is somewhat adjusted by the fact that you can get JUST a wheel sensor, without the addition of cadence. I'm just not sure how useful cadence is for the mtb. I suppose if you race and you truly train, knowing your cadence can help you get up climbs faster.

    The ability to record at 1 second intervals is secondarily important. What I don't know is just how the two features play together. I probably should do a test with a speed sensor and without, both with 1 second recording and with "smart" recording. I know that "smart" recording by itself on a twisty mtb trail is the least accurate option. But, for example, with the new Edge 25 that only does smart recording, but can accept a wheel sensor, will that wheel sensor make it just as accurate as 1sec recording plus a wheel sensor? Or is it still somewhat less accurate? The wheel sensor won't help the GPS track (which is still crap with "smart" recording), but fewer people care about the accuracy of the GPS track - most care about the recorded METRICS associated with the GPS track.

    With the rain we've had locally over the past 2 months, though (and the worst basement flooding I've had in the years I've lived where I do now), the local mtb trails won't be worth much for quite some time. I won't be able to do such a test for awhile. Running such a test on straight roads isn't going to be informative, as "smart" recording does perfectly fine in that situation. I'd need to do this on actual twisty trails.

    As for the shock resistance of the unit, I can't say I'm surprised by Garmin's website spec sheets having a typo. I've seen them before on there. It's usually in the later descriptions, though, and not on the feature checklist. I have to wonder if they have interns updating the product descriptions on the website at times. I've also noticed that they don't go back on there and update the spec sheets when they change something with a firmware update. That can be pretty frustrating when you're looking at the software features and they have an outdated list. It's already the case with this model (related to the downloading of 3rd party maps) and it's not even available yet.
    Mind linking the speed sensor you're using? Will it work with a 810?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buster View Post
    I am especially curious about accuracy and how this works with the sensor. I had a Garmin unit before but returned it to REI because the mileage was always off. I understood that this was the satellite losing visibility due to tree cover, and/or not enough data points on tight, twisty trails.

    Will the sensor fix these problems?
    Depending upon your settings recorded mileage with a Garmin Edge and separate speed sensor should be about right.

    Post #38 of this thread has my Garmin Edge 500 settings and some detail about how I have the speed sensor configured on my bike.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/xc-racing-tra...l#post11216130

    I use a Bontrager ANT+ speed sensor with a magnet on the wheel.

    http://www.bontrager.com/model/09814

    Where the speed sensor won't make any difference is for the accuracy of the recorded GPS track of your route, whether it picks up the twists and turns of your route properly. That's purely down to satellite reception. If you're riding under tree cover a new Garmin Edge 520 (which has GPS and GLONASS, using more satellites than older Garmin models) should record a better GPS track but it still relies on being able to communicate with satellites. In some situations a Garmin Edge 520 is likely to still encounter problems.

    For Strava you can repair the track of your rides using the Strava GPS Snap tool. That recalculates the track so that it hopefully recognises the segments you rode. This works better for road than offroad segments.

    http://strava-tools.raceshape.com/snap/

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    On the subject of GPS tracks. We did a five hour ride today with some hills. I bet my friend is annoyed. Looking on Strava his Garmin Edge 800 track has gone wrong for the biggest climb of the day. There were some hairpins under tree cover part way up and the GPS track is off the route.

    He had dropped me too by that point so was most likely on for a personal best...

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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoTone View Post
    Mind linking the speed sensor you're using? Will it work with a 810?
    https://buy.garmin.com/en-US/US/shop...-12103-00.html

    It should.

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    i believe its a garmin sensor, the new one. hub based
    Garmin Speed and Cadence Sensors 010-12104-00: HeartRateMonitorsUSA.com

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    Rarely used the speed sensor. Mrs had a spare so I mounted it to the CX bike. Mileage always seemed accurate and the speed sensor did nothing to improve that. It's main use would be if you use your bike on a trainer indoors.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JackJr View Post
    Rarely used the speed sensor. Mrs had a spare so I mounted it to the CX bike. Mileage always seemed accurate and the speed sensor did nothing to improve that. It's main use would be if you use your bike on a trainer indoors.
    Which head unit? What circumstances? It matters. Look at the track I posted above. Without a speed sensor, I would have lost around 8 miles of distance tracking.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bigdrunk View Post
    The 20% off at Performance deal pushed me off the ledge to buy my first GPS. I really could have used on last week.

    Question: I don't particularly have a use for a cadence or heart rate monitor so I bought the base Edge 520. Is the speed sensor a worthwhile purchase? I will be using the 520 on a road and mountain bike.

    And oh, Performance showed the unit "in stock" but after my order, I received the back order notice. I was kind of expecting it....
    where is this 20% off coupon or have it expired?

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    Glad it's shock resistant. I use the included leash for added security. What's a good resource for a Garmin noob? I want to learn to use it for live segments but I'm way too busy to read tons on pages!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flash View Post
    Glad it's shock resistant. I use the included leash for added security. What's a good resource for a Garmin noob? I want to learn to use it for live segments but I'm way too busy to read tons on pages!
    Hate to break it to you but learning to use all or even many features on newer gps receivers will probably require both a lot of reading as well as trial and error. If you wanted an idiot proof device that you can learn on the fly, you should not have purchased a brand new garmin with a pile of brand new features.

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    Stop making sense! I'm sure I will do fine with it but sometimes info sharing can save a bit of time. Seems like these days there can be too much info from everyone that thinks they are a genius. Wading through it can be cumbersome. So far it's a great device and I don't regret the purchase.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flash View Post
    Stop making sense! I'm sure I will do fine with it but sometimes info sharing can save a bit of time. Seems like these days there can be too much info from everyone that thinks they are a genius. Wading through it can be cumbersome. So far it's a great device and I don't regret the purchase.
    There are really a couple problems you will run into.

    1. Garmin provides the worst product manuals known to man. Entire feature sets are ignored.

    2. The Edge 520 is brand new so there will be very limited 3rd party feature documentation.

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    Exactly Harold. I originally had a 310 and sold it. I was fiddling with the device rather than riding. At least with this unit the basic features are easy to use.

  38. #38
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    You can free up an extra 6.75mb of memory on the Garmin Edge 520 by removing any unused language files:

    https://forums.garmin.com/showthread...armin-Edge-520

    .

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    None of my LBS have the 520 in stock right now and they said they won't get it for 2 weeks. I want one for my bike trip next weekend and JensonUSA is saying they have it in stock. (Hopefully it doesn't turn into 2 weeks of processing)

    Figured I'd ask here first, has anyone very recently ordered a 520 online and already had it shipped quickly? If so, where did you order it?

  40. #40
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    They're hard to get. The shop where I worked has ordered a few. A couple special orders and a couple for stock. The extras have sold quickly.

    If someone says they're "in stock", CALL TO VERIFY. A lot of online retailers drop ship from a distributor, or don't order them until a customer places an order. So if they're backordered at the distributor, you'll be waiting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AMac4108 View Post
    None of my LBS have the 520 in stock right now and they said they won't get it for 2 weeks. I want one for my bike trip next weekend and JensonUSA is saying they have it in stock. (Hopefully it doesn't turn into 2 weeks of processing)

    Figured I'd ask here first, has anyone very recently ordered a 520 online and already had it shipped quickly? If so, where did you order it?
    Ordered it Monday from Performance, received it Wednesday. Used it tonight.

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    Digging mine so far. Still getting discrepancies while running Android Strava and Garmin. A 5 minute segment shouldn't have a 30 second difference.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flash View Post
    Digging mine so far. Still getting discrepancies while running Android Strava and Garmin. A 5 minute segment shouldn't have a 30 second difference.
    A good test is to use Strava flyby to overlay the ride files. That lets you see the different GPS tracks from different riders overlaid together on a map. You can see from that if the two devices were both following the same route, or whether one had gone off course.

    On the Garmin Edge 520 if you go to the satellite settings option make sure that you have both GPS and GLONASS turned on, so that it is using both sets of satellites for keeping track of your location. By default it may only have GPS enabled.

    Make sure that the Garmin Edge 520 is set to record at 1 second intervals also. It may be using "Smart Recording" instead.

    When riding there should be a Data Field that you can add to a ride screen called GPS Accuracy. This shows how close the Gamin has your location pinpointed, the lower the number the more accurate your location is at that time. If you have that displayed whilst riding it will give an at a glance idea of how closely the Garmin is following your route.

    With a mobile phone Strava app GPS accuracy can vary by a lot due to several factors. If you have the phone buried in a backpack it may not get a good GPS signal, which will see it losing parts of the route. Recording rates are longer than 1 second so frequent twists and turns may not be picked up and the start and end of segments may not always be in the same place. On short segments this can have a big impact.

    The way that the Strava app (android in particular) identifies stationary time in rides can be a bit random too. You'll sometimes see rides on Strava, recorded using a mobile app, that have very low average speeds and no stationary time.

  44. #44
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    Thanks for the great info. I have tried the flybys. They confirmed my suspicions. The unit was set to GPS and GLONASS. I did make the change from Smart Recording to 1 second per your advice and that of a friend but haven't ridden yet with that setting. Thanks again for the help. I think this unit is just what I wanted and I'm getting closer to knowing all of the functions. I'm just late to the GPS game.

  45. #45
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    Thanks. I ordered it this afternoon and it said I would get it Sept 10th. Got an email at the end of the day saying my order was cancelled because my shipping address was different than my billing address and due to fraud issues they won't ship it. Now when I go to order the earliest I can get it is the 14th. Frustrating. JUST TAKE MY MONEY AND GIVE ME MY GARMIN! lol

  46. #46
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    Be careful about comparing data between two different services.

    From my Garmin, stuff uploads automatically to Garmin Connect and then gets sent to Strava. Same data file. Garmin Connect and Strava report different metrics.

    Sorting through it all, I've traced the differences back to how each site defines "stopped" time versus "moving" time. I do not set my Garmin to auto-pause, because I've found that fairly unreliable on slow, steep, grinding climbs. I let the websites sort out the data in the end. Also, When I load a track into Topofusion, I get yet another discrepancy between "stopped" time and "moving" time. Topofusion differs from GC and Strava both. The only way to narrow that difference would be to manually pause it when I'm stopped. That's a pain to remember (not just to pause it, but also to restart it every time). I tried doing it once just to see, and forgot to restart it again after a lunch stop.

    My ride the other day was another one with crappy accuracy of my device (Forerunner 310XT). It's small (small antenna), and pre-GLONASS capability. I've got my eyes on the etrex touch 35. I want a mapping GPS with GLONASS, I don't want to spend $600 for it, and I want to be able to use a couple fitness sensors with it. I might get one with my next paycheck.

  47. #47
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    If you're in the UK the individual and bundle versions of the Garmin Edge 520 are in stock at Wiggle and available to buy now:

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/?s=Garmin+edge+520

    It looks like they're in stock to buy from Garmin UK direct too:

    https://buy.garmin.com/en-GB/GB/spor...rod166370.html

    I've got one on order from Wiggle so it will hopefully turn up next week sometime.

  48. #48
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    My Garmin Edge 520 arrived from Wiggle today.

    I bought the bundle pack (including speed, cadence and heart rate sensors) and the Garmin Edge 520 was paired with the bundled sensors out of the box.

    The initial setup along with age / height / weight etc has some funny questions.

    "What is your cycling level?" I answered Superior.

    There's also another one "Are you a lifetime athlete?" Yes/ No

    On a serious note these questions are actually quite important to get right as they will have an impact on many of the calculations that the Garmin makes. How you answer the cycling level question in particular is likely to have a large impact on any calories burnt figures, along with what will appear in the VO2 Max and Recovery sections on the device.

    The main reason for switching to a new Garmin for me was GPS accuracy. My Garmin Edge 500 (2011 vintage) is reliable but the GPS track will be way off if there's tree cover. The Garmin Edge 520 has both GPS and GLONASS so should be more accurate. I stood both devices side by side outside and left them in one place for several minutes to get a good satellite lock. In the picture below GPS accuracy is shown by the onscreen number in feet. The lower this number is the more accurate the location is.



    The Garmin Edge 500 had a GPS accuracy of 21 feet and the Garmin Edge 520 had a GPS accuracy of 10 feet.

    There are several screen display options available on the Garmin Edge 520. It has a colour screen so you can have either white background and black text (day mode) or a black background with white text (night mode). There is also a backlight brightness option. Having the backlight on all the time is going to use the battery up faster than having it off.

    This picture shows my Garmin Edge 500 stood next to the Garmin Edge 520 when they are both on a Ride screen. The Garmin Edge 520 is set to day mode with no backlight. The Garmin Edge 500 has better contrast but the Garmin Edge 520 screen is still readable.



    Here's a picture showing the Garmin Edge 520 mounted on a stem mount. This is trying to give an idea of how it will look when riding. I've read some comments about the screen being hard to read online but my initial impression is that it will be ok. When mounted on the stem like this the lower device buttons are easy enough to press too. They might be hard to press on an out front mount but there's no issue with a stem mount.



    The Garmin Edge 520 paired straight away with the Bontrager ANT+ speed sensor and Power2Max power meter on my bike. The calibration figure for the Power2Max power meter appears as the same on both the Garmin Edge 500 and Garmin Edge 520 and I have the same manual wheel circumference entered for the speed sensor.

    There are quite a few menus of other settings to go through but I'm optimistic that it will all be good so far.

  49. #49
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    I got out for a ride with my new Garmin Edge 520 today.

    I did a steady 3 hour 52 minute ride with the Garmin connected to speed and power sensors. (No mobile phone connection and with the screen backlight turned off). The battery was at 100% fully charged when I set off and was at 70% charge when I got home.

    There were no sensor dropouts or spikes at any point so that was fine.

    Updating the Basemap
    The basemap that comes as stock with the Garmin Edge 520 is incredibly bad. I first downloaded a new map of the local area from here:

    Planet.osm extracts | BBBike.org

    Select Garmin BBBike as the format,
    Map type OSM Mapnik from the small + at the top right of the screen.
    Use the Add Points To Polygon to create the map you want.



    I followed the instructions from this thread to update the Edge 520 basemap.

    https://forums.mtbr.com/gps-hrm-bike...-a-985251.html

    1) Download the map section of interest per the ‘Part 1: Downloading the Maps’ section (again for the Edge 520, remember to keep it small*: See note at end of this section!).
    2) Plug-in your Garmin Edge 520 to your computer.
    3) Within the \Garmin folder on the Edge 520, you’ll find the gmapbmap.img file (Disc Image File). Make a backup copy of this on your computer for long-term safe keeping.
    4) Within the \Garmin folder on the Edge 520, delete the gmapbmap.img file (after you’ve copied it elsewhere).
    5) Copy the gmapsupp.img map file you downloaded into the \Garmin folder on your Edge 520.
    6) On the Edge 520, rename that map file gmapsupp.img to gmapbmap.img – don’t worry if you can’t see the .IMG extension, just rename it to gmapbmap, like below.
    7) There is nothing extra you need to do on the Edge 520 itself as far as configuring maps – it’ll happen automatically, so you can ignore Part 3 of the instructions.
    8. Go ride dcrainmaker

    How to download free maps to your Garmin Edge 705/800/810/1000 & Touring

    That updates the basemap so you now have a lot more detail.

    On the ride today I did the first hour with the display set to a ride screen with three data fields (as pictured above) but then for the last three hours I switched to map view, with GPS accuracy displayed alongside. I was interested to see how well the Open Street Map would match up with what was actually there.

    The screen on the Edge 520 is quite clear and I could read it whilst riding without needing the backlight. The map was easy to make out too. The actual accuracy and content of the Open Street Map is very variable though. Riding around the rural Cotswolds you could rely on it if you were sticking to the roads but the offroad footpath, bridleway and byways were frequently missing. It was a good thing I knew where I was going as trying to navigate using just the Open Street Map on the Garmin would have been impossible.

    At the same time when I got back into the more built up area in town the amount of detail on the Open Street Map was close to overwhelming. Individual buildings, railway lines, points of interest, wooded areas all appearing together on the map make it hard to even see the roads. That's fine on a 24" PC monitor but makes for a cluttered look on a small Edge 520 screen on the move.

    You aren't limited to just Open Street Map as a basemap. You can have Bing maps on there. Bing maps are missing the offroad tracks, but look like they may be better for road riding as there is less overload of information.

    GPS Track

    The GPS track and accuracy of the Garmin Edge 520 whilst riding (on a dry day with some cloud) is far better than the Garmin Edge 500. The Edge 520 was displaying between 10 and 15ft GPS accuracy for most of the ride with an open view of the sky. It was mostly spot on with the route.

    Under tree cover the track wasn't as good but I deliberately did some sections in trees that always defeat the Garmin Edge 500, causing it to go way off course. With the Garmin Edge 520 it wasn't perfect (losing some GPS accuracy under the trees) but the sections were still close enough to register the Strava segments.

    Edit:

    Screenshots
    You can take screenshots of what is displayed on the screen whilst riding. In order to turn this on go to Menu - Settings - System - Display and enable Screen Capture. When you press the Lap button it will now take a screenshot of the screen contents and save them as a bitmap picture file.

    Basemap Pictures
    I took a couple of pictures whilst out riding to show what the map looks like in different areas. This is using Open Street Map as the Basemap. One picture is up in the hills. I was riding along a country lane approaching an offroad bridleway (the yellow line heading off to the left. There are farm fields all around. This is clear enough and easy to read on the small screen.

    The picture next to it is a different area on the main road. Here there are multiple roads and junctions, a river, railway footpaths, bridleway, woods, houses. Even as a blown up screenshot like this there's a lot going on.

    Last edited by WR304; 10-12-2015 at 07:51 AM.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304 View Post
    "What is your cycling level?" I answered Superior.
    Correct.

    That gave me a chuckle when I was demo'ing one at the shop.
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  51. #51
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    Garmin Edge 520 Settings

    The Garmin Edge 520 has different activity profiles. I have two setup. One is called Epic for my mountain bike and one is called Turbo Trainer for indoors riding. These are the settings and data fields for my mountain bike:

    Activity Profile "Epic"

    Data Screens:
    Screen 1: 3 Fields (my normal riding screen)
    Field 1: Power 3s
    Field 2: Speed
    Field 3: Time

    Screen 2: 10 Fields (my summary overview screen to look at when riding)
    Field 1: Time
    Field 2: Distance
    Field 3: Avg Speed
    Field 4: Avg Power
    Field 5: Avg Cadence
    Field 6: Totl Ascent
    Field 7: Elapsed Time
    Field 8: Avg Balance
    Field 9: IF (Intensity Factor)
    Field 10: NP (Normalized Power)

    Screen 3: 4 Fields (Misc items that I may want to look at infrequently)
    Field 1: Time of Day
    Field 2: Temperature
    Field 3: Battery
    Field 4: GPS Accuracy

    Screen 4+5: Off

    Map Screen: None - On

    Compass Screen - Off
    Elevation Screen - Off
    Lap Summary Screen - Off
    Virtual Partner Screen - Off
    Cycling Dynamics Screen - Off

    GPS Mode: GPS+ GLONASS

    Map
    Orientation: Track Up
    Auto Zoom: Off
    Guide Text: When Navigating

    Alerts
    All turned off

    Auto Features
    Auto Lap: Off
    Auto Pause: Off
    Auto Sleep: Off
    Auto Scroll: Off

    Start Notice: Off

    Sensors:
    I have an Ant+ Speed sensor with manual wheel circumference and power meter paired.

    Bluetooth: Off

    System:
    Display: Brightness 40%
    Backlight Timeout: 15 seconds
    Color Mode: Day
    Screen Capture (usually Off)

    Data Recording
    Recording Interval :1 sec
    Cadence Averaging: Do Not Include Zeros
    Power Averaging: Include Zeros

  52. #52
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    Garmin Edge 520 Power Meter Settings and Notes

    If you have a power meter connected there are a few other screens to go through also. With a Garmin Edge 500 it would always come up with a pop up message "power meter detected do you want to calibrate" y/n (set the zero offset) screen when first turned on.

    The Garmin Edge 520 currently doesn't have this prompt. You can still manually calibrate (set the zero offset) by pressing the up arrow once to go to the status screen. If the power meter is connected you will see a calibrate option. Select that and it should give you a success message as pictured below. Under sensors you can also go to about and look at what details there are for it. With a Power2Max classic power meter this shows the battery level, firmware version etc for the power meter onscreen.



    Different types of power meter will have different options and report different zero offset values here. With a Power2Max whenever you freewheel for a few seconds whilst riding it will automatically reset the zero offset by itself. Doing a manual zero offset before starting isn't that critical so long as you freewheel from time to time during the ride.

    If you have a Quarq then it's important to remember to manually set the zero offset at the beginning of the ride. To reset the zero offset on a Quarq whilst actually riding you have to backpedal five times otherwise. One of my friend's has a new model Quarq on his road bike. He did a road race a few months ago where the zero offset wasn't set correctly (he did the zero offset calibration with one foot still clipped into the pedal just before the start). The entire race file was garbage as a result. All the power numbers were way off.

    If you have the Powertap P1 pedals the Garmin Edge 520, along with the Garmin Edge 1000 still has the incorrect crank length issue. This is where the crank length setting defaults to 172.5mm with no option to change it. See this thread:

    https://forums.garmin.com/showthread...rTap-P1-Pedals

    Setting FTP and Power Zones
    This is under Menu - My Stats. There is a seperate section called FTP here, which you should ignore and leave turned off!

    Where you actually have to go is keep scrolling down in My Stats beneath User Profile to the Training Zones section. Under Training Zones select Power Zones. At the top is where you manually enter your FTP figure. For consistency this should be whatever you use in other programs such as WKO+ 3.0, Golden Cheetah, Strava etc.

    FTP: enter your own value
    Based On: Watts
    Minimum: 0w

    I have the power zones set manually to match the six Coggan power zones in WKO+ 3.0.

    https://home.trainingpeaks.com/blog/...raining-levels

    In order to make them match I first edited Zone 7 so that it wouldn't be used. Enter a massive number in there that you will never reach, 5,000 watts say and then make Zone 6 limit just below it. The other zones can now be set to match.

    Once that is done the metrics such as IF, TSS, w/kg time in power zones etc should be very close to what you will see once the ride is loaded into your preferred program.

  53. #53
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    The rides that I'd done with the Garmin Edge 520 up until today were all in full daylight. With the screen set to "day mode" and no backlight I have no problems reading the display whilst riding.

    Today was a bit different in that it was a ride that started late afternoon around 4.30pm (full daylight) in order to get some miles in by myself before meeting up with the Friday group ride. This group ride goes into the late evening. I got home at 7.40pm (sunset) when it is close to fully dark. By the end of the ride you need to be running with lights. It gradually got darker over the course of the ride.

    To start with the screen visibility was fine but around 6.00pm as the daylight started to fade I was increasingly finding the Garmin Edge 520 screen hard to read. Under the trees it was difficult to make out. A Garmin Edge 500 with no backlight in the same conditions (gloomy but not fully dark) would still have been readable.

    I got to the group ride meeting point a few minutes early so I decided to change the screen mode and turn the backlight on. This showed up one big danger with the Garmin Edge 520. I pressed the Start/Stop button, which brings up the pause menu. Still being unfamiliar with the menus I then pressed the Enter button once (once! ) by mistake.

    The next thing I know there's a "saving ride" symbol on screen and the ride file has finished and been written to a .fit file. Not what I had in mind at all. With the Garmin Edge 500 you always had to deliberately long press a button to save the ride. With the Garmin Edge 520 it's almost too easy to save the ride as there is no confirmation prompt and Save Ride is the very first option on the pause menu.

    Changing Screen Display Settings Whilst Riding
    Here are the minimal number of key presses to make if you need to change the display settings partway through whilst the ride is still in progress. Display settings have a shortcut so you don't need to wade through all the menus.

    Starting from your normal riding data screen press Back once to reach the Ride screen, and then press Up arrow once to select Status Page. Press Enter once on the Brightness option on the Status page. This takes you straight to the display settings menu where you can change screen and backlight modes.

    Once you have made the changes press Back twice, and then Enter once to return to your normal riding data screen.

    If you have paused the ride press Down arrow four times on the pause menu, and then press Enter once to reach the Status Page that way. Press Enter once on the Brightness option on the Status page. This takes you straight to the display settings menu where you can change screen and backlight modes.

    Once you have made the changes press Back three times to return to your normal riding data screen.


    The screen display settings that I set for the rest of the evening ride were to put it in "night mode" (black background and white numbers) and set the backlight to 70% brightness and always on. 100% brightness makes the screen look washed out. With the backlight on the screen was nice and easy to read as dusk approached and it got steadily darker. That worked well for riding in the gloom. I was happy with how I could read everything on screen clearly for the remainder of the ride.

  54. #54
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    My EDGE 705 is on its last leg and I am thinking about buying a new unit. The 520 seems the most promising but I have a few questions.

    1. From what I am finding, there is no SD slot. Can someone confirm whether or not this is true?
    2. It shows that this unit will not do routing. Does that mean that if I download someone else's ride it wont tell me when I need to make a turn or does that just mean that I can't enter a destination and have it lead me there?
    3. I use my 705 as an odometer for my bikes so that I know when to do maintenance. The 705 keeps track up to 3 bikes. Will this do the same? How many bikes can I keep track of?
    Killing it with close inspection.

  55. #55
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    There are no SD slot or storage expansion options on the Garmin Edge 520. According to Windows Explorer my Edge 520 has 105mb of storage space in total and 64mb free space currently. I replaced the original basemap with Open Street Map (31mb size see post with details and pictures) which is smaller than the stock basemap.

    The Garmin Edge 520 seems to be a lot like a mini Garmin Edge 1000. Instead of named bikes and linked sensors it has "activity profiles" and a sensor pool where all the paired sensors are listed together. The sensors that are detected are linked to. In terms of tracking bikes and mileage this isn't a problem. Think of "activity profiles" as "bike profiles" and it does the same thing. You can have 10 seperate activity profiles so can keep track of mileage for 10 bikes with the Edge 520.

    These screenshots of my Edge 520 show how you select from the different profiles. My Specialized Epic is named as "Epic". When you go to the totals section of the Edge 520 there are individual totals for each profile, listing number of rides, mileage, hours and calories.



    The paired sensors can be renamed also, so that when you have lots of sensors they can be identified. By default they just have a sensor ID but that can be renamed. Here I have renamed the speed sensor and power meter so they match the name of the bike. It doesn't really matter with one bike but if you have many bikes and sensors this will show which is which.



    The navigation is on my to do list. It isn't something I use normally but I'm going to try it out. There seem to be some tricks to getting that working properly on the Edge 520

  56. #56
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    My first try at using courses on the Garmin Edge 520 wasn't hugely successful. I exported a previous road ride as a .tcx file from Strava and added it into the Garmin (in mass storage mode copy-paste the .tcx or .gpx file into the \Garmin\NewFiles folder. When you disconnect the Garmin from the computer it will automatically create a course from the file).

    Here are some screenshots of the ride when using a Strava created .tcx file to create the course:



    The Course had an estimated time of 85 hours and several invalid errors. Not a good start! I didn't have much time to spend messing around as I wanted to get out riding. I set it as the route to follow, put the Garmin on the map screen and set off. It counted down distance to the start of the course as I turned out of the house but then went straight to 38 miles to go once I had reached the beginning of the course.

    There was a purple track to follow on screen but no warning tones or turn directions.

    Strange pink lines kept appearing on the screen as I rode. You can see one in the middle picture above. This must have been something to do with the routing as they would come and go. They weren't part of the map screen.

    I stopped after a while and tried forcing on the directions screen. All it showed was a generic message "Go NorthWest" so I turned it off again.

    There were some roadworks that I decided to avoid, taking me off the course. Once I went off course this "Off Course" message appeared along the bottom of the screen. At the point that I rejoined the original route it went away again.

    A distance countdown began as I got close to finishing the route. As I reached the end point the Garmin played a tune and it came up with a message saying "Course completed, You win!"

    I definitely need to do more research on how to get courses working effectively. A .gpx file might work better if it can have some turn by turn instructions that the Garmin Edge 520 will be able to use.

    Update
    A .gpx file gives turn by turn directions for courses when loaded into the Garmin Edge 520. You can either import one, or use a saved ride on the device done previously to create the course. The predicted time for the route in the course summary is more or less correct with a .gpx file. It doesn't have the 85 hour problem of the .tcx courses.

    The turn directions in the .gpx course don't appear to be necessarily located on the route where you would want to see them whilst riding however (just before junctions and turnings).

    I think it may be a case of needing to create or edit the course in a particular program for it to work properly.

    "Turn notifications via TBT instructions and course point notifications are two separate and independent things.

    Course points are built in to a tcx file and are reported to the user by the Edge as you pass through that point. You could use a course point to notify you of a turn.

    A Turn-By-Turn (TBT) instructions are generated by the Edge through an analysis of the course file when you load it.

    You can control the reporting of TBT and Course points by the Edge separately."
    Aweatherall

    https://forums.garmin.com/showthread...-on-Garmin-520
    Last edited by WR304; 09-12-2015 at 10:56 AM.

  57. #57
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    This RideWithGPS help page and this Garmin forums thread seem to be about the best sources on getting a course to work. It appears it should work if you have a .tcx file with custom cue points and notifications added. You use cue points instead of the turn by turn navigation.

    I've got the navigation working on a small test route now. I created the route in RideWithGPS (premium membership needed). With the premium features you add cues into the ride and set it so you get a marker before the turn itself. You then export it as a .tcx course file to add to the Garmin.

    There is a known issue with switching between Strava segments and courses apparently. It's a case of using one or the other on the Garmin Edge 520.

    --------------------------------------------

    Export File Formats (Ride With GPS Help)
    Every Ride and Route on Ride with GPS has an export tab in the right side panel. You’ll see different export options like TCX Course, TCX History, GPX Track, CSV, and KML. What do these all mean?

    TCX FILES

    There are two versions of TCX files: TCX Course and TCX History.

    TCX Course files contain all the navigation to use with your Garmin Edge series devices. This is the most common file format that we recommend to get turn-by-turn navigation.

    There are three reasons you would want a TCX file over a GPX:

    1. You have a GPS unit that does not have mapping capabilities (Edge 305/500) but want turn warnings, or you have a GPS unit that has mapping capabilities (Edge 705/800) but you did not purchase the microSD card that contains the mapping/routing information which provides the nice GPS style turn guidance.
    A. TCX files contain the cuesheet generated when mapping a route using our planner.
    B. When you come close to the cuesheet entry, your Edge will beep and an arrow icon will appear on the map. An abbreviated 10 character description of the cue will also appear. Garmin’s are limited to 10 characters, so we attempt to strip out irrelevant text from the cue, leaving just the street name if possible.
    C. Often, the beep you get with the very simplistic turn by turn directions of a TCX occurs as you are in the middle of the intersection, meaning it doesn’t happen in advance of the turn. That’s fine for most people, since it’s just a reference – most of the time you have an idea of where you are going and just need an auditory beep to make sure you don’t accidentally pass a turn.
    2. Your GPS unit has fancy maps installed, but you have custom cue entries like water and food stops. Using the TCX will still allow your GPS unit to have the fancy turn guidance you get when you have a quality map installed on the GPS, however you will also get the simple beep/icon style navigation of the TCX. This allows you to get alerts when you approach your custom cues, while still using the fancy navigation capabilities of your GPS unit.
    3. You are interested in the training capabilities of the TCX, meaning, you want to export a route with a set speed, and you want to get alerts when you go above or below that speed. At this moment, we do not have the capability to export a *route* with these average speeds, however if you export a TCX of an existing activity that you have done, you can race against the speed you went when originally riding on that activity.

    TCX History files contain the entire track of the recorded ride including sensor information like heart rate, cadence, and power if applicable. Export as a TCX History if you wish to transfer a ride to another service or application for analysis.

    Export File Formats | Ride With GPS Help

    ---------------------------------------------------------


    "I've just finished a MTB ride (both on and off road) where I navigated using a TCX course from bike route toaster. This TCX file had course points at junctions/intersections and 150ft before each one as well. I turned off the "Turn Guidance" option on the Garmin and it showed me the course instructions at the correct times (even when I did not have the map screen displayed, which was nice).

    I also added fields for Course Point Distance, Distance to Next and Time to Next. These all showed the correct data all the way through the ride, and even after I restarted the course mid-ride the data was correct and the instructions continued to be displayed. It did take a couple of minutes after re-starting the course where I was puzzled to see it show every course instruction from the beginning (WTF?), but it did catch up to the correct instruction. However, I did not have any segments starred (so did not follow a segment), so it's not a valid test of the problem!

    The Course Point Distance had a uselessly small and badly coloured arrow, the Distance to Next had an extra decimal place so was slightly more accurate. If I'm picky I'd like the course instructions to use a bigger font (there's plenty of unused space), I may have to write a little Python script to convert them to upper case before I put them on the the Garmin.

    I am perfectly happy with the navigation/route following capabilities of this device, my offroad excursion was much more successful than when using my Mio Cyclo 505, which has true navigation but also has a nasty habit of deciding to send you off the course you actually wanted to follow, especially when bridleways are involved." Hulahoopian

    -------------

    "If you stop a course mid ride (because you want to load a Strava segment) following a TCX course made from RWGPS, and try to restart the course after your segment, you will not get ANY turn "course points" for the rest of you ride. This is a huge problem. It is bad enough that we can't use segments while following a course, but now we can't stop and restart the course mid ride if we want to have any idea on how to get home.
    This happened to me the other day and I had to stare at the map screen for the rest of my ride. This means I could not view my data page!" PMERRILL87

    -------
    "I have found what is causing the problem and I have a workaround for you.

    The issue is with the data that is being generated by RWGPS and how the Edge is using it.

    To determine if you are on or off course the Edge builds a bounding box around the track points that it considers to be part of the course that you are following.

    In selecting what track points to use it looks at the total time specified in the course file for completing the course. Using that time it goes through the list of track points and selects all the track points that fall within that time window.

    Here is the problem. The time for completing the course specified by RWGPS is much shorter than the time taken using the timestamps that are on each track point. The bigger the difference the fewer the number of track points that are included in the bounding box calculation.

    As an example I looked at the values in the file I was using and found that the time delta between the first and last track point was 18,370 seconds, while the time reported for completion of the course was 2,198 seconds. As you can see unless my course was confined to a very small area I would only be able to pick it up near the start.

    I'm betting if you look at the tcx file that you downloaded from RWGPS you will see a similar thing.

    Here is how to fix it.

    Using an editor (I like using the firstobject xml editor) open up the tcx file.

    Go to the first track point in the file and get the value for "Time". Do the same for the last track point. Then workout the difference between these 2 times in seconds and take that value and use it replace the value that is currently associated with the tag TotalTimeSeconds under lap near the top of the file.

    Save the changes and place the file in the Garmin\NewFiles folder." AWEATHERALL

    https://forums.garmin.com/showthread...urn-in-courses

    .

  58. #58
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    Creating Garmin Edge 520 Courses With Turn Notifications

    I've got the Garmin Edge 520 courses with turn notifications working now.

    You will need to create a .tcx route file. In order to have directions whilst riding on the Garmin Edge 520 this MUST have cue points in the file. Cue points are markers along the route that trigger when you approach their location. On the Garmin Edge 520 the cue points can display a symbol (left arrow, right arrow etc) and also 10 characters of text. This is usually directions but you can put anything in.

    The Strava .tcx route I tried to use yesterday didn't have any cue points, which is why there were no directions.

    There are a couple of different websites that will let you create and edit the route including cue points. Bike Route Toaster is a free option. It lets you add and edit cue points before exporting the file as a .tcx.

    Bike Route Toaster - Welcome to BikeRouteToaster.com

    Here I'm using RideWithGps to create the route.

    Map Bike Rides with Elevation Profiles, Analyze Cycling Performance, Train Better. Ride With GPS

    This is with a premium subscription which is required to allow cue point editing and add prior warnings. You can either import a track from elsewhere (such as a .tcx exported from Strava) or create one from scratch. In this picture the red line is the route that I have created. The map in the picture is Google Maps but if you click on maps at the top right of the RideWithGps map you can select Open Street Map, which will be better for offroad routes. Cue points are automatically added at junctions as you create the course. You can also add your own custom cue points and edit the existing ones.



    Once the course has been created you save the route. You can then go to Routes - View and click Export at the top right. Select .tcx course, tick notify before turn and put at least 60 metres in the box. This notification sets where the onscreen message on the map appears and where a warning beep will sound if you have tones enabled.



    There's currently a bug with the time in the exported .tcx file from RideWithGps. Open the .tcx in first object xml editor before loading it into the Garmin.

    Download firstobject XML Editor by First Objective Software, Inc.

    16 lines down you will see a field called TotalTimeSeconds. This is the estimated time for how long the route will take to travel in seconds. Change this number to a time (in seconds) that will take longer than the actual route. The easiest way to do this is by adding a 0 to the end of the existing number. If you were to do the route in four hours for example you would enter 14400 (four hours in seconds). This should allow the course to return to its route if you go off course or stop the course apparently (see the post above this one for more details).

    Save the .tcx file, and then with the Garmin Edge 520 in mass storage mode connected to your computer copy - paste the .tcx file into \Garmin\NewFiles. Unplug the Garmin and it will automatically create a new course that will be available to select and ride.

    Following a course with Cue Point Turn Notifications on the Garmin Edge 520

    Map Settings that I used today (under Menu - Settings - Activity Profiles - "profile name" - Map)
    Orientation: Track Up
    Auto Zoom: On
    Guide Text: When Navigating
    Data fields on screen was Courses - Course Point Distance

    To view courses on the Garmin Edge 520 go to Menu - Training - Courses. There are several options screens in this section too! At the top there are course options and then when you select the individual course there are settings there too. Here are screen shots of the settings I used. The average speed for the course should appear as slower than the actual speed will be with the estimated time being longer than it will take you. If it doesn't you need to go back and edit the .tcx file before importing it again.



    Once happy select the course you want to use and press Ride to load the course. Press the Start/Stop button to begin the timer and start riding. With the map screen displayed it should look like in this screenshot.



    The Course Point Distance field will have a distance count down to the next cue point. There is also a small icon showing what will happen at the next cue point that you are approaching. Here the next cue point is a right turn. There is a text notice overlaid on the map of what the next cue point is too. Here it says "Turn Right".



    As I reach the junction the map zooms in automatically, a beep will sound if you have tones enabled and a notification message and arrow appears at the bottom of the screen. Once past the junction the map zooms out again and the Course Point Distance field changes to the next location.



    For today's ride I did a 55 mile route that has defeated me in the past. There are multiple unsignposted junctions. When I tried a few weeks ago I wound up on the main road for several miles, instead of the quiet route through the lanes that I had intended to take.

    Following the Garmin Edge 520 map and directions it worked really well. I was able to follow the route easily. The notifications and onscreen map worked all the way round.

    I went off course on purpose, cutting out one section and a cue point. As soon as I rejoined the route it started working again, moving onto the next cue point. There seems to be a feature with the "Off Course" message. Once you go off course the map stops updating. It could possibly be a bug or it may be to force you to take notice. It happened yesterday and today.

    Battery life takes a hit with the course on. Where the battery was at 70% after 3 hours 50 minutes with no course Wednesday it was down to 60% battery after just 3 hours 30 minutes riding today with the course (backlight off, bluetooth off, two sensors connected).
    Last edited by WR304; 09-24-2015 at 11:58 AM.

  59. #59
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    Really useful thread, been struggling with Nav and settings on my new 520 for the past week. A couple of questions:
    1) Courses>settings> Always Display--what does this always display?
    2) How to turn off the 'Riding Northwest' text?
    3) I want a countdown to next nav point, should I be using Dist To Next or Course Point Dist? What's the difference between the two?
    4) Any way of preventing those big straight pink guidance lines appearing on the nav page?

    5) Any solution for the elevation profile y-axis being way off scale on RWPGS tcx files and BRT tcx files (which both don't show up in course preview screen, but when riding they are way too big)?

  60. #60
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    WR304: do you think the 520 (the screen resolution/contrast) is a bad choice for mountain biking if your rides consist of primarily woods, under cover of trees? Is it just too hard to read?
    Also. how would you compare it to a 500, which I have, in these settings in terms of readability?

    Thanks

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sprool View Post
    Really useful thread, been struggling with Nav and settings on my new 520 for the past week. A couple of questions:
    1) Courses>settings> Always Display--what does this always display?
    2) How to turn off the 'Riding Northwest' text?
    3) I want a countdown to next nav point, should I be using Dist To Next or Course Point Dist? What's the difference between the two?
    4) Any way of preventing those big straight pink guidance lines appearing on the nav page?

    5) Any solution for the elevation profile y-axis being way off scale on RWPGS tcx files and BRT tcx files (which both don't show up in course preview screen, but when riding they are way too big)?
    1. Menu - Training - Courses- "course name" - Settings - Always Display

    You would normally leave this set to off.

    "Always display will draw the route on the map page all the time even when not following that course." AWEATHERALL

    "If you were to say have 5 courses saved and all set to display, you'd see all of them. This could be useful and/or confusing if the courses overlapped each other." TLGPA

    https://forums.garmin.com/showthread...always-display

    2. To get rid of the headings go to Menu - Settings - Activity Profiles - "profile name" - Map - Guide Text. Set this to "Never Display". If you have "Always Display" set here it will have the grey box visible across the top of the map screen at all times. If you're using cue points on the course this text box isn't used for navigating with the Garmin Edge 520.

    If you were using a Garmin Edge with routable maps this grey text box would be giving you road name details etc displayed in the text box as you rode along. On the Edge 520 all it seems to do is give you a heading.

    3. Course Point Distance is the one to use. This gives you the additional small visual symbol and count down to the next cue point. Distance to Next seems to have the same distance but no symbol.

    4. I don't think you can do much about the pink lines on the map screen when riding a course. They form a rough pattern of the course you are riding. I suspect that it's a bug that needs to be fixed via a firmware update.

    5. The elevation screen profile is one part of the Garmin Edge 520 that is buggy. There is a known issue with the scales:

    "Nothing wrong with the data you are using.

    There is a bug in build 2.30 in the vertical scaling of the course preview elevation page."
    AWEATHERALL

    https://forums.garmin.com/showthread...levation-scale

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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304 View Post
    If you were using a Garmin Edge with routable maps this grey text box would be giving you road name details etc displayed in the text box as you rode along. On the Edge 520 all it seems to do is give you a heading.
    Thanks for the info. I use an open streetmap area inserted in the the device from BBBike.org, and with tcx route from bikeroutetoaster yesterday I got the street names popping up with turn prompts in a small black box at the bottom of the display.

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sprool View Post
    Thanks for the info. I use an open streetmap area inserted in the the device from BBBike.org, and with tcx route from bikeroutetoaster yesterday I got the street names popping up with turn prompts in a small black box at the bottom of the display.
    The navigation features and functions vary between the different Garmin Edge devices. Here's my attempt at explaining the differences.

    Routable Maps and Turn By Turn
    On a GPS device such as the Garmin Edge 1000 you have routable maps and what I'd describe as true turn by turn navigation. This is where the Garmin knows where you are on the map. It is able to reference your position and tell what road or track you are travelling along using its built in map.

    If you want to go somewhere you can punch in a destination and the Garmin Edge 1000 will automatically calculate a route from where you are to the destination. As you travel the route it will tell you the street names and where exactly to turn in detail from its built in map. If you're forced to go off course or need to change route the Garmin Edge 1000 can recalculate and create a new route to your destination. For this detailed turn by turn navigation the Garmin Edge 1000 uses the grey box at the top of the screen to display the information.



    There's a good description of this on the dcrainmaker Garmin Edge 1000 review:

    Garmin Edge 1000 In-Depth Review | DC Rainmaker

    Maps on the Garmin Edge 520
    The key thing to remember about navigation is that a mapping GPS with routable maps can tell you where to go whilst a GPS without routable maps can't. It can only follow a preset route that you have loaded in advance.

    The Garmin Edge 520 doesn't have the same mapping and navigation features as a Garmin Edge 1000. It's far more basic. Unlike the Garmin Edge 1000 the Garmin Edge 520 doesn't know where you are on the map or interact with it for navigation. It doesn't care what the map looks like, there could be no map at all and it wouldn't make any difference. All it knows is your GPS position coordinates.

    Where the Garmin Edge 1000 can independently tell you how to get from one place to another by itself the Garmin Edge 520 has to be told by you where to go, via loading a course. The course is a trail of GPS points that lead you along the set route. All the GPS is doing is pointing you to the next GPS point in sequence.

    Turn by Turn on the Garmin Edge 520
    Although the Garmin Edge 520 has "turn by turn" navigation this isn't the same thing as on a Garmin Edge 1000. Because it can't see where the actual junctions are via a map all the Garmin Edge 520 does is look for sudden changes of direction in the GPS track, guess that they are junctions and call these turns. Apart from that its "navigation" is just giving you a heading in the grey box. It isn't very good and not what most people think of as "turn by turn navigation".

    Cue Points
    Cue points are the directions embedded into the .tcx course file when you created it. The cue points are what you are seeing when the black box appears with directions at the bottom of the screen whilst following a course. You can have these cue points appear on both the Garmin Edge 1000 and Garmin Edge 520 in the same way. On both devices cue points will pop up as a black box at the bottom of the screen.

    On the Garmin Edge 1000 they're more supplementary entries (which can be turned off) additional to the primary detailed directions provided by the built in mapping (the grey box at the top of the screen on the Garmin Edge 1000). On the Garmin Edge 520 because you don't have the detailed directions the cue point directions become your main source of directions and are more important.

  64. #64
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    thanks for the explanation, that makes it a lot clearer, have you considered rewriting all the operating manuals for Garmin cos they are badly in need of someone technical to add some clarity!

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    Garmin manuals are legendary for their brevity. I'd struggle to stay under their word limit.

    Here is the current online version of the Garmin Edge 520 manual:

    Edge 520 Owner's Manual

    .

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    yep been through all that, great details about fixing the mount to your handlebars, care of your elastic silicone rings and charging the device, all the essential stuff, nothing much else about navigating and map settings. You would think they are better suited to selling bicycle bells judging by their focus on instruction manuals.

  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by jon123 View Post
    WR304: do you think the 520 (the screen resolution/contrast) is a bad choice for mountain biking if your rides consist of primarily woods, under cover of trees? Is it just too hard to read?
    Also. how would you compare it to a 500, which I have, in these settings in terms of readability?

    Thanks
    I think the side by side pictures in Post #48 are a fair representation of how the screens of the two devices appear without backlight. In full daylight both the Garmin Edge 500 and Garmin Edge 520 screens without backlight are easy enough to read. The Garmin Edge 520 screen is a bit darker but you can still see it. Without backlight the Garmin Edge 500 screen is easier to read when in the shade or gloom. The Garmin Edge 520 screen without backlight is harder to read when in the shade or near darkness.

    The main thing with screen readability is that this is talking about without the backlight turned on. As soon as you turn on the backlight there's no problem viewing the Garmin Edge 520 screen in shade or near darkness. The Garmin Edge 520 colour screen looks great and is very easy to read with its backlight on. The only reason for deciding to use the Garmin Edge 520 without backlight on all the time would be down to battery life considerations.

    Battery life for the Garmin Edge 520 is claimed to be "up to 15 hours". That is best case scenario though. Once you start using device features - ANT+ sensors, GLONASS, bluetooth connectivity, livetrack, following a course, screen backlight etc that will use up the battery faster. I haven't seen any detailed figures as to how much each feature takes up battery as yet. On the evening ride that I did last Friday, with the backlight on 70% brightness, the Garmin Edge 520 didn't seem to be using up battery that much quicker than with the backlight off.

    From the rides that I've done I think it's fairly safe to say that with ANT+ sensors, GLONASS and backlight permanently on (but no courses or bluetooth connectivity) the Garmin Edge 520 should conservatively manage at least 8 or 9 hours on a single charge with a safety margin on top. I wouldn't like to say more than that as I haven't tested it to see for sure.

    If you're doing rides that are much longer than that (24 hours say) you will need an external charger. The Garmin Edge 520 will continue to record and function whilst charging from an external battery pack. I've tried it connected to a USB charger (not a computer) and the Garmin Edge 520 stays functioning as a bike computer whilst charging, rather than switching to mass storage mode.

  68. #68
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    The Garmin Edge 520 has a barometric altimeter. The four small holes that you see on the underside of the device are for the barometric altimeter and temperature.



    These holes need to be unobstructed for the altimeter to work properly.

    Barometric altimeters are nothing new. They have been a feature of Garmins for a long time. Compared to using GPS elevation there are pros and cons to a barometric altimeter. The barometric altimeter can be affected by changes in the weather so isn't always perfect.

    https://gpstracklog.com/2012/12/all-...ltimeters.html

    With the Garmin Edge 520 you can set a starting altitude if you regularly set off from the same place. Enter the correct altitude and then Mark Location so that it will remember it for next time. I got into the habit of leaving my Garmin Edge 500 sat outside turned on for 20 minutes plus to settle before setting off on a ride and have been doing the same thing with the Garmin Edge 520 too.

    Here is a comparison between the Garmin Edge 520 and GPS elevation on today's ride.



    This graph shows the elevation recorded by my Garmin Edge 520 over 44 miles today. The green highlighted points are the top of the same hill. Near the beginning of the ride was heading out and I also came back past the same point on the way home. You can see how despite this the altitude values don't match. The location was the same but the Garmin Edge 520 had recorded a different, lower, value on the return journey. The weather was closing in and it was getting colder.

    The Garmin Edge 520 altitude trace isn't particularly detailed, it doesn't pick up small changes or rises. Compared to the Garmin Edge 500 the Garmin Edge 520 barometric altimeter seems about the same or maybe even slightly less responsive. It's one area that isn't clearly improved from the older models.

    For the entire ride the Garmin Edge 520 recorded 1558ft ascent and 1607ft of descent. If you import this ride into Strava it will use the Garmin ascent figure for the ride elevation.

    Here's exactly the same route in the Ride With GPS website. This has estimated the elevation profile from GPS data. The GPS elevation estimate for the same route gives 2150ft ascent and 2149ft descent. That's quite a big difference!



    The GPS elevation estimate for the same route gives 2150ft ascent and 2149ft descent.
    Last edited by WR304; 09-15-2015 at 12:37 PM.

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    When you first create a new interval Workout for the Garmin Edge 520 this has to be done via the Garmin Connect website. Where the Garmin Edge 500 had the option to create and edit workouts on the device itself this feature has been removed from the Garmin Edge 520. All you can do is run, preview or delete workouts.

    In order to create an interval Workout with multiple steps open Garmin Connect in a web browser on your computer, click on the Menu symbol at the top left and select Workouts from the bottom of the list. You then select "Create workout" and begin adding steps. There is a limit on the number of steps that you can have in an individual workout. If you are doing multiple intervals you would nest the steps, so that they are repeated for the correct number of times.

    This picture shows a 3x9 minute Under Over interval session in Garmin Connect. There are 3 9 minute intervals with a 6 minute recovery period between each one. Each 9 minute interval consists of 2 minutes Under, 1 Minute Over, 2 Minutes Under, 1 Minute Over, 2 Minutes Under, 1 Minute Over.

    You can put target zones in but I prefer to just use duration without any target zones in Garmin workouts. This avoids any pop up out of zone warnings appearing when doing the intervals.



    Once you are happy with the workout format send it to your device. In order to start a workout go to Menu - Training - Workouts - "workout name" and select Do Workout. The workout is now ready to begin. When you press the Start/Stop button the Garmin will go through the workout steps in order.

    If you decide to skip a workout step press the Lap button once and it will move onto the next step in the workout instead. Each time you press the Lap button it will advance an additional step.

    When the workout finishes the timer stops immediately. You'll see a Workout Complete notice and the Red band will appear around the outside of the screen. If you're outdoors and still riding don't forget to press the Start/Stop button at this point, in order to restart the timer and continue recording the rest of the ride!

    When actually trying to ride a workout there are some differences from the Garmin Edge 500. The Garmin Edge 500 had a dedicated Workout display screen. On this screen you could add a few Data fields of your choice, so that you were able to look at the information you were interested in. It wasn't amazing but was enough to get the session done.



    The Garmin Edge 520 has a dedicated Workout display screen too. It has some big problems though. The main one is that you can't add your own data fields, making it fairly useless. If you have no target set it only displays speed. If you have a target zone it displays the zone onscreen instead of speed.

    Along with this if you have target zones enabled the problem is that if you go outside the zone a warning message appears. This was bad enough on the Garmin Edge 500 (a box right in the middle of the screen) but on the Garmin Edge 520 there is a massive black box covering half the screen if you're out of zone. It makes it impossible to read the display and stays there for several seconds at a time. I want to be able to see the display as much as possible. By creating a workout with no target zones in the file it avoids the warning messages.



    The dedicated Workout screen on the Garmin is terrible and basically unusable. Fortunately there is a workaround. You can make a custom data screen that will show you most of the information needed. This wasn't present on the Garmin Edge 500 but with the Garmin Edge 520 you can choose to add a data field called Workouts - Time To Go onto a normal riding screen. This gives you the countdown timer for each workout step on a normal riding screen, allowing you to add your own choice of data fields alongside.

    For my intervals screen today I had Power 3 second average as the top field, Time to Go as the middle field, and then Power - Lap as the lower field. As soon as you begin the workout use the arrow keys to scroll from the default Workout screen to the new custom one. Power 3 second average is what I ride to, Time to Go shows how long the step will last and Power - Lap shows the average power for the interval step that I'm riding. Bear in mind that when each step begins you get a message partially covering the bottom of the screen so the most important fields need to be at the top.



    Here is a close up graph showing the first 9 minute Under Over interval of the three in WKO+ 3.0. The graph has no smoothing. The aim with Under Over intervals is to be able to lift your pace, recover whilst still trying hard and then lift your pace again. It is intended to help you deal with frequent changes of intensity when riding. It isn't simply going as hard as you can at one pace for 9 minutes at a time. I was trying to hold around 230 watts for the 2 Minute Under sections (96% FTP) and then hold over 260 watts (108% FTP) for the 1 Minute Over sections.

    The actual power data recorded by the Garmin Edge 520 with my Power2Max power meter looks just like it did with the Garmin Edge 500. You can see how even though I was trying to ride at a constant effort on a road there is still constant variation in power output. When riding it's helpful to have power displayed on the head unit with smoothing, rather than instant power. I usually use 3 second power, it makes the display less jumpy and easier to pace with.

    Riding outdoors you have to be careful with route choice to not get held up. Ideally you want a nice straight road with no junctions or obstacles. During this interval I had to slow down for a junction and then straight afterwards met some oncoming horses so had to slow down again. As soon as you start being held up it drags down your average power.

    Interval 1 wasn't as bad as interval 3. A tractor decided to pass me whilst I was partway through the interval. I was doing 21mph and he was only going 1 or 2mph faster. I had to ease off to let him complete the pass, and then of course I'm in the slipstream so not putting any effort in! As I was trying to stick to a set wattage I wound up braking to let him get a decent gap in front before continuing.

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    I was reading this thread about the Garmin Edge 520 temperature sensor accuracy (or lack of) and low readings.

    https://forums.garmin.com/showthread...rmometer-error

    https://forums.garmin.com/showthread...rmometer-error

    In terms of temperatures my Garmin Edge 500 has historically always read high. Before I turned the backlight on it was showing a temperature 1c higher than the indoor thermometer.

    The Garmin Edge 520 in contrast appears to read low. Before I turned the backlight on it was showing a temperature 2c lower than the indoor thermometer, 3c lower than the Garmin Edge 520. I've been noticing the same behaviour outdoors riding also. The Garmin Edge 520 shows temperatures that appear lower than I'd expect.

    There isn't much you can do about this as the temperature sensor can't be calibrated. I'm just going to make a note to add a few degrees celsius onto whatever figure is displayed by the Garmin Edge 520 in future.

    My original intention was to leave the Garmin Edge 520 and Garmin Edge 500 side by side for half an hour to let them settle next to an indoor thermometer before taking a picture. It was all going well until I had the great idea of turning the Garmin backlights on for the photograph, which promptly bumped their temperature readings up by a large amount!

    It's a nice picture showing the screens with backlights on anyway. The Garmin Edge 520 is in day mode here, 70% backlight, and the screen is easy to read. You can see the difference in font sizes between the Garmin Edge 500 and Garmin Edge 520 too.


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    This graph shows the altitude and temperature traces during today's ride.



    I got a puncture after two hours so spent 20 minutes stopped sat on a bench fixing it (it was a nice day and I wasn't in a hurry). I then set off again and rode the last hour home, making the ride three hours in total.

    The orange line on the graph shows the altitude in feet. The barometric altimeter isn't that consistent. It lost altitude over the course of the ride. I had the Garmin calibrated manually to 185ft altitude at the beginning of the ride, matching the starting elevation for this point in Ride With GPS. At the end of the ride (exactly the same location) it was 60ft lower, reading 125ft instead of the 185ft that it should have done. The Garmin had a total ascent of 2120ft and a total descent of 2165ft. The Ride With GPS website shows a total ascent of 2657ft and a total descent of 2653ft.

    The purple line shows the recorded temperature in celsius. Stationary the Garmin was reading 18c, which was probably about right. As soon as I started moving with the added wind cooling from riding the recorded temperature plummeted. It was reading 11c up in the hills and rose to 16c on the flat just before I punctured.

    Whilst I was stopped to fix the puncture, sitting on a bench, it rose to 18c over the 20 minutes. Once moving again it dropped back to 13c.

    When riding the temperature sensor of my Garmin Edge 520 is too low by a good 3 to 5c. Today was a warm sunny day. It felt like it was actually around 17 to 18c temperature. I was in short sleeved summer kit without feeling the need for arm or leg warmers.

    It isn't that big a problem but I probably wouldn't rely too much on the accuracy of the recorded temperature or altitude from the Garmin.

    A few weeks ago there was a Strava challenge to climb the altitude of Alpe d'Huez 6,102ft.

    https://www.strava.com/challenges/ju...bing-challenge

    My friend was telling me about one of his friend's who decided to do this by travelling to the Alpe d'Huez in France and physically riding up the actual climb. You'd think that this should have given him the achievement but his Garmin (not sure which model, it wasn't an Edge 520) recorded a lower altitude. When he uploaded the ride to Strava it said that he hadn't done enough climbing to complete the challenge!

    Edit: Looking back through rides done with my Garmin Edge 500 that was generally very close between starting and ending altitude, much closer than the Garmin Edge 520 is managing. The difference between Garmin Edge 500 beginning and final altitude readings over a three hour ride, starting and ending in the same place, was usually around 10ft or less. The altitude at high points on the top of hills on out and back rides with the Garmin Edge 500 were close too, also around 10ft or less.

    The overall altitude totals from the Garmin Edge 500's barometric altimeter were still a lot lower than Ride With GPS however. Eg: 29 August 2015 three hour ride, Garmin Edge 500 2,087ft total ascent, Ride With GPS for the same route 2,578ft total ascent.
    Last edited by WR304; 09-17-2015 at 12:43 PM.

  72. #72
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    Hi WR304,

    I've been testing my new edge 520 this weekend and I found it really slow to follow a course.
    I'm used to do MTB marathon races guided by GPS with my etrex, I always used it with no maps, only a line to follow and I can manage pretty well a MTB marathon without errors.
    I also had an edge 500 and it was impossible to do that as it would update the line every 4 seconds or so, and most of the time the line would disappear...
    With the edge 520 I notice that it is also slow to update our position on the map, I think it updates every 2 seconds, which is really slow if your going downhill on a mountain bike race for instance. Is there a way to speed it up? I've tried it with the base map which as little to non offroad information.

    and by the way thanks for the wonderful explanations and reviews.

    thx

    Tiago Silva

  73. #73
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    I don't think there's much that you can do about the speed that the course map updates. There aren't any options available. Unless it's changed by Garmin in a future firmware update that's it.

    If you haven't got any map overlay detail, but do have some idea of where the junctions are, I'd try and add additional manual course points to the route before loading it. That will give you a distance countdown, direction arrow and text warning on the map so you know what's coming up well in advance. You could have a text note to yourself pop up before the start of the descent, with a warning to watch for the turn partway down for example.

    Setting the map zoom manually to a different level might help too. Slightly more zoomed out could give a bit more time to plan ahead and react.

    Open Street Map is quite mixed when it comes to offroad trails. This link shows part of the Forest of Dean, where the blue lines indicate mountain bike trails. It's actually quite detailed for this area in places:

    http://www.openstreetmap.org/#map=16/51.8170/-2.5752

    .

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    Spurious Pink Line

    Hello all

    I was pointed at this thread by someone who for some reason is disagreeing on my review of the 520 on the vendor site stating that there are is no Turn Guidance on the 520 however it is interesting as I can see it is being discussed here in great detail.

    Anyhow the extra pink lines that appear can be sorted I believe by turning off Turn Guidance. The line is used when the device plots a Turn Guidance route based on the Course rather than using Course Points. Training>Courses>Course Options>Turn Guidance. Although it also puts a line on if you select Navigate To Start when you load your course.
    Last edited by City Velo; 09-23-2015 at 07:52 AM. Reason: Repeating earlier posts

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    NB This does not stop Course Point warnings being displayed.

    I also find that amending RWGPS files as detailed above (the overall time is out by a factor of 10 so I generally just add a 0) in the TCX file makes the unit generated Course more accurate and the spurious lines follow my course generally.

    Quote Originally Posted by City Velo View Post
    Hello all

    I was pointed at this thread by someone who for some reason is disagreeing on my review of the 520 on the vendor site stating that there are is no Turn Guidance on the 520 however it is interesting as I can see it is being discussed here in great detail.

    Anyhow the extra pink lines that appear can be sorted I believe by turning off Turn Guidance. The line is used when the device plots a Turn Guidance route based on the Course rather than using Course Points. Training>Courses>Course Options>Turn Guidance. Although it also puts a line on if you select Navigate To Start when you load your course.

  76. #76
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    One area of the Garmin Edge 520 that has a lot more detail than the Garmin Edge 500 are the post ride summary screens. On the Garmin Edge 500 this was incredibly basic. On the Garmin Edge 520 you have multiple screens including a fairly detailed summary, elevation profile, map, laps. You also get a time in power zones summary with a power meter and a heart rate summary if you are wearing a heart rate strap.

    1. Stationary and Moving Time
    The numbers that you see in the device summary aren't necessarily going to match with the numbers for the same ride once it is imported into another program or website. This is because different websites and programs calculate the averages differently to how it is done by the Garmin device. Each one has its own slight differences.

    This picture shows the Garmin Edge 520 device summary alongside the same ride summary once it has been imported in Strava.



    The Garmin Edge 520 includes all the time that the timer was running in its average speed and power calculations. I had auto pause disabled and left the timer running from when I set off until when I finished the ride. I had a total time of 2 hours 26 minutes 5 seconds for 42.6 miles. This is the time that was used to calculate the average speed of 17.49mph and average power of 206 watts displayed on the Garmin.

    On the Strava summary it shows a higher average speed of 17.8mph and average power of 210 watts for the same ride. The reason for this is that when you import the file into a website such as Strava the website looks through the file and automatically identifies any time that you were stopped. It then calculates average speed and average power based on your moving time, rather than your total elapsed time.

    For this ride I had a moving time of 2 hours 23 minutes 50 seconds, several minutes less than the total elapsed time of 2 hours 26 minutes 5 seconds. If the averages are calculated on the shorter time it will result in a higher average speed and higher average power. This is why the average speed and average power doesn't match between the Garmin and Strava summaries.

    My approach is that because I know the file will automatically have moving time identified once imported I leave the timer running and have auto pause disabled. I will stop the timer manually if I know that I'm going to be stationary for a long time (5 minutes plus), such as when fixing a puncture, to keep the onscreen ride time fairly close, but I won't stop it for shorter stops such as traffic lights, farm gates etc.

    2. Power Summaries
    In the picture above the power summaries are displayed for the ride on the Garmin and also on Strava:

    Garmin Edge 520
    Normalized Power 216 Watts,
    Intensity Factor 0.902,
    Training Stress Factor 197.3.

    Strava Website
    Weighted Average Power 213 watts,
    Intensity 89%,
    Training Load 192.

    This isn't down to timing differences or mismatched settings. It's because they are using different metrics. The Garmin uses Normalized Power, which is a 30-second rolling average. Strava uses xPower, which is an exponentially weighted moving average with a time constant of 25 seconds.

    xPower in Golden Cheetah - Training advice - Timetrialling Forum

    The two metrics give similar results but won't match exactly. It's close enough that the Strava Fitness and Freshness graph (Performance Management Chart) will read about the same as a Performance Management Chart based on Normalized Power anyway (eg: Training Peaks, WKO+ 3.0, WKO 4).

    The Normalized Power and Weighted Average Power power summary figures should be within a few points on both the Garmin Edge 520 and Strava. If you are seeing big differences this will be down to not having the same FTP setting in the Garmin Edge 520 as it is in Strava. They both need to have their FTP figure set manually (Garmin Edge 520 - Menu - My Stats - Training Zones - Power Zones - Enter a manual value), (Strava website - Settings - My Performance - Functional Threshold Power - Enter a manual value)

    Time in Power Zones
    This picture shows the time in power zones summary for the Garmin Edge 520 and Strava.



    There are a few seconds difference but overall the time in zones are close between the Garmin and Strava. If you want the zones to match exactly you'll need to manually edit the power zones on the Garmin Edge 520 (Menu - My Stats - Training Zones - Power Zones) to be the same as in Strava.

    In Strava you need to have a manually entered FTP figure (Strava website - Settings - My Performance - Functional Threshold Power - Enter a manual value) that matches the manually entered FTP figure that you have in the Garmin (Garmin Edge 520 - Menu - My Stats - Training Zones - Power Zones - Enter a manual value). If you have any automatically calculated figures then the two most likely won't match and your summaries will be all over the place.

    Elevation and Map Summary
    This picture shows the elevation and map summary screens on the Garmin Edge 520. You can't zoom or move around on these screens. They're not really that useful for anything. It seems to be very hit or miss whether an elevation summary is recorded. About 50% of the rides that I've done don't have anything visible in the elevation summary screen. There is elevation data in the .fit file but nothing appears in the ride summary elevation screen.

    Last edited by WR304; 09-24-2015 at 11:55 AM.

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by City Velo View Post
    Anyhow the extra pink lines that appear can be sorted I believe by turning off Turn Guidance. The line is used when the device plots a Turn Guidance route based on the Course rather than using Course Points. Training>Courses>Course Options>Turn Guidance. Although it also puts a line on if you select Navigate To Start when you load your course.
    I rode a course today with Turn Guidance disabled (Menu - Training - Courses - Course Options - Turn Guidance). There were no pink lines visible on the map. Thanks for the tip.

    I ran into an interesting issue at the start of the course though. When you start the course it asks onscreen if you want to navigate to the beginning of the course (which would use turn guidance). I chose Ok. On other rides with Turn Guidance enabled this would give a distance to start countdown.

    The start point of the course was 100 metres or so up the road. I set off in the right direction but this time nothing happened. There was no countdown, the first course point didn't trigger and the distance to next course point stayed at 0.1 miles as I rode past the start point of the course.

    I rode along for a couple of miles like this with no change before deciding to stop to try and sort it out. I stopped the course and loaded it again as a new course, whilst still on the course route. After loading the course again it came up with a "course found" message, and then displayed all the earlier course points (turn left, turn right, turn right, straight etc) onscreen one by one in order until it reached the correct point on the route where I was.

    I set off riding and the course worked properly with the course point countdown and pop up notifications for the rest of the ride.

    I'm not completely sure whether this problem was due to selecting "navigate to start" instead of cancelling with Turn Guidance disabled. It could possibly have been because I hadn't planned the course properly in Ride With GPS beforehand.

    When I was originally drawing the route in Ride With GPS I had created the course so that I would have to pass through the very end of the course to reach the beginning of the course, which was about 20 metres further on. This might have confused the Garmin and caused the issue of it not beginning the course. In future I'm going to make sure that the first point reached is the Start of the course not the End of the course.



    "Some tips for route planning (originally written by Uncycle on the Garmin forums):

    - To avoid confusing the Edge 1000, always finish a circular route 10-15 metres away from the start

    - When plotting a route always click in road segments NOT at junctions (to avoid little side stubs when you click a bit inaccurately)

    - Allow the website’s routing algorithm time after each click to complete its routing to that point (avoids odd little loopbacks)

    - Go round the course at max zoom to check that all is correct"


    Garmin Edge 1000 | / forgot /

    With the cue points that are added automatically by Ride With GPS it's worth going through them and checking the directions and 10 characters of text that will appear are correct before doing the ride. The automatic cue points aren't always correct, even going so far as getting left and right turns mixed up! I thought I'd checked them but at one junction the cue point said turn left, even though I could see from the onscreen map that it was a right turn!

    With 10 characters of text some of the automatic cue points will need re-writing for clarity. Only the first part of the message displays so that needs to be the information you want to see. On roundabout cue points for example I was changing the text to read "3rd exit", "2nd exit" etc. Junctions as simply "Turn Left", "Turn Right".

    Something that I haven't worked out is how to import a .gpx route from Strava into Ride With GPS, and then have it automatically add cue points.

    https://ridewithgps.zendesk.com/entr...-uploaded-file

    Update
    For today's ride I created a course with the Start point around 0.5 miles away and the Finish point several miles away, so that there would be no confusion. I had Turn Guidance set to OFF (which gets rid of the pink lines on the map). On first loading the course I chose to use Navigate to Start? again by clicking OK.

    Choosing Navigate to Start? OK when you first load the course currently breaks the course on the Garmin Edge 520 (2.30 firmware) if Turn Guidance is turned off. I began riding and the distance countdown to the Start point didn't change, as it had yesterday also. The course wouldn't have begun. Once I could see this happening I stopped, re-loaded the course (before reaching the Start) and chose CANCEL when asked if I wanted to Navigate to Start. This time the distance countdown worked properly and the course began once I reached the Start point.

    I'd expect this to be fixed at some point with a firmware update. The Navigate to Start? prompt shouldn't appear at all as an option if you have Turn Guidance disabled.
    Last edited by WR304; 09-25-2015 at 11:20 AM.

  78. #78
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    Strava Live Segments On Garmin Edge 520
    One of the features of the Garmin Edge 520 is that it can notify you of Strava segments on your route as you ride, providing a countdown and best time to try and beat. It's a feature that has been added to other Garmins too. The Edge 1000, Edge 810 and Edge 510 have Strava segments also. You need to have a Strava Premium paid subscription to use this feature.

    dcrainmaker has a detailed article about this here:

    Hands on: Strava and Garmin introduce on-device Live Segments for Edge series | DC Rainmaker

    This is the Strava help page on Live Segments:

    https://strava.zendesk.com/entries/6...on-your-Garmin

    I thought I'd have a go with this today. How difficult could it be.

    Strava Segments
    Strava segments are timed sections along your route, as recorded by your GPS. The times for each rider are ranked online with the fastest time being awarded the "KOM" for the segment.

    As with any online leaderboard it's easy to game the system. A lot of the Strava KOMs are either junk entries or simply untouchable if you're riding solo. Whether it's raging tailwinds, time trial bikes, entire leadout trains or drafting behind lorries on the road or offroad where the fastest riders mysteriously do a segment passing through four farm gates without slowing at all taking the KOMs seriously is just going to lead to frustration.

    Your user experience with Strava really depends upon how you approach this. The only segment times that I really pay any attention to are my own personal bests, or the times of people that I know personally. I'll ignore any randoms.

    Adding Strava Segments to the Garmin
    In order to add segments you first have to link your Strava and Garmin Connect accounts inside Garmin Connect. I did this on the computer. The segments are then synced to the Garmin Edge 520 from Garmin Connect.

    This sounds simple but in practice is quite involved. The only segments that will be synced are ones that are starred in Strava. It's only these segments that show up as you ride. You need to first plan where your route will be going that day. You then need to work out which Strava segments are along that particular route, and then you need to choose which of the available segments you want to star and have display as you ride.

    Along with this you need to decide what you want as your target time for the segment. Strava - Dashboard - My Segments - Starred Segments



    This picture shows a single Strava segment. It is starred so will be synced to the Garmin. There are multiple times for the segment: KOM, PR and Goal. If I was following anyone who had ridden this segment their time would be here too Rival. Only rides that are set to Public in Strava count towards your Personal Best time here. Any Private rides don't appear on the starred segment. You can temporarily make the rides Public, sync the segments to the Garmin, and then make the rides Private again.

    "During the segment, you can choose which effort to be compared against. You will always be able to select the KOM/QOM, and you could also have your PR, your goal, or the time from a friend who’s a little faster than you. The default priority is as follows:

    1. Goal (If you have one set for the segment)
    2. Rival (Next person above you that you're following on the leaderboard)
    3. PR
    4. KOM/QOM"
    Strava

    For each individual segment you can choose which of these times you want to try and beat when actually riding the segment.

    Garmin Edge 520 - Menu - Training - Strava Live Segments - “segment name” - Leaderboard

    Once you've eventually chosen the segments you want and set the target time you can sync the segments via Garmin Connect, make sure they are enabled and go ride. (You can't ride a Course and use Strava segments at the same time. If you want to use Strava segments don't start a Course.) I added four segments for today's ride.

    Riding a Segment
    When riding with the Strava Live Segments enabled the Garmin will automatically detect that you are approaching the beginning of one of the synced starred Strava segments.

    The Garmin Edge 520 Strava segment ride screen is a lot like the Garmin Edge 520 intervals screen. You can't choose what it looks like and the default layout is rubbish. There are no options to change appearance, map or data fields. You can use the arrows to switch from the Strava segment ride screen to another ride screen but unlike with the intervals screen there isn't a workaround that I can see. With intervals at least you can make your own custom ride screen showing the required information. With the Strava segments it's a case of either use the default screen or have no segment information displayed.

    For short segments, 1 minute or so, not having any onscreen information (power output, time etc) isn't an issue as you're just going flat out anyway. Strava segments can be as long as you want to make them though. For anything more than a few minutes I'd be changing to a different screen because of this.

    Here are some ride screenshots for a Strava segment.



    As I approach the segment the display switches to map and a countdown begins. At the top of the screen is the target time. Here it is the all time Strava KOM for the segment. A go notice appears at the start of the segment. On screen you have two data fields, Distance To Go and Time Behind/ Time Ahead of the goal time. At the end of the segment your time flashes up and a tune plays.

    If you are well behind the time you get a Virtual Partner Finished message blocking the screen at the point that the target time completes.

    This graph shows my power output for one of the Strava segments using the Strava segment screen. I rode this one flat out: 0.67 Miles, 1 Minute 45 Seconds, 23.1 Mph avg speed, 310 Watts average power.



    If you look at the power output you can see how the warning notice worked well. I hit the start of the segment at full power and averaged 333 watts for the first 53 seconds. I then started to fade, only averaging 291 watts for the next 35 seconds. This is where having the power display can be helpful. When you look down, you're dying and see the watts dropping it's a sign to redouble your effort.

    I was still trying hard when the Virtual Partner finished notice appeared, covering the bottom of the screen with the data fields. This is reflected in the power output as I eased off to 248 watts for a few seconds trying to work out what was going on! The message disappeared and I realised the segment still hadn't finished so the last 14 seconds were back up to 298 watts average power.

    To be fair the onscreen prompts were a good motivation to try hard throughout the segment.

    This particular segment made me laugh afterwards. Where I had done a time of 1 minute 45 seconds, 23.1mph avg speed the "All Time" Strava KOM for the segment, that had appeared as the target on screen whilst riding, was 1 minute 07 seconds, 35.8mph avg speed (6mph faster than anyone else). Digging into this KOM a bit more it was, you guessed it, garbage. The rider with the KOM had been using the Strava iPhone App. He'd averaged 8.8mph for 17 miles on the road, before the final segment suddenly showed him averaging 35.8mph. And that's why you don't bother with the Strava leaderboards.

  79. #79
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    Do you have regular success with the Live Strava Segments on your 520? On my 510 they are garbage, they will properly start tracking segments but nearly always give me an off segment notice within a couple minutes and it stops tracking them. A lot of feed back from other 510 users on the Garmin forum of the same results. I'm curious if the 520 does better.

  80. #80
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    I had four Strava Live Segments enabled today at different points around the route that I knew I would pass. The segments were spread out with several miles between each one and not overlapping at any point.

    The longest segment was around 6 minutes in duration. All four segments triggered and completed properly without any off course notices. Apparently if you have lots of segments enabled it can lead to the Garmin freezing but with just those four it all went smoothly.

    Although that worked ok I can't see myself using the Strava segment function much. The segment display screen simply isn't good enough with its restricted data fields.

    If I'm serious about doing my best on a particular segment I'll do my usual process of researching it on the computer beforehand to memorise the start and end points. I then use Strava compare to decide my target power outputs and pacing and ride it from memory based on that with my normal ride display showing what I want to see (Power 3s avg, Speed, Time).

  81. #81
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    For today's ride I loaded in lots of Strava segments all around the route. I did the first few miles the same as yesterday and then went off in a different direction. Although I wasn't riding them hard after 2 hours 30 minutes of Strava segments it was really starting to grate constantly having the screen showing segment countdowns and then time ahead/behind. The first 10 segments or so were ok but that was probably enough.

    Despite myself I was finding myself sneakily pedalling a little harder in places to make sure I beat the (extremely low endurance pace) personal bests that had synced from doing part of the same route the day before. I can see how for some people that could be really motivational, having new targets appearing onscreen to chase throughout the ride as a way of pushing harder. When you finish and save the ride you can go to Menu - History - "ride date" - Segments and the Strava segments that you rode on that day have your times listed for the ride, with little PR badges if you beat them. Click on the segment name for a detailed summary with speed, power etc.



    All the Strava segments that I had loaded on the Garmin Edge 520 today started and completed with no off course messages. I had also deliberately loaded a few segments that I knew would go off my route. For these segments they started normally. Once I turned off the segment direction a message came up saying "off segment", and then the segment seamlessly ended, switching from the segment map screen back to my normal ride screen. I didn't have to press any buttons for this to happen.

    In terms of function the Strava segments feature appears to work as intended on the Garmin Edge 520. I don't like the Strava segments map screen much but if you can get past that it seems to detect, notify and record the actual segments with no obvious issues.

    Managing Strava Live Segments
    Something that isn't really covered in the dcrainmaker article about Strava Live Segments is how you manage the segments that you have on the device.

    Apparently you can have a maximum of 100 starred segments loaded at any one time on the Garmin Edge 520:

    https://forums.garmin.com/showthread...nts-Limitation

    That sounds fair enough until you realise that if you have 100 starred segments in your local area enabled the Garmin is going to be constantly notifying you of new segments. I'm sure that's how many people are riding around at the moment, their Garmin screens a blur of segment notifications! I had nowhere near 100 segments enabled today and it was still far too many. It's a case of quantity over quality as you may only be interested in certain segments on a particular ride but it will be showing all the segments.

    One way is to only have the segments that you want on that day starred in Strava and sync them before each ride, keeping just a few segments on the device and removing the unused segments. If you have a lot of starred segments in Strava that means you lose your full list there however. Trying to find segments again in Strava isn't always that easy, especially as the naming conventions aren't consistent.



    On the Garmin Edge 520 itself there are some basic options for managing segments in bulk. You can selectively choose to enable all, disable all or select multiple segments.

    That allows you to turn off the unwanted segments and just have the segments that you are interested in appear whilst riding. The difficulty with this for managing segments is how the segments are arranged. The segments aren't listed in alphabetical order on the Garmin Edge 520! Considering how random the naming of public Strava segments is already if you have 100 segments in total, and want to enable 25 segments say, you first need to know the exact segment names, and then you will have to hunt through the entire list.

    There is a segment Search option but you have to select each character individually using the Garmin Edge 520 arrow keys.

    Looking through Garmin Connect I can't see any options there. All it is doing is pulling the starred segment information from Strava without letting you specify whether the segment is to be enabled or not.

  82. #82
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    So, I don't care so much about the "live segments", but rather the accuracy.

    How does the 520, or even the 510, stack up and compare to the 500? I know it uses an additional satellite network (Russian GLONASS), would should improve accuracy in theory, but how well do they work in actuality?

    I'm getting sick of losing signal in the deep, dark foliage of VA. Maybe I'm missing it, but has DCRainmaker done a comparison of GPS accuracy between these models?
    Last edited by Le Duke; 09-27-2015 at 05:48 AM.
    Death from Below.

  83. #83
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    Dcrainmaker did a group GPS accuracy comparison in woodland with the Garmin Edge 500 in 2010. Even then the Garmin Edge 500 didn't do that well for GPS accuracy.

    http://www.dcrainmaker.com/2010/11/s...h-part_11.html

    He did another group GPS accuracy comparison of running watches in 2011 but nothing similar since then.

    http://www.dcrainmaker.com/tag/gps-accuracy

    Looking at the GPS track from my Garmin Edge 520 it's been doing a lot better than the Garmin Edge 500 would in the same locations.

  84. #84
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    Here are some pictures trying to show how the GPS accuracy compares between the Garmin Edge 520 and Garmin Edge 500 under tree cover. This is one of those things where the location is likely to make a big difference. Not all woodland is equal, some being denser and more GPS unfriendly than others!

    For today I decided to do a climb through some woods on a route that a lot of Garmins struggle with. The last time I did this with a group my Garmin Edge 500 and the two Garmin Edge 800s of the other riders all went off track on this climb and missed some or all of the Strava segments.

    This picture shows the GPS track from my Garmin Edge 500 (11 August 2015) and Garmin Edge 520 (27 September 2015). The colour coded overlay is power output. The route that was being followed is the Buckholt Road. It's a nice clear marker showing exactly where the GPS track ought to be located.



    You can see from the GPS tracks that the Garmin Edge 500 goes a long way off course. From early on its track spends the majority of the climb away from the correct location. It missed all the Strava segments. The Garmin Edge 520 in contrast stays on the correct course throughout. If it is zoomed in closer the Garmin Edge 520 track isn't perfectly lined up but it was close enough to trigger the Strava segments.

    This picture shows a series of Garmin Edge 520 screenshots that I took whilst riding on this section. This is on the map screen following a course (the purple line is the route). For data fields I had GPS accuracy (in feet) and Distance to Next Course Point.



    The first picture shows the GPS accuracy in clear sky before starting the climb. The lower the number the better the GPS accuracy. Here it was 15ft.

    The next pictures are as I begin the wooded climb. When you have the GPS accuracy displayed it doesn't stay constant. Under the trees the GPS accuracy began to get worse. As I rode along the GPS accuracy gradually deteriorated from around 24ft near the bottom to 42ft. There was then a thinning of the tree cover and it recovered slightly to 28ft accuracy. When I reached the final section of the climb, where the trees were thicker again, the GPS accuracy went out to 38ft again.

    At the top of the climb there is a junction where I was turning right, it's still under tree cover. I was forced to stop here to give way, completely stationary for five seconds. When I looked at the display the GPS accuracy had gone straight back down to 10ft accuracy. I was quite surprised by that. I then set off and it went back up to 17ft accuracy.

    Here's a picture trying to give an idea of what the tree cover is like at the point that the GPS accuracy was lowest. This was where the Garmin Edge 520 was showing 42ft accuracy. The Google Street View picture is very close to what it was like today.



    On another part of the route there is a descent which is also a Garmin GPS blackspot. It hardly ever registered the Strava segment when I rode it with the Garmin Edge 500. From Strava there are only three entries on there it was that bad: 8 April 2012, 5 July 2014, and 27 September 2015 (Garmin Edge 520 today). All the other times I did that descent didn't register on Strava because they were so far off course.

  85. #85
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    On today's ride I was following a course. This showed up one feature of using course points to navigate, and particularly course point warnings.

    When you export the course as a .tcx file and select "Notify Before Turn" with a distance (eg: 80m) this does two things. It sets where the Garmin will beep and notify but it also adds a text notification onto the route. This text notification isn't a dynamic notification, one that pops up and then disappears after being triggered. It stays there on the route. This doesn't matter if you only pass a point on the route once.

    At one point I was going through the same junction twice, the first time was a left turn (a course point was set to say Turn Left) and then the second time was straight on (no course point on this junction, the next course point being a Left Turn 0.8 miles further on). Everything went smoothly until the second time through the junction. I just managed to get a screenshot.



    On the track there was still a Turn Left notice left over from the first time through! I knew where I was going but that would have been very confusing trying to negotiate an unfamiliar area. There isn't a direction arrow on the purple track itself. If you're going to be passing the same junction several times, taking different turns, then some careful planning of the course points is going to be needed.

    What I'd probably have done here would be to leave the first time through as Turn Left, but then for the second time have a course point with no text, to avoid adding text on screen. A Straight On arrow course point before the junction would have been enough to know which way to go.

  86. #86
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    Here is the altitude profile of yesterday's ride, as recorded by the Garmin Edge 520's barometric altimeter, compared to the same route in the Ride With GPS website:





    This ride was actually fairly close for the totals, with the Garmin recording a total ascent of 3051ft whilst the Ride With GPS website had a total ascent of 2932ft.

    I've highlighted the altitude at some of the highpoints along the route:

    Starting elevation for both 185 ft

    1. Garmin = 870ft RWGPS = 898ft
    2. Garmin = 927ft RWGPS = 951ft
    3. Garmin = 927ft RWGPS = 964ft
    4. Garmin = 906ft RWGPS = 919ft
    5. Garmin = 591ft RWGPS = 631ft
    6. Garmin = 631ft RWGPS = 656ft
    7. Garmin = 606ft RWGPS = 626ft

    Ending elevation Garmin 178ft, RWGPS 185ft

    Unlike some of the other rides that I've done for this one the weather was fairly constant throughout the three hours, warm and sunny. This possibly explains why the barometric altimeter didn't drift to the same extent that it has sometimes.

  87. #87
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    Dcrainmaker has announced that Garmin is releasing the new firmware updates required to use the Powertap P1 pedals with their Garmin Edge 1000 and Garmim Edge 520 this week:

    "Finally, for those on the FR920XT, there’s now a beta firmware update out that allows adjusting crank length for non-Vector power meters (needed for the P1). Additionally, the Edge 1000 firmware update went out this past week. And then final Edge 520 firmware update should be out any day now according to Garmin. All other Garmin devices are already compatible." dcrainmaker

    Interbike Power Meter Tidbits Roundup: Pioneer, Xpedo, WatTeam, PowerTap | DC Rainmaker

    Backing Up Garmin Settings Before Firmware Updates
    As with all Garmin firmware updates it's worth backing up all your settings and profiles before doing any firmware updates. This will allow you to restore the settings if something goes wrong during the firmware update!

    https://forums.garmin.com/showthread...639#post693639

    "Full backup not needed. Just copy the following files to a safe place before doing the update:

    All Cyclingxxx.fit files from the Garmin/Sports folder
    Locations.fit
    Records.fit
    Settings.fit
    Totals.fit
    Weight.fit
    all from their respective folder in the Garmin directory.

    After the update, just copy them all to the Garmin/Newfiles folder, restart the Edge and all will be well."
    ONDAEYES

  88. #88
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    I had a powerspike in my ride file today (it happens very occasionally with the Power2Max power meter). It's easy enough to fix. I'd normally do this in the raw.fit file, so that if I ever import it anywhere the data is correct to begin with.

    When I opened up the .fit file that had been created by the Garmin Edge 520 I was quite surprised by what it contained. The file was stuffed full of error messages!



    This picture shows what the raw .fit file recording looks like. The green highlighted areas are where it is normally recording for each second. The other sections are where there are error messages. Here are some examples of the error messages:

    "Error at pos 84E4:4F000013003EFD0486020486030485040485050485"

    "position_lat:617374698-812451341>10000000 position_long:-27242446-617273246>10000000 distance:620781-4268622004>10000000 altitude:2683-26029>500"

    "Suspect data at pos 85A4:0FB1"

    Also in the file were these notes from time to time: COURSE_POINT MARKER

    I had a course running and was following its directions today. I think the errors may be related to the course that was running. When I imported the .fit file the ride data shown in Strava, WKO+ 3.0 etc all looks ok. The data wasn't corrupt.

    Edit:
    Looking through my other Garmin Edge 520 raw .fit files they all have lots of these errors in, regardless of whether a course was running or not. In my Garmin Edge 500 raw .fit files there are none of these errors.

    As the data is ok when loaded this is just a footnote. It doesn't seem to be anything to worry about.

    Update
    The actual .fit file was fine. The problem appears to be that Garmin have changed their .fit file format for the Garmin Edge 520. The website that I used to convert the .fit into a .csv file was this one. It doesn't appear to be compatible with the Garmin Edge 520 .fit files:

    Home Page

    Although this website worked for editing Garmin Edge 500 .fit files it clearly doesn't like the Garmin Edge 520 .fit files.

    If you open the same Garmin Edge 520 .fit file in Fit File Repair Tool the data from that day all looks ok:

    fit file repair tool - Download

    .
    Last edited by WR304; 10-06-2015 at 09:25 AM.

  89. #89
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    When you do a ride the Garmin Edge 520 will log if you set a personal record - longest distance, fastest 40km, most ascent etc.

    I had the Garmin Edge 520 recording for a car journey yesterday (It was quite interesting to see that the car speedometer consistently reads several mph lower than the actual GPS speed as shown by the Garmin. Apparently a car speedometer in the EU is legally required to not read lower than the actual speed but is allowed to read up to 110% + 4kph higher than the actual speed. As a result the car manufacturers routinely set the speedometer to read higher than the actual speed. That way they have a defense if anyone is caught speeding and tries to claim they were only speeding because the car speedometer was inaccurate. In order to be caught speeding the in car speedometer would have to be showing a speed much higher than the actual speed.

    https://www.ukpoliceonline.co.uk/ind...ter-vs-satnav/

    When sat behind some lorries on the motorway in contrast the lorries were travelling at exactly the 56mph speed that they are limited to in the UK).

    The result of that however was that the personal records on the device were skewed, with a much higher "fastest 40km" than I could do on a bike. Looking in the records section Menu - My Stats - Personal Records it turns out that you can revert the new record to an older one individually. You don't have to delete all the records to fix one bad entry.



    There is a catch though. If you decide to revert the entry it reverts to your previous record, not your second best achievement for that record. In the picture above you can see that the distance record here was set 10 September 2015 70.9miles. The previous record that it can revert to is 09 September 2016 56.6 miles.

    Any rides that I've done after 10 September 2015 that were shorter than 70.9 miles, even if they were further than the 56.6 miles of 09 September 2015, don't count and aren't available to become the new record if you revert. The same applies to the other records also.

    On the subject of Strava segments I was out on the club ride today. On the way home I was just riding along when I looked down at the display and saw it had begun a countdown to a Strava segment! The segments that I had loaded the other day were still active and I was on part of the route where I'd loaded them in previously. They had just been waiting for me to go that way again before starting up all by themselves!
    Last edited by WR304; 10-02-2015 at 08:18 AM.

  90. #90
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    Garmin released their 3.00 firmware update for the Garmin Edge 520.

    -------------------------------

    Changelog:

    Changes made from version 2.30 to 3.00:

    - Added support for Varia Smart Bike Lights. Now you can form a network of lights including head lights, tail lights, and a rearview radar tail light.
    - Added support for sensor software updates
    - Added the ability to edit crank length for PowerTap P1 pedals
    - Added dynamic zooming while displaying the elevation graph during an activity
    - Added a Percent Effort option for adjusting the virtual partner speed when following a course
    - Added a preview of an incoming text to smart notifications
    - Updated the FTP test to include setting a goal and accepting or declining the test results
    - Fixed an issue preventing accurate data from being displayed with an HRM-Run
    - Fixed an issue preventing the elevation graph from being drawn correctly
    - Fixed an issue where segments would randomly not start
    - Fixed an issue where courses would sometimes not start at a point along the course but away from the start location
    - Improved device performance with many segments loaded
    - Improved device performance while navigating through the list of courses
    - Improved stability of device-to-device transfers
    - Various fixes for general improvements to stability and performance

    Garmin: Edge 520 Updates & Downloads


    -------------------------------

    I first made a backup of the Garmin Edge 520 contents. I then deleted all the .fit activity files on the device (it seems the update may fail if there isn't enough free space) and updated the firmware from 2.30 to 3.00 by plugging it into the computer with a USB cable and updating via Garmin Express.

    The firmware update went smoothly enough. When prompted on first setup after disconnecting the Garmin from the computer just go through all the options and select No to add ANT+ sensors. Your existing sensors should still be paired already.

    The other settings should be more or less the same. If you copy the backup files listed a few posts above into the \Garmin\NewFiles folder it will put them back to how it was before the firmware update. If you don't put the backup files back in check your display settings, unit settings and your FTP setting as they had changed on my Garmin.



    As part of the firmware update Garmin put the three default profiles (Train, Race, Indoor) back in. My custom named profiles were still there but I had deleted the defaults.

    In terms of history totals the personal records are all still there, as are the device totals. The individual profiles have reset to zero though. Restoring the backup files didn't change this. If you want to keep track of individual bike mileage write it down before applying the firmware update!

    There's also a new Varia data screen in each profile for if you have the Varia radar. I disabled it.



    Under Sensor details there's a new "Software Update" option. I have a Bontrager speed sensor and Power2Max power meter. This option doesn't do anything on my Garmin. If you have Garmin sensors connected it might do something.

    Edit:
    Reading around about the software update feature it's for certain Garmin sensors. If you have the Garmin Vector power meter pedals for example the Software Update option lets you update the pedals firmware. See the instructions here showing how the feature works:

    https://forums.garmin.com/showthread...-now-available

    For the Strava segments there aren't any new options to add segment Distance To Go and Time Ahead/ Behind fields to other ride screens in this firmware. It's still just the map screen. The Garmin Edge 510 and Garmin Edge 810 do allow you to add these fields to other ride screens so it will probably be included at some point.



    I still haven't fully decided whether to disable the Strava segments altogether. This screenshot is from today's ride. I was out for a gentle recovery ride when this uphill Strava segment appeared on screen, with a KOM time set by one of my friend's (way faster than me).

    I was almost 5 minutes slower than the KOM. Just what I wanted to know!
    Last edited by WR304; 10-02-2015 at 01:19 PM.

  91. #91
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    I've actually been using the courses feature of the Garmin Edge 520 a lot more than I thought I would. As I've been riding with it I've been getting a little better at creating the courses to follow. When it comes to placing course points a warning around 80 metres before the turn seems about right. I've been leaving the audible tones beep enabled also.

    If there are multiple closely spaced turnings the subsequent turn notices don't always appear, as the first turn notice is still being displayed. The map will stop updating whilst this happens too so you can lose both turn notice and map when you need them most! For this sort of multiple turning adding extra course points, well before the actual turns happen, gives you a chance to rehearse the route. At the closely spaced turns themselves minimal course points, including one just after the turnings to confirm the correct direction, keeps the map updating so you can see where to go.

    With firmware 3.00 the map screen has had a few changes. A new scale has been added in the lower right corner and the compass direction in the top left corner has been moved down. This screenshot shows the changes:



    This screenshot is from today's ride passing through a small town.



    Although you can't route to a point of interest on the Garmin Edge 520 when the map is zoomed in there is quite a bit of detail visible. In an urban area there are local amenities shown on screen. At a push you could use this to find a nearby shop or similar. When you zoom the map out this detail disappears so it would need to be manually zoomed in.

    One thing that you don't get shown on the Garmin Edge 520 Open Street Map automatically are place names - town or village names. It's a bit of a strange omission. I guess it keeps the map clearer but if you wanted to know what town you are in the Garmin won't tell you. You could add some town names in on the route beforehand with course points perhaps. This could potentially be a big problem if you're lost in an unfamiliar area.

  92. #92
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    Kind of a strange question, but can you actually display your grid coordinates on the 520?

    Ideally, UTM or MGRS...
    Death from Below.

  93. #93
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    The GPS grid coordinates are only displayed on one riding screen that I can see. That is the Compass data screen.



    (The picture above has no satellite lock which is why the coordinates are blank. I'll update the picture with an in use one when I'm out riding).

    Menu - Settings - Activity Profiles - "named profile" - Data Screens - Compass - Enable

    The Compass data screen can have two riding data fields added at the bottom.

    Once enabled that riding screen shows your compass heading and the GPS coordinates at the top of the screen. There are lots of different display options for the coordinates, far more than there were on the Garmin Edge 500. This includes both UTM and MGRS as options.

    Menu - Settings - System - Units - Position Format

    On the Garmin Edge 500 you have a screen that shows which satellites are currently in view and how strong the signal is. There should be one on the Garmin Edge 520 too. I haven't been able to find where it is located in the menus though.

  94. #94
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    Yeah. On the 500, there is no option to view my actual grid location. Which I dislike immensely.
    Death from Below.

  95. #95
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    You can view your GPS location on the Garmin Edge 500 but only in the menu, not on a ride screen.

    Garmin Edge 500 position format:

    Menu - Settings - System - System Setup - Select a Position format (UTM and MGRS are in the list)

    To view GPS location on Garmin Edge 500:

    Menu - GPS - Satellite - press the Up- Down arrows to switch from the GPS accuracy screen to the satellites screen. The current GPS coordinates are displayed on screen.

    I hadn't turned my Garmin Edge 500 on for a while. I'd forgotten just how long it takes to get a satellite lock. The Garmin Edge 520 usually only takes 30 seconds or so whilst it took over 5 minutes for the Garmin Edge 500.

    Indoors just now (it's night time here) the Garmin Edge 520 has a GPS accuracy of 13ft, full GPS strength showing. The Garmin Edge 500 has a GPS accuracy of 160ft and keeps warning that it has a weak signal.

  96. #96
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    Here's a better picture showing the Compass screen in use with a satellite lock outdoors.



    There are various different ways of displaying your GPS location coordinates. This one is using MGRS (Military Grid Reference System).

    MGRS
    "The military grid reference system (MGRS) is the geocoordinate standard used by NATO militaries for locating points on the earth. The MGRS is derived from the Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) grid system and the universal polar stereographic (UPS) grid system, but uses a different labeling convention. The MGRS is used for the entire earth.

    An example of an MGRS coordinate, or grid reference, would be 4QFJ12345678, which consists of three parts:

    4Q (grid zone designator, GZD)
    FJ (the 100,000-meter square identifier)
    12345678 (numerical location; easting is 1234 and northing is 5678, in this case specifying a location with 10 m resolution)

    An MGRS grid reference is a point reference system. When the term 'grid square' is used, it can refer to a square with a side length of 10 km (6 mi), 1 km, 100 m (328 ft), 10 m or 1 m, depending on the precision of the coordinates provided. (In some cases, squares adjacent to a Grid Zone Junction (GZJ) are clipped, so polygon is a better descriptor of these areas.) The number of digits in the numerical location must be even: 0, 2, 4, 6, 8 or 10, depending on the desired precision. When changing precision levels, it is important to truncate rather than round the easting and northing values to ensure the more precise polygon will remain within the boundaries of the less precise polygon. Related to this is the primacy of the southwest corner of the polygon being the labeling point for an entire polygon. In instances where the polygon is not a square and has been clipped by a grid zone junction, the polygon keeps the label of the southwest corner as if it had not been clipped.

    4Q .....................GZD only, precision level 6° × 8° (in most cases)
    4QFJ ...................GZD and 100 km Grid Square ID, precision level 100 km
    4QFJ 1 6 ...............precision level 10 km
    4QFJ 12 67 .............precision level 1 km
    4QFJ 123 678 ...........precision level 100 m
    4QFJ 1234 6789 .........precision level 10 m
    4QFJ 12345 67890 .......precision level 1 m
    Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milita...ference_system

    If you want to find a location you can use an online tool such as this website to find the correct location from the coordinates:

    MGRS Coordinates Grid On Google Maps | Worldwide Topo Map



    On the Garmin Edge 520 you have an option to "Mark Location". You can go to Menu - Training - Locations and see a list of what they are. You can select a location from the list, have it appear on the map, and also have a pink line appear to "navigate" to that point. There doesn't seem to be a way to find the GPS coordinates of the marked location that you created on the device itself.

    For adding new Marked Locations to the Garmin Edge 520 these instructions may work:

    "You can create a new location from any training page from the context menu (mark location), but it will create it with your current position. You can update that position by going to a new location and selecting that location and use the "Reposition here" option.

    There is not an option to manually change the lat/long values on the unit.

    You can unpack the Garmin\Locations\locations.fit file, make changes, add new entries and repack it and place the modified file in the Garmin\NewFiles folder for import.

    You can use the FITSDK to do this or other tools such as the FITFileRepairTool.

    I think that there are quite few tools out there that will allow this to be done."
    AWEATHERALL

    https://forums.garmin.com/showthread...elevation-data

    Here's how you add locations using the fit file repair tool

    fit file repair tool - Download

    In order to install this you'll need the Microsoft Access 2010 runtime installed along with the program itself.

    Step 1: On the Garmin Edge 520 browse to \Garmin\Locations and copy the locations.fit file off to a folder on your computer.
    Step 2: Open Fit File Repair Tool and select Import and repair file. Choose locations.fit and wait for it to load.



    Step 3: Add a new entry. For the latitude and longitude you can use a website such as this one to find the coordinates

    Google Map - GPS coordinates, lat and long

    If you have GPS coordinates in a different format this website will convert them for you:

    Convert Coordinates

    Use the Windows Ctrl C and Ctrl V keyboard shortcuts to copy paste the coordinates into the Fit File Repair Tool fields (mouse right click and copy - paste doesn't work)



    Step 4: Once happy select Export File to save the new locations.fit file. This will appear as locations-fixed.fit.
    Step 5: Rename the file to locations.fit and copy - paste it back into \Garmin\NewFiles on the Garmin (not the Locations folder).
    Step 6: Disconnect the Garmin from the computer and the new locations will be available to choose from the list.
    Last edited by WR304; 10-06-2015 at 09:29 AM.

  97. #97
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    The .fit files that the Garmin Edge 520 creates aren't compatible with the website I linked previously for editing them unfortunately. That's why I was seeing errors in the .fit file when it was converted to a .csv file:

    https://garmin.kiesewetter.nl

    If you need to fix bad data, such as power spikes, the fit file repair tool works well and supports the .fit files created by the Garmin Edge 520. The downside is that it is a paid program, rather than free.

    fit file repair tool - Download

    There are a couple of ways to fix power spikes using the fit file repair tool.



    The easiest way is to go to Information/Settings - Program Settings and change the Power Warning Limits setting. This can be set so that when you import a file it automatically replaces all power values (spikes) above a certain power value, 1000 watts say. Once it has done that you simply export the file again and you have a .fit file with no spikes.



    You can also manually edit the spikes. In order to do this sort the power values, so that the largest values are all together. You then select the first cell and then the last cell that you want to change. Click on "between" to select them all and then type in the value that you want to replace the spikes with (0 watts usually).

  98. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304 View Post
    In terms of history totals the personal records are all still there, as are the device totals. The individual profiles have reset to zero though. Restoring the backup files didn't change this. If you want to keep track of individual bike mileage write it down before applying the firmware update!

    UpdateYou need to be using Fit File Repair Tool 6.5.3 or newer for this to work. Garmin changed the totals.fit file format between firmware 2.30 and 3.00

    Here's how to add your individual profile mileage totals back into the Garmin Edge 520. If you made a backup of your files before upgrading from firmware 2.30 to 3.00 the individual profile mileage totals will still be in the backed up totals.fit file on your computer.

    Using the fit file repair tool open the backed up totals.fit file. Line 1 is the overall totals for the device. The next 10 lines are the profile totals.

    This picture shows my Garmin totals.fit file from before the firmware update:



    You can see how there are three entries there. Line 1 the overall totals and then two totals below. I only have my "Epic" and "Turbo Trainer" profiles. Each profile has its individual totals. As I have only been using the Epic profile the Turbo Trainer profile is blank.




    This picture shows my Garmin totals.fit file post the 3.00 firmware update. The profiles no longer have their original totals. I had done a few more rides in between so the overall totals have updated whilst the activity profiles no longer match.




    To put the correct totals back in type the values for the individual profiles into the newer 3.00 firmware totals.fit and export the file. Rename the exported file to totals.fit.

    Keep backups of both your totals.fit files and then put the edited totals.fit file into \Garmin\NewFiles to add the individual profile totals back in again. Depending upon how your profiles are laid out this may take a couple of goes to get the right totals with the right profiles.

    This picture shows the Epic profile totals on the Garmin Edge 520 using the edited file:

    Last edited by WR304; 10-09-2015 at 10:12 AM.

  99. #99
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    I'm having an issue with my new 520. Used it once, and uploaded to Strava. Was fully charged before the ride. Now at home and charging and it will not power back up. It tries to turn on for 20 seconds and then it goes dark. Any thoughts?

  100. #100
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    Does it show that it's charging? Mine had a faulty plug. The new one has been great.

  101. #101
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    Spoke to Garmin today, they walked me through a fix!!! Great customer service on their part, friendly and fast conversation and it's as good as new!

  102. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by sellnit View Post
    Spoke to Garmin today, they walked me through a fix!!! Great customer service on their part, friendly and fast conversation and it's as good as new!
    How did you fix it and get it working again? What keypresses were needed on the Garmin Edge 520?

    To do a master reset on most Garmin Edge devices you have to:

    1. Power device off
    2. Press and hold Lap and Start/Stop
    3. Power device on while still holding both buttons
    4. Continue holding buttons when Garmin "splash" screen appears
    5. Release buttons when Garmin "splash" screen disappears

    https://support.garmin.com/support/s...00000000000%7D

    Apparently plugging the malfunctioning Garmin Edge into a computer via USB can sometimes get it to recognise mass storage mode and start working again too.

  103. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304 View Post
    How did you fix it and get it working again? What keypresses were needed on the Garmin Edge 520?

    To do a master reset on most Garmin Edge devices you have to:

    1. Power device off
    2. Press and hold Lap and Start/Stop
    3. Power device on while still holding both buttons
    4. Continue holding buttons when Garmin "splash" screen appears
    5. Release buttons when Garmin "splash" screen disappears

    https://support.garmin.com/support/s...00000000000%7D

    Apparently plugging the malfunctioning Garmin Edge into a computer via USB can sometimes get it to recognise mass storage mode and start working again too.
    I plugged the USB into the 520, then plugged it into the computer while holding the lap button. It entered mass storage mode and then I emptied the activities folder, and voila it worked again!

  104. #104
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    Thanks for posting the details. That's useful to know.

  105. #105
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    The mapping capabilities of the Garmin Edge 520 are artificially restricted, in order to differentiate it from other devices in the range.

    Despite this it can still do more than just be a cycling computer.

    If you want to make a note of exactly where you were at a particular point whilst out and about it's possible to do this with the Garmin Edge 520. One example of why you would do this are if you spotted some rare plants and wanted to be able to report the location. eg:

    Plants of Concern | Citizen Science Rare Plant Monitoring Program

    https://www.plantsofconcern.org/uplo...ons%202013.pdf

    On the Garmin Edge 520 you can quickly mark a location, creating a record of the GPS coordinates where you are stood.



    To do this whilst outdoors from a ride screen press the Enter button once to reach the menu, press the Up arrow once and then press Enter button on Mark Location. Press Enter again to OK save the location. By default this will save it with a name such as 001, 002 etc. You can edit the location name by going to Menu - Training - Locations - "location" - Change Name

    The problem with this by default is that Garmin don't display these GPS coordinates of the marked location on the device in any menus. This is where they have artificially limited the functionality as it would be easy to add this ability if they chose.

    The GPS coordinates are stored in the locations.fit file which is in the \Garmin\Locations folder on the device.

    With the Garmin plugged into a computer copy the locations.fit file to your computer and open it with Fit File Repair Tool (version 6.5.5 or newer)



    This lists all the GPS locations that you have marked.



    In order to export the locations to a fresh file. Click on the Export File button. From the options select CSV and tick the box "Export GPS coordinates as signed numbers". Click OK and a new .csv file will be created in the location you specified.



    When you open this .csv file with a program such as Microsoft Excel the GPS coordinates for all the locations are listed in Decimal Degree format. This format lets you do whatever you wish with the GPS coordinates. You can send them to other people, convert them to a different format, use them to find where in the forest you were etc.



    Here I have entered the coordinates from one of the locations that I marked today into an online GPS position website.

    Google Map - GPS coordinates, lat and long

    This shows the exact location that I was at when I pressed the Mark Location button on the Garmin Edge 520.
    Last edited by WR304; 10-10-2015 at 11:01 AM.

  106. #106
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    I went over the Severn Bridge the other day. There is a cyclepath that runs alongside the M48 motorway to take you across from Aust to Chepstow. It's a really nice ride to do on a sunny day with fantastic views.

    Here are some pictures showing the planned map in Ride With GPS and then how this appeared on the screen when riding.



    Using the Open Street Map view in Ride With GPS you can route along cyclepaths and footpaths when planning the route. You have to be careful with this as the automatic route planner can be overly optimistic and send you along paths that aren't rights of way for bikes. Here the blue dotted lines on the map show the cyclepath. I added three cue points as notifications of where to go.



    This picture shows the Garmin Edge 520 map display at the same point. It's giving quite a clear idea of where to go upon exiting the roundabout. The cue point text appears on the map, the purple line is heading down the cyclepath and I received the pop up messages and audio signals.

    The map auto zoom feature on courses is something that doesn't seem to be working for me at the moment. It used to work but all the rides that I've done recently the onscreen map has been staying at 300ft scale throughout. This may be due to changes in firmware 3.00 or it may be down to having Turn Guidance disabled. If you look at the bottom right of the picture the map scale is still at 300ft. Even with auto zoom enabled it stayed at this level throughout.

    One new thing with Firmware 3.00 is that you can now cancel any Off Course warning messages and unfreeze the map. Use the arrow keys to switch to a different screen and then back to the map for it to sort itself out.

  107. #107
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    There's a workaround to have a course displayed whilst still being able to ride Strava segments on the Garmin Edge 520. Set the course you want to follow to "always display" in its options but don't actually start the course.

    When viewing the map you will now have the course track coloured line visible to follow onscreen but Strava segments will still trigger once you reach them.

    This isn't perfect, as you won't have any cue point turn notifications popping up or audible tones, but seems to be as close as you can get currently.

  108. #108
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    I've got two Garmin Edge 520s here at the moment. One is mine and the other is one that I'm configuring for a friend.

    He uses a heart rate monitor so I also have a Scosche Rhythm+ optical heart rate monitor to go with it. This is a dual ANT+ / Bluetooth Low Energy heart rate monitor. It means that you can have heart rate without needing to wear a chest strap.

    Dcrainmaker review:

    Scosche RHYTHM+ Dual ANT+/Bluetooth Smart Optical HR Band In-Depth Review | DC Rainmaker

    The strap I have here is the newest version. It has user updateable firmware. In order to update the firmware of the Scosche Rhythm+ you currently need an IOS device and the Scosche Fitness Utility app. I downloaded the app onto my ipad Air 2.

    https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/fitn...661537331?mt=8



    Pair the Scosche Rhythm+ to the device by bluetooth and when you launch the app it should be detected. The current firmware version is displayed on the first page. The second page shows what is being transmitted and then the third page has an "update firmware" button. This updated the firmware from version 2.60 to version 2.62.

    As a quick test I started the Wahoo fitness IOS app and that detected the strap straight away.



    I then paired the strap to a Garmin Edge 520 and that detected the strap straight away too.



    As I had it available I paired the other Garmin Edge 520 with a standard Garmin premium chest strap to see how the two compared.



    I had the Scosche Rhythm+ on my forearm. I went and moved around the house for 10 minutes, not simply sitting down in one place. The heart rate, as recorded by two Garmin Edge 520s with different sensors, was quite different between the two. At rest the readings were close but as soon as I stood up they were quite different!

    The Scosche Rhythm+ seemed much more sensitive with surges in displayed heart rate whenever I did anything. The Garmin premium chest strap barely responded to the same movements. It could be that it's down to the levels of smoothing applied to heart rate. It might be that over longer more sustained efforts at higher levels of effort, riding a bike, the recorded heart rates will be more even. That's what it looks like from the dcrainmaker graphs.

  109. #109
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    With two Garmin Edge 520s I thought I'd have a look at how the temperature sensors compared with them stood outside.



    On the left is the newest Garmin Edge 520, mine is in the middle and on the right is my Garmin Edge 500.

    I thought that my Garmin read low. This new one reads an extra 1c lower again!

    The screens looks the same between the two and they both have the same level of GPS accuracy.

  110. #110
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    I did a turbo trainer session today with both heart rate straps on, each one recording to a seperate Garmin.



    The original intention was to do a full interval session with a variety of intensities. After half an hour - I kid you not - the Garmin Premium heart rate strap dropped out and wouldn't reconnect. It was a brand new one that came in a Garmin Edge 520 bundle too.

    That brought the comparison part of the session to an abrupt halt and reminded me of one of the reasons I don't wear a heart rate strap monitor normally.

    This graph shows the first part of the turbo trainer ride. I was wearing the Scosche Rhythm+ on my upper left arm, the transmitter on the inside close to my armpit (If I'd been wearing a cycling jersey it would have been concealed underneath the sleeve) and the Garmin Premium heart rate strap on my chest.



    I did a 10 minute warmup and then a 20 minute steady state effort. After this the heart rate strap died. At the very beginning of the session I was adjusting the Scosche Rhythm+ position to get it in place.

    Once it was in place and I began riding the heart rate strap and Scosche Rhythm+ readings were tracking fairly closely, much better than they had been indoors. I was seeing roughly the same numbers on both screens. I'm quite tired at the moment, which is why the heart rate response is so low at under 120bpm for what was quite a hard 20 minutes. I was trying quite hard and sweating during the 20 minutes. This is the main reason I don't bother wearing a heart rate strap. My exercise heart rate varies enough from day to day and week to week that it doesn't really work well using it for pacing or trying to stay in defined zones based on heart rate.

    Comfort wise the Scosche Rhythm+ on my arm was just about ok. You have to be very careful with how tight you do up the arm band, as loose as possible I think. The problem is that if you have it even slightly tight the strap literally becomes a tourniquet, stopping blood flowing down your arm.

    I was a bit disappointed that my original plan didn't work. What I wanted to do was have just the Scosche transmitter on my thigh, held in place by the cycling shorts. This was the most comfortable and the optical heart rate works fine like this sat down without exercising. As soon as I started pedalling though the heart rate readings were way off. 90bpm showing on the Garmin Premium heart rate strap and 160bpm showing on the Scosche Rhythm+. I was barely even started at that point so I switched to the arm band and restarted the session.



    I didn't think the RR data was supposed to work with optical heart rate but both Garmins came up with the same Recovery Advisor screen at the end of the ride. 5 hours to recover from 35 minutes on a turbo trainer apparently.


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    Hi,
    can anyone share their feeling after upgrade to 3.0?
    Got a brand new nice 520 and used it for 1 day with the stock version of software (that was 2.3 version).
    Was quite satisfied.

    Then (obviusly for no reason, just could not stand temptation to get newer software) updated to 3.0.

    I have a strong feeling the device startup time increased.
    Another feeling is that it looks for satellites for a much longer period (I have time to leave the backyard and get to the nearest traffic light - around 200m).

    I would say mobile phone with GPS-only got the position faster sometimes.
    And when on 2.3 version Garmin was almost perfect - satellite lock in seconds.

    I understand I used 2.3 just not enough to make sure - can someone share their experience?
    If there is a fix - please let me know.

    Thanks in advance!
    PS: GPS+Glonass on.

  112. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by K.E.Johnson View Post
    Hi,
    can anyone share their feeling after upgrade to 3.0?
    Got a brand new nice 520 and used it for 1 day with the stock version of software (that was 2.3 version).
    Was quite satisfied.

    Then (obviusly for no reason, just could not stand temptation to get newer software) updated to 3.0.

    I have a strong feeling the device startup time increased.
    Another feeling is that it looks for satellites for a much longer period (I have time to leave the backyard and get to the nearest traffic light - around 200m).

    I would say mobile phone with GPS-only got the position faster sometimes.
    And when on 2.3 version Garmin was almost perfect - satellite lock in seconds.

    I understand I used 2.3 just not enough to make sure - can someone share their experience?
    If there is a fix - please let me know.

    Thanks in advance!
    PS: GPS+Glonass on.
    Stood outdoors I just timed my Garmin Edge 520 with firmware 3.00 booting up. From completely turned off, pressing the power button through to getting a satellite lock took 49 seconds. That might be a bit slower than with firmware 2.30.

    When you consider that my previous Garmin Edge 500 could take more like 5 minutes to get a satellite lock it is still far quicker than that.

    Some things to consider would be if between the first ride and later rides you've enabled some more features (eg: loaded 100 Strava segments, added more sensors, paired by bluetooth to a phone etc). Those added features could potentially result in more processor load and a slower boot time for the Garmin if it is having to do more during its initial startup sequence.

    Looking at the sensors menu you have a sensor pool, where all the paired sensors are listed. By default they're all enabled and the Garmin searches for any nearby sensors when it starts up. If you have multiple bikes you can enable or disable sensors, without needing to remove them, so that just the sensors you want to use are being searched for:


  113. #113
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    The Strava live segments use to work even if you had several segments that overlap. It seems after the software updates that whatever segment first is reached that will overtake any other segments that fall into the first segment and the Garmin will not notify you of that segment in a segment. Kind of bummed since some longer segments have segments in them that I would like to be notified of as well.

  114. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304 View Post
    Stood outdoors I just timed my Garmin Edge 520 with firmware 3.00 booting up. From completely turned off, pressing the power button through to getting a satellite lock took 49 seconds. That might be a bit slower than with firmware 2.30.
    yes, that's looks close to what I have (I may have even faster lock, never timed it).
    On 2.3 it was less then 30 secs (close to 20, I think - since I barely noticed the time and was really impressed).
    I can live with that, but it would be nice to have "impressed time" of 20-30 secs back

  115. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by K.E.Johnson View Post
    yes, that's looks close to what I have (I may have even faster lock, never timed it).
    On 2.3 it was less then 30 secs (close to 20, I think - since I barely noticed the time and was really impressed).
    I can live with that, but it would be nice to have "impressed time" of 20-30 secs back
    GPS Ephemeris
    "GPS satellites transmit information about their location (current and predicted), timing and "health" via what is known as ephemeris data. This data is used by the GPS receivers to estimate location relative to the satellites and thus position on earth. The ephemeris data can also be used to predict future satellite conditions (for a given place and time) providing a tool for planning when (or when not) to schedule GPS data collection."

    https://huxley.wwu.edu/sal/gps-ephemeris-data

    GPS Almanac
    "In the world of satellite navigation systems, the almanac is a regularly updated digital schedule of satellite orbital parameters for use by GNSS receivers.

    The almanac for any given GNSS consists of coarse orbit and status information covering every satellite in the constellation, the relevant ionospheric model and time-related information. For example, the GPS almanac provides the necessary correction factor to relate GPS time to co-ordinated universal time (UTC).

    The major role of the almanac is to help a GNSS receiver to acquire satellite signals from a cold or warm start by providing data on which satellites will be visible at any given time, together with their approximate positions. An ephemeris message is still required from each satellite for the receiver to compute the exact position, but it is the almanac for the constellation that gives the receiver its starting point."


    Spirent Blogs - What is a GPS almanac?

    When you turn on a Garmin it will download this information from the satellites themselves periodically. This can take several minutes.

    Garmin Precaching
    Newer Garmins have the ability to have this data precached, so that they don't have to download it from the satellites. Instead it can be synced to the Garmin from a computer or mobile phone. This is one way of speeding up the time to satellite lock. With current precached data the Garmin should be able to get a satellite lock rapidly. This thread on the subject is a good explanation:

    --------------------------

    "Here is what was given to DC Rainmaker by Garmin regarding the cache feature.

    Here was a great post up above on how to pre-cache the satellite info, provided from Garmin Support:

    “At this time there is no indication from the watch or application that the data has been downloaded to the watch. To be specific here are the scenarios where the watch will be loaded with the satellite data:

    – USB – connecting to the data cable which is plugged into your computer’s USB port and having Garmin Express Fit recognize the device should be enough to facilitate a satellite data update
    – WiFi – Pressing the Connect button on the Forerunner 620 to check for files will facilitate a satellite data update
    – BLE/Phone app – Connecting to the phone app should be enough to facilitate a satellite data update (We currently support the iPhone 4S and above at this time)

    The above only occurs when the data is either not present on the watch or when the data on the watch is expired. Updating through your computer downloads 7 days worth of data and downloading via Bluetooth downloads 3 days worth of data.”

    There is no way to pre-cache the other metrics."

    How to Pre-Load Satellites on Garmin Devices : Triathlon Forum: Slowtwitch Forums

    ----------------------------------------

    Regarding Garmin vs mobile phone for connection speed :

    "The biggest reason cellphones acquire GPS more quickly is the cell towers provide the GPS ephemeris. A non-cellular GPS device either has to have it precached (recent watches like the Garmin 620) or it has to pick it up as it's broadcast more slowly from the GPS satellites themselves."

    See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assisted_GPS

    http://community.runnersworld.com/to...53333438218384

    .

  116. #116
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    When using the Garmin Express software you can't control whether you want device updates to be downloaded or not. By default it will automatically download and install any firmware updates that are available.

    If you open Garmin Express, click on the small cog symbol and go to Schedule. This gives you the option that appears to decide when you would like updates to be downloaded.

    The small blue symbols at the top right of the device icons show that there are updates available for the Garmin Edge 500 and Garmin Edge 520 in the picture above.



    As soon as you actually connect the device it promptly ignores this setting and starts updating straight away...
    Last edited by WR304; 10-16-2015 at 08:05 AM.

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    WR304, I heard about pre-caching (considering that garmin advertises that a lot).
    since the device is new I connect it to PC on a daily basis.
    And I have my BT connection to my phone more often then that.
    Will see how it goes next time though

  118. #118
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    In terms of precaching a good test is to take your Garmin Edge 520 outside (with it turned off).

    Stand in one place with a clear view of the sky, turn the Garmin on and let it get a satellite lock. Time how long it takes, and then leave it turned on for another minute or so to settle down afterwards.

    Still standing in the same place turn the Garmin off and then turn it back on again. Time how long it takes to get a satellite lock this time.

    Still standing in the same place turn the Garmin off and then turn back on again a third time. Time how long it takes to get a satellite lock this time.

    On my Garmin it was around the 45 second mark to get a satellite lock the first time, 20 seconds the second time and 15 seconds (instant) the third time.

    The first 15 seconds of that startup sequence consists of the Garmin logo splash screen, followed by the "loading courses, workouts and locations message".

    I then left it turned off for an hour. When I turned it on again an hour later the satellite lock was very fast still, about 20 seconds. That's with firmware 3.00.

  119. #119
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    I finally got round to reviving my brand new Garmin Premium heart rate sensor. It dropped out and was no longer detected after just 35 minutes on Tuesday turbo training.



    In order to reset the sensor you remove the CR2032 battery, put the battery back in reversed, leave it for a few seconds and then put the battery back in normally. This forces a reset and can bounce the sensor back into life. This worked fortunately and the Garmin Premium heart rate sensor is back working again.

  120. #120
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    I would have liked to have done a full turbo trainer session for comparison between the Scosche Rhythm+ and Garmin Premium heart rate strap. I only had the Scosche Rhythm+ and second Garmin Edge 520 for a few days unfortunately.

    This week has been a recovery week. My Specialized Epic has a blown rear brain shock so it has had to be sent off to be repaired. I needed a rest anyway as I was getting a bit too tired following several tough weeks in a row.

    Monday - day off
    Tuesday - 35 minutes on turbo trainer
    Wednesday - day off
    Thursday - day off
    Friday - day off
    Saturday - 1 hour 5 minutes on turbo trainer
    Sunday - 1 hour on turbo trainer
    Monday - day off
    Tuesday - 1 hour 15 minutes on turbo trainer

    I did the full session that I had intended to do Tuesday on Saturday, after a further three days recovery time. I wore a Garmin Premium heart rate strap again. It worked for the whole session this time. Each session was done at around the same intensity (same gear, cadence and resistance on turbo trainer).

    Update: I also did the same session on the following Tuesday. This is an updated graph.



    Here is the heart rate for the first 30 minutes of each turbo trainer session overlaid. When tired you'll often see a lower heart response. After just one day recovery my heart rate response wasn't really there. I did quite a hard 20 minutes at an average heart rate of just 115bpm on Tuesday.

    The same session three days later shows a clear difference. I still wasn't feeling great but for the 20 minutes effort I had an average heart rate of 131bpm, 16bpm higher than for the same session on Tuesday.

    This was the start of a workout by Andrew Coggan that I usually do fairly regularly on the turbo trainer (wattage figures are only examples)

    "Seriously, the best season I've had in recent years followed a winter
    during which I did the following '90/90'90' workout 3 d/wk:

    5 min w/u
    20 min @ 275 W
    5 min easy
    5 min @ 325 W
    2.5 min easy
    5 min @ 325 W
    2.5 min easy
    0.5 min at 500 W
    2 min easy
    0.5 min at 500 W
    2 min easy
    0.5 min at 500 W
    2 min easy
    0.5 min at 500 W
    2.5 min easy
    5 min warm-down

    The '90/90/90' refers to the fact that (almost by chance) the powers
    used were about 90% of the best that I could produce for that duration
    when at peak fitness. That made the session challenging enough that I
    didn't lose too much fitness over the winter, but not so hard that I
    ever dreaded the workout or burned out from doing it."
    Andrew Coggan

    This is how the workout looks in Garmin Connect before being sent to the device. I don't have any zones set to avoid pop up warnings onscreen whilst doing the workout.



    I had to go back a few years to find a session where I had done the same workout wearing a heart rate monitor and fresh. This graph shows 04 September 2013 overlaid with 17 October 2015.



    4 September 2013 was one of the first turbo trainer sessions that I had done after a year off the bike (due to crashing and breaking my leg in August 2012). I was fresh, unfit and it was a warm day.

    17 October 2015 I was still fairly tired but fully fit and it wasn't that hot.

    It's quite a good example of just how much exercise heart rate can vary. Right from the start on 4 September 2013 my heart rate when fresh was far higher. Throughout the session my heart rate was consistently 20bpm plus higher.

    One thing to watch out for is the heart rate in the recovery periods between intervals. On 4 September 2013 my heart rate wasn't dropping much between intervals, a sign that I was lacking fitness and struggling to recover. On 17 October 2015 as soon as each interval ends there is a steep drop in heart rate immediately. If you look at the four 30 second sprints on 17 October 2015 my recovery heart rate between intervals was higher each time, a sign that I wasn't fully recovering before beginning the next sprint effort.

    The difficulty with using heart rate for pacing and training zones is that if you are seeing large variations, as shown here, between different sessions just a few days apart it makes it hard to gauge what the actual intensity of the session was.

    After finishing the session the Garmin Edge 520 said that it would take 31 hours to recover from just 1 hour 5 minutes on the turbo trainer.

    Last edited by WR304; 10-20-2015 at 09:30 AM.

  121. #121
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    My friend did his first ride with his new Garmin Edge 520 and Scosche Rhythm+ today. Looking at the file afterwards the positioning of the Scosche Rhythm+, where the sensor is placed, appears to be important.

    This graph shows an extract from his ride today.




    The red trace is heart rate, as recorded by the Scosche Rhythm+. Although there are no gaps in the red line (which would be a drop in connection between the Garmin and Scosche) there are frequent sections, as long as 30 seconds at a time, where the heart rate line isn't changing. If you see sections where the displayed heart rate stays constant this is a sign that there are drop outs in the readings that the Scosche is making.

    If it was working properly the heart rate trace should be changing constantly every few seconds. You can see how the Cadence and Speed traces continue to change at the same points.

    The fix for this would be to have changed the position of the strap, rotating it around the arm a little until the optical heart rate readings were picked up again.

    ----------

    Update: I spoke to my friend and for the ride in the graph above he was wearing the Scosche Rhythm+ on the inside of his wrist, where you would have a watch strap. He said that he didn't have the strap that tight either, so the optical sensor might not have been held securely enough.

    He's going to try with the strap a little tighter next time, along with experimenting with a higher arm position also. I suggested the upper arm as apparently with optical heart rate you get better results when the sensor is closer to your torso, rather than further away by the wrists.

    --------



    This graph is an extract from my ride today, on the turbo trainer wearing a Garmin Premium heart rate strap. This is trying to show how a working heart rate trace should appear on the graph. In contrast to my friend's ride you can see how the heart rate is changing all the time. It isn't perfect, there are a few sections where the heart rate doesn't change for 5 seconds at a time, but it's mostly responsive.
    Last edited by WR304; 10-19-2015 at 06:04 AM.

  122. #122
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    Does anyone know if the 520 supports weather alerts? I know that the 510 advertised that it did and I believe I've seen notes about weather on some of the feature listings but I cannot seem to find it. On the Garmin site it says your need to turn it on via the settings on the Garmin App but there is no option when I look. Anyone figured it out? It's not a necessity by any means but it would be nice to be alerted of an incoming storm on the fly so I can alter my route without having to pull out my phone.

  123. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by WATERBOOY View Post
    Does anyone know if the 520 supports weather alerts? I know that the 510 advertised that it did and I believe I've seen notes about weather on some of the feature listings but I cannot seem to find it. On the Garmin site it says your need to turn it on via the settings on the Garmin App but there is no option when I look. Anyone figured it out? It's not a necessity by any means but it would be nice to be alerted of an incoming storm on the fly so I can alter my route without having to pull out my phone.
    I do have 'alerts' toggle in Garmin app (there are 3 switches - auto upload, weather and alerts).
    Never saw it showing up, but I don't expect any alerts in my region (weather functions fine, though it shows up only when satellites found)
    Device is moto droid maxx, running android 4.4.4.
    Will check if an older phone has the switch (it shows weather, but SMS/ call notification does not work, I think you need BT 4.0 to have it working).

    Switch is in 'devices -> settings'

    PS, sorry for typos, my phone is not perfect )

  124. #124
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    Got the 520 over the weekend.

    Getting the Strava live segments was about a 3-hour 47-step process. Some highlights:

    1. I could not sync the unit using Garmin Express and a cable as I could not install Gamin Express on my WIN7 PC. Apparently I needed to install the 4.5 framework before Garmin Express. Trying to update to the 4.5 framework got me about 8 invitations to upgrade to windows 10 before I aborted this story arc.

    2. I could not install Garmin connect mobile on my phone because I am a Blackberry holdout. Based on present market share numbers this is a problem most of you will apparently not have. I had to patch the garmin android app, and on the third try it loaded on my BB10 and appeared to be functioning as intended.

    3. In order to sync the 520 to the phone, it needed to be in tether mode, which meant that it kept randomly disconnecting from my home wi-fi and burning into my LTE data. This might be a Blackberry-only problem, I have no idea.

    4. Once in tether mode, I had to sync the 520 and the phone together; they would link up successfully for about 3 seconds, then disconnect with no error messages as if that was the objective. Only once the Garmin mobile app was installed and seeing the 520 under the "devices" list would they stay connected. Oddly, after that, the garmin connect app no longer needs to be running for the 520 to connect and stay connected, after they had sync'd the first time with it on.

    5. Getting strava segments into garmin connect (before I could even think about getting them on the 520) was the longest effort. My garmin connect (both the web page and the app) were both showing the old garmin segments no one uses. Instructions were provided by both Strava and Garmin to switch over to Strava segments using a Garmin Connect menu button that did not exist. I spent about an hour disconnecting and reconnecting everything fruitlessly. After giving up and going to bed, I got an overnight email from garmin connect thanking me for buying an Edge 520, which I took as a sign they had detected it. When I went back to the garmin connect page, strava segments were enabled and that non-existent menu button had mysteriously appeared.

    6. Nothing was still happening on the actual 520, which was still showing a blank segment page. I auto-uploaded a ride to Strava through the connect app. Nothing. On the advice of the strava forums I UN-STARRED my favourite segments and then RE-STARRED them at Strava.com using a web browser. Nothing happened. I tried again. This time the 520, (which was apparently connected to my phone although the connect app wasntt running) beeped and said "Upload completed" The old garmin segment menu item disappeared and the segment menu became populated with strava segments.

    7. Success? Well maybe, I haven't ried to ride any of them yet.

    So yeah, I'm starting to wonder if I have now swung too far into the realm of technological overload.
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  125. #125
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    Got the 520 over the weekend.

    Getting the Strava live segments was about a 3-hour 47-step process.
    Really wierd.
    Got BT syncronization working in about 5 minutes, 3 of them spent trying to ensure they will syncronize without Garmin Connect on the phone (yes, I don't like to read text on screens).

    Why you need "tether mode" (in theory it is Garmin -> BT -> Phone -> 3G/ 4G Connection)? It doesn't work the other way?

    PS: Personally I don't see any value in Garmin Express except for firmware updates. No need at all.

    PPS: Have you tried importing from Garmin to Strava/ other services? I think they are expected to work with garmin connected as mass storage (which works with most PCs)? Never tried though

  126. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    Got the 520 over the weekend.

    Getting the Strava live segments was about a 3-hour 47-step process. Some highlights:

    1. I could not sync the unit using Garmin Express and a cable as I could not install Garmin Express on my WIN7 PC. Apparently I needed to install the 4.5 framework before Garmin Express. Trying to update to the 4.5 framework got me about 8 invitations to upgrade to windows 10 before I aborted this story arc.
    The thing to concentrate on here is getting your Windows 7 PC to install the .Net framework that is required. You don't have to do this through Windows Update as there are standalone installers.

    This Filehippo link lets you download the .net framework. Click on just the Green button that says "Download Latest Version" and save the file to your computer. (Don't click on any other buttons you see on screen as depending upon your settings they could be ads, just the green highlighted one)



    Download .NET Framework Version 4.6 - FileHippo.com

    Once you have downloaded the file install the .net framework, so that the required files are there, and then try installing Garmin Express again on your Windows 7 PC.

    The Windows 10 upgrade prompt is a PITA. There is a tool to remove the GWX updates automatically so that you don't see it.

    Ultimate Outsider: Using GWX Control Panel (formerly GWX Stopper) to Permanently Remove the 'Get Windows 10' Icon

    GWX Control Panel download (remove Windows 10 upgrade nag screens):



    Ultimate Outsider - Software Downloads

  127. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304 View Post

    The initial setup along with age / height / weight etc has some funny questions.

    "What is your cycling level?" I answered Superior.

    There's also another one "Are you a lifetime athlete?" Yes/ No

    On a serious note these questions are actually quite important to get right as they will have an impact on many of the calculations that the Garmin makes. How you answer the cycling level question in particular is likely to have a large impact on any calories burnt figures, along with what will appear in the VO2 Max and Recovery sections on the device.
    As I've been doing some rides with a heart rate monitor strap on the Recovery and VO2 Max numbers have been appearing.

    My record so far with the Recovery Advisor after 1 hour 15 minutes on the turbo trainer is a time of 62 hours to recover afterwards:




    VO2 Max Estimate On Garmin Edge 520
    After a few weeks stuck on the turbo trainer I was able to get out for a ride on my mountain bike today. With a power meter and heart rate monitor together this will give you an estimated VO2 Max number. I don't normally wear a heart rate strap so this was the first time I'd had a heart rate strap and power meter running at the same time. I just did a steady 1 hour 40 minutes ride, nothing serious.

    At the end of the ride an estimated VO2 Max number appeared on screen. 52 ml/kg/min.



    This VO2 Max estimate is based on a formula by Firstbeat technologies. There are a few inputs that affect this. Heart Rate Variability is one but it also uses the personal settings that you entered on first setup, especially what you chose for activity level.

    Heart Rate Variability
    With a heart rate strap the Garmin Edge 520 records the R-R data from your heartbeats as a separate entry.

    "The time between heartbeats varies slightly, even when the average Heart Rate is constant. For example, a Heart Rate of 60 BPM is an average of one beat per second. However the actual time between heartbeats could vary so that some beats occur after 0.8 seconds, and some after 1.2 seconds. Generally, heart rate variability is greatest at rest and the variability declines as the heart rate rises. Heart rate variability is linked to aerobic fitness, with the fittest individuals having the greatest variability, and this can be used to predict V̇O2max"

    Heart Rate Variability - Fellrnr.com, Running tips

    "In an electrocardiogram, the interval from the onset of one R wave to the onset of the next one, one complete cardiac cycle."

    R-R interval | definition of R-R interval by Medical dictionary

    User Activity Level
    With the inclusion of power data the Garmin Edge 520 may be using a more refined formula than older devices (there's no documentation about what the Garmin Edge 520 uses exactly) but estimating VO2 Max from heart rate variability isn't new. It's been around for many years.

    My Polar RS800cx heart rate monitor from 2010 included a VO2 Max estimate feature, also using Firstbeat technologies and R-R data. This is where the user activity level comes in. There are tables estimating VO2 Max based on age and activity level. eg:



    VO2 Max

    Without doing a full lab test the VO2 Max figure provided by the Garmin Edge 520 is an educated guess. The age and activity level that you entered into the Garmin on first setup feed into the formula used. If it's anything like the Polar RS800cx the activity level that you chose will have a large impact on whatever figures the Garmin gives you. Change the activity level and you can expect the VO2 Max displayed to change also. Increase the activity level and your displayed VO2 Max will magically increase too. Decrease the activity level and your displayed VO2 Max will magically decrease also.

    Activity Levels In Garmin Connect
    After first setup there isn't an option that I can find to change activity level on the Garmin Edge 520 itself. The only way seems to be to do it through Garmin Connect.



    Open Garmin Connect click on the picture on the left hand side - Settings - Personal Information and there is an option to choose an activity level between 0-10. Click on the small "What is this?" icon alongside to see the table.

    With the Garmin Edge 520 you can the "send to the device" button at the top of page to sync them to the Garmin.

    As with all these things, estimated training zones, estimated VO2 Max, calories burnt etc, I'd take the Garmin Edge 520 VO2 Max figures with a pinch of salt. Don't expect them to necessarily be correct or anywhere near what you would see from an actual lab test.
    Last edited by WR304; 10-30-2015 at 09:58 AM.

  128. #128
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    Thanks as always for continuing to provide an almost non-stop stream of often-valuable information on this thing.

    Alas I have no power meter, but I have been getting the "recovery time" estimates at the end of each ride... Usually it says I need 24+ hours. "Uh... I have to ride to work tomorrow guys.."

    But that said, so far my recovery has been rated "Good" every morning, in a sudden mid-ride announcement that often startles me at inopportune times.

    Of course, I'm now convinced my Wahoo Tickr is completely making up my HRM data, so this may not mean anything.

    The 520 seems to be fine pulling the weather and the Strava live segments whenever it is connected to the phone, but wireless uploading of rides requires the Garmin Connect app to be running, is that what everybody else is getting?

    Also: I turned off tethering, and the phone asked for it to be turned on one more time and then gave up asking. The 520 connection still works fine with it off.
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  129. #129
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    Also for the "user reviews" file.

    1. I really like how it figures out which bike you are riding from the speed sensor ID and announces when it changes. This was the only cool part of my Wednesday morning when I set off in the rain on my road bike, broke my 6700 STI shifter at the end of my driveway, and had to return to my garage to get my cross bike. This is going to be an expensive week. You can apparently also add an unlimited library of ANT+heart rate monitors, if you're into that kind of thing. A+

    2. As a K-edge out-front mount user I'm really annoyed at where they put the start-stop buttons... of all the places they could have put them... I basically start the unit before I put in on the mount, and stop it when I take it off at the end of the ride. D-
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  130. #130
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    Setting Training Zones
    You have to be very careful with zones as there are many different methods of calculating training zones (Coggan, Friel, Carmichael, British Cycling etc). Different methods will give you different zones depending upon what they are based on (power for a set duration, max heart rate, LTHR heart rate etc). Sometimes there can be large differences between the zones as a result.

    1. What are training zones? | Heart rate and power zones for cycling

    Generally if you're following a particular training program from a coach or in a book (eg: Chris Carmichael Time Crunched Cyclist) you would want your zones to be calculated using the method of that particular training program. Don't assume that "Zone 2" in one set of zones is the same as "Zone 2" in another set of zones!

    Heart Rate Zones
    I put Coggan heart rate zones in my Garmin Edge 520 as that is what is in the WKO+ 3.0 software that I use most.

    Heart Rate Training Zone Calculator - Argonaut Cycle Coaching

    Because there isn't one fixed set of zones the Garmin Edge 520 and any programs or websites need to be edited so that you see the same zones in each one. In order to set any heart rate zones you can go to Menu - Settings - My Stats - Training Zones - Heart Rate Zones



    As with the power zones the first thing to do is turn off "Auto Detect Max". You want the zones to stay consistent. Set the zones to Based On: BPM. You can either manually edit your own values in or add them in Garmin Connect before Sending To Device.



    In Garmin Connect Click on the Picture icon - Settings - Heart Rate Zones

    With Edit Mode set to BPM the numbers you see here are the upper and lower limits of each zone. You can't have the lowest limit as 0 bpm in Garmin Connect. It has to be 1bpm or higher. The following numbers are the upper limit. Here Zone 1 is 10-111 bpm, Zone 2 is 111- 134, Zone 3 is 134-152bpm, Zone 4 is 152-170bpm, Zone 5 is 170bpm - 186bpm.

    You then press Save and then Send to Device to update the zones on the Garmin Edge 520 when it is connected.

    Strava by default uses a different set of heart rate zones again. You have to manually change the heart rate zones in Strava to match the device.



    Move the sliders until they match the zones that you want to use. Be aware that this change doesn't seem to affect older rides. The heart rate zones on those rides will stay based on the previous zones that were in Strava. All later rides uploaded to Strava should use the new zones however.


    Heart Rate Zones vs Power Zones
    This part of the post is really following on from Post #120 and the graph showing how my exercise heart rate changes with fatigue.

    I was well rested for today's ride. It was a fairly steady 2 hour ride on the road after several weeks of doing nothing but some turbo training.

    Here is the Strava summary showing my time in heart rate zone. This is with the edited Coggan heart rate zones:



    Here is the Strava power zone summary for the same ride. The Strava zones line up with the Coggan power zones.



    Where heart rate is recording how fast my heart was beating my power output is recording how hard I was actually pushing on the pedals during the ride. There are some clear differences between the power summary and heart rate summary. The power summary shows me spending 22 minutes 51 seconds in power Zone 1 (less than 132 watts) and 41 minutes 29 seconds in power Zone 2 (133-180 watts). There were some hard sections but the power output doesn't show it as a particularly tough ride overall. I had plenty in reserve.

    The heart rate summary in contrast is showing that I did quite a hard ride. 49 minutes 46 seconds in heart rate Zone 3 and 35 minutes 17 seconds in heart rate Zone 4. This is where the graph in Post #120 comes in. I was fresh and well rested so my heart rate response was quite high today. If my heart rate were to stay at this level all the time that would be fine. I could retest and adjust the heart rate zones. What I know happens however is that there are differences in my exercise heart rate between days, weeks and months.

    As I get back into riding regularly, and the fatigue builds up again, my exercise heart rate will drop significantly for the same power output. If I were to do exactly the same ride when fatigued in a few weeks time my heart rate could easily be as much as 24 bpm lower than it was today. If my heart rate was that much lower it would reduce the time in higher heart rate zones and increase the time in lower heart rate zones, showing that the ride was more like the steady paced ride that it actually was.

    The problem is that where power output should stay constant between rides when exercise heart rate changes by large amounts trying to use it for zones becomes difficult. You can set heart rate zones that seem right one day and then the same zones will be way off on another day, depending on your heart rate response during that ride.
    Last edited by WR304; 10-31-2015 at 01:13 PM.

  131. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    Also for the "user reviews" file.

    1. I really like how it figures out which bike you are riding from the speed sensor ID and announces when it changes. This was the only cool part of my Wednesday morning when I set off in the rain on my road bike, broke my 6700 STI shifter at the end of my driveway, and had to return to my garage to get my cross bike. This is going to be an expensive week. You can apparently also add an unlimited library of ANT+heart rate monitors, if you're into that kind of thing. A+

    2. As a K-edge out-front mount user I'm really annoyed at where they put the start-stop buttons... of all the places they could have put them... I basically start the unit before I put in on the mount, and stop it when I take it off at the end of the ride. D-
    Did you get Garmin Express installed on your computer?

    There is a limit on the number of Ant+ sensors that you can have connected with the newer Garmins. I saw a dcrainmaker comment about it but can't remember the exact number offhand. If you have lots of sensors have you renamed them all individually?

    With the Wahoo Tickr there is an incompatibility between some versions of the Wahoo Tickr heart rate sensor and the Garmin Edge 520. It could lead to dropouts and difficulty connecting the sensor. Apparently the fix is to get a Wahoo Tickr X or Tickr Run instead...

    https://forums.garmin.com/showthread...kr-HRM-problem

    The button placement is a bit tricky if you use an out in front mount. I have my Garmin Edge 520 on top of the stem so the two buttons aren't obscured.

  132. #132
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    There are a few different handlebar mount options for the Garmin Edge 520.

    Included with the Garmin you get two of the rubber stem/ handlebar mounts. This is the lightest option:



    You also get a Garmin out in front bracket. This out in front bracket places the Garmin ahead of the handlebar, but also higher than it. Using this included mount the two rear buttons aren't blocked and can be used.



    Along with the stock Garmin mounts there are lots of aftermarket mounts too.

    For the Garmin Edge 520 you need a longer bracket than normal, so that the buttons can be used. K-Edge do an XL out in front bracket. It's intended for the Garmin Edge 1000 but the extra gap should let you use it with a Garmin Edge 520 too.

    https://www.acecosportgroup.com/k-ed...-mount-xl.html

    If you have a bike with a non standard handlebar Raceware Direct make Garmin mounts for many different bikes.

    https://www.racewaredirect.co/produc...garmin-mounts/

    Garmin also make a Garmin Edge remote control. This is a button that sits by your handlebar grips. It lets you switch view screens, mark laps and Start / Stop the Garmin without having to press the buttons of the unit itself.

    https://buy.garmin.com/en-US/US/shop...rod146078.html

  133. #133
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    Today's ride was in thick fog. It was very damp with a layer of moisture over the front of the bike. I could barely see out of my glasses they were so wet on the inside and outside of the lenses. It was cold to begin with as well. I could have done with some slightly thicker gloves than the summer ones that I was wearing!.

    The Garmin Edge 520 got wet too. That's not a problem but predictably the barometric altimeter blew a gasket. In order for the Garmin's barometric altimeter to function the four small holes on the bottom of the device have to be unobstructed. Whenever these holes fill with water the barometric altimeter will no longer work. This happens on all Garmin Edges with barometric altimeters in the wet and the Garmin Edge 520 is no different.

    Here is what the elevation profile of the ride, as recorded by the Garmin Edge 520 originally, looks like.



    There are sharp changes in altitude, mixed with flat sections that should be uphill. This isn't as bad as sometimes because it was only wet fog, rather than heavy rain. When you get a thorough soaking the altitude trace of a Garmin will turn into a flat straight line with no changes at all.

    This picture shows how the elevation profile should actually appear:



    Here's the worst section of the barometric altimeter profile with power output and speed alongside. You can see how the altitude trace doesn't match with the changes in the power and speed traces. Where I was going slowest at the highest power output is the actual steep sections of climb.



    An altitude trace like that is no good. Fortunately you can repair the ride files easily. This process replaces the bad barometric altimeter trace with altitude data based on GPS. This GPS altitude normally isn't as accurate as the barometric altimeter, there can be strange altitude spikes, but is better than the broken altitude trace from a Garmin on a wet day.

    There are a few ways of doing this.



    If you have imported the ride into Strava a small blue "Elevation" button is underneath the altitude total on the Overview page. Click on the blue "Elevation" button and an option to Correct Elevation will appear. Click this, it may take a few minutes for a long ride, and then reload the page to see the corrected elevation data. This works.



    In Garmin Connect by contrast if you open the ride with bad data there is a small button on the right hand side titled Elevation Corrections. By default this is set to Disabled with a Garmin Edge 520 but you can turn it to enabled, which in theory should repair the file. This hasn't actually worked for me however. The elevation profile has stayed wrong on the file.



    If you use WKO+ 3.0 you can select the entire workout - Edit - Corrections - Fix Elevation Profile Using GPS and repair the altitude. You usually have to go through and make a few manual edits afterwards.

    Not all programs offer the ability to replace the bad altitude data with GPS altitude data. If you want to have good altitude data then you have to repair the original .fit file before importing. Fit File Repair Tool has an option to replace the altitude data in the .fit file. If you use several different programs this is the tidiest option. It also means that if you ever want to import the .fit file into a different program in future the altitude data is already corrected.



    This shows the repaired file after it has been imported into rubiTrack for IOS on iPad.



    Even though there are no options in rubiTrack for IOS itself to change the altitude repairing the .fit file before importing it gives the correct altitude profile.
    Last edited by WR304; 11-01-2015 at 09:15 AM.

  134. #134
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    Someone really needs to produce a small bonnet to go over the unit in wet weather. A Garmin condom if you will. Light elastic band with clear material. I usually carry Ziploc baggies but they don't stay on the unit well. Just something to keep mass water and mud off.

  135. #135
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    Garmin sells silicone condoms for the edge series. Not sure how well they keep water out of the altimeter ports

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    I have the silicone shell. Doesn't protect the device much. I'll have to poke around to find something better.

  137. #137
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Garmin sells silicone condoms for the edge series. Not sure how well they keep water out of the altimeter ports
    The barometric altimeter holes on the Garmin Edge 520 are directly underneath the clamp mechanism.



    The aftermarket silicone covers only cover the buttons. They don't go over this part of the device.

    These holes have to be left open to the air for the barometric altimeter to work. If they were blocked by a cover that would stop the altimeter working just as effectively as rain water does.

    Looking at other people's rides from today (in the same wet fog that I was riding in) a lot of other Garmin Edge devices (all different models) had exactly the same issue with the barometric altimeter stopping working.

    For protecting the Garmin you could cut a mobile phone screen protector down to the size of the Garmin screen. That would stop the screen being scratched when you wipe it with a muddy glove to clear the display. The side buttons are rubberised so they won't get dirt in, it's just those two rear buttons that are exposed.

  138. #138
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    Those silicone covers are neither waterproof nor airtight, so they wouldn't prevent the barometric altimeter from functioning any worse than burying the altimeter holes inside the clamp mechanism. Really all that's needed, I think, is a splash guard

    But for that matter, the barometric altimeter port in my Oregon 450 is located underneath the back battery cover, which has a rubber gasket around its perimeter. That's more covered/protected than what a silicone rubber cover would supply.

  139. #139
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    How does your Garmin Oregon 450 barometric altimeter deal with wet weather?

    Looking around there is an interesting forum thread in detail about the older Garmin Edge 705 having the same problem in the rain. The pictures are missing but you can still read the text.

    http://www.zonefivesoftware.com/Spor...hp?f=43&t=6739

    They added a rain protector to keep the holes clear of water and apparently that kept the Garmin Edge 705 barometric altimeter working throughout a wet ride.

    The Garmin Edge 705 used a different bracket and case back design, not the quarter mount style, so I'm not sure how you would do this with the Garmin Edge 520.

    All the recent Garmin Edge devices seem to have their barometric altimeter holes in the same place directly underneath the clamp. That makes it difficult to modify.

  140. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flash View Post
    I have the silicone shell. Doesn't protect the device much. I'll have to poke around to find something better.
    Which one do you have
    this

    Garmin Edge 520-71sj38-jril._sl1500_.jpg

    or

    Garmin Edge 520-71o2aqnsryl._sl1500_.jpg

    I was thinking of getting the yellow one, looks like it will protect the 520 fairly well

  141. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304 View Post
    How does your Garmin Oregon 450 barometric altimeter deal with wet weather?

    Looking around there is an interesting forum thread in detail about the older Garmin Edge 705 having the same problem in the rain. The pictures are missing but you can still read the text.

    SportTracks | View topic - Edge 705 Home Made Rain Protector

    They added a rain protector to keep the holes clear of water and apparently that kept the Garmin Edge 705 barometric altimeter working throughout a wet ride.

    The Garmin Edge 705 used a different bracket and case back design, not the quarter mount style, so I'm not sure how you would do this with the Garmin Edge 520.

    All the recent Garmin Edge devices seem to have their barometric altimeter holes in the same place directly underneath the clamp. That makes it difficult to modify.
    Can't really say for sure. I don't get out in those conditions much. I'd usually rather be inside and there's enough dry weather most of the time that I can be picky about it.

    My old GPSMap 76CSx spent more than half an hour completely submerged in a river after I dumped the canoe in some whitewater. You can see its effect on the altimeter in the last half hour here:
    https://connect.garmin.com/modern/activity/12584860
    On this model, the barometric altimeter port is NOT covered by anything.

    The wettest ride I've done in recent memory was this one:
    https://connect.garmin.com/modern/activity/383451975

    and I wasn't using my Oregon. I was using my Forerunner, which does not have a barometric altimeter.

    This one was wet, but less so, but also with the Forerunner.
    https://connect.garmin.com/modern/activity/895133115

  142. #142
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    Which one do you have
    this
    Have the yellow one. Comes with screen protector and I think does good job protecting (especially that frame on top that I think will protect screen if the device falls flat on hard surface)

    The downside is the movement of the case against device that I feel sometimes. It is too'silicony' (soft )

    I ordered the red one as well (with less area covered) - and will compare those as soon it arrives

  143. #143
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    I think the case is most useful in helping find the 520 in the event it comes off the mount.

    Provided the case actually stays on. It's not a very tight fit.
    Death from Below.

  144. #144
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    I'm not convinced that those rubber cases really protect the Garmin much. They should keep mud out of the lap and Start/ Stop buttons but that's about it.

    When my friend crashed a few months ago his Garmin Edge 800 had a Garmin rubber case on. The Garmin Edge 800 flew off the bars and was smashed anyway. He had to buy a new Garmin.

  145. #145
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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304 View Post
    I'm not convinced that those rubber cases really protect the Garmin much. They should keep mud out of the lap and Start/ Stop buttons but that's about it.

    When my friend crashed a few months ago his Garmin Edge 800 had a Garmin rubber case on. The Garmin Edge 800 flew off the bars and was smashed anyway. He had to buy a new Garmin.
    If something would smash the Garmin without the case, the rubber condom won't change anything. It's not offering anything structural. What it might do is help for a more minor event. Something that would scratch the device. I agree that the bright colors can help you find it if it pops off. But a tether is more helpful there...it will prevent you from needing to look in the first place. The tether, for that matter, can keep the device from most drops, too. Aside from the initial impact that pops it off of the mount, anyway.

    I find that most aftermarket mounts have a stronger hold on the device than Garmin's mounts do, also.

    Speaking of damaged Garmins...it occurs to me that having the altimeter ports on the mount makes it difficult to deal with many of the common repairs for broken mounting tabs. If you make new tabs with epoxy, you have to be more careful that you don't get any epoxy in the holes. And I think that dogears are entirely out of the question unless you're willing to lose the altimeter.

  146. #146
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    I have been using the tether on mine, but I plan to get a screen protector. Something to help protect the screen when it gets covered in mud and I wipe it off with a dirty glove

  147. #147
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    I got caught in heavy rain today. It absolutely lashed it down for the last few miles home. The rain started just before the final descent off the hills into town.

    My cycling shoes still haven't dried but it does make a good example of how the Garmin Edge 520 barometric altimeter will respond in heavy rain.



    The upper picture shows the Garmin Edge 520 barometric altimeter recording and the lower pictures shows the Ride With GPS corrected elevation for the route.

    The first 26 miles were just light rain. It was damp but not too bad. You can see how the Garmin Edge 520 was ok in this. The barometric altitude profile recording from the Garmin is a reasonable match for the GPS altitude profile. The rain wasn't heavy enough to affect it.

    At the 26 mile point you can see how as soon as the heavy rain hit that was it. The barometric altitude profile becomes a gradual line, no longer registering what is happening. The descent and flat run in are completely missing. This is where the holes in the underside of the Garmin were full of water, stopping it working.

  148. #148
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    I'm not sure it totally stopped working there. The water seemed to slow the sensor's response significantly, though.

  149. #149
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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304 View Post
    I'm not convinced that those rubber cases really protect the Garmin much. They should keep mud out of the lap and Start/ Stop buttons but that's about it.

    When my friend crashed a few months ago his Garmin Edge 800 had a Garmin rubber case on. The Garmin Edge 800 flew off the bars and was smashed anyway. He had to buy a new Garmin.
    I do believe it help a lot.

    Yes, it won't save the device in all situations, but it decreases the impact - just as your helmet does - no gurantee you will be unhurt, but it is more likely you will not get to the hospital.

    And yes, I strongly beleive in screen protectors - I never use any kind on bumpers or cases on my phone, but have a screen protector always. The funny thing is that I never broke my screen, although my phone meet the asphalt at least once a week (and I had body of the phone broke, but screen was safe). I think it helps to redistribute the impact equally vs stress at one point only.
    (and yes, it also helps not to care about dust/ sand/ anything that might be on the screen).

    It won't help of course if you drop it and 10 bikers ride over it going 50km/h (but with the bright red/ yellow case you will find debris much easier )

  150. #150
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    I'm not sure it totally stopped working there. The water seemed to slow the sensor's response significantly, though.
    You're right. The barometric altimeter didn't stop working so much as stop responding quickly enough. I edited my original post as that wording is better.

    The weather was horrible today. As a fair weather cyclist I had the day off.

    One of my friend's did get out for a ride though.

    This picture shows the altitude profile for his ride alongside the corrected GPS altitude.



    He was using a Garmin Edge 800 (not a Garmin Edge 520 unfortunately) which had the protective rubber cover on. This rubber cover goes over the device body. The Garmin Edge 800 has its barometric altimeter holes in the same place on the underside of the mount. It should still give a reasonable idea of whether the rubber case would help with the barometric altimeter in wet weather. I wouldn't expect it to make any difference as the rubber cover doesn't go near the altimeter holes but it's worth looking at.

    As with my ride yesterday when the heavy rain began the Garmin Edge 800 with rubber cover ran into the same problem. The entire last part of the ride sees the barometric altimeter losing its responsiveness. Instead of the descent and short bumps there is just a gradual line.

    Although I'm not convinced of its effectiveness the rubber cover doesn't do any harm to have. It will protect the Garmin from scratches and keep it looking tidy for longer anyway.

  151. #151
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    I did a quick read of the thread and didn't see my answer, apologies if already covered.

    WR or others with the 520; can you do a test for me? Will it continue to work with a battery pack tethered to the unit? For bikepacking, I have the need to recharge while using. The 500 does not allow this (it acts as if it is connected to a PC for upload). I have friends with the models newer than the 500 and they allow a tether charge (I think he has the 800). Thanks in advance.

  152. #152
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iowagriz View Post
    I did a quick read of the thread and didn't see my answer, apologies if already covered.

    WR or others with the 520; can you do a test for me? Will it continue to work with a battery pack tethered to the unit? For bikepacking, I have the need to recharge while using. The 500 does not allow this (it acts as if it is connected to a PC for upload). I have friends with the models newer than the 500 and they allow a tether charge (I think he has the 800). Thanks in advance.
    The Garmin Edge 520 will continue to work when connected to a micro USB charger.



    In this picture my Garmin Edge 520 is plugged into a mains charger. It hasn't gone into mass storage mode and is searching for satellites and sensors whilst charging.

    That seems to work ok but you need to be alert to the automatically shutting down in 15 seconds? notice that appears when the Garmin is unplugged from the charger. You have an ok or cancel prompt that has to be pressed otherwise the Garmin will turn off.

  153. #153
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    Thank you for the quick help.

  154. #154
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    So excuse my ignorance, but will this allow me to get directions when on a trail, about which way to turn and things?

  155. #155
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    Quote Originally Posted by andersonsmog View Post
    So excuse my ignorance, but will this allow me to get directions when on a trail, about which way to turn and things?
    You have some reading to do.

    The short answer is yes AND no. The details are more complicated and discussed at length elsewhere. If you're unwilling to read the whole thread, a Google search will get you what you need (but chances are, at least one of the hits will take you back here).

  156. #156
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    Quote Originally Posted by andersonsmog View Post
    So excuse my ignorance, but will this allow me to get directions when on a trail, about which way to turn and things?
    The maps that you load onto the Garmin Edge 520 are created from Open Street Map.

    http://www.openstreetmap.org/#map=6/52.676/-0.857

    If you go to the Open Street Map webpage, and then zoom right in on where you normally ride you can check to see what detail is there. In some parts of the world you may find there is a lot of detail - mountain bike trails, footpaths, individual blades of grass almost, whilst in other parts there will be nothing there at all. It isn't uniform.

    If the trails aren't on the Open Street Map web page you won't see them on the Garmin Edge 520 whilst riding either.

    In terms of navigation Post #56 of this thread on are discussing the Garmin courses for following routes. Post #63 is my attempt at explaining the navigation differences between different Garmins.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/gps-hrm-bike-...l#post12197613

    .

  157. #157
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    I just purchased a new 520 and had my first ride yesterday, after the lbs set it all up. I was using an openstreetmap app on my iPhone to see the trails. When I was done, my ride was recorded on the 520. I put my phone into Bluetooth mode, pushed SAVE RIDE on the Garmin and didn't see my ride on GC app or strava ( it's linked). I played with the 520 and found UPLOAD RIDE. After I did that, everything loaded. Shouldn't I just have to hit SAVE RIDE?


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  158. #158
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    Quote Originally Posted by thecanoe View Post
    I just purchased a new 520 and had my first ride yesterday, after the lbs set it all up. I was using an openstreetmap app on my iPhone to see the trails. When I was done, my ride was recorded on the 520. I put my phone into Bluetooth mode, pushed SAVE RIDE on the Garmin and didn't see my ride on GC app or strava ( it's linked). I played with the 520 and found UPLOAD RIDE. After I did that, everything loaded. Shouldn't I just have to hit SAVE RIDE?


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    I'm not an iPhone user, but sometimes there are unexplained delays between activating the Bluetooth on the 520 and pairing. And unless I m monkeying with live track, I usually turn off Bluetooth on the 520 when riding (the incoming notification aren't compatible with my phone).

    It usually uploads when I save the ride if it is paired with the phone, but sometimes I also need to click on the activity to upload it from the 520.

    Sent from my BB10 with Taptalk.
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  159. #159
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    Didn't know you could turn off Bluetooth on the 520. But your explanation makes sense. Thanks.


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    Removing Bad Data From Rides In Strava
    Something that can happen occasionally is that there is a ride with sections that need to be removed. The Garmin could be left recording as you drive home in the car or you may start the Garmin early, stop it and then have a massive gap at the beginning of the file.

    On the turbo trainer you may sometimes forget to turn the GPS off and it will record a short jumpy route, even though you were stationary throughout.

    My friend did a turbo trainer ride the other day where he had 27 minutes of junk time at the start, the Garmin was on but he hadn't started the session, along with having left the GPS on. This is what the ride looks like in Strava if it has been sent directly through Garmin Connect:



    There is a 27 minute section at the beginning to be removed and a GPS track for a ride that doesn't exist.

    Removing GPS Track In Strava
    If you just have a GPS track in error, and don't need to do anything else to the file, the easiest way is within Strava. To remove the GPS track click on the small Pen icon at the bottom left to Edit the ride. Click on the Stationary Trainer button and Save Changes. This removes the GPS track from the display. For the majority of turbo trainer rides this is enough.



    Cropping Out Bad Ride Sections In Strava
    The hard part within Strava is removing the bad data at the start of the ride, in this case where my friend had the Garmin on but wasn't doing any riding. If you have an outdoors ride and need to crop some of the ride out, such as where you drove home in the car afterwards, then this is straightforwards to do inside Strava. Click on the Actions - spanner icon - select Crop and then use the sliders to remove the section of ride that you want excluded. The blue selected section is what is being kept.



    This is fine for outdoors rides but no use for indoors rides. The X axis for adding or removing sections of ride is based on Distance, not Time. With a stationary ride you have no idea what parts are being selected.

    Edits In Fit File Repair Tool
    The most certain method for fixing this is to delete the bad turbo trainer ride from Strava altogether, edit the original .fit file and then re-upload it manually. This is how to repair the ride using Fit File Repair Tool.



    1. Open the original .fit file in Fit File Repair Tool.
    2. With the data sorted by Timestamp scroll down to where you want to cut out the data. Here I knew that the beginning of Lap 3 at 27 minutes and 02 seconds represented the start of the ride. Put a tick in the entry immediately before (27 minutes and 01 seconds in this case).
    3. Click on Quick Select "Up to here" in the bottom right corner of the screen. This will select all records from the beginning of the ride to the point where you want to delete them.
    4. Click on Delete Selected Records.
    5. A dialogue box will appear. Put a tick in the "Delete and insert Stop/ Start event (recommended for Export as a Fit file) and then click ok.

    This will delete the first 27 minutes 01 seconds off the beginning of the ride.

    Removing GPS Data In Fit File Repair Tool
    It's easy to strip the GPS data out of the .fit file at the same time, saving having to mess around with the file again in future. You can also easily remove other traces, power, heart rate etc if you want to share the ride publicly without other people being able to see what your power was.



    Click on Export File, select Fit file as the file type and then from the Exclude options select Altitude Data to remove it from the file.

    Click Ok and this will save a new .fit file in your chosen folder. This file name will end in -fixed.fit.

    ***If you don't want distance before you upload this file to Strava load it back into Fit File Repair Tool again.***



    Without doing anything else to the file save it again as a new .fit file. This time the file name will end in -fixed-fixed.fit. By doing this you remove any distance data from the file. If you have a speed sensor fitted to your turbo trainer bike there's no need to do this. It's only if you have junk distance in there. My friend had a cadence sensor and heart rate strap only, no speed sensor, so didn't want any distance information.

    The -fixed-fixed.fit file is now ready to upload. Within the Strava webpage click the Red + at the top right of the screen - Upload - From File - Browse to your repaired .fit file and upload it. Don't forget to mark the file as a Stationary Trainer ride!


  161. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by thecanoe View Post
    Didn't know you could turn off Bluetooth on the 520. But your explanation makes sense. Thanks.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    If you start at the Garmin Edge 520 Ride screen press the Up arrow once to get to the Status page. That gives you quick shortcuts to the display options, satellites, sensors and Bluetooth. Press enter on the Bluetooth section and there is an option to enable or disable Bluetooth.

    Having Bluetooth off when riding should extend battery life if you aren't using it.

  162. #162
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    I have two rides now on my 520. Both were recorded correctly, but, the Bluetooth is taking forever to connect to my phone. Is there something I should look for?


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  163. #163
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    If my phone has been previously paired with my headset or something, I need to turn off BT and turn it back on again on the phone to pair with the 520. Otherwise they can't find each other.

    This was a problem I didn't have for the first 2 weeks of use, not sure why it's happening now. Of course, with my phone being a completely unsupported device, I can't complain too loud, I guess.
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  164. #164
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    According to the Garmin forum, this is a common iPhone problem. But it seems if you open the GC app first, then turn on BT, it connects quicker. I tried it a few times and it works.


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  165. #165
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    I have the 510 and have found the barometric altimeter has similar issues when the weather changes. Here in California we don't have much rain anymore, but on several long rides when a cold front moved in, the altitude became skewed dramatically upwards. From what I have read I think the 520 uses a similar or perhaps even the same altimeter (same four holes in the bottom too).

    Anyhow, I don't know why Garmin can't use GPS data to correct for this, so that we don't have to try to figure it out. I don't like to have to use the Strava elevation correction feature. It is not always accurate (for example, it thinks I was on the water when going over a bridge).

  166. #166
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    Quote Originally Posted by J-Flo View Post
    I have the 510 and have found the barometric altimeter has similar issues when the weather changes. Here in California we don't have much rain anymore, but on several long rides when a cold front moved in, the altitude became skewed dramatically upwards. From what I have read I think the 520 uses a similar or perhaps even the same altimeter (same four holes in the bottom too).

    Anyhow, I don't know why Garmin can't use GPS data to correct for this, so that we don't have to try to figure it out. I don't like to have to use the Strava elevation correction feature. It is not always accurate (for example, it thinks I was on the water when going over a bridge).
    Barometric drift. It happens on ANY device with a barometric altimeter. The ONLY WAY to address that is to calibrate the sensor. Hiking models allow you to manually calibrate them. The Edge models do not. However there is a way. If you have a waypoint stored on the device, and you pass that waypoint, the device will calibrate to the elevation of that point when you pass it. Otherwise, you're pretty much reliant on the auto-calibration Garmin offers, which DOES use GPS satellites. The problem there is that the accuracy of GPS elevation is usually pretty terrible (worse than DEM corrections that Strava or anyone else uses) so it's not going to be a perfect real-time correction system for barometric drift. It can help when the accuracy is good, but that's not going to be terribly often. Make sure you check your device settings to see how it's handling elevation calibration.

    I'm sure WR304 would be thrilled to post a couple screenshots of the Edge 520 for us. :-)

  167. #167
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    There are two things in particular that Garmin Edge devices have a terrible reputation for. One is Garmin Connect and the other is Bluetooth connectivity.

    Avoid those two areas and it makes for a much happier experience. As I use WKO+ 3.0 I usually connect my Garmin Edge 520 by USB and copy off the original .fit file, rather than syncing with Garmin Connect.

    Connecting and Syncing Garmin Edge 520 via Bluetooth
    Before you start you will need to have created a Garmin Connect account and a Strava account with the login details ready. This doesn't have to be done on the mobile device. You can sign up on a computer or through a web browser ahead of time.

    The pictures below are using my iPad Air 2 with IOS 9.1.

    Garmin Connect Mobile App
    The first thing to do is download the Garmin Connect Mobile app from the Apple app store. Do a search for Garmin and it will come up near the top. There are lots of other Garmin apps but you only need this one.

    https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/garm...583446403?mt=8

    Download and then run the Garmin Connect Mobile app. When prompted enter your Garmin Connect user name and password.

    In the Garmin Connect Mobile app tap on More in the bottom right corner - Settings - Third Party Apps - Strava. When prompted enter your Strava user name and password to link your Garmin Connect and Strava accounts together. This can be unlinked from within either Garmin Connect or Strava websites at any time.

    Pairing The Garmin Edge 520
    It's always worth closing all running apps beforehand, especially anything that might use Bluetooth. In IOS 9.1 double tap the home button. This will bring up a list of all the apps that are open on the device. Swipe up on each app in turn to close it until all that remains is just the home screen.



    Go to Settings and select Bluetooth from the list. Turn it on on the device. You should see a small spinning icon as it searches for any new Bluetooth connections. Leave it open on this screen.



    Turn on the Garmin Edge 520. When it has booted from the Ride screen press the up Arrow once, select Bluetooth from the list and press Enter. On this screen you will see an option to enable or disable Bluetooth. If it's off turn it on.

    On the Garmin Edge 520 screen you will now see the Bluetooth name of the Garmin "Edge 520" (which can be changed) and below it a Pair Smartphone button. Press Enter on the Pair Smartphone button and the pairing screen will appear. On the IOS device a BT_Edge 520 should appear in devices. Tap on this and you will see a pairing message appear. Tap pair:



    On the Garmin Edge 520 the same message will appear. Press the Enter button on the Garmin Edge 520 to confirm.



    Pairing isn't finished yet. Open the Garmin Connect Mobile app and it should show that your Garmin Edge 520 is connected. As soon as it has done this go back to the IOS Bluetooth Settings screen and another new device will have appeared. This is called BLE_Edge 520. Tap on this and select Pair for this one also.

    On the Garmin Edge 520 pairing screen all three icons should now be lit up to confirm that they are connected. It will return to the previous screen with extra options showing:



    Forced Sync
    In theory if you have the tick box enabled in the app it should sync with Garmin Connect automatically.

    In order to force a sync with the two devices paired, connected and the Garmin Connect Mobile app open on the Garmin Edge 520 go to Menu - History - Rides - Select a ride - scroll down to the bottom of the list and you will see an "Upload Ride" button. Even if the ride has already been uploaded pressing enter on this button will force it to do a sync each time.



    You'll know that the sync is working because a blue progress bar will appear on the Garmin Connect Mobile app screen.



    Weather
    When the Garmin is connected via Bluetooth, and weather alerts are enabled, an additional option appears at the bottom of the Status screen. This is the weather from a nearby locations. Press Enter on the weather and it brings up a more detailed page that also allows you to scroll down to see future weather.



    Last edited by WR304; 11-10-2015 at 02:29 PM.

  168. #168
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    That was a great explanation of the syncing process. I had my LBS do this for me. Now when I finish a ride, I open GC app on my phone, then turn Bluetooth on, on my phone and it seems to connect quicker. But I still get "unload failure" and go to history and select the ride and hit "upload ride" and it finally uploads to GC then to Strava.


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  169. #169
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    Back to protector covers.
    Received the second one recently, so I am able to provide review on both options below

    Quote Originally Posted by Ducman View Post
    Which one do you have
    this

    Click image for larger version. 

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    or

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I was thinking of getting the yellow one, looks like it will protect the 520 fairly well
    Note that I tried in real-life (i.e. riding) only the bigger one (yellow above) - I closed my season a week ago.

    Yellow one (TufLuv or something, purchased on ebay.uk)
    - comes with screen protector
    - covers more on the back (leaving only mount + 3-5mm around it + holes for strap and charging port)
    - covers much more on the front, leaving open only actual screen (i.e. covering up to 5mm from the "edge of the Edge").
    - feels a bit "slippy" on the device (moving against it a bit) if you wish
    - changes feeling of buttons - sort of you feel that you compress rubber

    Red one (came with Garmin label, purchased on aliexpress)
    - device looks much nicer (I have white) and less bulky
    - on front side covers around 0.5-1mm from the edge of the device, although protects from "flat surfaces"
    - do not cover the back, aside 3-5mm (and does not cover serial number)
    - feeling of buttons is the same as device itself
    - less movement (I feel none)


    As a conclusion I'd say TufLuv (yellow above) offers a better protection, but worse feeling (and in case you get mud inside you'll get tons of scratches), garmin one (red above) feels better and stiffer but covers less area.

  170. #170
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    90 minute ride on a cold (1C) Monday night with everything running (Glonass, BT-Livetrack, backlighting, CAD/HRM.

    Burned through about half the battery life.

    Does not bode well for my next all-day ride.
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  171. #171
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    After reading 169 posts, I hadn't thought about cold weather performance. This could get interesting....

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  172. #172
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    90 minute ride on a cold (1C) Monday night with everything running (Glonass, BT-Livetrack, backlighting, CAD/HRM.

    Burned through about half the battery life.

    Does not bode well for my next all-day ride.
    That is strange. Was it your first ride with the new device? What was the level of the backlight?

    PS:
    Haven't ridden in 1C, but I had 3 rides at 3, 4 and 5 degrees (the latter one had ~2.5 degrees half of that time - according to Edge reading, but I had a protective rubber cover that might influence temperature on the device)
    Time was 1h40min, 2h, 2h30min

    Livetrack on, Glonass on, recording 1 second, CAD/Speed/HRM, backlight at 60%.

    I would say that it burns around 8% each 40 minutes (so it makes 12-15% per hour maximum).
    In total each ride burned not more then 20% (from 100 to 82%, from 100 to 85% and from 60 to 40%).

    PPS: Li-Ion batteries do tend to loose capacity at lower degrees (especially below zero), but I really don't think that it is that serious at around zero.

  173. #173
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    1:15 last night only burned 20% of the battery, but I had BT off and 80% backlight. For some reason if BT is on and livetrack is not, it causes these strange dropouts in the sound from my BT headset.

    Quote Originally Posted by DC Rainmaker
    The Edge series devices will get Connect IQ support in the following three ways:

    – Apps
    – Data Fields
    – Widgets

    You’ll notice the only thing missing from how Connect IQ is supported on wearables is the watch faces functionality, which obviously doesn’t make much sense here – so it’s a logical exclusion.
    And thus ends my dream of having an speedometer dial on my bike for the first time since 1985.

    I'm not joking. I wanted it.

    Just not enough to mount my phone on the handlebars.
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  174. #174
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    1:15 last night only burned 20% of the battery, but I had BT off and 80% backlight.
    As another data-point for cold temp battery life...

    Last night I rode for 2 hours in 3°C, 60% backlight on full time, BT connected to iPhone, and had 86% battery remaining at the end. No complaints here.

  175. #175
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    Anybody REALLY pushed the battery life on one of these? I used my Forerunner 310XT on a 10hr ride last weekend. Nice fall weather, so not terribly cold. I still had hours of battery left. My Oregon 450 on alkalines didn't make it, though. Alkalines suck, of course (I usually use Sanyo Eneloops or Lithiums in it, but that's what was installed at the time), and the screen backlight kept activating in my pack. Just had me wondering about this device since the spec says 15hrs battery life, and I know that the spec tends to be a little optimistic in most cases.

  176. #176
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    The Garmin Edge 520 saves battery status in the recorded .fit file for each ride that you do. If you open the .fit file in Fit File Repair Tool you can see the battery status every five minutes throughout the ride.

    This picture shows the battery charge from a ride that I did a few days ago.



    - ANT+ speed, heart rate and power sensors connected
    - Course running
    - GPS + GLONASS on
    - The screen backlight was turned off
    - Bluetooth was turned off.

    The ride duration was almost exactly 4 hours and the temperature was around 53f. Starting battery charge was 98% and after 4 hours it had dropped to 66% battery charge. If it continued to use 8% battery every hour the Garmin Edge 520 should have lasted for around 12.5 hours on a full charge.

    Saved in the .fit file are signal strength and battery status for the power meter too. This picture shows the reported values for the same four hour ride from my Garmin Edge 520. My Power2Max usually has a signal strength of 99% and based on when I last replaced it the battery ought to be ok for another 100 hours or so.

    Last edited by WR304; 11-16-2015 at 04:18 PM.

  177. #177
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    First real attempt at a strava live segment did not go well. On the climb the readout qas oscillating between 1 seconds behind and 30 seconds behind my PR the whole way up. At the top of the climb it said off course and did not report a time. Then about 30 seconds later if turned itself off and deleted the track log for the ride up to that point.

    Sent from my BB10 with Taptalk.
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  178. #178
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    Once turned back on it resumed and somehow accurately reported the total ride distance and elevation despite the lack of track points. But it also recorded an average speed of 58 kph

    Sent from my BB10 with Taptalk.
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  179. #179
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    First real attempt at a strava live segment did not go well. On the climb the readout qas oscillating between 1 seconds behind and 30 seconds behind my PR the whole way up. At the top of the climb it said off course and did not report a time. Then about 30 seconds later if turned itself off and deleted the track log for the ride up to that point.

    Sent from my BB10 with Taptalk.
    That's not good. Did you have Bluetooth connected, Livetrack etc?

    The two most possible reasons that I've read for why Strava segments can cause the Garmin Edge 520 to shut down is if you have lots of Strava segments enabled and / or you have overlapping segments.

    You can have up to 100 starred segments enabled on the Garmin in theory. The more segments you have enabled the greater the risk of the Garmin getting confused however. Overlapping segments appear to increase the risk even more as it then has to try and decide which of multiple segments to follow.

    If you link the original device .fit file from the ride there is a list of events saved in it. It might be possible to repair the .fit file in Fit File Repair Tool to get your full ride back also.

    On the Edge 1000 the device turning off can also possibly be linked to Bluetooth issues or if you have too many history files on the device. The Garmin Edge 520 and Edge 1000 seem to share some similarities so these are possibilities to consider with the Garmin Edge 520 as well.

    https://forums.garmin.com/showthread...f-off-mid-ride

    .
    Last edited by WR304; 11-14-2015 at 05:18 AM.

  180. #180
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    No overlap. I have about 20 segments starred and the next closest was about 1 km away. BT was off. However, at the top of this climb I turned around as was bombing back down, meaning the 520 might have been about to give me the "approaching start " warning even though I was going the other way.

    I tried the "online fit repair tool" that DC rainmaker linked to but it gave me a gibberish 1kb file.

    I cannot try the other fit repair tool as my boot drive failed yesterday on my PC. Friday the 13th was not kind to my technology.



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  181. #181
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    I tried the "online fit repair tool" that DC rainmaker linked to but it gave me a gibberish 1kb file.

    I cannot try the other fit repair tool as my boot drive failed yesterday on my PC. Friday the 13th was not kind to my technology.
    The online website ( http://garmin.kiesewetter.nl/ ) isn't compatible with Garmin Edge 520 .fit files. They are in a different format to .fit files from older devices. It works with files from older Garmins but not the Garmin Edge 520.

    The Fit File Repair Tool ( http://fitfilerepairtool.info/ ) is updated so that it does work with the newer Garmin files.

  182. #182
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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304 View Post
    The Garmin Edge 520 saves battery status in the recorded .fit file for each ride that you do. If you open the .fit file in Fit File Repair Tool you can see the battery status every five minutes throughout the ride.

    This picture shows the battery charge from a ride that I did a few days ago.



    - ANT+ speed, heart rate and power sensors connected
    - Course running
    - GPS + GLONASS on
    - The screen backlight was turned off
    - Bluetooth was turned off.

    The ride duration was almost exactly 4 hours and the temperature was around 53f. Starting battery charge was 98% and after 4 hours it had dropped to 66% battery charge. If it continued to use 8% battery every hour the Garmin Edge 520 should have lasted for around 12.5 hours on a full charge.
    To try and test the battery usage a bit more I did a ride on Sunday with most of the features running:



    - ANT+ speed, heart rate and power sensors connected
    - Course running with display on map screen. (The map is constantly redrawing when displayed which should use more battery if you leave it on the map)
    - GPS + GLONASS on
    - The screen backlight was turned to 70% always on
    - Bluetooth was turned on.

    The ride duration was a little over 2 hours and the temperature was around 55f. Starting battery charge was 94% and after 2 hours it had dropped to 69% battery charge. If it continued to use 12.5% battery every hour the Garmin Edge 520 should have lasted for around 8 hours on a full charge. That's 4.5 hours less than on my previous ride!

    The main thing that was missing which will use additional battery is Livetrack. I couldn't check that as I don't have a smartphone with any paid mobile data.

    In terms of cold rides and battery life although it is November it is still fairly warm at the moment here. It will be a little while yet before having to do any cold weather rides.

  183. #183
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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304 View Post
    The Fit File Repair Tool ( fit file repair tool - Home ) is updated so that it does work with the newer Garmin files.
    Unless I'm missing something, it also requires paying $50USD to repair anything.

    I think I'll just ride the climb again...
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  184. #184
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    Unless I'm missing something, it also requires paying $50USD to repair anything.

    I think I'll just ride the climb again...
    The Fit File Repair Tool is a paid for program, not free.

    As I bought a license for it if you want to pm me a link to your original .fit file (Dropbox, Google Drive etc) I can have a look at it and see if the file is fixable if you like.

  185. #185
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    Thanks for the offer, but since the total distance and elevation gain were salvaged, we'll let this one die.

    The last time my old edge 500 ate a massive ride, I did a turn-by-turn recreation of the ride the next weekend, made a GPX copy, altered the date stamp in a text editor, and uploaded it to Strava twice. However since the dawn of Strava "flyby", I'd now need the repeat ride to be timed to the second in order for it to be authentic to any passers-by


    I did load up the trial version of FFRT, on my PC (which has a new spacious boot drive); however as you know the trial puts nonsense UTMs for the 2nd half of the ride, which was where the problem was. The error consul listed a "unexpected large gap between track points" or something to that effect, but I couldn't make much more out of it.
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  186. #186
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    The last time my old edge 500 ate a massive ride, I did a turn-by-turn recreation of the ride the next weekend, made a GPX copy, altered the date stamp in a text editor, and uploaded it to Strava twice. However since the dawn of Strava "flyby", I'd now need the repeat ride to be timed to the second in order for it to be authentic to any passers-by
    All that I'd do would be to title the second ride clearly after uploading, so that anyone who sees it knows why it is a duplicate. Instead of the automatic "Morning Ride" in Strava change it to something like "Garmin lost original ride. Duplicate to keep 2015 mileage and elevation totals correct".

    There is no confusion for any passers by then. As soon as they see the title they will know what's going on.

    If you were riding in a group, and there is an issue with your own ride file, another workaround is to borrow another rider's Garmin .fit file for the same ride, crop it down to the part of the ride you did and upload it to your Strava (with a clear title again as to why). That works so long as they aren't much faster than you, as then there will be lots of personal bests that are hard to beat!

    Have you got Garmin Connect working via USB on your new computer?

  187. #187
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    I've avoided installing express up to this point since I was told that it would inhibit the ability to directly upload files from the 500/520 (i.e. prevent it from functioning like a drive).
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  188. #188
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    I've avoided installing express up to this point since I was told that it would inhibit the ability to directly upload files from the 500/520 (i.e. prevent it from functioning like a drive).
    With the Garmin Edge 520 and Garmin Express 4.1.10.0 this isn't the case.

    You can still view and browse the Garmin Edge 520 as a mass storage drive with Garmin Express installed and running on a Windows PC.

    This picture shows my Garmin Edge 520 connected to the computer by USB. Garmin Express is running and the Garmin is still available to browse at the same time.



    You can choose whether to have Garmin Express running in the background or not also. If you don't use Garmin Express very often you can leave it turned off for the rest of the time. This is what I do.

    Open Garmin Express and click on the small cog symbol to open the Settings menu. Here there is an option to "Always keep Garmin Express running in the background". Untick this and Garmin Express won't start with Windows.



    In order to use it you can either launch Garmin Express from the programs menu, or when using the Garmin Connect website it will start when you select to sync or send settings to device.

  189. #189
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    First real attempt at a strava live segment did not go well. On the climb the readout qas oscillating between 1 seconds behind and 30 seconds behind my PR the whole way up. At the top of the climb it said off course and did not report a time.
    I've been having 2 of those problems, oscillating time difference between my current time vs. the PR/goal (bounces between 5-30 seconds) and off course problems since the firmware update. Very disappointing since it was perfect before the update. I have not had it turn off. I've been exchanging emails with Garmin about the two issues. You should contact them also. I figure the more noise the sooner it gets fixed or allow me a way to go to the old firmware.

    (edited: typos from cell phone & clarified)
    Last edited by kdiff; 11-20-2015 at 06:34 AM.

  190. #190
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    Happy to report my 520 works perfectly. Strava live segments is simple to use. I just star the segments and set my goal and its beamed to my garmin. The only inconsistency is the time my rides are uploaded.

  191. #191
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    Let me star some segments on the route home tonight and see if if the split time is still bouncing around. I'm actually sort-of glad to hear that the problem is new, since if the problem was created by a firmware update, then in theory it can be solved by a firmware update.

    Garmin forums does report some other folks are having it turn off, but no one else is reporting the track log deletion issue.

    As many others have noted, the thermometer reads at least 5C too low. Maybe if the sun was shining on it, the reading would be closer, but at night it's way off.
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  192. #192
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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304 View Post
    With the Garmin Edge 520 and Garmin Express 4.1.10.0 this isn't the case.

    You can still view and browse the Garmin Edge 520 as a mass storage drive with Garmin Express installed and running on a Windows PC.
    Indeed. I'll wait to hear from Harold on this first since I also have an older 310XT that the garmin forums widely reported as problematic with Garmin Express.
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  193. #193
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    Indeed. I'll wait to hear from Harold on this first since I also have an older 310XT that the garmin forums widely reported as problematic with Garmin Express.
    The 310XT is a totally different animal. It was EXTREMELY problematic with Express at first, but things have settled down and it's pretty reliable.

    If the uploads start taking longer than they should, it's a hint that I need to clear out the history of the device. If I let it go too long between clearing the history, Express will really bog down and uploads will start failing. This is probably largely due to the crappy data rate on ANT+ and the fact that you really cannot browse the device like a drive through that protocol.

  194. #194
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    Alright, Thanks.

    My boot drive failure wiped ANT+ Agent off anyways, so I'll go with Express on the re-install
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  195. #195
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    Alright, Thanks.

    My boot drive failure wiped ANT+ Agent off anyways, so I'll go with Express on the re-install
    Now that I remember, I had similar issues with ANT Agent bogging down when the device was full when I used it to upload to Strava or Connect before Express came around. The problems just manifested a little differently.

  196. #196
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    With some more monkeying with the settings in the Connect App I now have the caller ID coming up on screen, which I never thought would work with it linked to a Blackberry. No text message alerts though.

    Bluetooth connecting remains temperamental. Having the connect app running seems to help, but I've had it connect immediately without the app running and fail to connect utterly with the app running no matter what I tried.
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  197. #197
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    On today's ride I had done about an hour and was (I know) just riding along through a small town when the Garmin went haywire. There was no indication on screen. Whilst riding it had appeared fine. Speed, power and timer continued to show all ride and it didn't turn off.

    When I got home and tried to load the file however the ride only lasted for that hour before disappearing. There was no graph after that point for the remaining 2 hours 30 minutes of the ride. My Garmin Edge 520 had corrupted a ride file. I couldn't believe it.



    Loading the file into Fit File Repair Tool it became apparent what had happened.

    At 10:46 am the GPS dropped connection and the timestamps changed from 26/11/2015 10:46:41 to 06/04/2019 23:59:44. The timestamps had jumped forwards by four years! It then changed again to 11/04/2019 10:46:52 (the correct time but wrong year). Two minutes later the GPS got a lock again and continued recording the ride, only still with a date of 11/04/2019.

    As the data was there I was able to fix the file using the "Repair Timestamps" option in Fit File Repair Tool. In the end no information was lost, which is something at least.

    It's shaken my confidence in the Garmin Edge 520 though. In all the rides that I did with my old Garmin Edge 500 I never had a single corrupt file.

  198. #198
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    Let me star some segments on the route home tonight and see if if the split time is still bouncing around.
    One segment was about 11:00 and it seemed to give a pretty good representation of my pace relative to my PB.

    The other segment was about 2 minutes long and the VP was bouncing from 8 seconds ahead to 8 seconds behind the whole time (in Strava, I was never more than 2 seconds off my target pace.) It them reported my final time as 1:54 when Strava came up with 1:52 when I uploaded.

    No more data loss incidents, FWIW.
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    encountered something weird today. about 50mins into my ride I was passing a fork in a road where I have live segments enabled. Came into the 200ft warning. But I went the other direction on my loop. As I got passed the fork in the road my garmin turned off. Not cool Garmin! I only have 5 live segments synced.

  200. #200
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    Hmm. Something about riding a segment backwards is causing the problem?

    It doesn't happen every time, I have a backwards segment loaded on my commute that has caused no issues, other than the pointless notification as I get close to the start.
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