DeLorme Earthmate PN-60w w/ SPOT- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    DeLorme Earthmate PN-60w w/ SPOT

    Does anyone here have any mountain biking experience with this combo yet?

    I've been wanting to get a GPS unit to help with back-country route-finding. I've also been thinking seriously about getting a SPOT device "just in case" something goes terribly wrong, but I heard a lot of criticism of the first-gen SPOT hardware, is this new version better?

  2. #2
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    need info on this product

    agreed, i realy would like to get some feed back on the new gps combo.

  3. #3
    Masher
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    I have the combo, works great for my uses. I don't use the SPOT device biking, only when up in the backcountry alone or out of cel range fishing/hiking. Spot had Gen 1 and now is shipping Gen 2. This Delorme/spot device is gen 2. I've never had a message not get thru. Cool thing about the Delorme/Spot combo is the ability to send freeform text messages, now I can let the wife know not to worry, all is safe.

  4. #4
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    awesome thanks! that is exactly what i was hoping. can you tell me if it helps keep you on thetrail. im absolulty horrible and reading maps and staying on the trail. can this help?

  5. #5
    Masher
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    Well, The DeLorme data won't have all the bike trails on it, but you can turn on tracking and follow your breadcrumb back if you get somewhere you shouldn't be! Then save all that data and over time you can build up a trail map with all the trails you ride. As long as you are tracking you can find your way back and not get lost. Um, I guess I shouldn't say that, some people can get lost in a box...!

  6. #6
    since 4/10/2009
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    You need to learn how to read a map, anyway. If you can't, you have no business in the backcountry, whether you have a GPS, a SPOT, or any other techno-wonder device.

    If you cannot read a map, you will only be even more lost when your GPS and/or SPOT fail on you. And they will at one point or another. One day, you will probably forget a spare set of batteries, or you will think you have a fresh set in your pack when in fact, the ones in your pack are dead. It happens to everyone. And if you aren't competent enough with a map to use it by itself, then you will be SOL.

  7. #7
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    I didn't read jfloyd saying anything about backcountry use.
    On the other hand I should not assume that everyone knows that a map and compass should be the primary navigation tool either, a GPS is always secondary.
    Remember, to some people 'backcountry' means 'the woods by my house' (where there are lions, tigers, and bears). To others (myself) backcountry is where there is no cel service, and if I get hurt it would take a heli to get me out...

  8. #8
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by fishbum
    I didn't read jfloyd saying anything about backcountry use.
    On the other hand I should not assume that everyone knows that a map and compass should be the primary navigation tool either, a GPS is always secondary.
    Remember, to some people 'backcountry' means 'the woods by my house' (where there are lions, tigers, and bears). To others (myself) backcountry is where there is no cel service, and if I get hurt it would take a heli to get me out...
    Frontcountry = relatively developed, probable cell service of some kind, you don't need a SPOT, you still ought to be able to read a map and carry one, if you get lost it will most likely be measured in hours, not days. you'll probably see other people while you're out unless you always go during off hours. there are paved roads less than a mile from your location

    Backcountry = remote, undeveloped, mostly likely to be absolutely no cell service, if there is any, it's very intermittent and you will probably only to be able to get a text message out. a SPOT might be useful to reassure family you're okay or signal for help. you NEED to know how to read a map and use a compass and you need to carry them at all times. if you get lost, you will likely need to spend the night. you're not likely to see another soul on your outing. no pavement nearby. few dirt roads, even, that may not be traveled by anyone for days at a time

    As soon as someone talks about a SPOT, I think backcountry. In the frontcountry, it's just not necessary unless you happen to be in a part of the country with atrocious cell coverage.

  9. #9
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    I guess that even in the frontcountry having a SPOT device in tracking mode could be useful if you were suddenly injured and couldn't call. I picture an old guy that hunts near his urban home having one in case he falls out of his treestand they would know where he is. I used mine last summer to just check in at home on an extended trip and no phone service. But I wonder how often people get one and think they can go places they shouldn't be? Like owning an avalanche beacon means you can ski more dangerous slopes?!

  10. #10
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by fishbum
    I wonder how often people get one and think they can go places they shouldn't be?
    It happens...regularly enough to make news. The 3 time activation story in the Grand Canyon was a big one. I remember hearing about it right after it happened. Having such a device often makes inexperienced people overconfident in the backcountry. People get the same way with a GPS, but the rescue functions of the SPOT make it all too easy to send SAR crews on frivolous "rescue" missions that endanger their lives and cost a lot of money.

    It's a viable option for folks who know what they're doing and won't let overconfidence get them in over their head and who find themselves in a legitimate emergency and in need of rescue. But neither a SPOT nor a GPS is a substitute for a lack of training or experience.

    The Delorme with SPOT is a handy combination, however, that can let you get non-emergency text messages out (like telling your ride to come pick you up at such-and-such coordinates or telling your wife that you'll be home late from your ride where there's no cell signal) but it's important that you don't let the SOS button get to your head and either use it frivolously or do something you shouldn't be doing.

    http://www.nationalparkstraveler.com...ional-park4790

    http://www.bogley.com/forum/showthre...ckers&p=382359

    http://www.squidoo.com/spot-satellit...module64329682

  11. #11
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    no thanks

    this post was rude and completely unnecessary. this had absolutely nothing to do with the question i asked and assumed a number of things that are not true.

    nice job nighthawk.

    i wonder how much better our sport would be without attitudes like this?

  12. #12
    discombobulated SuperModerator
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    lets stick to the OP's intent...
    The internet is a dry medium, and its hard to read people through it.
    Lets all be civil........

  13. #13
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by jfloyd
    this post was rude and completely unnecessary. this had absolutely nothing to do with the question i asked and assumed a number of things that are not true.

    nice job nighthawk.

    i wonder how much better our sport would be without attitudes like this?
    You're the one who said you are horrible at a map & compass. Whether you want to hear it or not, you need to develop those skills before you let a GPS and a beacon get you overconfident.

  14. #14
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    Have any of you guys tried the SPOT Connect yet? It links to your smart phone instead of a GPS. I want a way to get help if I need it. Or for people to check on me with out the $500 price tag.

  15. #15
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by pulser
    Have any of you guys tried the SPOT Connect yet? It links to your smart phone instead of a GPS. I want a way to get help if I need it. Or for people to check on me with out the $500 price tag.
    I haven't seen any reviews yet.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk
    I haven't seen any reviews yet.

    It looks really good. I just wonder how well it works. And how long before people can send you texts back.

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