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  1. #1
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    Headset on a Reign 2008 frame?

    Anyone know if a headset is included if you purchase a separate Reign Zero 2008 frame? (http://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-GB/...in/1404/29669/)

    I guess it doesn't, that's when my second question pops up: anyone know which headset might suit this frame the best way possible?

    Thanks a bunch.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by thorlock
    I guess it doesn't, that's when my second question pops up: anyone know which headset might suit this frame the best way possible?

    Thanks a bunch.
    Not sure about question number 1. Question number 2.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=326383

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=380153

  3. #3
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    My UK spec 08 Reign frame came fitted with a reasonable semi intergrated sealed angular contact bearing headset already installed. Also included, the conical carbon headset spacer and a set of standard carbon headset spacers, carbon top cap, what looks like adaptors to fit a standard headset, a shock pump and a spare gear hanger.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Citizen Kane
    My UK spec 08 Reign frame came fitted with a reasonable semi intergrated sealed angular contact bearing headset already installed. Also included, the conical carbon headset spacer and a set of standard carbon headset spacers, carbon top cap, what looks like adaptors to fit a standard headset, a shock pump and a spare gear hanger.
    Ah, thanks. That's exactly the one I'll import from the UK. Guess it'll come with all those things listed above. Great.

    Btw, what do you think of the frame?

  5. #5
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    The frame is great, mine was a warranty replacment for a cracked VT. Compared to the VT the back end is much stiffer with no detectable flex. If I was ordering today I would try and get the bike shop to swap the DHX air for a RP23. I find the DHX blows thru the mid travel way to fast and I've had to resort to running loads of pressure in both the main chamber and the boost valve. If you cant get the RP23 try and push for a lower volume air sleeve as part of the deal.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Citizen Kane
    The frame is great, mine was a warranty replacment for a cracked VT. Compared to the VT the back end is much stiffer with no detectable flex. If I was ordering today I would try and get the bike shop to swap the DHX air for a RP23. I find the DHX blows thru the mid travel way to fast and I've had to resort to running loads of pressure in both the main chamber and the boost valve. If you cant get the RP23 try and push for a lower volume air sleeve as part of the deal.
    Hm, Ok. I've read of many being satisfied with their DHX 4.0 air.. Are you a heavy rider? Not that that should matter, of course.

    You're certain there's nothing wrong with your example of that shock?

  7. #7
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    No not a heavy rider, I think its just the large volume air sleeve. I have to run 200 psi in the air sleeve and 100 psi in the boost valve just to get an acceptable ride. I think its a combination of the suspension linkages designed to have a falling rate to try and counteract the inherent rising rate in an air shock, and a shock thats designed to have a more linear rate spring like the DHX. Add the two together and I think that its just a bit too much. I'm about 80 kgs all geared up, if your significantly lighter It may well work for you. Next time I have the air sleeve off its my intention to fill the void in the secondary air sleeve to try and up the compression ratio a bit. Its not a bad shock, but it could be better.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Citizen Kane
    No not a heavy rider, I think its just the large volume air sleeve. I have to run 200 psi in the air sleeve and 100 psi in the boost valve just to get an acceptable ride. I think its a combination of the suspension linkages designed to have a falling rate to try and counteract the inherent rising rate in an air shock, and a shock thats designed to have a more linear rate spring like the DHX. Add the two together and I think that its just a bit too much. I'm about 80 kgs all geared up, if your significantly lighter It may well work for you. Next time I have the air sleeve off its my intention to fill the void in the secondary air sleeve to try and up the compression ratio a bit. Its not a bad shock, but it could be better.
    There's a low volume air sleeve available for purchase through Fox. Many of the homers in the Turner forum have exchanged them with good results on the older RFX's.

    Cheers,
    EB

  9. #9
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    Thanks for the info EB. Your probably right, I should just dip into my pocket and get the lower volume air sleeve. The two main problems with that are my natural tightness means I find I extreamly hard to spend money and I'm a fiddler. Add them both together and you can guess which way I'm going to go.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Citizen Kane
    No not a heavy rider, I think its just the large volume air sleeve. I have to run 200 psi in the air sleeve and 100 psi in the boost valve just to get an acceptable ride. I think its a combination of the suspension linkages designed to have a falling rate to try and counteract the inherent rising rate in an air shock, and a shock thats designed to have a more linear rate spring like the DHX. Add the two together and I think that its just a bit too much. I'm about 80 kgs all geared up, if your significantly lighter It may well work for you. Next time I have the air sleeve off its my intention to fill the void in the secondary air sleeve to try and up the compression ratio a bit. Its not a bad shock, but it could be better.
    Alright, I'm slightly lighter (though not much, 70kg non-geared) but 80kg is certainly not much.. Quite surprising that you're experiencing problems, I'm hoping I won't see the same thing. But if I do I hope EB's tip on a solution might save the day.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by thorlock
    Alright, I'm slightly lighter (though not much, 70kg non-geared) but 80kg is certainly not much.. Quite surprising that you're experiencing problems, I'm hoping I won't see the same thing. But if I do I hope EB's tip on a solution might save the day.
    The DHX 5.0, for instance, has a bottom out knob that essentially allows you to adjust the volume on the shock. So, basically, just think of the lower volume air canister as a bottom out assist in lieu of that knob on the dhx 4.0

    Because there's less air volume, the shock ramps up more as you get further into the shock stroke. For bigger guys on bikes with a higher leverage ratio (Reign is 3:1), this often can allow you them to run proper sag without bottoming too hard. As it is, bigger guys might have to run more air pressure (at the detriment of small bump compliance) to avoid bottoming off of seemingly small stuff.

    I put an aftermarket linkage on an old Kona of mine. It raised the leverage ratio to 4:1 in the long travel mode and, as a result, I had to run an ultra stiff spring just to keep it from bottoming off of everything. Overall, the bike rode like crap with the linkage so I sold it.

    Cheers,
    EB

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