handlebar length- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    handlebar length

    After 14 years riding an NRS (somewhat infrequently) my better half upgraded me to a 2018 Trance 2. Got out the other day for a short ride, amazing bike but the bars, 30.7" seem huge compared to the NRS at 22"
    I know personal preference plays a large part in fit, but is there a rule of thumb for sizing? What's everyone else using?

  2. #2
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    Oh you got a Trance and are interested in what handlebar width people are riding, well there are two options to find that out:

    1) All people who've already posted their handlebar widths in this thread http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=107871 in great detail with pics and experience reports since 2013 come over here in a few days and post all that information again,

    or...

    2) you navigate over to that handy Trance thread yourself http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=107871 search for "handlebar" and start reading.

    I always wonder why people visit a forum just to disregard years of valuable information in order to start fresh with a well established topic (Trance 27.5 was introduced in 2013)

    Since you opened this thread you obviously consider the first option to be the more effective and likely to happen which I find highly amusing

    Well here's my take: Cut down to 22" and never look back, changes ain't good.

  3. #3
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    #rideitlikeyoustoleit

  4. #4
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    I’m sure that Steel Calf meant to add, “welcome to the forum. Glad you’re here”.
    Last edited by Cuyuna; 10-12-2017 at 05:55 AM.

  5. #5
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    Ride it for awhile and see if you like it. It may surprise you.

    Just for Sh!ts and giggles, put a tape measure on the floor. Put your hands on it in a comfortable push up position and proceed to knock out a few pushups. Adjust your position if needed and knock out a few more.

    Now look at the distance measured from the outside of each hand.

    It's not hard science but it's a good place to start for a comfortable handle bar width.

    Keep in mind other factors will come into play.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    I'm a mountain bike guide in southwest Utah

  6. #6
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    I went from 635mm on my old bike to 740mm on the new. I've upgraded my bars to 750mm carbon ones a few months ago now.

    The first couple of rides with the wider bars felt odd but I wouldn't want to go back to the narrow bars now after riding my new bike for the past 18 months.

  7. #7
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    get used to the bars, you'll never go back

  8. #8
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    In general I think wider bars are preferred. In fact, THE criticism of the Trance last year was the stock handlebars being too narrow (it was 29.5"). They addressed that criticism for the 2018 model (increased it to 30.7").

    I have a 2017 Trance 2. I didn't have issues with the stock bars, but I decided to try longer bars anyways. I switched from the 29.5" to 30.9". Personally I greatly prefer longer bars. So, I say keep riding the longer bars unless you're actually having issues with them.

  9. #9
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    no cut them

  10. #10
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    THIS!!


    Quote Originally Posted by Silentfoe View Post
    Ride it for awhile and see if you like it. It may surprise you.

    Just for Sh!ts and giggles, put a tape measure on the floor. Put your hands on it in a comfortable push up position and proceed to knock out a few pushups. Adjust your position if needed and knock out a few more.

    Now look at the distance measured from the outside of each hand.

    It's not hard science but it's a good place to start for a comfortable handle bar width.

    Keep in mind other factors will come into play.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    The average "effective lever length" (ELL), is the magic number 430. What you do is measure your natural push-up distance, as Silentfoe kindly supplied, all this 'X'.

    Then calculate Stem length = 430 - X/2.

    So for push-up distance of 760mm; stem length = 430 -760/2 = 50mm.

    You can go lower or higher than 430, you simply speed up or slow down steering respectively.

    At the end of the day, you can use what you want, but I'd argue this is by far the most logical way to start as it is using YOUR body measurements.

  11. #11
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    when it comes to handlebar length people are forgetting one important aspect

    the handlebar is not only a lever used to turn but also to tilt the bike

    while the turn radius and it's leverage depends on handlebar width and thus greatly on body measurements the applied tilt lever depends on handlebar hight measured from above ground

    so if you go higher due to a longer fork or higher frame you need an equally longer handlebar or tilting the bike will become harder

  12. #12
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    Good point, and if the height at the front is high, there is wisdom in slamming the stem as the cheapest (free) DIY.

    Quote Originally Posted by Steel Calf View Post
    when it comes to handlebar length people are forgetting one important aspect

    the handlebar is not only a lever used to turn but also to tilt the bike

    while the turn radius and it's leverage depends on handlebar width and thus greatly on body measurements the applied tilt lever depends on handlebar hight measured from above ground

    so if you go higher due to a longer fork or higher frame you need an equally longer handlebar or tilting the bike will become harder

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by lucifuge View Post
    Good point, and if the height at the front is high, there is wisdom in slamming the stem as the cheapest (free) DIY.
    ohh so that's what those little rings are for...
    oops I wasn't clipped in

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jim c View Post
    ohh so that's what those little rings are for...
    *mindblown*

  15. #15
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    I noticed that Giant for most (every?) model keeps the bar length the same across frame size but increases stem length with frame size. Seems to run counter to what I've read here and other places. Would make more sense to get the frame size right instead of lengthening the stem.

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