finding climbs difficult on new trance coming from HT- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1

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    finding climbs difficult on new trance coming from HT

    Hi all
    delighted new owner of an 06 trance 3. took it out for a 4 hr spin yesterday on a local trail and i takes way more energy to climb a few steep good surface climbs that felt way easier on my old Trek HT. If the surface is poor or lumpy it climbs well but a steep fire road climb feels way tougher. I was expecting some difference but it was worrying yesterday.
    I've the rear fox float r shock well pumped for my weight ( perhaps it could be more pumped as my back pack was heavy yesterday etc. ). I have the front shock nice and stiff as I prefer a firmer shock. 40+ psi in rear wheel. sludge tubes front and back.
    I was in the middle between an 18 & 20" frame and i bought the 18". ( I'm 6' with 32" leg )
    I am fairly fit at moment as training for a marathon in september and this is my usual trail and I was comparing the new trance to my trek HT on different things like handling , climbing etc.

    Any advise or thoughts on the climbing difficulties greatly appreciated.
    ( Maybe I just had an off day )

    P

  2. #2
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    Reputation: swoodbrn's Avatar
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    Stay in the saddle, for sure. Test ride another fs bike to differentiate the energy loss due to fs, vs. any extra energy loss due to Trance. Most think it's pretty efficient.

  3. #3
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    Rear sag is fairly critical with Maestro, too firm or too soft is not good.

  4. #4
    I AM I AM
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    I don't know, I recently rode a giant alias hardtail after being exclusively on the trance for the last year. The alias is maybe a hair lighter than my trance (both are 31lb max). On the rough trails the alias seemed to handle just as well as the trance and I was expecting to feel more get up and go in relation to acceleration compared to the trance and strangely it didn't feel any different, I felt like the same effort was required to pedal on the alias compared to what I was used to on the trance.

    As far as hills go, well I haven't taken the alias on the same short but steep and rocky hill yet, it will be an interesting comparison. I agree that the rear wheel on the trance feels like it really wants to grip the ground, it's ideal for getting up loose climbs and like Swoodbrn said best to stay in the saddle. I don't think it's inefficient because I reckon the same amount of effort would be required to ride a hardtail of equivalent weight up a hill, I certainly look forward to testing that idea with the alias though.
    As far as steep but smooth hills go, I rode the trance up mountain on a bitumen road a couple of times (took close to an hour to get up there), the rear felt efficient to me, I didn't see any bobbing under the pedal strokes but any small bumps in the road felt non existent. And it was good to be able to lock the fork out in that situation. Even now that I don't live where there are huge mountains I still enjoy taking the trance on a road ride from time to time.

    If it's your first dual suspension bike it may take a bit of getting used to, even little things like being able to stay seated over rough sections, I noticed going back to a hardtail I had to remember to lift my butt of the saddle!

  5. #5
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    Random thoughts:

    I'm not sure of your technique, but full suspension bikes like to be rode in the saddle, and with a fairly high RPM (cadence) with a smooth power output. Spinning the cranks vs. mashing the pedals works for me.

  6. #6

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    I agree... after moving from a HT (Scott Racing) to the trance, I noticed that steep pinches were definitely much harder.

    Before I only ever rode with an 11 to 32 T cassette. Now I really need the 34T, which more than makes up for the difference effort wise, still just slower.

    Also, I have to adjust my technique more. My HT had more weight over the front, so I have to really move forward on the seat.

    Having said that, with the dual suspension and much better quality front forks (with slacker head angle) my descending over technical terrain is infinitely better. Am I any faster as a result? Depending on course, probably.

  7. #7

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    Yea. Interesting ideas alright. I relooked at the sag in my rear shock and it seems too much.
    closer to 15-20 mm. so I have loaded my back pack and weighted my combined weight.
    without gear 180lbs and with gear 190lbs. tested sag and have it at the recommended 10mm rear. I liked my HT and don't mind veering on the side of stiff rather than plush.
    Fine tuned my front shock and I will test over the next few days. I will post back with outcomes. Predicting a better climbing performance I would stress to new bike owners to make sure the pressures are right as I experienced a sizable enough effect on my climbing performance with a softer rear shock.
    I have the damping tuned to 3 clicks from top towards slow as suggested by Lynx as similar rider weights apply. so we'll see.

    Thanks for all the advice and suggestions.

    PAUL

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by podracer
    Yea. Interesting ideas alright. I relooked at the sag in my rear shock and it seems too much.
    closer to 15-20 mm. so I have loaded my back pack and weighted my combined weight.
    without gear 180lbs and with gear 190lbs. tested sag and have it at the recommended 10mm rear. I liked my HT and don't mind veering on the side of stiff rather than plush.
    Fine tuned my front shock and I will test over the next few days. I will post back with outcomes. Predicting a better climbing performance I would stress to new bike owners to make sure the pressures are right as I experienced a sizable enough effect on my climbing performance with a softer rear shock.
    I have the damping tuned to 3 clicks from top towards slow as suggested by Lynx as similar rider weights apply. so we'll see.

    Thanks for all the advice and suggestions.

    PAUL
    Depending on your shock - the propedal/platform setting will affect the firmness while climbing too, so you can dial that up a bit if you want (especially for a long fire road climb). The good thing about that, you can flip it off for a plusher descent than if your air pressure is a bit high.

  9. #9

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    My shock's the Fox Float R.
    Took the new pressure setup out yesterday for a spin and did some climbing.
    The bike felt far nimbler on climbs and I found I was in similar climbing gears to my old HT.
    On the road for about 30 minutes I was concentrating on spinning to minimise bob.
    After a while I got the hang of it. I guess that with the excitement of the new bike and all the suspension and brake upgrades I was distracted from an efficient technique.

    anyway thumbs up and thanks for all feedback and comments.

    Paul

  10. #10
    Johny Sokko!
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    Also, check your wheels, the Trance 3 wheelset and tires are not exactly lightweight. The rotational weight difference could be throwing you off. Once you get a good lightweight wheelset for the Trance things will change.

    Oh yeah! Ditto on everything else

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