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Thread: 2019 Trance 29

  1. #1401
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boozy View Post
    No Negatives so far,it does give the bike an overall plusher feel (slightly)
    the 2.5 reducer if fairly easy to remove.
    Open air can( deflated )
    Slide down o ring then silver flat washer
    Just above is the 2.5 reducer (alloy ring)
    I cut through with a set of heavy duty side cutters Both sides( be very careful not to scratch shaft)
    Or you can go the expensive way & send to fox?
    Just out of interest, what size frame are you running and what sag percentage have you settled on since the change?

  2. #1402
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    Good job!

    Quote Originally Posted by The_Bob View Post
    Just out of interest, what size frame are you running and what sag percentage have you settled on since the change?

    26% sag 240psi 3 rebound (from slow)DPX2
    20% sag 78psi 7 rebound (from slow) Performance Elite (Fit4 Damper) swapped Grip out)
    Size Large
    I have 3 wheel sets (all 30mm internal)
    Bontrager alloy ,Ardent Race 2.35 F .Aspen 2.2 R (Town commuting etc)
    Giant TRX1 Carbon ,Forcaster 2.6 F. Rekon 2.4 R (Trail / XC)
    Race face Affect R ,DHR2 2.4 F. Disecter 2.4 R (Enduro)

  3. #1403
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    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 2019 Trance 29-cf3adfd3-3af9-4592-a21e-5d93cbcf37d0.jpg  


  4. #1404
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boozy View Post
    No Negatives so far,it does give the bike an overall plusher feel (slightly)
    the 2.5 reducer if fairly easy to remove.
    Open air can( deflated )
    Slide down o ring then silver flat washer
    Just above is the 2.5 reducer (alloy ring)
    I cut through with a set of heavy duty side cutters Both sides( be very careful not to scratch shaft)
    Or you can go the expensive way & send to fox?
    Great. Thanks for the info.
    Bike is pretty close to perfect for me.
    If I could ask for more.........it would be a little more comfort on jumps to flat. Any improvement on this?
    Love isn't blind... its retarded.

  5. #1405
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boozy View Post
    26% sag 240psi 3 rebound (from slow)DPX2
    20% sag 78psi 7 rebound (from slow) Performance Elite (Fit4 Damper) swapped Grip out)
    Size Large
    I have 3 wheel sets (all 30mm internal)
    Bontrager alloy ,Ardent Race 2.35 F .Aspen 2.2 R (Town commuting etc)
    Giant TRX1 Carbon ,Forcaster 2.6 F. Rekon 2.4 R (Trail / XC)
    Race face Affect R ,DHR2 2.4 F. Disecter 2.4 R (Enduro)
    Thanks! Bike looks very slick

  6. #1406
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boozy View Post
    Very Nice!!

  7. #1407
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    Fwiw, I ride my trance hard, i frequently do 4' drops on it and I've taken it to snow summit (big bear) and skypark here in socal and have no issues with any of the jumps. It's all about the setup. Find the rear shock pressure and air volume reducer that works for the type of riding and suspension progression you need.

  8. #1408
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    Quote Originally Posted by V-Tach View Post
    Great. Thanks for the info.
    Bike is pretty close to perfect for me.
    If I could ask for more.........it would be a little more comfort on jumps to flat. Any improvement on this?
    Nothing too noticeable to be honest,The 140mm air shaft is good, Giant have pretty much got it dialled for a Trail bike. I guess itís an SX model Now!😬 Iím in process of changing the Fork & Shock Decals(Magenta & Grey) this time.(cheap option to keep it looking Fresh) .will post Photos once they arrive.

  9. #1409
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    Quote Originally Posted by minimusprime View Post
    Fwiw, I ride my trance hard, i frequently do 4' drops on it and I've taken it to snow summit (big bear) and skypark here in socal and have no issues with any of the jumps. It's all about the setup. Find the rear shock pressure and air volume reducer that works for the type of riding and suspension progression you need.
    This makes me feel better that I can, if I put enough effort into setting it up, make the bike work for the way I ride it.

    I ended up ordering a Evil Following tuned Superdeluxe RCT shock so I guess I will see how that goes.

    I decided on that for a couple of reasons. I am pretty sure that my DPS needs an air can service which, apart from being money I can use for a new shock, is probably affecting the small bump sensitivity.

    The other reason is that I think it might be heating up on stretches of rough stuff which is also affecting the performance. On a couple of tracks when descending it would feel fine at the start, but midway through it would start feeling harsh. I'd then bounce around on the bike stationary at the end of the trail and it would just feel a bit strange. If I then waited a few mins before starting the next descent, the same thing would happen again. It's only something I am starting no really notice now on all the places I ride as we had a bit of a rain event and the trails are all a little rougher (and fun) now.

    In any case it's too late now and I feel I have justified my purchase to myself...

  10. #1410
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    NBD and finally first test ride with Trance 1 29. Customized with Rekon/Rekon Race, Elite Cannibal XC bottle cage, Ergon grips and saddle.

  11. #1411
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    What kind of paths do you have on those tires?

  12. #1412
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    2019 Trance 29

    Quote Originally Posted by sergio0624 View Post
    What kind of paths do you have on those tires?
    Finnish forest trails, so quite flat and not interested downhill or enduro so I was looking for better rolling tyres than original Minions. I have used Schwalbe RoRo/RaRa etc tyres in my other bikes and Panaracer FatB Nimble-Rekon combination with my plus hardtail. So I decided to go Maxxis this time based on good experience. I have second set of wheels if I want to get light XC tyres some day.

  13. #1413
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirtyrider_fi View Post
    Finnish forest trails, so quite flat and not interested downhill or enduro so I was looking for better rolling tyres than original Minions. I have used Schwalbe RoRo/RaRa etc tyres in my other bikes and Panaracer FatB Nimble-Rekon combination with my plus hardtail. So I decided to go Maxxis this time based on good experience. I have second set of wheels if I want to get light XC tyres some day.
    I mentioned somewhere earlier in this thread that I had the Minions taken off my bike right out of the box, and replaced with 2.6 Rekons. I haven't regretted it. I may try something a little smaller for the next tire, but I have enjoyed the Rekons thus far. The Rekon race may be a little too relaxed a tread for some of what I get into, but I've pondered a set of those for my single speed.

  14. #1414
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    I'm seriously thinking about getting one lighter wheelset for my Trance Advanced 1.
    I can get Bontrager Kovee Pro for about 500Ä or perhaps Newmen XA 25. Both weigh around 1500gr, so that's 250-300gr lighter than the TRX-1.
    That, along with some faster rolling thread such as Rekon Race 2.35 on the rear would really make for a racy bike.

    I'm currently running Nobby Nics 2.6 on TRX1 and while they're pretty good tires providing good grip and comfort, they're bit slow and don't feel quick enough. Getting another "XC" wheelset would drop around 900-1000gr from the wheels (including lighter CL rotors and XX1/X01 cassette) and that would definitely be noticable for longer and flatter rides.

  15. #1415
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    Updates...

    Traveled a bit to get away from the snow and cold. Bike is still running great and is an impressive frame in terms of suspension feel, geo, and overall versatility.

    I've read through a lot of this entire thread and there is a common theme of folks having set up issues with their rear shocks. This shock seems to have a rather short stroke. That makes setting sag tricker, and it becomes more crucial to get it spot on. Even a few millimeters off proper sag and you'll likely feel it. Personally I've found erring on the side of a bit less sag to work well.

    My rear DVO died last year but they turned it around fast I it has given me no issues since.

    Last year Maxxis added a Rekon 2.6" with 120 tpi casing with their new + protection. Its not that much heavier than the Rekon 2.4 WT, and that only come in a 60 tpi. Anyway, I think the combo of a more forgiving rear tire, run with a bit less sag in the rear shock, has dialed this bike even further towards the ideal trail bike.

  16. #1416
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    2019 Trance 29-4ff7d895-951a-4667-93c5-d0e9b5a89c55.jpg
    Quote Originally Posted by Boozy View Post
    Updated colour scheme!

  17. #1417
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    gorgeous bike Boozy. Love the purple and black.

    I got out for a ride yesterday on my trance. First one in a while on the trance as I've been doing some big rides on my big bike. I'm in the middle of servicing the dpx2 and changing the compression/rebound tune on it so I ran the stock dps. I have to say the stock dps is pretty damn good, but I still have to sorta be all over the compression lever between open and medium. Medium would be perfect if it were like 10-15% backed off on the compression stack.

    Still loving these bontrager xr4 front and xr3 rear tires on this bike. Obviously with a DHF/DHR2 combo the bike makes tons of grip but I love the fast rolling nature and high volume of the 2.4 xr series. I really think xr4 front/rear or xr4 front/se4 rear would be a great setup for this bike for it's travel amount.



    I was considering moving this frame down the road and going to something similar with a steeper seat tube angle... but I'm still loving this thing so for now, it stays.

  18. #1418
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    I'm looking forward to trying the 120mm sid. It sounds like it might be a good choice for our bikes.

    Sent from my Pixel 3 using Tapatalk
    TCX advanced SX

  19. #1419
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    120mm fork on the Trance 29 = pedal strike city. Would need to go to 165mm cranks at least. Though I am curious how it would affect climbing with the steeper seat tube angle

  20. #1420
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    Not necessarily. This can easily be mitigated with little less sag front and rear but depends on the ATC as well because 10mm less travel in front (7-8mm sagged) is easily compensated with 2-3% less sag up front and back.

  21. #1421
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    Sounds like it would make the bike pretty stiff. ~ 20% sag front and rear? With lighter wheels and tyres it could push the bike to being a burly XC rig. Not my preferred setup metric, but will doubtless work for some people

  22. #1422
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    The nice thing about this bike, and some of the other short travel 29ers, is that you can vary set up to get anything from an XC rig, to a lighter duty enduro bike.

    20% sag mated with a super light 120 fork, light wheels/tires and such can make sense.

    For my riding, more sag front and back, with a nice light wheelset, crank, bars, etc. but mated to a 2.6 DHF/2.5 Aggressor at lower pressures is heaven. My second ride in Moab last week (before the zombie apocalypse hit!) I got a PR on a 1 hour segment of Navajo Rocks (lower taco CW). That's compared to previous trips where I dabbled with the more XC set up. And, it's way more comfortable.

  23. #1423
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    So just reporting back after fitting the Rockshox Super deluxe. Shock came with 1 token installed and after going on a ride at a park with the family and blowing through the travel if I even looked at a bump, acquired 2 tokens and installed them.

    After messing with the shock on a circuit ride, I have ended up on 30% sag, rebound in the middle and no LSC. I really need to dial it in properly by doing repeat runs, but it seems to be a big improvement. Granted I am comparing it with a shock that I am pretty sure needed an air can service and a bigger volume spacer, however, accross the board it just seems to perform better.

    I need to take it off a proper sized drop, but current ramp up toward the end of the stroke indicates it will be fine.

    For the price the pros closet are selling these things it seems to be a no brainer if you have a dps and the spare cash.

  24. #1424
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    Quote Originally Posted by DANIEL42 View Post
    So just reporting back after fitting the Rockshox Super deluxe. Shock came with 1 token installed and after going on a ride at a park with the family and blowing through the travel if I even looked at a bump, acquired 2 tokens and installed them.

    After messing with the shock on a circuit ride, I have ended up on 30% sag, rebound in the middle and no LSC. I really need to dial it in properly by doing repeat runs, but it seems to be a big improvement. Granted I am comparing it with a shock that I am pretty sure needed an air can service and a bigger volume spacer, however, accross the board it just seems to perform better.

    I need to take it off a proper sized drop, but current ramp up toward the end of the stroke indicates it will be fine.

    For the price the pros closet are selling these things it seems to be a no brainer if you have a dps and the spare cash.
    Thanks for the feedback. Which size shock did you buy, 165x45mm? How do you know it was tuned for an Evil Following? How does this tune compare to the Trance stock tune?

  25. #1425
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhioPT View Post
    Thanks for the feedback. Which size shock did you buy, 165x45mm? How do you know it was tuned for an Evil Following? How does this tune compare to the Trance stock tune?
    At 45mm (DVO Topaz3), the upper rocker hit the seat tube at full compression. Going to 42.5 with a spacer fixed it.
    Almost = Didn't

  26. #1426
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhioPT View Post
    Thanks for the feedback. Which size shock did you buy, 165x45mm? How do you know it was tuned for an Evil Following? How does this tune compare to the Trance stock tune?
    So I contacted the ebay seller who told me that the shocks were sold to them as oversold stock. They then supplied me with a serial number which I then gave to Rockshox who said that the serial number indicates that the shock was originally designed for Evil Bikes and the full description was: "RS SDLX RCT 165X45 DB2T LL1 380 TR ST". The only Evil bike that could be using that shock is the Following.

    I was going to, but did not end up contacting Giant to see what the tune is on this year's Advance 0 as earlier feedback from people who had sourced DPX2 off Evil Following bikes seemed positive.

    Just a note for people who might want to purchase this shock, it comes with an eyelet reducer in the bottom eyelet as well as a du bushing. If you have access to a bench vice, you can remove both by using sockets from a socket set to act as the pusher and receiver. If not, most likely you will need to find a bike shop/suspension specialist to do it for you or buy the correct tool.

    If you want to get the shock open to add more tokens - just a word of warning, that air can is done up super tight. If you don't have a strap gripper thing so you can loosen it while on the bike, you better have a bench vice and a decent amount of strength.

    Also, people were earlier making comments about not being able to get the trunnion mount back together and were sanding down washers. I'm pretty sure sanding down the washers is the wrong move. It's fiddly, but it will go back together.

    I have also had no issues with the upper rocker hitting the seat tube. When fully deflated and bottomed out, it seems to have at least 10mm spare.

  27. #1427
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    Thanks for the detailed response!

  28. #1428
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    Quote Originally Posted by DANIEL42 View Post
    Also, people were earlier making comments about not being able to get the trunnion mount back together and were sanding down washers. I'm pretty sure sanding down the washers is the wrong move. It's fiddly, but it will go back together.
    Sanding the washers is 100% unnecessary. I struggled for almost an hour to fit my Super Deluxe, but I have a method now that gets the job done in less than 5.
    1. Make sure the bottom mount is straight relative to the top mounts.
    2. Install the two bolts for the upper mounts and the washers. Make sure that the bolts are not pushed in past the inner edge of the washers and that the washers are pushed flush against the bearings. A dab of grease can help keep everything in place.
    3. Move the rocker up as far as it will travel.
    4. Feed the shock up from under the rocker. Start with the stanchion shaft in the shock ďwellĒ then push the shock upwards into the rocker. Watch from above to make sure the edges of the shock are not catching the washers.
    5. Once the shock is secured between the washers, remove the top mounting bolts and align the bolt holes. Once done, install the bolts hand tight.
    6. Push the shock stanchion forward towards the down tube to make space for the lower spacers.
    7. Working from behind the shock, install the non drive side spacer and push the shock bolt through, just enough to keep it in place.
    8. Pull the shock back ever so slightly just so the edge of the mounting hole touches the spacer installed in step 7.
    9. Slip the other spacer into place and pull the shock back into position.
    10. Push the lower bolt through and tighten it.
    11. Torque all bolts to spec

  29. #1429
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    Making the most of isolation time, all our local trails are closed for riding (Nelson, New Zealand). Missed the inside of the cranks, guess that will give me something to do tomorrow.


  30. #1430
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    Trim that dropper remote cable housing as well!

  31. #1431
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    Quote Originally Posted by Willdat? View Post
    Making the most of isolation time, all our local trails are closed for riding (Nelson, New Zealand). Missed the inside of the cranks, guess that will give me something to do tomorrow.


    I like the front Mudhugger on the rear.
    Almost = Didn't

  32. #1432
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    That's nice colorway.

    I just got great deal on Giant XCR 1 wheelset that I plan on converting to ratchet and dressing in some XC/Marathon tires with lighter rotors and easy option to swap the cassette between wheelsets, weight should be 1600gr after the conversion. I paid 350Ä for it.

    It's slightly narrower at 25mm IW, but also lighter and uses same construction as TRX 1 that have been faultless for me and same hubs so in theory swapping wheels should be painless and shouldn't require mech or caliper adjustment.

    This should drop around 800gr off the current TRX 1 wheelset (~150-200gr for the wheels, 100gr rotors and 500gr for the tires) which should come in handy for marathon rides and occasional XC race.

    Does anyone have any experience with ZTTO and other identical unbranded cassettes? They're very light and built like the X01 and XX1 Eagle but on sale you can get them for ~$100.

    I'll wait a bit on those however as they seem to improve them on the fly and they might copy Shimano shift ramps in the future and maybe offer Shimano-like spacing for the biggest cogs.

    One pic from the "stay home" BS we're being fed with
    2019 Trance 29-20200329_160442.jpg

  33. #1433
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Bob View Post
    Trim that dropper remote cable housing as well!
    Ha, yeah I'd forgotten about that when I fitted the OneUp 210mm dropper, you'll be pleased to know that I managed to trim 300+mm out of the cable.

    Quote Originally Posted by MarinCRO View Post
    That's nice colorway.

    Does anyone have any experience with ZTTO and other identical unbranded cassettes? They're very light and built like the X01 and XX1 Eagle but on sale you can get them for ~$100.
    I don't think it's similar to the ZTTO one you're talking about, but I've got one of these on my second wheelset, https://www.bikeinn.com/bike/sunrace...B&gclsrc=aw.ds
    Shift quality is good, and the price was right compared to GX, means I can swap wheelsets over in ~1 minute depending on the trails I'm riding.

  34. #1434
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    So another update with the super deluxe.

    Did not get to do repeat runs of the rough track I want to use to dial it in, however, I did take it on a ride with a variety conditions,jumps and took it off a 3ft drop to slight slope uphill that the dps would bottom out on.

    It pretty much feels really good everywhere. From the settings I had it at after last ride, I slowed the rebound by 1 - was just slightly getting bucked on jumps. I will run slightly less sag as it bottomed out on the 3ft drop (not harsh) which will probably mean pumping it up to around 155psi. I still think i will need some LSC as I am blowing through the travel pumping rollers and berms and stuff but it's not too bad and I will sort that out last.

    The next problem I am having is that it kinda starts exposing the weaknesses with the float 34. It never ends........

  35. #1435
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    How much do you weigh? I need 265 PSI in my Super Deluxe to get 25% sag at around 178 pounds

  36. #1436
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    I am around 140lb with gear.

    Not sure how many volume spacers you are running, but I have 3 which would also impact things.

  37. #1437
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    Couple Q's, what is weight on a size small frame? And pros/cons on running a 140 fork?

    Thanks in advance.
    Ripley V1 XC/Gravel Adventure rig
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  38. #1438
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    Quote Originally Posted by DANIEL42 View Post
    I am around 140lb with gear.

    Not sure how many volume spacers you are running, but I have 3 which would also impact things.
    Run it mostly with one spacer, tried two, but didn't like how progressive the bike was with that setup. Pressure was roughly the same for 25% sag

  39. #1439
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    Medium or Large?

    Hey guys, I'm looking for some sizing advice for the Trance 29. Iím about 5í9Ē (174cm) with a 32Ē (81cm) inseam. Current ride is an Anthem 29 in Medium, which I love. That said, for the best fit I have had to push the saddle as far back on the rails as it will go.

    Looking at the numbers, reach on the Anthem M is 437mm with a 70mm stem. Reach on the Trance M is 442mm with a 40mm stem. While the reach is similar, the shorter stem and slightly steeper seat angle means the Trance M is going to be more cramped than the Anthem M.

    This worries me, since Iím already against the limits on the Anthem. Giant's guide suggests I'm just below the threshold for L, but some comments in this thread suggest sizing up might be reasonable. Should I ignore Giant's guide and go up to the L? Great idea or crazy?

    I know I should just demo, but that's tough these days.

    Thanks in advance!

  40. #1440
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    So you are trying to compare the "Top Tube Length" measurement? On the Trance 29 it's 612 and on the Anthem 29 it's 610 for Mediums (for an unknown seat height I assume).

    I am 175cm and I ride a medium. I did not demo any other sizes - I only rode my bike around the carpark before I bought it.

    At the end of the day it's personal preference. If you can't demo, it's probably safer to stick to the Giant recommendation as you fall in the middle of the height range for the medium.

  41. #1441
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    Quote Originally Posted by DANIEL42 View Post
    So you are trying to compare the "Top Tube Length" measurement? On the Trance 29 it's 612 and on the Anthem 29 it's 610 for Mediums (for an unknown seat height I assume).
    Yah, pretty much. Agreed the Anthem and Trance have very similar top tube length, but the Anthem has a much longer stem (70mm vs 40mm). On the Anthem I've already got the saddle all the way back to fit comfortably, so the shorter-stemmed Trance M would leave pretty much no room for adjustment. The TT + stem measurement on the Trance L almost exactly matches the Anthem M, hence my curiosity about that option.

    I'm gonna keep the Anthem for local XC trails, the Trance would be for longer climb-and-descend trips in the mountains where the Anthem's short travel becomes a limiting factor.

    I am 175cm and I ride a medium. I did not demo any other sizes - I only rode my bike around the carpark before I bought it.
    Good to know. I'm curious what your inseam is?

    Thanks!

  42. #1442
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    A self measurement of my inseam gets me 82cm.

    A couple of things to consider:
    When do you feel your current bike is a little cramped?
    Do you have a dropper on your anthem?

    I'm asking those questions, because, it sounds like you are buying the bike to ride places where you ride up, so you can ride down. Which means that the bike has to feel comfortable enough when riding up where you will be seated. But, when you are riding down, who cares what it feels like when you are seated because you won't be - the seat will be down out of the way. What matters then is how the bike feels when standing which is all reach dependent.

    The other thing to consider is whether a trance is the bike for you. Is the Trance too similar to the Anthem? Would you be better off with a Reign or similar?

  43. #1443
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    Quote Originally Posted by DANIEL42 View Post
    A self measurement of my inseam gets me 82cm.
    OK, interesting. We're pretty similar shape wise. I'm assuming you're pretty happy with the medium?

    A couple of things to consider:
    When do you feel your current bike is a little cramped?
    Do you have a dropper on your anthem?

    I'm asking those questions, because, it sounds like you are buying the bike to ride places where you ride up, so you can ride down. Which means that the bike has to feel comfortable enough when riding up where you will be seated. But, when you are riding down, who cares what it feels like when you are seated because you won't be - the seat will be down out of the way. What matters then is how the bike feels when standing which is all reach dependent.
    Good points, you're giving me something to think about. You're right, I need to think about it differently than the Anthem, because their purpose will be different.

    (I do have a dropper on the Anthem, and it's a very capable bike. The only time I've unhappy is on chunky descents where it - no surprise - can get bucked around)

    The other thing to consider is whether a trance is the bike for you. Is the Trance too similar to the Anthem? Would you be better off with a Reign or similar?
    Definitely been considering the new Reign, but I've heard there are some frame flex/brake rub issues when climbing under power. I'm not convinced it's a fully baked product yet. Price/value ratio is also definitely better on the Trance.

  44. #1444
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    From what I have seen in comments, the rub issue only affects the carbon frame?

    I am happy with the Trance. I am not the best rider, but when riding down I feel I have enough room. I haven't ridden too many bikes, but I have ridden a Large 27.5 Anthem which I found too big (my brother is the same height as me and loves his though) and a Medium 27.5 reign which felt fine.

    As far as bikes brands go, are you just considering Giant? My next bike will probably be something in that 160 front 140-150 rear travel range and if I was buying one today, I'd probably be going for an Ibis Ripmo AF NX build (and immediately swap out the brakes). The thing I really like about what they are doing with the Ripmo AF is that all the builds get the top tier suspension because that is the thing that is the most expensive to upgrade and really matters. Everything else just has to be "good enough" in my opinion. Of course "good enough" is very subjective.

  45. #1445
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    Your body position is more upright on the trance (higher front end), so it's not direct comparison to some XC bike on which you're more stretched out and perching in front of the wheel.

    But, I'd agree on the Reign recommendation, in Europe at least there are great deals on Reign 1 and SX 29er which are the ones to get. Carbon models have flex and are not much lighter frame wise. Not to mention I'd feel far more comfortable riding aluminium bike with aluminium wheels on rocky and jagged terrain than some flashed out carbon Wunderbike that's one bad line choice away from being totalled.

  46. #1446
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    I'm 175cm with 81cm inseam and ride a medium Trance 29. I run my saddle towards the front of the bike for a bit more weight on the front wheel whilst climbing and to make the effective seat angle a bit steeper. I've never felt the need to push my seat back and this is after coming off a Scott Spark. The Spark was also a medium and, on paper, has similar numbers to the Anthem in terms of reach. Also keep in mind that the Trance will have a wider bar (40mm IIRC) which will influence how it feels vs the Anthem. I'd say you should really try for a demo to see which size feels best. Then as others have suggested, if the terrain is really nasty a Reign is probably what you are looking for.

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    Appreciate the insight from everyone! I think youíve talked some sense into me, thatís just what I wanted. Medium it is, unless I can figure out a way to demo.

    Iíve definitely been looking at other bikes. The Ripmo seems universally praised, Iíve also considered SB130, Hightower, etc. Ripmo AF is tempting. The big problem is Iím in Canada and our currency is getting weaker by the day, so American brands are pretty darn pricey. Giant has always been a far better value. As an example, a Reign Advanced Pro 1 (alloy rims, GX spec) is $5600 CAD. A very similar GX spec Ripmo is $7400, a 30% premium... tough to justify.

    The Trance at that same price level is an even better value, getting carbon rims. Hopefully that can explain why the Trance ends up high on my list. I know price isnít everything, but it does make the argument a lot easier.

  48. #1448
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    Iím 177cm with 80 cm inseam and an ape index >1 and I ride a medium Trance 29.
    I rode a large in the carpark which felt good based on my shoulder position over/behind the bars when standing. Unfortunately I was only able to demo a medium on the trails and I was in the similar situation trying to decide on what size. I was leaning toward the large due to all the hype about the new ďlonger is betterĒ.
    But then I read Lee McCormacks Dailed. Which made more sense to me one sizing a bike than just the general rule of thumb of the day ďsize up one size from your normal sizeĒ and the numbers matched up with Giants sizing for my height of a Medium. But I do prefer a Ride Area Distance (distance between bottom bracket and Hand position) of ~815 rather than ~795, but I think this is because I donít ride heels down and I prefer my cleats under the balls of my feet, not mid-foot.

    Iím still skeptical of the hype around the ďlonger is betterĒ especially for the trail trail bike segment. It makes a lot of sense if your ploughing steep black/double black trails at high speeds all day long, but not so sure itís optimal for typical trail bike conditions.

  49. #1449
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    I'd also say Medium for you at 5'-9". At 5'-11", I feel my large is a tad large.

    Also, as you mentioned, it comes with a small stem. So it'd be easier to throw a longer stem on the Medium than to get the Large and get a shorter stem. There's just not much shorter you could go for the stem. Also, I think it steers plenty quick already. So a longer stem slowing down the steering a little wouldn't be terrible.

    Bluman8- Have to agree with you. I wish I could throw a new stem on with more rise to get a little more height at my grips. But stems are so short these days you can't really adjust very much with a stem swap. We're getting pushed into adjusting the cockpit with bar changes which I think is stupid. Bigger hassle, bigger investment before you know how you'll like it, more weight for bars with higher rise, etc. Changing a stem is so easy.
    Have fun!

  50. #1450
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    This video sums up the new geometry and sizing debate nicely IMO:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RoaXrFhhncI

  51. #1451
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Bob View Post
    This video sums up the new geometry and sizing debate nicely IMO:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RoaXrFhhncI

    That fellow is right on.

  52. #1452
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    I prefer my bikes long. If anything, I wish the trance where a smidge longer, but with a 2 degree steeper seat tube angle. If it were any shorter, I'd be riding the bike off the back end and not weighting the front enough to get proper grip.

    Regarding stem swaps to get a higher rise... I think it's 6 one way, have dozen the other. These days, stems are pushing up to 60-100 bucks and are about the same cost as decent aluminum handlebars. You can step into a nice set of carbon bars for 130-150 and you can step into the top of the line stems for the same amount of dollars (i9).

    In my opinion, the long/low/slack trend doesn't change anything in terms of our ability to fit ourselves on the given frame sizes. If you want a smaller bike, you can still size down and stem up, if you want the opposite, then size the way the industry is suggesting. This has all finally lead to appropriate sized frames for those of us that are 6'2" and above. If you're under that mark, I understand not seeing current Geo is a huge advantage... but those of us that have been pedaling our bikes from behind the rear axle for years, very much appreciate the new trends.

  53. #1453
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    How long is too long is almost as much about where you ride, as it is about your body dimensions. I'm riding an XL Trance, and can tell you the bike is slower in really tight short-radius turns compared to my previous bikes. There's no way in getting around it (no pun intended) with a longer wheelbase/front center. I will say that some of our local trails are about as tight as you can make them, as we try to create the most miles in a relatively small area. For shorter riders on smaller frame sizes, I don't think this is really an issue though, and you should buy whatever bike fits you best ergonomically.

    I will say though that despite the longer wheelbase and slacker HTA, I have not had any issues with keeping the front wheel down or steering on steep climbs. In fact, I recently swapped the stock 55mm stem for a 35mm one I had in my parts bin to lighten the front end for getting over obstacles and getting the front up easier on jumps. I've been using an Easton Haven carbon handlebar with 750mm width and 40mm rise from the get-go. The low BB height and stack height really does keep the front end planted!

    At 6'3", I feel the XL is a really good fit, but I wouldn't necessarily want the wheelbase or front center to be any longer for the trails I normally ride. If I lived out West in the mountains, I could perhaps see the benefits of a longer bike. I think Giant has struck a near-perfect balance of agility and stability with the Trance 29.

  54. #1454
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    That fellow is right on.
    Yep. I figured there'd be push-back eventually. I won't be surprised if geometry starts going back a little bit. The bike shop I bought from was strongly pushing me to size up. Luckily I knew enough to make my own decision, but someone should show this video to the guy at my local bike shop. :-)
    Have fun!

  55. #1455
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    Problem with all these new "progressive" geo bikes is that they're made for enduro riding (one big climb and steep descent). People don't ride just that, especially if you don't live in the mountains but have local hills and ride a lot up and down over undulating terrain and some flats as well with tight or flat corners. Here steep STA and very slack HTA suck and you're better off with a more conservative geometry.

    Those over-inflated reach and seat tube numbers are not really that much radical if you consider that seat tubes are more kinked and shorter (dramatically slacking the seat tube as you raise the saddle), head tubes are short and raising the bar drastically cuts the reach especially on bikes with slack HTA and the only real thing you get is large wheelbase, especially if you're taller rider with raised bars and saddle.

  56. #1456
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarinCRO View Post
    ...head tubes are short and raising the bar drastically cuts the reach especially on bikes with slack HTA and the only real thing you get is large wheelbase, especially if you're taller rider with raised bars and saddle.
    This is why I started ignoring "reach" measurements when looking at geometry tables. If you ignore the stack, it can be very misleading. I suspect that some manufacturers have even gone so far as to keep headtubes shorter on larger frame sizes, just so their "reach" numbers looks better (longer) on paper. Same goes for ETT measurements, as without considering the STA, it can be misleading. The primary numbers I glance at first nowadays are wheelbase/front center, BB height/drop, stack, HTA, and STA. If a frame is too long/short or too low, I can quickly cross it off from my checklist. Rarely are bikes too "high" today.

  57. #1457
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    I got few questions for some of your who modified your Trances.
    How hard is to cut the travel reducer in the shock? Could I slide some plastic between shim and piston to protect the piston while cutting.

    Also, I am thinking of cutting the existent volume reducer, or lopping bit off to reduce it a bit. Is that possible? Is the reducer hollow and that cutting it would pierce it and render it useless?

    My idea is to get the 140mm shaft for the 34 as well and modify the bike into "Trance SX" with 140/120-ish travel.

  58. #1458
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarinCRO View Post
    I got few questions for some of your who modified your Trances.
    How hard is to cut the travel reducer in the shock? Could I slide some plastic between shim and piston to protect the piston while cutting.

    Also, I am thinking of cutting the existent volume reducer, or lopping bit off to reduce it a bit. Is that possible? Is the reducer hollow and that cutting it would pierce it and render it useless?

    My idea is to get the 140mm shaft for the 34 as well and modify the bike into "Trance SX" with 140/120-ish travel.
    I have no info to help you with the shock spacer, but why not just overfork the bike as is? The 140 shaft will actually raise the static height of the front end, but removing the shock spacer will not raise the back end of the bike (since the travel gained in the shock is all at the bottom of the compression stroke).

  59. #1459
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhioPT View Post
    I have no info to help you with the shock spacer, but why not just overfork the bike as is? The 140 shaft will actually raise the static height of the front end, but removing the shock spacer will not raise the back end of the bike (since the travel gained in the shock is all at the bottom of the compression stroke).
    I would do both most likely. Using a smaller volume reducer (or cutting existing one) would mean I'd run slightly more pressure than now and have similar bottom out resistance while keeping slightly smaller sag.
    This, along with slightly longer fork would raise the BB a bit which would be good and maybe slack out the front a tiny bit.

  60. #1460
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    Maybe a 140mm airshaft with a Luftkappe. This would give the front end more travel, but because of the bigger negative air spring, there would be more front end sag to keep the head angle and bb height more in line with the stock figures.

  61. #1461
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    So, anyone got any tricks for tuning the rear shock? Or maybe had it retuned? Got the Fox Performance Elite DPS model. Pedalling seems spongy as the open, medium and 3 black dial settings make very little difference but the firm setting is rock hard so not that usable off road. With smaller volume spacers it lacks mid stoke support and bottoms out, bigger and it's harsh over medium bumps like roots. Sag is correct, although with me at 72kg it needed between 40-110psi more than any other bike I've owned? I'm wondering if some of the harshness is the carbon wheels but hard to say without trying another wheel in there. Going to try this in the next few days.

    I've had a several older Trances and have other bikes now with the same shock, no problems. I just can't imagine what Giant were thinking with this shock tune.

  62. #1462
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    I have also found the shock needs a lot of pressure for my ~75kg weight. 250 PSI odd for the DPS and 260 PSI for the Super Deluxe I changed to. I did notice that after I did an air can service on the DPS itís action improved quite a bit (same goes for the fork, the action opens up significantly after a lower service). I usually left the shock in open mode and position 2 of the open mode adjust and around 3 clicks of rebound. I also popped in the yellow spacer as the orange stock spacer was just to progressive.

  63. #1463
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    Quote Originally Posted by DenyEverything View Post
    So, anyone got any tricks for tuning the rear shock? Or maybe had it retuned? Got the Fox Performance Elite DPS model. Pedalling seems spongy as the open, medium and 3 black dial settings make very little difference but the firm setting is rock hard so not that usable off road. With smaller volume spacers it lacks mid stoke support and bottoms out, bigger and it's harsh over medium bumps like roots. Sag is correct, although with me at 72kg it needed between 40-110psi more than any other bike I've owned? I'm wondering if some of the harshness is the carbon wheels but hard to say without trying another wheel in there. Going to try this in the next few days.

    I've had a several older Trances and have other bikes now with the same shock, no problems. I just can't imagine what Giant were thinking with this shock tune.
    Iím 73 and have 235PSI in my topaz to get 28% sag.
    Try playing with your tire pressure a couple PSI.
    I run 26 PSI front and back. I have DVO stuff but if I run 24 PSI in the back things get a bit spongy, havenít really donít it enough to notice it becoming harsh.

    If I run 24 PSI in the front it makes my fork really harsh over square edge and medium bumps. Itís like the tire and fork are compressing at different speeds and and by time the tire has stopped compressing the fork is already into its ramping up phase so feels like it comes to a sudden stop.

  64. #1464
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    DPS Shock Tuning

    https://www.ambmag.com.au/feature/te...e-elite-482126
    "I installed a 0.4in3 spacer on top of the already installed 0.4in3 and headed for the local trails.
    A slight drop in pressure, 110 down to 100 and back into trail carving I went. For me, tuning the shock is about finding the balance between Open and Medium modes. Firm, although regularly used, is mainly to get me home at max pace. With the inclusion of the volume spacer the ride evened out. In the Medium setting the ride firmed up a tad, while in Open mode it was smooth sailing."
    Almost = Didn't

  65. #1465
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    I'm running fairly low tyre pressures already as it's not rocky here. Have just swapped the rear wheel for a Newmen 30mm from another bike, see if that makes any difference. I guess I'll see what's possible with getting it retuned after Easter. If I could get a firmer pedalling platform that still absorbs bumps without feeling like a hardtail then I could open up the other adjustments for the descents rather than trying to get one setting to do everything. Shame Cane Creek don't do a shock that fits, their climb switch is amazing.

  66. #1466
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    It does indeed feel smoother and more controlled with the aluminium rear wheel. The harder I rode the more noticeable it was. Interesting as the Newmen wheels aren't exactly compliant like Stans. Actually set a PR down a fairly rough trail.

    2019 Trance 29-rsz_dsc_0809-01.jpg

  67. #1467
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    I've done some wrenching on my bike this evening and removed the travel reducer from the shock. It's very easy to do, just cut it off with wire cutters taking care not do damage shaft.

    I can easily replace it with a plastic ring if needed but there's still about 1.5-2cm left between seatstay brace and seat tube at full compression, so it's not really necessary.

    There was however some damage to chrome coating at the spot where the reducer sits on the shaft. I don't know how that came to pass but I took photo evidence before cutting the reducer in case of warranty issues.



    My shock came in with 0.6 inch^3 spacer which was a pleasant surprise as I had thought that it came with a bigger one..

    I even removed one more air volume spacer from the fork (it now has only one inside), but upped the pressure to 100psi (from 90-95) as lately I've been having issues bottoming the fork on some new trails that we've built, interestingly not while landing jumps. I didn't want to put another spacer in there, but I'll check how this rides and see if I need more spacers.

    I also reverted to my original Giant bar+stem combo, from the Syncros copy from Aliexpress. Not that there was anything structurally wrong with the integrated bar, but I feel Giant bars might have better geometry for me (more backsweep and more reach and rise) and to be honest, I never had a perfect peace of mind with those one piece 250gr bars although they didn't fail.

    Back to the shock - if you tinker with it, you're much better off not using a bike stand to bolt the lower pivot axle and I'd suggest fixing the upper trunnion mount first before trying to thread the lower axle with spacers, shock is much easier to fit and align that way.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 2019 Trance 29-img_20200411_200028.jpg  


  68. #1468
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    Nice to hear that removing the spacer is easy. Are you also running a large size frame?

    As for removing the spacers in the fork, I think youíre going to find that you will be putting at least one back. I was having issues with getting close to bottoming whilst pumping rolling g-outs. Went back to 3 tokens and the same air pressure and am having zero issues and the fork feels great

  69. #1469
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    It's an XL.

  70. #1470
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    Update on my Easter ride today with new settings:

    Rear end is fantastic, I'm really happy with it now. It seems more "bottomless" than before and I haven't bottomed it out yet. There seems more useable travel as well and it doesn't end abruptly nor does it blow through travel. It might be more due to different pressure/setup, but added travel doesn't hurt, right?

    Front end was excellent on steep and chunky stuff staying high in the travel, but it was slightly too stiff on the flats. I dropped pressure slightly and it's much better on the flats, but might be too soft on steeps now.
    I might try 3 tokens at 90 PSI to see how it works (I had 2 tokens before @90 PSI) and 95-100PSI with one token right now.

    Bars are noticeably higher right now which suits me well making for a more comfortable position. I might get Newmen carbon bars and their ultra light stem making for ~250gr set compared to current Giant aluminium set that's around 440gr.

    I'm also 3D pinting some stem spacers, you can easily drop 50g with those and it's practically free

  71. #1471
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    I popped my bike in the stand yesterday determined to find the root cause of a clicking sound I experience when the non-drive side pedal is on its way up. Everything looked good, so I decided to see if all the bearings were ok. Turns out I had one seized and several running very rough. Smashed them all out this morning and will ask my LBS to order some Enduro Max bearings for me so I can install once we're out of lockdown. A friend has promised to help make a press to install the new set. The bike is a year and 3 months old, and hasnít seen a lot of wet riding. Guess they save a bit of money with cheap bearings from the factory. For those interested the bike takes the following bearings:

    Rear triangle upper: 6900 x 2
    Rear triangle lower: 6902 x 2
    Rocker main pivot: 6900 x 2
    Rocker shock mount: 63800 x 2
    Lower arm: 6802 x 2
    Frame shock mount: 6802 x 2

  72. #1472
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    I never had issues with bearings on my Giants, but then it's quite dry here and I never wash my bike with pressure washer.

    Forget Enduro, they're mediocre bearings. Get some proper bearings from reputable brands such as SKF, NSK, NTN or Schaeffler.

  73. #1473
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    I think I am going to need to mess with my DPS volume spacers this year. On the Open mode I will blow through the travel no problem, and it bobs annoyingly. In the medium mode (which it is always in) I can never get full travel, and it is harsh near the end of the travel. However, seated pedaling (90%) of my riding it feels pretty dang good. 205lbs on a L frame

  74. #1474
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarinCRO View Post
    I never had issues with bearings on my Giants, but then it's quite dry here and I never wash my bike with pressure washer.

    Forget Enduro, they're mediocre bearings. Get some proper bearings from reputable brands such as SKF, NSK, NTN or Schaeffler.
    Same for me. Mostly dry here and only use the garden hose to wash the bike. I'll try source some SKF or NSK bearings as you suggest 👍🏻

  75. #1475
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    Quote Originally Posted by robhurlburt View Post
    I think I am going to need to mess with my DPS volume spacers this year. On the Open mode I will blow through the travel no problem, and it bobs annoyingly. In the medium mode (which it is always in) I can never get full travel, and it is harsh near the end of the travel. However, seated pedaling (90%) of my riding it feels pretty dang good. 205lbs on a L frame
    I found running less sag took care of this issue nicely.

    The stroke on the shock seems relatively short. So just a small change in sag makes a big change in how the bike behaves.

    I've settled on a relatively small amount of sag and am happier overall.

  76. #1476
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    I found running less sag took care of this issue nicely.

    The stroke on the shock seems relatively short. So just a small change in sag makes a big change in how the bike behaves.

    I've settled on a relatively small amount of sag and am happier overall.
    what is yours set at? mine is .4in

  77. #1477
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    IIRC I think I'm running like a hair less than 25% sag. Can't recall the actual stroke. What's the shock's stroke and I'll do the math. At work and not near the bike.

  78. #1478
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    I've put 3 spacers in my Fox 34 and pumped it to ~87-88PSI.
    Wow! It's so good now, very supple and sensitive with pretty good progressesion and doesn't bottom out. It was so great riding my Trance today, it just rips with these new tweaks.
    Definitely much better than 1 spacer and more pressure than I had before.

  79. #1479
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    IIRC I think I'm running like a hair less than 25% sag. Can't recall the actual stroke. What's the shock's stroke and I'll do the math. At work and not near the bike.
    Is it 42.5?

  80. #1480
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    10.6mm or 0.4in is 25% for the stock 42.5mm shock size

  81. #1481
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarinCRO View Post
    I've put 3 spacers in my Fox 34 and pumped it to ~87-88PSI.
    Wow! It's so good now, very supple and sensitive with pretty good progressesion and doesn't bottom out. It was so great riding my Trance today, it just rips with these new tweaks.
    Definitely much better than 1 spacer and more pressure than I had before.
    how much do you weigh?

  82. #1482
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Bob View Post
    10.6mm or 0.4in is 25% for the stock 42.5mm shock size
    Maybe try a hair less sag. I run a bit less than 25% and that seemed to make a big difference. But that's on the stock DVO rear damper.

    I set my sag from the attack position.

  83. #1483
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    Quote Originally Posted by robhurlburt View Post
    how much do you weigh?
    90-95kg, not sure as I haven't weighted in a while

  84. #1484
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    I'm 160 pounds (about 72 Kg) and ride in Utah. Mostly Wasatch Back with about 200 miles in Moab in a normal year. I have the DPX2 and run just about (12.8mm) 30% sag just sitting upright in the saddle.

    That closely corresponds to (10.3mm) 24% in an attack position. I use the seated position to quick check the sag only because the attack position for measuring can change day to day, depending on how I get on the bike.

    After putting on low friction seals and getting a service, that pressure is about 225 psi. That's more pressure than it used to take, and I didn't take out or replace the OE spacer.

    It's an unbelievably nice ride. I have a buddy with the newest Tallboy who is really pi$$ed he didn't get a Giant. No matter what he does (and he got the top of the line TB) he can't get it to ride nearly as nice.

  85. #1485
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    This is probably my final update of where I ended up with my setup on the 45mm stroke Super Deluxe as I am really happy with the way it is performing.

    So to recap, I am around 140lb geared up.
    I ended up running 25% sag set from the seated position.
    To get that I have 3 volume spacers and 160psi.
    I have my LSC fully open and rebound 2 clicks from the slowest.

    It is set up to perform while going fast and handle 4 ft drops to flat.

    As a mentioned briefly in my last post, the Rhythm on the front is starting to struggle which means I am now starting to have lean on the rear shock. Yes, I need to do a lower service which I expect will help to a certain extent, but I don't think will solve all my problems.

    Unfortunately, I don't think I am going to pick up a brand new (or lightly used) top level fork for even close to $300 AUD as what happened with the rear (I'd be looking in the $1100 to $1400 AUD range). This means I want to investigate my cost effective options as to how I can get more performance out of the Rhythm.

    So I found Diaz Suspension with the RUNT which now fits a fox 34. It allegedly does all the good things like give you more sensitivity and mid-stroke support all for $300AUD. I have read up on it as much as I can and most people seem to be paring it with top tier forks but do think it's worth it. I can't find much info from people who have paired it with a lower end fork. Anyway, just after people's thoughts on the RUNT or other budget friendly alternatives before I contact Diaz Suspension to see what they have to say.

    Link: https://diazsuspensiondesign.com/shop/fox34

  86. #1486
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    For those with the DVO Topaz: do you have to remove the shock from the frame in order to pop the air can and move spacers around? I started by letting all of the air out of the chamber, but the shock obviously compresses and since the stroke is so short, it doesn't seem like there'd be enough room to slide the sleeve down.

    Does anybody whether the shock comes set up with a stock/standard spacer config?

  87. #1487
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    Quote Originally Posted by hmai18 View Post
    For those with the DVO Topaz: do you have to remove the shock from the frame in order to pop the air can and move spacers around? I started by letting all of the air out of the chamber, but the shock obviously compresses and since the stroke is so short, it doesn't seem like there'd be enough room to slide the sleeve down.

    Does anybody whether the shock comes set up with a stock/standard spacer config?
    No you donít have to remove the shock. There is enough room to slide the outer can down and add/remove spacers. They are split ring so you can just pull them out.

    Mine came with 3 +ve and 3-ve spacers pre-installed.

  88. #1488
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluman8 View Post
    No you donít have to remove the shock. There is enough room to slide the outer can down and add/remove spacers. They are split ring so you can just pull them out.

    Mine came with 3 +ve and 3-ve spacers pre-installed.
    What size frame are you on? I had to send my Topaz to DVO last week but I hope to start playing around with different spacers soon.

  89. #1489
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluman8 View Post
    No you donít have to remove the shock. There is enough room to slide the outer can down and add/remove spacers. They are split ring so you can just pull them out.
    Good to know. I just can't seem to get enough purchase/leverage on the sleeve to twist and pull down.

  90. #1490
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    2019 Trance 29

    Quote Originally Posted by phrider View Post
    What size frame are you on? I had to send my Topaz to DVO last week but I hope to start playing around with different spacers soon.
    On a Medium. I havenít really played with spacers other than to see their effect on sag. I moved them around for a couple rides, but then decided to try and stick with the curve that giant & DVO designed the bike to have for a while as I was just playing because I could not for any real reason.

  91. #1491
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    Quote Originally Posted by hmai18 View Post
    Good to know. I just can't seem to get enough purchase/leverage on the sleeve to twist and pull down.
    Try cycling the shock a few times once you let the air out. If you donít the -ve spring side will still be a full pressure, which will make it harder to get it off.

  92. #1492
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    Thanks, the pressure equalization did the trick. My medium came with 3+ and 2- installed. At ~140lbs geared and running between 28-30% sag, I don't think I've ever used more than 40mm of stroke, even on some of the bigger hits I've taken on the North Shore and Squamish.

    Given how little travel the bike has to start with, keeping the shock progressive is probably a good idea. I'll probably start with 2+/1- but I'm wondering whether I'd be better off having equal spacers in both chambers.

  93. #1493
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    Quote Originally Posted by jhtopilko View Post
    I'm looking forward to trying the 120mm sid. It sounds like it might be a good choice for our bikes.

    Sent from my Pixel 3 using Tapatalk
    Did you get around to do this?
    I'd wish I could bring the front end lower.
    Check my Site

  94. #1494
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warp View Post
    Did you get around to do this?
    I'd wish I could bring the front end lower.
    It's just a dream at the moment, and I'd want to pair it with a lower headset spacer to keep the height up.

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    Not sure if you guys have seen it, but Awesome Mtb did a video where they rode with a guy on a Trance 29 built up light. He had a Fox 34 SC 120mm on the front.

    Link to the video is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gb_KIyFHrbM&t=559s

    They do the bike's specs at 5:20 in the video.

  96. #1496
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    Apart from the weight saving, whatís the goal?

    10mm lower bar height can easily be picked up in headset spacers, low rise or flat bar.

    Iím not sure the travel trade-off to save 300-400g is worth it. But Iím only a semi weight weenie....the margarine of weight weenies...

  97. #1497
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    So I got some volume spacers from my LBS for my Fox DPS. My goal is to get the shock to work in the ďopenĒ setting. Currently the sag is set at 25% and if I run open mode it has terrible pedal bob and I blow through the travel (205lbs), so I always run ďmediumĒ.

    What size spacer should I move up to?
    Is there any maintenance I should perform while the shock is apart?

    i had planned on following this video. it appears i should not need to remove the shock from the frame
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tT_uado9NCs

  98. #1498
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    Quote Originally Posted by robhurlburt View Post
    So I got some volume spacers from my LBS for my Fox DPS. My goal is to get the shock to work in the ďopenĒ setting. Currently the sag is set at 25% and if I run open mode it has terrible pedal bob and I blow through the travel (205lbs), so I always run ďmediumĒ.

    What size spacer should I move up to?
    Is there any maintenance I should perform while the shock is apart?

    i had planned on following this video. it appears i should not need to remove the shock from the frame
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tT_uado9NCs
    The shock has the orange (0.8)spacer in it from the factory. The red (0.95) is the next and last size up. How much psi are you running in your shock?

  99. #1499
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    The spring is one thing, but always remember the dampers role. I tried a spacer kit and went through every configuration allowed. I ended up buying a super deluxe from an evil following.

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  100. #1500
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    2019 Trance 29

    Quote Originally Posted by hmai18 View Post
    Thanks, the pressure equalization did the trick. My medium came with 3+ and 2- installed. At ~140lbs geared and running between 28-30% sag, I don't think I've ever used more than 40mm of stroke, even on some of the bigger hits I've taken on the North Shore and Squamish.

    Given how little travel the bike has to start with, keeping the shock progressive is probably a good idea. I'll probably start with 2+/1- but I'm wondering whether I'd be better off having equal spacers in both chambers.
    Correction mine came with 2+/2-, should have checked rather than relying on memory.

    Iíd try 2/2 first. That will keep the same mid stroke support youíve got but just dial your end stroke back a bit.

    I purposely set my suspension up to never use full travel under controlled riding. I like to keep the last few mm for when I get it wrong or out of control.
    Last edited by Bluman8; 04-27-2020 at 04:48 AM.

  101. #1501
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brother Lu View Post
    The shock has the orange (0.8)spacer in it from the factory. The red (0.95) is the next and last size up. How much psi are you running in your shock?
    265psi. i just recently bumped it up to 275 but haven't had a chance to ride it yet

  102. #1502
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    what is your riding weight? I was running ~250 PSI to get 25% sag for a riding weight of 78kg. The DPS on the Trance 29 needs higher pressures than usual to get the right sag numbers

  103. #1503
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Bob View Post
    what is your riding weight? I was running ~250 PSI to get 25% sag for a riding weight of 78kg. The DPS on the Trance 29 needs higher pressures than usual to get the right sag numbers
    205lbs or so with gear.

  104. #1504
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    Have you guys seen the Linkage Design post about Trance 29?

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sour...tu1dBc-piiYGwP

    According to his data, Trance leverage ratio reduces as the travel increase. This means you don't need to reduce volume that much and it means that maybe this idea with very high pressure is unfounded because the beginning stroke acts with more leverage creating more force on the shock and possibly extra sag and as the bike eases into travel the leverage reduces meaning it's harder to achieve full travel especially with air shock and decently sized volume reducer.

  105. #1505
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    Quote Originally Posted by robhurlburt View Post
    205lbs or so with gear.
    I think your pressure is too low at 275 psi, get the sag at 25% (10.6mm or 0.4inch). Once that is done, re-evaluate how much travel you are using and whether a bigger spacer is needed. Going for a bigger spacer isn't going to stop pedal bob in the first third of the bike's travel

  106. #1506
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Bob View Post
    I think your pressure is too low at 275 psi, get the sag at 25% (10.6mm or 0.4inch). Once that is done, re-evaluate how much travel you are using and whether a bigger spacer is needed. Going for a bigger spacer isn't going to stop pedal bob in the first third of the bike's travel
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xhnKTZu2AKs

    i used this technique, and actually 265psi was right at .4in.

  107. #1507
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    Method doesn't really matter as long as you are consistent. From my experience (250 PSI for a ~175lb rider) I think your pressure is a bit low. Make sure to measure from the lip of the seal, not the shock body (just checking)

  108. #1508
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    Quote Originally Posted by robhurlburt View Post
    265psi. i just recently bumped it up to 275 but haven't had a chance to ride it yet
    I'm 20lbs heavier and run 320psi. 11mm sag.

  109. #1509
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    Hey everyone, new on the forum.

    I'm looking to upgrade my MTB from a 500$ "cheap" hardtail with a XC geometry to this really nice trail bike !!

    I come here to have some information cause i have quite a weird body shape :
    I'm 178cm/5′10 and i have 88cm/34,6457 inch (don't know how inchs and feed really work, metric user here)

    So as you can see, i have quite long legs and a short torso, the question now is what size should i get ?

    I can't ask the question to the closest Giant shop which is closed due to Covid19.

    I think a M should be the best fit, but i would like to know if i can get my 78cm/30.70 inch seat high with the stock 395mm/125mm dropper seatpost or if i can get a higher saddle high by getting the 440mm/150mm dropper ?

    I'd like to know also how weird will it look/feel if i ride a bike with that much seatpost out, if someone has a M and can send a photo with this saddle high and see if it respect the minimum insertion of the dropper, i would be really thanksful !

    Anyway i think that a large would be to big for me in term of reach, especially since i'm planning to use this bike for both Trails and a little bit of XC, don't really wan't to end up with a bike that feels like an Enduro bike.

    Thanks again !

  110. #1510
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Bob View Post
    Method doesn't really matter as long as you are consistent. From my experience (250 PSI for a ~175lb rider) I think your pressure is a bit low. Make sure to measure from the lip of the seal, not the shock body (just checking)
    Tend to agree. Iím 165lb with 235PSI in a Topaz 2 for 12 mm sag. But it seems from this forum thatís pretty much the trend. Iíve seen some comparatively low pressures for weight on other bikes in some of Topaz discussions. A couple interesting things I noticed when setting mine up though (which are mostly likely user error) but:
    - From ~200-230 PSI there was pretty much no measurable difference in sag.
    - setting sag seated (post up or dropped) or standing did seem to give measurably different sags. But I optíd to set mine seated with the post dropped so I could reach the shock and measure sag while on the bike.
    - changing spacers around in the Topaz didnít change sag

  111. #1511
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZeBen84 View Post
    Hey everyone, new on the forum.

    I'm looking to upgrade my MTB from a 500$ "cheap" hardtail with a XC geometry to this really nice trail bike !!

    I come here to have some information cause i have quite a weird body shape :
    I'm 178cm/5′10 and i have 88cm/34,6457 inch (don't know how inchs and feed really work, metric user here)

    So as you can see, i have quite long legs and a short torso, the question now is what size should i get ?

    I can't ask the question to the closest Giant shop which is closed due to Covid19.

    I think a M should be the best fit, but i would like to know if i can get my 78cm/30.70 inch seat high with the stock 395mm/125mm dropper seatpost or if i can get a higher saddle high by getting the 440mm/150mm dropper ?

    I'd like to know also how weird will it look/feel if i ride a bike with that much seatpost out, if someone has a M and can send a photo with this saddle high and see if it respect the minimum insertion of the dropper, i would be really thanksful !

    Anyway i think that a large would be to big for me in term of reach, especially since i'm planning to use this bike for both Trails and a little bit of XC, don't really wan't to end up with a bike that feels like an Enduro bike.

    Thanks again !
    If i were working in a shop and you came in, I would seat you on a large to start. I believe that a medium and large will feel similar while seated because of the effective vs actual seat tube angle. My guess is that a Large with a 40mm stem would be the right fit due to your leg length.

    That being said, you are the exact type of rider that would benefit from a very steep seat tube angle. Quite frankly, a bit steeper than the trance has. That's not to say that the trance can't be a great bike for you that fits well, I just think that you may fit a bit better on say, a norco sight for example.

  112. #1512
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    The only reason i would go for a large is because the seat tube would not be long enough on a medium to accomodate the dropper minimum insertion, the reason i really don't want a large is because as i have really long legs and arms, my torso is really really short, my weight balance is pretty bad on pretty much any market bikes, if i get a 20 mm longer bike it will feel really too long for me.

    I tried a Santa Cruz Tallboy (the new one) size L, and it felt way too long and slack to me, so the Norco Sight, just by seeing the geo seems too much on the really slack enduro side to me, i come from the road and i really like a good standard pedalling position, i know it become quite weird on mtb in steep descents/climbs with a standard seat angle due to the weight being too far back.

    I also have my eyes on a Canyon Neuron which has a more conservative geometry (longer seat stay which might be better since my weight will be more on the back wheel, steeper head angle and shorter reach).

    The reason i'd like to go with the Giant is because my road bike is a Giant TCR and i really like the the bike shop, plus the price is really good (https://www.giant-bicycles.com/fr/trance-29-1--ge--2020), it has an alloy frame, which i would prefer since i'm a noob at mtb and live in a really rocky area and i don't wan't to crash it first ride and crack the carbon, it has Shimano XT (not really a fan of Sram overall), Fox Performance which has pretty good reviews and the most important, a pretty dope paint job :

    2019 Trance 29-img0n2608181.jpg

  113. #1513
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZeBen84 View Post

    ...i come from the road and i really like a good standard pedalling position

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I would keep an open mind on having a different setup, as far as seating position is concerned. I'm sure the LBS has people who ride both. I'd listen hard to their advice for your setup. I haven't ridden a road bike in decades, but the position looks like it would take the fun out of mountain biking.

  114. #1514
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    The problem is that your desire for a road bike seating position is going to mean you have a very short bike as you will end up keeping a short reach to deal with your fore/aft seating position. Keep in mind that you're going to be climbing steeper grades on your mtb, which means that your "standard" road bike flat ground fit, is going to put you even further back over the rear axle. Typically, if you were climbing a grade that steep on a road bike, you would start standing and cranking at 12-13% and steeper, where on a mtb, you're still going to be grinding up to 18-20%. If all you are going to do, or all you are trying to arrange fit for is flat ground pedaling, then the comparison between mountain and road fit makes sense, otherwise I would endeavor to let go of your road bike fit desires and focus purely on the mountain bike style of riding and what fit it wants vs road.

    https://99spokes.com/compare?bikes=n...bon-cc-29-2020

    I digress, you need to weigh the seating vs standing fit of the bikes. Of the bikes you mentioned, the tallboy has the shortest seated cockpit length and is within a few mm of standing cockpit length of the trance. Tallboy is 12mm shorter while seated, and 8mm longer while standing.

    Me personally, I can deal with a pretty wide range of length of bike before it starts to be an issue. I find that I can usually adjust within 3-4 rides and I don't notice standing cockpit length. On the flip side, I am very sensitive to seated cockpit length (ETT) and I cannot adjust to a bike that does not fit me well when seated.

    Furthermore, I believe that your desire for a rearward seating position, along with your short arms/torso, is going to lead to issues weighting the front of the bike while seated. I would really really pay careful attention to seat tube angle and make sure that your seated position of your hips/butt helps you put weight on the bike so that it will corner while seated... otherwise I believe you are going to have front traction issues in trail/xc seated pedaling situations.

  115. #1515
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    Having long legs and arms and a short torso but being taller I should have bought an xl. I don't think you'd like a medium for very long, and a large wouldn't take much to feel comfortable on.

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  116. #1516
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZeBen84 View Post
    Hey everyone, new on the forum.

    I'm looking to upgrade my MTB from a 500$ "cheap" hardtail with a XC geometry to this really nice trail bike !!

    I come here to have some information cause i have quite a weird body shape :
    I'm 178cm/5′10 and i have 88cm/34,6457 inch (don't know how inchs and feed really work, metric user here)

    So as you can see, i have quite long legs and a short torso, the question now is what size should i get ?

    I can't ask the question to the closest Giant shop which is closed due to Covid19.

    I think a M should be the best fit, but i would like to know if i can get my 78cm/30.70 inch seat high with the stock 395mm/125mm dropper seatpost or if i can get a higher saddle high by getting the 440mm/150mm dropper ?

    I'd like to know also how weird will it look/feel if i ride a bike with that much seatpost out, if someone has a M and can send a photo with this saddle high and see if it respect the minimum insertion of the dropper, i would be really thanksful !

    Anyway i think that a large would be to big for me in term of reach, especially since i'm planning to use this bike for both Trails and a little bit of XC, don't really wan't to end up with a bike that feels like an Enduro bike.

    Thanks again !
    Not sure on where your measuring your seat height. But this a Medium with 125 reverb at minimum insertion measured from BB, so youíll probably need a 150 post at least on Medium.




    Iím the same height 177, but with a 78 inseam and on a Medium. Plus my arm span is greater than my height.

    Iíd say go with a Medium and just get a 150 or 170 post (especially if your arms are short too). For few reasons
    - Itís Giantís recommended size for your height
    - The large size wonít change where your seat is relative to the rear axle or BB. It will just increase the reach likely stretching you out too much given your short body. Head tube is the same length so bar height is unchanged between the sizes
    - Your body geo is more likely to naturally centre you closer to the BB when standing in a neutral position and youíre more likely to actually be able to get your centre of gravity behind the BB on the steep stuff and keep the heels down in the corners.
    - You donít want it to feel like an enduro bike. IMO the large will feel more like an enduro bike than the medium.

    Might not be a good thing, but the seat height vs bar height will likely put you in a pretty aggressive XC position. Youíll probably need to look at some high rise bars, maybe even a 12 or 16 degree sweep.

  117. #1517
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluman8 View Post
    - The large size wonít change where your seat is relative to the rear axle or BB. It will just increase the reach likely stretching you out too much given your short body. Head tube is the same length so bar height is unchanged between the sizes
    Incorrect. Seat tube angle is an "effective" measurement, meaning that it's at an estimated seat height. There is no way that giant utilized a seat height for a medium that would be what a person with a 35" inseam would use. Since the actual seat tube angle is much slacker than what giant states... having a seat height that is greater than what giant utilized for their geo chart, will mean that your seat tube angle is effectively even slacker than what giant is stating (as much as 1-2 degress). This means that your hips/butt will very much be further towards the back of the bike than it would be on a larger sized frame.

    In addition to this, the distance from your seat to the center of head tube may will be longer on a medium than it would be on a large, since the seat tube angle is effectively slacker. This compounds the fit issues that he is fighting, as he is struggling to balance wanting a short reach vs a tall seating position. It will also make the bike harder to ride and turn from a seated position as it will be a longer cockpit, and will make weighting the front of the bike, harder yet again. Combing this with being sized down, and you have a brutal combo of the bike wandering on climbs and struggling for front end grip while seated and cornering.

    All of this means that the Large will very much be a better fit as it will feel shorter while seated, and place his body position further forward, which will help him weight the front wheel. Think of it like a teeter totter and the back wheel is the part that's touching the ground. As you move closer to the pivot point, the teeter totter starts doing what it does, and the end on the ground gets lighter, and the other end gets heavier.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bluman8 View Post
    - Your body geo is more likely to naturally centre you closer to the BB when standing in a neutral position and youíre more likely to actually be able to get your centre of gravity behind the BB on the steep stuff and keep the heels down in the corners.
    - You donít want it to feel like an enduro bike. IMO the large will feel more like an enduro bike than the medium.
    Incorrect. This is not the body position that you want on a short offset fork, longer reach 29r. This is the type of riding style that is better on older bikes with a 51mm offset, and short top tubes. Riding off the back of the bike (even in steeps) is not something that will be advantageous in the newer age of bike geometry. This riding style takes some adjustment, but it's very easy, and intuitive for riders to adjust after a short period of time.

    I see a lot of people buy bikes because of my proximity to my local bike shop. The people that buy bikes like you are suggesting to, more often than not regret their decision to size down over time.

    The truth of this is sizing down on trance 29 exacerbates the weakest part of this bikes geometry, which is the slack seat tube angle. That will cause handling issues with this bike (i experienced it myself) as I demo'd both a L and XL trance. I am 6'2" and giant's geo chart puts me in between sizes. I can say, emphatically, that it would be a mistake to be over 6'1" and be on a size large trance 29.

  118. #1518
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    Quote Originally Posted by DANIEL42 View Post
    So I found Diaz Suspension with the RUNT which now fits a fox 34. It allegedly does all the good things like give you more sensitivity and mid-stroke support all for $300AUD. I have read up on it as much as I can and most people seem to be paring it with top tier forks but do think it's worth it. I can't find much info from people who have paired it with a lower end fork. Anyway, just after people's thoughts on the RUNT or other budget friendly alternatives before I contact Diaz Suspension to see what they have to say.

    Link: https://diazsuspensiondesign.com/shop/fox34
    So, I've had a Runt in my Fox 36's (Factory GRIP2 @ 150mm) on my Evil Offering for a few rides now. This thing is a game changer! Believe the hype! All the performance of coil, with none of the down sides, and more adjustability...? You bet! Superb as the GRIP2 damper is on that fork, the stock EVOL air spring still leaves quite a bit to be desired, and the volume spacer system just isn't good enough for fine tuning I'm afraid. At 90kg I was running 2 volume spacers and had to go to 33% sag to ever get near to using full travel (pressure was about 80psi)! Small bump sensitivity was great though, but the fork used too much of its travel too readily, then ramped up nastily at the end. I took a volume spacer out, had to drop to 25% sag @ 92psi to stop bottoming out regularly, and then I had very little small bump compliance at all.

    With the Runt...? Well with 65psi in the main chamber, and 130psi in the secondary chamber, it's incredible! You have to run a minimum of 2:1 pressure ratios between the chambers, and can go to as much as 3:1. At 2:1 the fork is more linear, but still has amazing small bump sensitivity. I've not tried going as far as 3:1 yet, but in theory the small bump sensitivity would be off the chart and there would be more mid stroke ramp up, but still a more linear feel than the stock air spring.

    Anyway... How does it feel in a more basic fork like the 34 Rhythm? I don't actually know cos I've not tried it, but in theory, a more basic fork should benefit more than one with a superior damper. I could have dialled in a little more LSC on the GRIP2 to get a touch more mid stroke support potentially, or a little more HSC to allow a slightly softer pressure with more bottom out resistance. My preferred approach is to get the spring rate right on a fork, assume the damper is just there for rebound only, then maybe once everything is set you can add just a little compression damping to suit if required. At 90kg, I still run very little compression damping on my 36 and with the Runt it feels wonderful!

    I've got a Hardtail here with a Fox 34 Performance GRIP here, and thinking of ordering a Runt for that... I just checked with Diaz Suspension the other day, and the Runt also fits the 34 Rhythm too... Just as well cos I'm also considering picking up a closeout deal on a 2019 spec Trance 29er to use as more of an XC and lighter weight trail bike, in lieu of perhaps my hardtail and also now that my Evil Offering lives in a full Enduro spec these days...

    Get one, I doubt you'll regret it!

  119. #1519
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    Thanks for the feedback about the runt. It is consistent with what everyone else seems to be saying. Did you get the damper's shims adjusted? I am considering putting the runt in myself then getting a local suspension place to adjust the shims for me next fork service.

    If you do pick up a lower spec Trance with the dps, you might want to consider replacing the dps straight up with a super deluxe from here:
    https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/2018-Roc...8AAOSw2FJc3xyT

    They were purchased in bulk from Evil by the pros closet and would have been off the Following. It will also increase your rear travel to 121mm I believe.

  120. #1520
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluman8 View Post
    Not sure on where your measuring your seat height. But this a Medium with 125 reverb at minimum insertion measured from BB, so youíll probably need a 150 post at least on Medium.




    Iím the same height 177, but with a 78 inseam and on a Medium. Plus my arm span is greater than my height.

    Iíd say go with a Medium and just get a 150 or 170 post (especially if your arms are short too). For few reasons
    - Itís Giantís recommended size for your height
    - The large size wonít change where your seat is relative to the rear axle or BB. It will just increase the reach likely stretching you out too much given your short body. Head tube is the same length so bar height is unchanged between the sizes
    - Your body geo is more likely to naturally centre you closer to the BB when standing in a neutral position and youíre more likely to actually be able to get your centre of gravity behind the BB on the steep stuff and keep the heels down in the corners.
    - You donít want it to feel like an enduro bike. IMO the large will feel more like an enduro bike than the medium.

    Might not be a good thing, but the seat height vs bar height will likely put you in a pretty aggressive XC position. Youíll probably need to look at some high rise bars, maybe even a 12 or 16 degree sweep.
    Thanks for the photo and comment, it looks fine in term of saddle heigh, if you could post a photo of the whole bike of what it would look like with this seat high i think it might help to 'judge" the balance of the bike, the saddle to drop is not too much of a problem if it does not goes beyond 10cms as i'm quite flexible.

    I was on your side on this one but apparently the seat tube angle is going to be a problem on the M, i'm going to send a mail to Giant and see if i can some more precise informations on the actual seat post angle at my seat high on both M and L sizes.

    And thanks @minimusprime for the more information on this topic, i was pretty sure that the only thing that was changing from the M to the L was just the top tube and seat tube lenght.

    So i don't know how effective seat tube angle is a thing in mtb world, taking the average saddle height (which is ?!) for the recommended size which goes to the frame size and give the ESTA like wtf is this, how are you supposed to fit someone when you are a shop and you don't have the actual bike...

    I hope Giant will respond to my mail.

    For the steep stuff, unless there is some lose rocks at 20%+ i don't have any problems with my hardtail despite having a 73į STA and a 69.5į HTA (maybe that helped me to keep the front wheel planted, idk i'm not experienced enough in MTB geo to know) and the same for the road, i can go up 20% climbs "no problem" other than digging deep, i usually just slide forward on my saddle when it gets too steep because with my short torso, it is actually quite weird to get out of the saddle and at the same time have rear wheel traction.

    Getting another bike because of my body shape might be a solution, but the thing is that i want a bike that pedals well and feel more like a long travel XC bike than a short travel Enduro bike, the Tallboy i tried felt non efficient and slow for example.

    Thanks again for your comments and help @Bluman8 and @minimusprime

    (Sorry for bad englando everyone, i'm french)

  121. #1521
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZeBen84 View Post
    Thanks for the photo and comment, it looks fine in term of saddle heigh, if you could post a photo of the whole bike of what it would look like with this seat high i think it might help to 'judge" the balance of the bike, the saddle to drop is not too much of a problem if it does not goes beyond 10cms as i'm quite flexible.

    I was on your side on this one but apparently the seat tube angle is going to be a problem on the M, i'm going to send a mail to Giant and see if i can some more precise informations on the actual seat post angle at my seat high on both M and L sizes.

    And thanks @minimusprime for the more information on this topic, i was pretty sure that the only thing that was changing from the M to the L was just the top tube and seat tube lenght.

    So i don't know how effective seat tube angle is a thing in mtb world, taking the average saddle height (which is ?!) for the recommended size which goes to the frame size and give the ESTA like wtf is this, how are you supposed to fit someone when you are a shop and you don't have the actual bike...

    I hope Giant will respond to my mail.

    For the steep stuff, unless there is some lose rocks at 20%+ i don't have any problems with my hardtail despite having a 73į STA and a 69.5į HTA (maybe that helped me to keep the front wheel planted, idk i'm not experienced enough in MTB geo to know) and the same for the road, i can go up 20% climbs "no problem" other than digging deep, i usually just slide forward on my saddle when it gets too steep because with my short torso, it is actually quite weird to get out of the saddle and at the same time have rear wheel traction.

    Getting another bike because of my body shape might be a solution, but the thing is that i want a bike that pedals well and feel more like a long travel XC bike than a short travel Enduro bike, the Tallboy i tried felt non efficient and slow for example.

    Thanks again for your comments and help @Bluman8 and @minimusprime

    (Sorry for bad englando everyone, i'm french)
    Your english is just fine... much better than most people that live in the states.

    Effective Vs actual seat tubes is one of a few things that are still all over the place in the industry. Let's just say that most geometry charts are open for interpretation on how they are presented, and most brands have been playing games with them for years. A few are starting to play it very straight, and hopefully that changes the industry.

    As luck would have it, Giant seems to have posted a photo on their site that is a medium. (see the below image) What is your saddle height, I may be able to take a guess on the comparison between L and M for your given saddle height.

    Regarding hard tails... they don't need quite as steep of seat tube angles because there is no rear suspension sagging, which in effect slackens the seat tube angles and shortens reach. From my experience, most hard tails ride as if they had 1 - 1.5 degrees steeper seat tube angles when compared to full suspension bikes (depending on travel obviously as 25-30% sag is way different on 115mm travel vs 160mm travel).

    I understand steep seat tube angles feeling a bit odd at first, however now that I've spent time riding 76 - 78 degree seat tube angle bikes, getting on the trance sorta sucks. On the trance, I still have to perch on teh nose of the saddle to get up really steep grades... on my other bikes I just sit in a normal pedaling position and crank out power without having to move around on the saddle. Ironically, I can climb things better on my megatower than I can on my trance for this reason.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 2019 Trance 29-trance-29-ett.jpg  


  122. #1522
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZeBen84 View Post
    Thanks for the photo and comment, it looks fine in term of saddle heigh, if you could post a photo of the whole bike of what it would look like with this seat high i think it might help to 'judge" the balance of the bike, the saddle to drop is not too much of a problem if it does not goes beyond 10cms as i'm quite flexible.

    I was on your side on this one but apparently the seat tube angle is going to be a problem on the M, i'm going to send a mail to Giant and see if i can some more precise informations on the actual seat post angle at my seat high on both M and L sizes.

    And thanks @minimusprime for the more information on this topic, i was pretty sure that the only thing that was changing from the M to the L was just the top tube and seat tube lenght.

    So i don't know how effective seat tube angle is a thing in mtb world, taking the average saddle height (which is ?!) for the recommended size which goes to the frame size and give the ESTA like wtf is this, how are you supposed to fit someone when you are a shop and you don't have the actual bike...

    I hope Giant will respond to my mail.

    For the steep stuff, unless there is some lose rocks at 20%+ i don't have any problems with my hardtail despite having a 73į STA and a 69.5į HTA (maybe that helped me to keep the front wheel planted, idk i'm not experienced enough in MTB geo to know) and the same for the road, i can go up 20% climbs "no problem" other than digging deep, i usually just slide forward on my saddle when it gets too steep because with my short torso, it is actually quite weird to get out of the saddle and at the same time have rear wheel traction.

    Getting another bike because of my body shape might be a solution, but the thing is that i want a bike that pedals well and feel more like a long travel XC bike than a short travel Enduro bike, the Tallboy i tried felt non efficient and slow for example.

    Thanks again for your comments and help @Bluman8 and @minimusprime

    (Sorry for bad englando everyone, i'm french)
    Your english is just fine... much better than most people that live in the states.

    Effective Vs actual seat tubes is one of a few things that are still all over the place in the industry. Let's just say that most geometry charts are open for interpretation on how they are presented, and most brands have been playing games with them for years. A few are starting to play it very straight, and hopefully that changes the industry.

    As luck would have it, Giant seems to have posted a photo on their site that is a medium. (see the below image) What is your saddle height, I may be able to take a guess on the comparison between L and M for your given saddle height.

    Regarding hard tails... they don't need quite as steep of seat tube angles because there is no rear suspension sagging, which in effect slackens the seat tube angles and shortens reach. From my experience, most hard tails ride as if they had 1 - 1.5 degrees steeper seat tube angles when compared to full suspension bikes (depending on travel obviously as 25-30% sag is way different on 115mm travel vs 160mm travel).

    I understand steep seat tube angles feeling a bit odd at first, however now that I've spent time riding 76 - 78 degree seat tube angle bikes, getting on the trance sorta sucks. On the trance, I still have to perch on teh nose of the saddle to get up really steep grades... on my other bikes I just sit in a normal pedaling position and crank out power without having to move around on the saddle. Ironically, I can climb things better on my megatower than I can on my trance for this reason.

    2019 Trance 29-trance-29-ett.jpg

  123. #1523
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    Nice !

    My saddle height would be 77.7cms/30,59" (changing like -3mm if i put my saddle and with the 170mm instead of the 172.5mm crank arm lenght, so i can go 77.4mm).

    I didn't think about the rear suspension modifying the seat angle, another thing learnt .

    And like i said i don't really bother having to go on the nose of the saddle, i personnally use ISM saddles (triathlon saddles) and they are pretty good cause no matter where you sit, your sit bones are supported and you don't sit on your balls, i know that might look silly on a mtb but hey fonction>fashion !
    They also can be slammed much more forward than a standard saddle.

    Plus as a roadie i like to be able to change position on the bike by few millimeters, so if i can do it on the mtb too, as i want to be able to do some long rides on it (30-50+ miles).

    If you also manage to calculate the reach, it would also help, let's say if we add the standard 30mm of spacers, cause seeing ~64cm on the reach number is actually as you said might be a too short of a bike even to a short torso guy like myself !

    And if you have a software to do that i'd be really interested to be able to compare different bike geo, it would be a must have !

    Thanks for the help !

  124. #1524
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    Quote Originally Posted by DANIEL42 View Post
    Thanks for the feedback about the runt. It is consistent with what everyone else seems to be saying. Did you get the damper's shims adjusted? I am considering putting the runt in myself then getting a local suspension place to adjust the shims for me next fork service.

    If you do pick up a lower spec Trance with the dps, you might want to consider replacing the dps straight up with a super deluxe from here:
    https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/2018-Roc...8AAOSw2FJc3xyT

    They were purchased in bulk from Evil by the pros closet and would have been off the Following. It will also increase your rear travel to 121mm I believe.
    Diaz don't have shims to alter the GRIP2 damper, only the GRIP...

    Not interested in either Rockshox, or a piggyback shock for a Trance. I like Fox, and if I get one I'll be running it more as intended (a short travel trail/marathon bike) rather than trying to turn it into a mini Enduro bike like some have. In fact, I'd consider swapping the 2.5mm spacer to a 5mm to reduce the travel to around 110mm, and probably drop the front to 120mm travel at the same time, and maybe fit a 2mm offset shock bush to raise the BB by around 5mm and steepen the HA & SA by around 0.5deg and lengthening the reach very slightly too. It would also have the benefit of increasing the anti squat very slightly too, which is as I see, perhaps the Trance's slight weakness compared to some more overtly XC bikes.

    Or I may just leave it stock and not worry... Who knows...

  125. #1525
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    Quote Originally Posted by markyboy1980 View Post
    Diaz don't have shims to alter the GRIP2 damper, only the GRIP...

    Not interested in either Rockshox, or a piggyback shock for a Trance. I like Fox, and if I get one I'll be running it more as intended (a short travel trail/marathon bike) rather than trying to turn it into a mini Enduro bike like some have. In fact, I'd consider swapping the 2.5mm spacer to a 5mm to reduce the travel to around 110mm, and probably drop the front to 120mm travel at the same time, and maybe fit a 2mm offset shock bush to raise the BB by around 5mm and steepen the HA & SA by around 0.5deg and lengthening the reach very slightly too. It would also have the benefit of increasing the anti squat very slightly too, which is as I see, perhaps the Trance's slight weakness compared to some more overtly XC bikes.

    Or I may just leave it stock and not worry... Who knows...
    Might also consider that option later as i plan to ride this bike the same way !

  126. #1526
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    What's the pedalling platform like on a Super Deluxe? Just 2 positions? Open and rock hard?

  127. #1527
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    @DenyEverything The superdeluxe does only have 2 positions. I have only ever used the lever on the dps and superdeluxe when grinding up a fire road.

    @markyboy1980 For my weight, in stock configuration, I found that the dps was always the limiting factor. After the upgrade, my first ride was on pure xc trails and there was a massive increase in grip. I only then started to really notice issues with the fork. I have no brand preference and for me on a budget with what I was trying to achieve, the superdeluxe was just a really good value solution.

  128. #1528
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    I found the lockout on the super deluxe was less harsh than the dps. Meaning I've been down rooty trails with the lever in that position and the back end was still smoother than the dps in firm.

    Sent from my Pixel 3 using Tapatalk
    TCX advanced SX

  129. #1529
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    Quote Originally Posted by minimusprime View Post
    Your english is just fine... much better than most people that live in the states.

    Effective Vs actual seat tubes is one of a few things that are still all over the place in the industry. Let's just say that most geometry charts are open for interpretation on how they are presented, and most brands have been playing games with them for years. A few are starting to play it very straight, and hopefully that changes the industry.

    As luck would have it, Giant seems to have posted a photo on their site that is a medium. (see the below image) What is your saddle height, I may be able to take a guess on the comparison between L and M for your given saddle height.

    Regarding hard tails... they don't need quite as steep of seat tube angles because there is no rear suspension sagging, which in effect slackens the seat tube angles and shortens reach. From my experience, most hard tails ride as if they had 1 - 1.5 degrees steeper seat tube angles when compared to full suspension bikes (depending on travel obviously as 25-30% sag is way different on 115mm travel vs 160mm travel).

    I understand steep seat tube angles feeling a bit odd at first, however now that I've spent time riding 76 - 78 degree seat tube angle bikes, getting on the trance sorta sucks. On the trance, I still have to perch on teh nose of the saddle to get up really steep grades... on my other bikes I just sit in a normal pedaling position and crank out power without having to move around on the saddle. Ironically, I can climb things better on my megatower than I can on my trance for this reason.
    So, after looking more into it without calculating, just using paint and a ruler, apparently the ESTA 74.5 is at max saddle heigh which for a medium is ~78.6cm and for a large is ~86.4cm.

    So the difference in seat tube angle would not be that much i think (~0.6į maybe).

    The question is, how much do these ~0.6į would be a difference in term of reach between the large and medium.

  130. #1530
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    2019 Trance 29

    Quote Originally Posted by ZeBen84 View Post
    Thanks for the photo and comment, it looks fine in term of saddle heigh, if you could post a photo of the whole bike of what it would look like with this seat high i think it might help to 'judge" the balance of the bike, the saddle to drop is not too much of a problem if it does not goes beyond 10cms as i'm quite flexible.

    I was on your side on this one but apparently the seat tube angle is going to be a problem on the M, i'm going to send a mail to Giant and see if i can some more precise informations on the actual seat post angle at my seat high on both M and L sizes.

    And thanks @minimusprime for the more information on this topic, i was pretty sure that the only thing that was changing from the M to the L was just the top tube and seat tube lenght.

    So i don't know how effective seat tube angle is a thing in mtb world, taking the average saddle height (which is ?!) for the recommended size which goes to the frame size and give the ESTA like wtf is this, how are you supposed to fit someone when you are a shop and you don't have the actual bike...

    I hope Giant will respond to my mail.

    For the steep stuff, unless there is some lose rocks at 20%+ i don't have any problems with my hardtail despite having a 73į STA and a 69.5į HTA (maybe that helped me to keep the front wheel planted, idk i'm not experienced enough in MTB geo to know) and the same for the road, i can go up 20% climbs "no problem" other than digging deep, i usually just slide forward on my saddle when it gets too steep because with my short torso, it is actually quite weird to get out of the saddle and at the same time have rear wheel traction.

    Getting another bike because of my body shape might be a solution, but the thing is that i want a bike that pedals well and feel more like a long travel XC bike than a short travel Enduro bike, the Tallboy i tried felt non efficient and slow for example.

    Thanks again for your comments and help @Bluman8 and @minimusprime

    (Sorry for bad englando everyone, i'm french)
    Sorry bike was mid rebuild. But here is a a photo of my seat measurement and a photo of the whole bike rebuilt. I also run a low rise bar with ~20mm under, ~20 above stem.

    I just happened to be changing the post over to a BikeYoke Revive anyway. Usually once set, I avoid at all costs adjusting seat post or handlebars.








    @minimusprime is right about the ďeffectiveĒ seat angle. I forgot it was effective and actual seat angles should be varied to keep the seat in a certain design envelope.

    But I only somewhat agree with him about modem geo bikes as there is still a need to ride off the back in steep & techy stuff, otherwise we wouldnít need dropper posts. My concern would be that depending on your arm length, shoulder strength and mobility your weight might end up too front centred on a large

    Iím on the side of sizing based on Lee McCormicks RAD (distance between BB and Grips) rather than just reach and sizes numbers. https://m.pinkbike.com/news/lee-mcco...ke-set-up.html
    Except I use the womenís RAD for my height.

    Anyway my opinion is based on bike sizing and setup that feels good to my body and riding style.

    At the end of the day your ride experience and technique are going to be drastically different to your current bike so itís probably going to be a gamble either way even if you can demo both sizes.

  131. #1531
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    Anyone know the torque spec on the pivot bolt in through the seat stay?

  132. #1532
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    I can't believe my bad luck with Maxxis Minion tires!
    Either these tires are poor or I'm extremely unlucky.

    Having used DHF+DHR2 combo on 3 bikes in about 10-15 rides total:

    1. Warped rear DHR2 2.4WT on less than perfect landing from a medium drop on my old Pivot Switchblade

    2. Cut DHR2 27.5" twice riding local paths and trail on single outing with friend's Trance 27.5

    3. After I finally wore down my old rear Nobby Nic 2.6 which served as a front tire for my old Switchblade 4-5000km plus 1000+ km on my Trance 29er as a rear tire, I switched to stock DHF/DHR2 3C combo for my Trance 29 and on my second ride managed to cut the front DHF on a small 1 meter drop on the new trail (which needs work still!).

    I also have leftover DHF/DHR 2.5/2.4 tires in the garage but I think they're just overkill for the Trance.

    Searching for a good tire combo for my Trance 29 and it's hard to find a suitable tires but I think I've got it:

    2.6" Nobby Nic is very nice as far as longevity, comfort and speed are concerned but it's not grippy enough for more agressive riding and 3C Minions despite being narrower are just much grippier. However, at almost 1kg per tire 2.6" Nobbys are a bit heavy for the intended use. Narrower, 2.35" variant is too fragile and only suitable for light duty trails and marathons.

    2.3" DHF/DHR2 combo is pretty nice as far as the grip is concerned but it's bit draggy and DHR2 3C wears FAST on the dry and sharp, loose rocks we have here. I do like the precision and agility of 2.3" tire over 2.6".

    Now, I've been to my local Specialized shop and came home with an interesting combo: 2.3" Eliminator and Slaughter combo which might work well on our trails. At around 850gr per tire and decent width (supposed to be about 2.4" on 30ID rims) these tires could be goldilocks for the conditions we have here. The rear might lack the breaking traction, but having stiff enough casing and nice big shoulder knobs it should corner well while rolling very fast so might be perfect for undulating and not terribly steep terrain. Eliminator in the front is supposed to be very good, maybe close to DHR2 or even better and not too draggy like the DHF.
    I was planning to get new Purgatory for the rear, but the shop didn't have these in stock, besides I've always thought that unless you're riding really steep stuff with soft soil, semi-slick rear tire and grippy front might be great combo for the Trance 29. Both tires cost me little over one Maxxis 3C model.

  133. #1533
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    I am currently running DHF 2.5WT in MaxTerra compound, EXO casing on the front and Dissector 2.4WT in Maxterra on the back. Surprisingly big difference in feel to the stock 2.3 tires. To get the same feel I lowered the pressure on the front from 1.55bar to 1.4bar. The tires sit quite a bit taller. The Dissector in the back has decent grip, rolls better than the DHR2, but the later has more overall grip. Only have 3-4 rides on the new combo, but linking it so far.

    Stefan

  134. #1534
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarinCRO View Post
    I can't believe my bad luck with Maxxis Minion tires!
    Either these tires are poor or I'm extremely unlucky.

    Having used DHF+DHR2 combo on 3 bikes in about 10-15 rides total:

    1. Warped rear DHR2 2.4WT on less than perfect landing from a medium drop on my old Pivot Switchblade

    2. Cut DHR2 27.5" twice riding local paths and trail on single outing with friend's Trance 27.5

    3. After I finally wore down my old rear Nobby Nic 2.6 which served as a front tire for my old Switchblade 4-5000km plus 1000+ km on my Trance 29er as a rear tire, I switched to stock DHF/DHR2 3C combo for my Trance 29 and on my second ride managed to cut the front DHF on a small 1 meter drop on the new trail (which needs work still!).

    I also have leftover DHF/DHR 2.5/2.4 tires in the garage but I think they're just overkill for the Trance.

    Searching for a good tire combo for my Trance 29 and it's hard to find a suitable tires but I think I've got it:

    2.6" Nobby Nic is very nice as far as longevity, comfort and speed are concerned but it's not grippy enough for more agressive riding and 3C Minions despite being narrower are just much grippier. However, at almost 1kg per tire 2.6" Nobbys are a bit heavy for the intended use. Narrower, 2.35" variant is too fragile and only suitable for light duty trails and marathons.

    2.3" DHF/DHR2 combo is pretty nice as far as the grip is concerned but it's bit draggy and DHR2 3C wears FAST on the dry and sharp, loose rocks we have here. I do like the precision and agility of 2.3" tire over 2.6".

    Now, I've been to my local Specialized shop and came home with an interesting combo: 2.3" Eliminator and Slaughter combo which might work well on our trails. At around 850gr per tire and decent width (supposed to be about 2.4" on 30ID rims) these tires could be goldilocks for the conditions we have here. The rear might lack the breaking traction, but having stiff enough casing and nice big shoulder knobs it should corner well while rolling very fast so might be perfect for undulating and not terribly steep terrain. Eliminator in the front is supposed to be very good, maybe close to DHR2 or even better and not too draggy like the DHF.
    I was planning to get new Purgatory for the rear, but the shop didn't have these in stock, besides I've always thought that unless you're riding really steep stuff with soft soil, semi-slick rear tire and grippy front might be great combo for the Trance 29. Both tires cost me little over one Maxxis 3C model.
    Good info.

    I'll repost from the 29er Components:

    Maybe someone will find it useful, maybe not, but I've been experimenting with tires recently.

    I'm 67 and just under 160 pounds in Utah with a preference for climbing performance, so this data concentrates on that. I'm on a Trance 29 Pro 1. I haven't torn or cut a tire in a very long time, probably 15 years, so that aspect of tires doesn't seem to be a priority for me.

    " As a general rule I like higher volume tires, around 2.4"-2.6" (which usually come out around 2.5"). I'm also on the Trance 29.

    So far the following tire combos have resulted in the following climb times on a 5.3 mile 850 foot segment:

    1. 29x2.6 Rekon rear, 2.6 DHF front 46:23 (45:01 moving, but a stop to empty my bladder on a long flat section, which apparently can take over a minute at my age).
    2. 29x2.35 Nobby Nic front and back 46:27
    3. 29x2.5 Aggressor rear 2.6 DHF front 47:10
    4. 29x2.4 Rekon rear 2.35 NoNi front 51:41

    There are several other segments that time out similarly.

    Conclusions?
    1. My climb times are more dependent on whether I've had a good BM and lots of water than on tires.
    2. I think I'll keep the 2.6 Rekons for local (and the NoNi's when they wear out) and use the Aggressors for Moab.
    3. I'm shocked at how consistently fast the 2.5 Aggressor/2.6 DHF combo is, climbing and pleasantly surprised at the grip and speed on the 2.6 Rekons.

    To a point, I think the tire combos are more important down than up. I should probably settle on a pair that hold up well, won't send me over a cliff and have good climbing, braking and steering grip and be done with it."

    I think if descending performance were more of a priority, I'd run the DHRII up front. I tried that and greatly prefer it over the DHF. I really like the 2.5 Aggressor out back and that's what I run in Moab with the 2.6 DHF up front.

  135. #1535
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    We the people ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Bluman8 View Post
    Sorry bike was mid rebuild. But here is a a photo of my seat measurement and a photo of the whole bike rebuilt. I also run a low rise bar with ~20mm under, ~20 above stem.

    I just happened to be changing the post over to a BikeYoke Revive anyway. Usually once set, I avoid at all costs adjusting seat post or handlebars.








    @minimusprime is right about the ďeffectiveĒ seat angle. I forgot it was effective and actual seat angles should be varied to keep the seat in a certain design envelope.

    But I only somewhat agree with him about modem geo bikes as there is still a need to ride off the back in steep & techy stuff, otherwise we wouldnít need dropper posts. My concern would be that depending on your arm length, shoulder strength and mobility your weight might end up too front centred on a large

    Iím on the side of sizing based on Lee McCormicks RAD (distance between BB and Grips) rather than just reach and sizes numbers. https://m.pinkbike.com/news/lee-mccormacks-guide-to-perfect-bike-set-up.html
    Except I use the womenís RAD for my height.

    Anyway my opinion is based on bike sizing and setup that feels good to my body and riding style.

    At the end of the day your ride experience and technique are going to be drastically different to your current bike so itís probably going to be a gamble either way even if you can demo both sizes.
    Ok, i didn't know this RAD method of fitting but seems pretty good and close from what i should getting on both my road and hardtail bikes, i think i'll test the M or the L and up with feeling+RAD.

    As for the stack, i'm sure it will not be a problem if i run the stock 30mm spacers and riser bars which are provided on the bike, it would put me on the same cockpit high as my hardtail which has almost no drop compared to my saddle.

    Thanks a lot to you two @Bluman8 and @minimusprime !

    I'll keep you update for when i can go to my shop, which seems to be for the 11th of may here in France, when lockdown will be over.

    PS : If the M is till too long, there is always this solution (JK)
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 2019 Trance 29-d34da0a188cb64fcf392102ae8f7b322.jpg  


  136. #1536
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluman8 View Post
    Apart from the weight saving, whatís the goal?

    10mm lower bar height can easily be picked up in headset spacers, low rise or flat bar.

    Iím not sure the travel trade-off to save 300-400g is worth it. But Iím only a semi weight weenie....the margarine of weight weenies...
    I don't mind much the weight. I'd actually use my current fork.
    I want the front end a bit lower. I did actually run a Renthal stem in negative rise and only one 3mm spacer under the stem... because you can't actually use no spacers with the Renthal in negative rise!

    Point is... my trails are not that gnar, I don't ride that gnar and I like lower front ends. 120mm may be that goldilocks thing.


    Quote Originally Posted by DANIEL42 View Post
    Not sure if you guys have seen it, but Awesome Mtb did a video where they rode with a guy on a Trance 29 built up light. He had a Fox 34 SC 120mm on the front.

    Link to the video is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gb_KIyFHrbM&t=559s

    They do the bike's specs at 5:20 in the video.
    Thanks! I'll check that video!

    Edit... That's insane riding on a basically XC spec Trance!!
    Check my Site

  137. #1537
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    Now that the GRIP2 damper is available for the Fox 34, is anyone here going to try it on their Trance 29?

  138. #1538
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    I think the grip 2 damper fits into the last couple of years 34-----I have been interested and did post a bit back but little input----have a different bike but have a 130 fit 4 34 on my Pivot and not all that happy with it----I think the damper is about $330

  139. #1539
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    I have been running the Fox 34 with the Vorsprung Fractive tuning since 3 months now, and I can highly recommend it. Immensely better control over rough stuff and jump/drop landings. It is a lot cheaper than the new GRIP2 and IMHO it is hard to beat the custom tune you get with it. It is not hard to install either if you are happy with working on the FIT4.

  140. #1540
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    Quote Originally Posted by DocFPV View Post
    Now that the GRIP2 damper is available for the Fox 34, is anyone here going to try it on their Trance 29?
    I think it's too much money. Fox is asking as much for it as the fork (Performance) is worth in the used market and Grip damper is pretty good as it is, certainly better than any Fit4 that I've used before.
    All those adjustments make you fiddle with them more than is necessary and you can get worse results more often than not.

  141. #1541
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    Quote Originally Posted by sstefanov View Post
    I have been running the Fox 34 with the Vorsprung Fractive tuning since 3 months now, and I can highly recommend it. Immensely better control over rough stuff and jump/drop landings. It is a lot cheaper than the new GRIP2 and IMHO it is hard to beat the custom tune you get with it. It is not hard to install either if you are happy with working on the FIT4.
    Amen brother! Have a Fractive tune in my Performance Elite 34 and it has transformed the fork from decent to amazing. Easier to service as well seeing as only Fox gold oil is needed for the damper and air legs when doing a lower service.

  142. #1542
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarinCRO View Post
    I think it's too much money. Fox is asking as much for it as the fork (Performance) is worth in the used market and Grip damper is pretty good as it is, certainly better than any Fit4 that I've used before.
    All those adjustments make you fiddle with them more than is necessary and you can get worse results more often than not.
    I got some Cushcore xc tire inserts today that I'll try first to see if they have any impact on the feel of the suspension. I just did a lowers maintenance a few weeks ago, but I didn't check to see if there was too much grease in the negative air chamber. Might take it apart again this week and see if that could be improved. Just waiting for some more crush washers.

  143. #1543
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    Mounted new tires today, as mentioned before I got Trance with 2.3" DHF&DHR2 combo that I felt was very slow and DHR2 was wearing ridiculously fast on our dry and rocky terrain, so I replaced them with 2.6" Nobby Nics.
    Nobby Nics are very nice tires, very comfy, reasonably fast and 2.6" variant is very durable and long lasting due to APEX insert. However, I only had one new tire and other one was from my old Switchblade that I used as front for 4-5000km and due to age and storage, one part of the casing started to lift from the thread underneath and it had to be replaced.

    I might try the Hans Dampf 2.6 + Nobby Nic combo later when I get a hold of the HD.

    In the mean time, I returned to 2.3" stock tires (DHF&DHR2) and liked the increased grip over Nobbys, but managed to cut the front in first or second ride, so I went to my local Specialized shop and got myself 2.3" Eliminator and Slaughter combo.

    After the first ride today I've got some impressions to share:

    Tires inflated great just with a floor pump (but most others go well on Giant TRX1 rims), I had to use some dishwasher soap to make installation easier however.

    Eliminator weighs at around 950gr and Slaughter at around 910gr, both tires are slightly wider (around 1-2mm) than Minions and they come at around 59mm fresh and could stretch a bit over time.

    Both tires are Grid version, not Grid Trail (they didn't have Grid Trail in 2.3") and Eliminator's sidewall feels slightly lighter than the Slaughter's which is good at it's probably slightly more compliant and Slaughter having a tougher casing should come in handy.

    I was pleasantly surprised by Slaughter's grip in the rear, it grips great over our dry, rocky, loose trails. Hopefully the grip won't degrade much as it wears.

    Eliminator feels very controlled and relaxed, it provides plently of grip and GREAT braking, over loose and rocky surfaces doesn't feel any worse than the DHF but feels to roll faster.
    Since I only ridden it once, I still need to ride it more over different trails, but so far they've performed very well, hopefully they will hold up well.

    I knew Eliminator was supposed to be excellent tire and it's knobs show it's intent so no big surprised there, but Slaughter was a very pleasant surprise and reading some reviews of similar tires claiming it lacks braking and climbing grip I can't say I agree as it surpassed my expectations. It wouldn't be my first choice if I was riding sloppy and steep trails, but for dry, rocky, loose and moderately steep it's been great.
    The only weird thing is that there's an odd sensation when making sharp leaning turns and loading side knobs it feels a bit weird when small blocky center thread transions to big side knobs but I guess you just have to get accustomed to it.











  144. #1544
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    What size tires can the Trance advance 29 take on the rear? I see some of you have run the nobby nic 2.6, does that fit well or is rear clearance tight? I didn't think it would fit safely.
    Has anyone tired the Bontrager xr4 2.6 in the rear as I hear that's a big tire that rolls well and has decent grip.

  145. #1545
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    Fits without issues, there's plenty of clearance.

  146. #1546
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    Hey all,

    I jut pulled the trigger on a medium that is on the way. Have really enjoyed reading through everyone's set up.

    What I am having a hard time with is finding a legit frame spec sheet.It is strange giant doesn't make this prominent. Could you all point me in the direction for this or the details? Specifically I am looking for headset dimensions, and bb, both of which have many options out there. Trying to see if the parts I have laying around will work or if I need to snag a new hs.

    Thanks for any help!

  147. #1547
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    Headset is pretty much standard 1 1/2 to 1 1/8" tapered ZS (integrated headset) and BB is Pressfit 86/92 which is also pretty much standard unless your bike is sporting BSA (threaded) BB.

  148. #1548
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    Ideally I'm looking for the spacers the upper shock bolts use. I lost one and I've tried replacing the one I lost with chainring spacers but I haven't been able to build it up enough to a point where I can turn the rebound knob on the super deluxe shock all the way.

    Sent from my Pixel 3 using Tapatalk
    TCX advanced SX

  149. #1549
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    Quote Originally Posted by Niko View Post
    What size tires can the Trance advance 29 take on the rear? I see some of you have run the nobby nic 2.6, does that fit well or is rear clearance tight? I didn't think it would fit safely.
    Has anyone tired the Bontrager xr4 2.6 in the rear as I hear that's a big tire that rolls well and has decent grip.
    The width of the gap on the rear end at about where the knobs would be on a true 2.6" tire is 3.28". It's pretty roomy! A 2.6" Rekon fits no sweat and I think that's about 2.55" (right now I have 2.35" NoNi's on it, but that's my recollection).

  150. #1550
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    Replaced all the rear suspension bearings (finally) on my Trance 29. The bike feels super supple now and seems to need ~10 PSI less for 25% sag. Happy days

  151. #1551
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    I'm thinking about selling my Trance 29, Advance Pro frame (large) with Pike Ultimate. Less than one full season of riding. (I share riding duties with 2 other bikes).

    The bike served me well for traveling to areas with more xc/trail oriented terrain, being stuck to my home turf I want to run at least 150 up front. So looking at maybe the Reign.

    Just thinking out loud. If this is a bad place to post this I'm cool with taking it down.

  152. #1552
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    I'm thinking about selling my Trance 29, Advance Pro frame (large) with Pike Ultimate. Less than one full season of riding. (I share riding duties with 2 other bikes).

    The bike served me well for traveling to areas with more xc/trail oriented terrain, being stuck to my home turf I want to run at least 150 up front. So looking at maybe the Reign.

    Just thinking out loud. If this is a bad place to post this I'm cool with taking it down.
    you won't be dissappointed with the reign. TBH, the reign pedals so well and can be built so light, that i've considered getting rid of my trance and getting a reign frame and forking it down to 150mm.

  153. #1553
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Bob View Post
    Replaced all the rear suspension bearings (finally) on my Trance 29. The bike feels super supple now and seems to need ~10 PSI less for 25% sag. Happy days
    How hard of a job and how many tools were involved?

  154. #1554
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    Quote Originally Posted by phrider View Post
    How hard of a job and how many tools were involved?
    Removing the bearings was ok. I just used a punch and a hammer and knocked them out. Cleaned everything up and then pressed in the new bearings using the old bearings (as guides) and a vice. Next time I'll get a friend to machine some guides for me to make it easier. If you have the bearings its probably a three hour job from when you start disassembly to when you are done. getting the top rocker spacers and the spacers between the shock and the trunnion bolts in can be tricky and leave you in fits. Best advice is to take it easy and don't rush the job

  155. #1555
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    2019 Trance 29-060a4342-ed42-48ec-88fd-2ca6a681a544.jpgClick image for larger version. 

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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Bob View Post
    Removing the bearings was ok. I just used a punch and a hammer and knocked them out. Cleaned everything up and then pressed in the new bearings using the old bearings (as guides) and a vice. Next time I'll get a friend to machine some guides for me to make it easier. If you have the bearings its probably a three hour job from when you start disassembly to when you are done. getting the top rocker spacers and the spacers between the shock and the trunnion bolts in can be tricky and leave you in fits. Best advice is to take it easy and don't rush the job
    I grease all bearings straight out of the box(because of this ,see photo) pivotal, headset & wheel Bearings .

  156. #1556
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boozy View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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    I grease all bearings straight out of the box(because of this ,see photo) pivotal, headset & wheel Bearings .
    I do the same, never changed a set yet. Donít want to take the risk of forcing them in out of alignment. I just pull the seals and regrease. Iíve even revived a few seezed ones with some wd40.

  157. #1557
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    The DVO on my Trance Pro 0 has started to leak air pretty consistently. This one is already a warranty replacement shock so I'm thinking about trying a different brand. Im a 240lb rider so looking for something that can take a beating. Any recommendations? Also what size replacement would I be looking for? Thanks!

  158. #1558
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    The easiest and cheapest option is probably a 2018 Rockshox Super Deluxe RCT (this is now named the ultimate) from ebay:

    https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/2018-Roc...8AAOSw2FJc3xyT

    The tune worked well for me, but I am 140lb, so maybe a heavier rider that has put in a shock from an Evil the Following can comment.

    The size of the shock on the bike as stock is 165x42.5mm. The shock i gave a link to is 165x45mm which means it has a slightly longer stroke giving you slightly more travel without affecting the geometry. There is sufficient clearance for putting this longer stroke shock on as a number of people on the forum have done this successfully.

  159. #1559
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    Hi I have a 2020 Giant Trance 3 29 on order. Iím planning on stripping the brakes off (MT400) when it comes in as I need them for my wifeís hard tail. Was going to then buy some M6000 Deore brakes - can anyone tell me the max rotor size for the Marzocchi fork? I want to buy the ice tech RT86 in 203mm on the front. Ive searched forever on the Giant and Marzocchi sites and cant find the info

  160. #1560
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    The Marzocchi lowers are the same as the Fox 34 lowers (apart from the arch). A 203 rotor will work fine with the appropriate caliper adaptor.

  161. #1561
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Bob View Post
    The Marzocchi lowers are the same as the Fox 34 lowers (apart from the arch). A 203 rotor will work fine with the appropriate caliper adaptor.
    Excellent thank you- also Iím assuming they are 6 bolt rotors not centrelock?

  162. #1562
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    I'd suggest you try Formula Cura brakes.
    I've had some issues with pistons not engaging simultaneously on SRAM Code RS and had them warrantied but got myself Cura in the meantime.
    They're just as powerful but significantly lighter and don't have much dead lever throw. They're also easier to setup as there are only 2 pistons reducing the chance of sticky pistons. Pistons are also much bigger which is better in terms of tolerances as they don't need to be so tight so the pistons move easier.

    These brakes can be used on DH bikes and were used for winning DH runs so no questioning the power available.

    Unlike Shimano, they're not plagued by wandering bite point either.

    These are by far the best brakes I've ridden so far and I've ridden quite a lot - from old XTs, Zee, newer XTRs, differrent Guides, Code and so on.

  163. #1563
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    Quote Originally Posted by Merlin6014 View Post
    Hi I have a 2020 Giant Trance 3 29 on order. Iím planning on stripping the brakes off (MT400) when it comes in as I need them for my wifeís hard tail. Was going to then buy some M6000 Deore brakes - can anyone tell me the max rotor size for the Marzocchi fork? I want to buy the ice tech RT86 in 203mm on the front. Ive searched forever on the Giant and Marzocchi sites and cant find the info
    You should be fine with the bigger rotor. You will need to change out the brake line if you switch out the brakes. The cheaper MT200/MT400 series uses a different, lower pressure line. It's a slight PITA with the internally routing. Before I even rode my Trance 3, I switched to a set of new M615 Deore brakes I already had in my inventory. I really like the shorter 1-figure levers, and I've never had issues with them on other bikes. Super easy to get a good bleed, unlike my experience with Maguras.

  164. #1564
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhioPT View Post
    You should be fine with the bigger rotor. You will need to change out the brake line if you switch out the brakes. The cheaper MT200/MT400 series uses a different, lower pressure line. It's a slight PITA with the internally routing. Before I even rode my Trance 3, I switched to a set of new M615 Deore brakes I already had in my inventory. I really like the shorter 1-figure levers, and I've never had issues with them on other bikes. Super easy to get a good bleed, unlike my experience with Maguras.
    Hey yeah the Shimanoís lever/Caliper combo come with the brake hose as a pack and its all pre-bled and pre assembled. Though I am assuming I will have to seperate the Caliper from the hose in order to internally route the hose.

  165. #1565
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarinCRO View Post
    I'd suggest you try Formula Cura brakes.
    Will check them out - add them to my spreadsheet!

  166. #1566
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    Quote Originally Posted by Merlin6014 View Post
    Hey yeah the Shimanoís lever/Caliper combo come with the brake hose as a pack and its all pre-bled and pre assembled. Though I am assuming I will have to seperate the Caliper from the hose in order to internally route the hose.
    Correct. So make sure you have a spare olive at least (you can cut out and reuse the barbed insert in a pinch).

  167. #1567
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    Quote Originally Posted by Merlin6014 View Post
    Will check them out - add them to my spreadsheet!
    Cura comes with ingenious quick connector at the caliper side so you can disconnect the hose and route it internally without chopping up the hose and having to bleed every time you need to route the brakes.

  168. #1568
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    Not to change the subject, but real quick I can't find any frame spec sheets out there. Could someone tell me if the bottom bracket is 89.5 or 92? Trying to get the spacers right on the install, and don't have a working caliper at the moment. Really appreciate it.

  169. #1569
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmcox6 View Post
    Not to change the subject, but real quick I can't find any frame spec sheets out there. Could someone tell me if the bottom bracket is 89.5 or 92? Trying to get the spacers right on the install, and don't have a working caliper at the moment. Really appreciate it.
    92.

  170. #1570
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    Hello, I have a 2019 advanced 1, I am 240lbs and I find the fox dpx2 to sit low in it's travel, will volume spacer help me? also looking to upgrade the fork, a friend offered me a pike ultimate at 140mm, it is ok to run 140mm? thanks2019 Trance 29-trance-fede.jpg

  171. #1571
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmcox6 View Post
    Not to change the subject, but real quick I can't find any frame spec sheets out there. Could someone tell me if the bottom bracket is 89.5 or 92? Trying to get the spacers right on the install, and don't have a working caliper at the moment. Really appreciate it.
    IIRC, while Giant says its a 92 when I measured it out with calipers I got 89.5

    Again, IIRC, I did use a spacer on between the shimano BB driveside cup and the frame.

  172. #1572
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fedeleon View Post
    Hello, I have a 2019 advanced 1, I am 240lbs and I find the fox dpx2 to sit low in it's travel, will volume spacer help me? also looking to upgrade the fork, a friend offered me a pike ultimate at 140mm, it is ok to run 140mm? thanks
    Pike at 140 will be fine. Seat angle will be a bit slacker if that matters to you. What sag and pressure are you running

  173. #1573
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    For anyone paying too close attention to this thread, I posted a while back that perhaps this bike, specifically the 130mm up front, wasn't cutting it. Well, pulled the Pike apart and found the issue (air leaked into the lower on the air spring side). After the fix the front end is handling duties very well. Rookie mistake on my part. Anyway I'm stoked to be back on the bike with it running like it should. Great bike.

  174. #1574
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    I'm thinking about selling my Fox 34 and replacing it with Pike Ultimate RC2 140mm.
    Any experience there?
    Since I upped the rear travel to ~120mm I wouldn't mind more travel in the front and slightly beefier fork and Pike might just be the ticket.

    It's supposed to be excellent fork and Fox shouldn't be hard to sell for decent amount of cash.

  175. #1575
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarinCRO View Post
    I'm thinking about selling my Fox 34 and replacing it with Pike Ultimate RC2 140mm.
    Any experience there?
    Since I upped the rear travel to ~120mm I wouldn't mind more travel in the front and slightly beefier fork and Pike might just be the ticket.

    It's supposed to be excellent fork and Fox shouldn't be hard to sell for decent amount of cash.

    Now that I got mine back in working order, yeah, the Pike works great. Mine is an Ultimate but the darn RCT3 flavor. Interestingly, my Lyric Ultimate with the RC2 feels under-damped. It is quite easy to tell by cycling the damper rod by hand when you drop the lowers for service. Seems you've got to dial up both the HSC pretty far before the LSC kicks in. Funny as I thought it went the other way, but I'm not too savvy with how those circuits are designed. But the RCT3 in open mode has a LSC that seems very effective and when dialed makes a bigger difference than on the Lyric. I don't know how to explain why, but it definitely feels that way. Otherwise, that trail and lock mode are pretty useless on a trail bike. Such a waste. So, I can't speak to the RC2 Pike, but if I were buying a Pike right now that's what I'd get.

    Travel - I got my Pike at 140 but installed a 130mm air spring rod (very easy) to keep it where Giant spec'd. Doubt if the 10mm makes that much of a difference but I think the HTA is quite slack, and the STA for a shorter travel bike is spot on. The bike runs super well as is. Giant seems to have the R&D to test whatever they want. I think they are less prone to just "follow trends". For example this bike has 115 out back. Weird. If they were just following the market they'd have made it at least 120-130. Landing at a number that they felt tested best, well, I've give them credit for doing it based on what they felt rode best, not just trying to sell a bike based on popular numbers.

    Anyway, the Pike is a good fork. Easy to set up. Easy to service. QC seems good. Good re-sale. I'd stick with the 130 but heck, like I said, 140 ain't that much difference. I can say that it tracks quite well and feels very up to hard riding when I push it. But once a fork starts to get longer, you get less bushing overlap and it might be less sturdy. If I needed a 140 up front I'd get a Lyric, but then I think the A2C is relatively longer.

    Not sure if that helps, but some stuff to think about.

  176. #1576
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    I have decided to put a 140mm Air Shaft and a Diaz Runt in my Fox 34 Rhythm. I probably won't have it for around a month given the shipping delays but I will report back once I have it all set-up.

    Ideally I would like to put a Pike Ultimate in, but hopefully I can get a similar result for less money.

  177. #1577
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    Has anyone put a shockwiz on their DPX2?
    For the first year I settled on ~200psi and 11 clicks rebound. More recently I made a big change to 250 psi/ 7 clicks. Obviously the latter keeps me much higher in the travel, better use of the travel, but not so plush.
    I just got hold a shockwiz and was keen to see what it thought. First I did my fork and it gave suggestions in line with what I expected. Then the shock. For the 250 psi (260 on the shockwiz) it gave me scores in the mid 90's on my favourite trails (pat on the back, good tuning job...) All greens for pressure, volume, rebound. Only compression was in the yellow, usually on the firm side. Sag 25%. Balanced and Playful gave identical results.
    Then for completeness I changed to my old settings. I was expecting the shockwiz results would lead me back to the higher pressure setup. Instead, first trail and it gave me 100%. After a few more mid 90's were again typical. ~30% sag. All greens for pressure, volume, rebound. Compression again yellow (but typically too soft). Again, balanced and playful gave identical scores. Only if I went to the extremes on the custom tuning would I draw out suggestions, but that is kinda worthless.
    I was surprised that it would give me good scores at both sag extremes, whether it be balanced or playful (I never saw any difference between the two). I was hoping for a bit more refinement in its suggestions...
    Could it be that the DPX2 volume and stroke is simply too small for the shockwiz to get good measurements? Or is it really saying the ideal tuning range is that broad? Clearly a 20% reduction in pressure gives a very different feel. They are not both very "balanced" and very "playful".
    I'm living on the edge of a world class mtb forest, so good tracks for good data is definitely not the issue.

  178. #1578
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pingelig View Post
    Has anyone put a shockwiz on their DPX2?
    For the first year I settled on ~200psi and 11 clicks rebound. More recently I made a big change to 250 psi/ 7 clicks. Obviously the latter keeps me much higher in the travel, better use of the travel, but not so plush.
    I just got hold a shockwiz and was keen to see what it thought. First I did my fork and it gave suggestions in line with what I expected. Then the shock. For the 250 psi (260 on the shockwiz) it gave me scores in the mid 90's on my favourite trails (pat on the back, good tuning job...) All greens for pressure, volume, rebound. Only compression was in the yellow, usually on the firm side. Sag 25%. Balanced and Playful gave identical results.
    Then for completeness I changed to my old settings. I was expecting the shockwiz results would lead me back to the higher pressure setup. Instead, first trail and it gave me 100%. After a few more mid 90's were again typical. ~30% sag. All greens for pressure, volume, rebound. Compression again yellow (but typically too soft). Again, balanced and playful gave identical scores. Only if I went to the extremes on the custom tuning would I draw out suggestions, but that is kinda worthless.
    I was surprised that it would give me good scores at both sag extremes, whether it be balanced or playful (I never saw any difference between the two). I was hoping for a bit more refinement in its suggestions...
    Could it be that the DPX2 volume and stroke is simply too small for the shockwiz to get good measurements? Or is it really saying the ideal tuning range is that broad? Clearly a 20% reduction in pressure gives a very different feel. They are not both very "balanced" and very "playful".
    I'm living on the edge of a world class mtb forest, so good tracks for good data is definitely not the issue.
    I have put a shockwiz on mine. Have you tried running 225 and see how that comes out?

    I've gotten some strange turning recommendations out of my shockwiz, but not really surprising ones. Even if you keep the same tune and run the setup on a variety of trails it will give a huge range of tuning recommendations.

  179. #1579
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cotharyus View Post
    I have put a shockwiz on mine. Have you tried running 225 and see how that comes out?

    I've gotten some strange turning recommendations out of my shockwiz, but not really surprising ones. Even if you keep the same tune and run the setup on a variety of trails it will give a huge range of tuning recommendations.
    I did try around 240, with similar results. I'll drop it a little more and see what it says about the compression then.
    Might also try a 0.4 reducer (currently stock 0.6) with pressures at the higher end, and see what it says.

    With the fork I was getting results that were very trail and riding style (or non-style) dependent

  180. #1580
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    Am i the only one who suffers from a creaky seatpost on their trance? I have been riding for 25+ years and this is the first seat post that creaks/squeaks and its infuriating to me. I have removed it, cleaned it, lubed it and reinstalled 10+ times now. I may get one ride through before it starts again, sometimes halfway through the ride it starts up. I also remove the QR clamp and collar and clean and lube that along with the seat post. I have used no lube, park tool poly lube and assembly paste. I have not tried the assembly paste on the QR collar as I feel that part is supposed to move when you clamp down the QR. I have tighten/loosened the QR with no change. I can typically loosen the QR, move the saddle up and down 1-2in, re-tighten down and it goes away for 2mi or so if I have recently cleaned it. i used to clean the saddle rails every time also, but since i started only cleaning the post (and the noise goes away for a bit) i don't bother with the rails.

  181. #1581
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    Quote Originally Posted by robhurlburt View Post
    Am i the only one who suffers from a creaky seatpost on their trance? I have been riding for 25+ years and this is the first seat post that creaks/squeaks and its infuriating to me. I have removed it, cleaned it, lubed it and reinstalled 10+ times now. I may get one ride through before it starts again, sometimes halfway through the ride it starts up. I also remove the QR clamp and collar and clean and lube that along with the seat post. I have used no lube, park tool poly lube and assembly paste. I have not tried the assembly paste on the QR collar as I feel that part is supposed to move when you clamp down the QR. I have tighten/loosened the QR with no change. I can typically loosen the QR, move the saddle up and down 1-2in, re-tighten down and it goes away for 2mi or so if I have recently cleaned it. i used to clean the saddle rails every time also, but since i started only cleaning the post (and the noise goes away for a bit) i don't bother with the rails.
    Have you tried a different saddle?
    Sometimes that can be the source where the rails move against the saddle material. I've not had noise from the seat post on mine, but I did get some noise from a saddle and replaced it. It was due anyway and that solved the problem.

  182. #1582
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSU Alum View Post
    Have you tried a different saddle?
    Sometimes that can be the source where the rails move against the saddle material. I've not had noise from the seat post on mine, but I did get some noise from a saddle and replaced it. It was due anyway and that solved the problem.
    I have not. Someone else had suggested adding a drop of lube where the rails meet the seat, which I will try. I have not suspected the seat because I can usually fix it by cleaning/lubing the post.

  183. #1583
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    Quote Originally Posted by robhurlburt View Post
    I have not. Someone else had suggested adding a drop of lube where the rails meet the seat, which I will try. I have not suspected the seat because I can usually fix it by cleaning/lubing the post.
    The lube trick also works. I did that for a while before getting a new saddle. Fiddling with things in the area sometimes stops the noise for a little while even if it's from the seat itself.

  184. #1584
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    Quote Originally Posted by robhurlburt View Post
    Am i the only one who suffers from a creaky seatpost on their trance? I have been riding for 25+ years and this is the first seat post that creaks/squeaks and its infuriating to me. I have removed it, cleaned it, lubed it and reinstalled 10+ times now. I may get one ride through before it starts again, sometimes halfway through the ride it starts up. I also remove the QR clamp and collar and clean and lube that along with the seat post. I have used no lube, park tool poly lube and assembly paste. I have not tried the assembly paste on the QR collar as I feel that part is supposed to move when you clamp down the QR. I have tighten/loosened the QR with no change. I can typically loosen the QR, move the saddle up and down 1-2in, re-tighten down and it goes away for 2mi or so if I have recently cleaned it. i used to clean the saddle rails every time also, but since i started only cleaning the post (and the noise goes away for a bit) i don't bother with the rails.
    For me a generous amount of Rock N Roll super coat grease on the seat post and the collar lasts at least 6 months before any creaks are heard. I just make sure that all the post that is inside the seat tube is well greased.

    And it definitely is more prone to creaking than my previous bikes, but nothing that worries me, really. And it does not seem to be seat post dependent - the Giant Dropper creaked if not greased, the current Oneup creaks if not greased properly too.

    Hope this helps,
    Stefan

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