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  1. #101
    always licking the glass
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    In your own words, how has aging affected your mountain biking? State your age also.

    44 here.

    Still climb like shit but Iím climbing here now that I can breathe.

    Moved to Colorado a year and a half ago. Learned to mtb in Florida and NC in the early 90s before moving to California in the mid 90s.

    I was my most technical riding in Florida and NC. In California I developed asthma. That really sucks. and I found it hard to find technical riding in the Bay Area that didnít involve a lot of climbing so my tech riding suffered.

    Here my asthma is much more in check, and Iím spending a lot more time working on jumping and dh. Iím not hitting anything hard core but there are better progressions and better riding opportunities here to ride dh. And Iím learning how to ride the big bike. Itís amazing, even if Iím older. And Iím relearning how to ride the rocks.

    Iím also healthier here. But yeah recovery from injury takes longer and same for recovery from harder rides.
    Guerrilla Gravity BAMF, Colorado Front Range
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  2. #102
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    My aging process and riding

    My experiences have been a little different than the majority. In my 20's and 30's, I was at, what I thought, " the top of my game. But when I turned 40, I was riding better and faster than I've ever had. In my mid to late forties, I slowed down a bit, mostly due to family and work. Late in my 40's, 48,49, I started to pick it up again and when I turned 50, I probably had my best year racing ever. I won almost every race I entered, 50+ cat.1 and even had a couple of races in which I passed most of the younger riders and caught some of the pro riders who started 9 minutes ahead.
    I was really amazed at my riding but knew that someday I was going to have reach a plateau. A few ago, I'm 56 now, I think I did. While I still had some really amazing days, it seems for the most part, I just don't have that kick anymore.
    Right now and for the last 4 months, I've hardly ridden due to a re-occurring back injury and a business that has been going crazy.
    I hope to get back on my bike soon and get back some of my fitness
    EXODUX Jeff

  3. #103
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    55 and still alive! I live in western Colorado surrounded by sweet single track. Very blessed to be on my bike almost every day. XC raced for over 20 years but gave that up 2 years ago. I find that I ride just as much now if not more than ever. A few years back i picked up a fat bike and now there is no off season for me. I find myself skiing less and riding more. I really do feel that cycling helps me stay younger than I am. Side note.. I also weight train 4 days a week and eat pretty much what ever I want.
    Last edited by tg; 03-21-2018 at 10:23 AM.

  4. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    I'd describe the majority of my rides as high intensity. I'm not doubting that age effects recovery times as people are reporting here but I haven't noticed it yet, something to look forward to I guess
    I'm guessing you're very fit and can manage that workload. Later in the season I can pull that off, but not at this phase of training.
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  5. #105
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    Great to read all of the stories for sure..also great to know that success is not always about trophies am=nd speed!!

    I think if we all just keep our personal goals in mind, we will always ride better....funny how many people are also actually riding more, and possibly better after 50 than in their early years. I know I ride more now for sure...and I ride more focused, even if it is not more physically demanding due to the age of my body...my brain still thinks I am 17

    keep at it !!!
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  6. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crankout View Post
    I'm guessing you're very fit and can manage that workload. Later in the season I can pull that off, but not at this phase of training.
    I am feeling pretty good these days and here in the SW USA there really is no off season.

    I'm sure I was stronger in some ways and had better lung capacity 30 years ago but I feel more fit now, maybe that's selective memory presiding but either way I'll take it. It would be interesting to race my former 25 y/o self, I'm positive I'd destroy that poor sap on the mtb but I wonder about on the road?
    I brake for stinkbugs

  7. #107
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    Bikes - Jones Plus SS / Evil The Following / 92 Cannondale M800 1x10

    Been riding MTB for close to 30 years. The rigid SS does a good job of getting and keeping me in shape. Rides on the FS are cake after that.

    Started doing a lot of pushups about 3 years ago and have basically eliminated lower back pain and improved most everything else.

    Like any sport, some days you're on fire, some days you're sucking ass on the trails.

    I always have to have my pre ride coffee and bring a mid ride banana and gels/chews.

    It's amazing how the changes in geometry and wheel size have benefitted my riding. I used to endo quite regularly on my 26" HT's. That maneuver has been basically eliminated from my repertoire - except when I took my 92 Cannondale M800 out this past Thanksgiving and promptly endoed over a couple logs that my other bikes don't even consider obstacles.

  8. #108
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    73 years young here in the Phoenix area. MTB gets me out of the rocking chair (death trap). I have slowed down the last couple of years (according to Strava) but still enjoy riding 3 x/week getting in 30-40 miles/week. I have an arthritic left knee and have been advised to get replaced . I think if I wasn't riding I would have to get a knee replacement so the riding keeps it lubed up. I mostly spin up the hills and no big gears and ride x country trails.
    As I read the comments above one thing stands out 'Everyone remembers when they were at their best' and that is one of the frustrations of aging but inevitable. Most of you guys have a long ways to go but it can be some of the best times as long as you adjust your expectations. I occasionally ride with a guy named Bill. He is 76 and up to a year ago he rode a rigid ss. He now rides an 11 speed rigid with 2.8" tires but I can't keep up with him unless it is rocky and downhill. The message is 'keep active"
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  9. #109
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    42. I was never an elite athlete in my youth, so I don't have some lofty standards by which to judge myself.

    I can still feel rusty the first few rides after winter, when I only ride an indoor trainer, and the first few techy trails are out of rhythm. I keep getting better throughout the season for skills, because again, I was not that awesome.

    cardio is different than skill. no doubt I have to work harder for a given amount of cardio and I lose it faster. and no doubt I don't ride as much as I would like to be able to. the best riding I ever did was when I was between jobs for a few months about 5 years ago.

    my son just turned 11 and it's fun getting out with him on rides. he whines more than I did as a kid, I think it's his mom's fault. I raced dirtbikes and crashed a lot, and it hurt. the speeds and weight of the vehicles alone makes MTB crashes a lot less violent on the whole. we skipped MX for him due to cost, lack of legal riding areas, and the fact the whole family can ride MTB. he likes MTBing and he is getting better by leaps and bounds. whereas I'm still getting better slowly.

    very soon he'll exceed my cardio endurance abilities but he has a long way to go to exceed my skills and determination. once all 3 dominoes fall, he'll be the one waiting up for me on the trails.

  10. #110
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    47 in a couple of weeks and I have slowed considerably. Though, that was compounded by the fact that I lost interest in biking due to depression, age and getting fat. I was so depressed that I sold my bikes. I recently bought a new bike and am getting back into it. I used to be quite dedicated to mountain biking and was much quicker than a lot of the young whippersnappers. Now, I am a fat brick on wheels. Though, I have changed my mentality and want to just have fun and am no longer interested in being fast.
    Yo no hablo inglťs

  11. #111
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    i am fifty six.

    don't talk to me about recovering from injuries; injuries suck when you're over fifty.

    my eyesight has always been iffy now it is iffy-er. this becomes an issue mainly during night rides which are few and far between.

    however, i probably go downhill somewhat faster which i think may be a result of my refining riding skills over the years. (i started riding MTB when i was 29) i also believe my patience and decision making while on the bike have improved somewhat as well.

    i don't ride in the rain for fun any more and i avoid riding in san francisco traffic whenever possible, since i used to pedal the 17th street gauntlet from the inner richmond to dogpatch every day for eleven years.

    commuting with numbnuts in four wheeled steel boxes will take the joy of cycling out of a man right quick.

    yes, recovery is slower but i can still pull off back to back rides although one of those back to backs has to be shorter and mellower.

    what age has not changed is my passion for the sport. i hope i'm still able to pedal the same terrain i'm riding now when i'm sixty-six.

  12. #112
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    38 here. Rode from 1993-1997, when I was 13-17 years old.

    I am 6', and was 140lb back then. 210 right now.
    I don't think my age has affected much in and of itself. I don't have the ability to just go flat bonkers anymore, but it's more having a wife, two little guys, and trying to run a 1 man small HVAC business that keeps me sane. Definitely don't have the ability to just go for something without a care in the world.
    That's how I got my screen name in 1993. DethWshBkr (biker). I would challenge anyone, anywhere, anytime on downhills. You had the main line? Cool, I'll go off trail through chunder and still pass. One ride, I scared a bunch of expert riders, passing them through a rock garden that was not part of the trail. They thought I was out of control and crashing.
    Nope. Later that ride, they told my dad I need to slow down, because it seemed I had a death wish.
    I defintley don't have that complete lack of fear. (Could also be weight related, as 210 lb doesn't stop, maneuver, or crash as nicely as 140 lb does!!)

  13. #113
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    Turning 41. Been riding since I was 8.

    The biggest change is my appetite for risk. I can ride as fast or perhaps even faster then when I was younger but not all the time. Nowadays there is a lot of mental checks I make before I really decide to push my limits. I need to feel that I am on and sharp, if I am feeling slightly off I will stay within my comfort zone.

    I am OK with this. Crashing hurts, and I have a lot of fun riding my bike smoothly and cleanly.
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

  14. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Interesting and a little disheartening that longer recovery times seem to be nearly universal as people age, not surprising I suppose. I guess I'm sort of a freak because I'd ride 6 days a week if I could, spare time is the only thing holding me back. I'll take what I can get and enjoy it while I can.
    The increased recovery time mainly applies to anaerobic work. Really hard efforts take longer to recover from. However, someone who has been riding regularly their whole life has this huge aerobic base that allows them to long ride after long ride after long ride.

    Years of riding has it benifits
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

  15. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by MiWolverine View Post
    47 in a couple of weeks and I have slowed considerably. Though, that was compounded by the fact that I lost interest in biking due to depression, age and getting fat. I was so depressed that I sold my bikes. I recently bought a new bike and am getting back into it. I used to be quite dedicated to mountain biking and was much quicker than a lot of the young whippersnappers. Now, I am a fat brick on wheels. Though, I have changed my mentality and want to just have fun and am no longer interested in being fast.
    Dude, I went through the same kind of thing about 10 years ago. Got real depressed after a 13 year relationship suddenly ended. Did the whole recluse, living like a hoarder thing for about 5 years....biking is what got me back out of it. I had sooo many good memories of what biking was when I was younger. I actually came across the old MTB when cleaning out all of the mess, and it was like magic!! It gave me a new reason to get up and out for sure. 5 years this side of what I call "The Darkness" now and there has been now sign at all of depression. I really can't beleive Iactually was in that world.

    I hope you also find your "catapult". I also only ride for my own fun. I have never raced, even when I was younger on BMX, it was all about the hang, and learning tricks. MTB is escape for me, and a connection to the outdoors, which I also grew up with by camping and hiking. I ride MTB to keep my skills challenged from a tech side, and it also keeps the gear-head in me happy. Still ride BMX as well. My step-son does both BMX and MTB with me, and that is cool
    " ...the moonlit swamp Krampus is a king among bikes." - geraldooka

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  16. #116
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    I'm 54 years old now. I started riding as a kid. I bought my first rigid mtb in the late 80s. I raced for a few years in mid 90s in my 30s. At 46 I broke my wrist mountain biking. At 48 I dislocated my ankle and required surgery. Then, at age 52 I went OTB and dislocated my shoulder, again requiring surgery.

    I am not as flexible nor as light as I used to be, so I watch my speed and especially take notice of when I get tired, because that is when I tend to wreck.

  17. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobLyman View Post
    I'm 54 years old now. I started riding as a kid. I bought my first rigid mtb in the late 80s. I raced for a few years in mid 90s in my 30s. At 46 I broke my wrist mountain biking. At 48 I dislocated my ankle and required surgery. Then, at age 52 I went OTB and dislocated my shoulder, again requiring surgery.

    I am not as flexible nor as light as I used to be, so I watch my speed and especially take notice of when I get tired, because that is when I tend to wreck.
    did you ever recover full range of motion from your dislocated shoulder?

    i dislocated mine back in september and the muscles froze. my ROM is still limited somewhat but i can ride.

    how long was your recovery from dislocation to "full"?

  18. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by shekky View Post
    did you ever recover full range of motion from your dislocated shoulder?

    i dislocated mine back in september and the muscles froze. my ROM is still limited somewhat but i can ride.

    how long was your recovery from dislocation to "full"?
    I've mildly seperated both of my shoulders at separate times. It took a long time for them to completely heal, as in 6+ months so I would think a serious dislocation would take quite a while to heal. I also dislocated my pinkie and it took a surprising long time to be 100%, longer than the doc said it would take.
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  19. #119
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    Only been MTB for about 12 years. Was a roadie, discovered cyclocross started doing gravel and trail riding before it was a thing and just kept going deeper into the woods until that became my main thing. My ankles and knees can't take running much but I can still ride. Technique is pretty darn good for an old roadie, which is to say pretty bad. My bunny hop is an upward lurch.

    Still having fun. Still scare myself from time to time and don't crash a lot so I'm good.

  20. #120
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    I rode my first mtb 9 months ago. Previously was all paved road riding for stamina and endurance, up to 250 miles per week in August heat and humidity. Riding hills, no, make that CLIMBING hills in the mountains has increased my cardio/aerobic capabilities and made my legs stronger. I don't care about being fast and am cautious on any downhills, because I don't want to crash.

    I don't eat anything special. Whatever I happen to want, from donuts to ramen soup and sandwiches. I take various vitamins on a semi regular basis. B12 sublingual is good for balance. I'm 6ft, 170 pounds.

    You young whippersnappers in your 40s and 50s, are not close to being old. You might need a younger woman, if you are truly feeling old. And quit avoiding the climbs. Speed on the DH or catching air on a jump won't help you when it's important, which is when you're with a woman. Unless that's not important to you, hahaha!!

  21. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by shekky View Post
    did you ever recover full range of motion from your dislocated shoulder?

    i dislocated mine back in september and the muscles froze. my ROM is still limited somewhat but i can ride.

    how long was your recovery from dislocation to "full"?
    dislocated my right shoulder playing hockey 3 years ago - big check in the boards - tore my rotator cuff as well. I still don't have full ROM...probably 60% right now, but am working on it. It has gotten better over time. Due to not having health insurance whne it happened, I also know I did not follow the proper protocol for rehabbing it, so that probably did not help. I know that it healed back wrong, so I am fighting that...
    " ...the moonlit swamp Krampus is a king among bikes." - geraldooka

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  22. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by shekky View Post
    did you ever recover full range of motion from your dislocated shoulder?

    i dislocated mine back in september and the muscles froze. my ROM is still limited somewhat but i can ride.

    how long was your recovery from dislocation to "full"?
    My dislocation include a labrum torn about 66%. I too had a frozen shoulder during recovery. A single cortisone shot during PT worked it out. I regained 80% range of movement in 3 months or less. I was doing push ups by then. My job required it. Another 10% over the next year. I'm at about 95-99% now, but get some popping going on depending on how I rotate my arm/shoulder.

    The ankle was much worse, with a 2" and a 2.5" screw in my ankle during recovery. It was 5 months before I rode a bike again.

  23. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    I am feeling pretty good these days and here in the SW USA there really is no off season.

    I'm sure I was stronger in some ways and had better lung capacity 30 years ago but I feel more fit now, maybe that's selective memory presiding but either way I'll take it. It would be interesting to race my former 25 y/o self, I'm positive I'd destroy that poor sap on the mtb but I wonder about on the road?
    Ha! It's funny, I wonder the same thing in regards to current vs. former fitness. I have to say, I definitely train smarter than I ever have out of necessity. It seems like it takes me longer to warm up than before; in other words, I feel like I can't hammer out a decent interval without spinning for about 15-20 minutes, or even longer.
    Stick around if you're housebroken...

  24. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    Great to read all of the stories for sure..also great to know that success is not always about trophies am=nd speed!!

    I think if we all just keep our personal goals in mind, we will always ride better....funny how many people are also actually riding more, and possibly better after 50 than in their early years. I know I ride more now for sure...and I ride more focused, even if it is not more physically demanding due to the age of my body...my brain still thinks I am 17

    keep at it !!!
    Definitely more focused, in part because I have the time to ride, and in my early 50's I want to make every workout meaningful.
    Stick around if you're housebroken...

  25. #125
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crankout View Post
    Definitely more focused, in part because I have the time to ride, and in my early 50's I want to make every workout meaningful.
    having it be meaningful is definitely a larger factor for me to...quality over quantity, though with biking, really, ANY ride is a great ride. As many have mentioned, my worst day of riding is better than my best day at work, sometimes (I actually love my job)

    but knowing how the riding is tied into eating habits and weight management to make my body last longer is definitely more of an interest of mine now. Also, understanding how keeping my body in balance effects my riding is a motivational thing for sure...every gym/training session is like "getting new components" for the bike to make it run faster, and more efficient
    " ...the moonlit swamp Krampus is a king among bikes." - geraldooka

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  26. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeadGrandpa View Post
    65

    I rode my first mtb 9 months ago. Previously was all paved road riding for stamina and endurance, up to 250 miles per week in August heat and humidity. Riding hills, no, make that CLIMBING hills in the mountains has increased my cardio/aerobic capabilities and made my legs stronger. I don't care about being fast and am cautious on any downhills, because I don't want to crash.

    I don't eat anything special. Whatever I happen to want, from donuts to ramen soup and sandwiches. I take various vitamins on a semi regular basis. B12 sublingual is good for balance. I'm 6ft, 170 pounds.

    You young whippersnappers in your 40s and 50s, are not close to being old. You might need a younger woman, if you are truly feeling old. And quit avoiding the climbs. Speed on the DH or catching air on a jump won't help you when it's important, which is when you're with a woman. Unless that's not important to you, hahaha!!
    i don't want a younger woman because i "feel old"...

    i want a younger woman because...


  27. #127
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    cool thread!

    i'm 47 (48 in july)

    for me, aging with reference to riding has been a compensation of sorts.

    when i was i younger i had:
    - way fewer responsibilities
    - much more free time
    - more physical strength
    - more stamina
    - less recovery time between rides
    - much less fear of speed, jumps, drops, but mostly of FALLING

    now, as we all know, with age we generally replace "less/fewer" with "more/much" and vice-versa.

    it could be said that a "certain type" of mtb riding is for the young, but i essentially think that with all sports (and with many things in life), you eventually need to calibrate things to your capabilities and get the most out of what you can get.

    at my age i would like to be able to be KOM on a gnarly downhill section, but is it worth getting hurt and as a result having to take off from work, burden my family, spend money on doctor bills and risk not ever getting back on the bike?

    not for me.

    so my reasons for riding have changed. i go to spend the day, or a couple of hours, out on my bike, and although i try to push my limits now and then, i try to improve riding skills and keep things like heart rate in check and make sure i have plenty of snacks and water.

    most importantly, i still have fun and when i get home, i am already thinking about my next ride, just like when i was younger.

    that said, i feel pretty good for my age and consider it a good time to be a mountain biker. i am in decent shape (the same weight as i was when i was 30), and although my priorities have changed, i now have more of an interest in things like trail building, bike repair, training, diet, etc. (the internet has helped a lot imho). so i spend a lot of my free time involved in the general field of interest, especially when "middle age" problems like prostatitis and hemorrhoids occur.

    there are also fewer "temptations" in terms of getting stupid drunk or stoned, eating bad, etc. now staying in shape is more than a goal, it's the means to an end: keep riding as long as possible.

    one other, less important aspect is having considerably more disposable income to spend on all the goodies modern mountain biking has to offer, something i couldn't say 20 years ago.
    Be yourself. Everyone else is already taken.

  28. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by shekky View Post
    i am fifty six.

    don't talk to me about recovering from injuries; injuries suck when you're over fifty.
    Wow. Many of these responses are downright depressing.

    I think that riding regularly contributes significantly to my recovery time from injuries.

    Recovering from recent injuries havenít been any different over fifty for me(yet).

  29. #129
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    I'm 43, 2020 will be my 30th year mountain biking. The only negative for me has been longer recovery time after really hard rides. Otherwise I'm in the best shape I've been in since high school. Back to that weight too - 170. I've been running 3-4 miles every day that I'm not biking since 2008, and lifting weights one day a week (upper body/core only) since 2015. When I started the weightlifting again it was 2-3 times a week. It eliminated most of the back, shoulders and neck pains I'd have after riding. But I scaled it back to one day a week as I started to gain some weight. I don't eat any carbs for breakfast or lunch, but I kind of pig out at dinner and drink beer every night. If I cut out alcohol completely I could probably get down to a super ripped 160 pounds but I'm not that motivated.

  30. #130
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    In your own words, how has aging affected your mountain biking? State your age also.

    49 yrs young. Started riding bikes again about 10yrs ago, after stopping pretty much when I got my drivers license, to try and avoid the heart issues that my uncles and grandfather suffered from. So far, so good and I have my fingers crossed. Things I've noticed as I've gotten older are that I seem to have lost some of the 'pop' in my riding and that sometimes I think too much about my performance as I ride instead of just enjoying it. The loss of 'pop' I'm going to blame on my equipment and attribute it to going from 26" wheels to 29" and then from rigid SS 29er to FS 29er. The FS 29er is more capable and more comfortable but doesn't have that 'zing' and 'pop' that the 26er did, at least that's what I'll blame it on. The thinking too much part is me trying to blame the lack of 'pop' on my bike while I'm riding it.


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  31. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by CGrr View Post
    49 yrs young. Started riding bikes again about 10yrs ago, after stopping pretty much when I got my drivers license, to try and avoid the heart issues that my uncles and grandfather suffered from. So far, so good and I have my fingers crossed. Things I've noticed as I've gotten older are that I seem to have lost some of the 'pop' in my riding and that sometimes I think too much about my performance as I ride instead of just enjoying it. The loss of 'pop' I'm going to blame on my equipment and attribute it to going from 26" wheels to 29" and then from rigid SS 29er to FS 29er. The FS 29er is more capable and more comfortable but doesn't have that 'zing' and 'pop' that the 26er did, at least that's what I'll blame it on. The thinking too much part is me trying to blame the lack of 'pop' on my bike while I'm riding it.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Pretty much my same story, but I am riding now post family inherited heart attack. Went from a 90s era Trek 26er to a 2015 Surly Krampus...soooo much more fun to ride right now, ans am trying to get the pop I had back in the early 80s on BMX. Still ride BMX as well looking for that pop.

    Keep up thenriding, and also to avoid that HA, reduce sodium intake....big time! For me that and other sensible food choices have been the best thing for my health and riding success!!!!
    " ...the moonlit swamp Krampus is a king among bikes." - geraldooka

    15 Surly Krampus
    LET IT SNOW!

  32. #132
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    39 now, started mountain biking back when I was 10 or 11.

    The main difference compared to my teens and 20s is smarter risk taking. Back in those days I'd hit any jump, drop, teeter-totter, or stupid line straight down the mountain as long as I thought I had a 20-25% chance of pulling it off. It didn't matter if I crashed most of the time, if I thought I had that small chance of looking like a hero, I'd ride it. I guess that's what happens when you're young, a bit crazy, and everyone in the riding group believes in encouraging others to push their limits.

    These days I still do a lot of stupid stuff but it's a lot more calculated, I'm not going to huck myself off a drop without carefully scoping out the surroundings, I'm not going to attempt something unless I feel I have a 90% chance of pulling it off. And even then I'm going to look at my bailout options and figure out what the possible crash is going to look like if I botch things. I take more risks when the likely consequences are only minor injuries, but when there's a high potential for an ambulance ride I'm unlikely to risk things. In short, I still take risks and push my limits a lot, but I do it in a much safer & more controlled way so that I don't end up in the hospital.

  33. #133
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    At 35 i feel like i've been 20 for 15 years. I'm more aware of my mortality, but i experience it vicariously through watching my peers age and get hurt. Me, i feel great and crash frequently without repercussions. (knock on wood!) Haven't really noticed any change in recovery time or fitness. I know it won't last forever, and i don't do things that could really break me, but in the mean time i know i'm lucky and i'm gonna exploit it!

    If anything, my stamina is better, my anaerobic power is fractionally worse, and i'm somewhat stronger. I attribute all that to being active for a long time and not caring about fitness, aging is just a measure of that time.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
    Mikhail Kalashnikov

  34. #134
    Just A Mountain Biker.
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    43 years old, been riding for 31 years this year.

    As many have stated, the most pronounced thing I have noticed is recovery between rides. I used to be able to ride every day, all day, but now I need a rest day if I go 20 miles or so.

    I am sure I am probably slower overall, but the most important thing I have learned is to take my time and enjoy the ride.

    When I got sober 5+ years ago, I promised myself I wouldn't do things that didn't bring me joy (for the most part). I hate getting up early on the weekends, so I don't ride in the mornings during the summer; I found that dragging myself out of bed for it made me resent the ride so I stopped doing it. I'd rather deal with the heat in the afternoon.

    If I don't feel like going riding, I don't force it.

    I ride primarily by myself, I usually have a route mapped out in my head and I don't like to compromise (sorry not sorry). Also, mountain biking and beer has become so intertwined it seems more like riding is the excuse the go sit at a trailhead and drink after the ride, and I'm just not there anymore.

    I do more things like hiking these days, between ride days.

    My average ride is closer to 20 miles or so, definitely longer than I used to. In the old days, I was one of the guys that raced out to the trailhead to do an 8-mile loop on my carbon wonderbike and reward myself with those aforementioned beers in the parking lot.

    What I may lack in outright speed, I make up for in smoothness which I feel has kept me faster over the long run. Still running rigid and single speed so that helps the focus on riding light and smooth.

    Recovering from injuries also sucks as you get older, so I try not to get hurt.
    MTBR: Your dad's online mountain bike forum.



  35. #135
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    In my twenties I could party all night, go to bed a 2 am, get up at 7:30 am still drunk, and ride all day. Now a days it's much different. Drink a twelve pack, bed at midnight, and up a 6 am, and only ride a half day.

  36. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott O View Post
    48

    In my twenties I could party all night, go to bed a 2 am, get up at 7:30 am still drunk, and ride all day. Now a days it's much different. Drink a twelve pack, bed at midnight, and up a 6 am, and only ride a half day.
    That clean living will be the end of you Scott.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  37. #137
    West Chester, PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott O View Post
    48

    In my twenties I could party all night, go to bed a 2 am, get up at 7:30 am still drunk, and ride all day. Now a days it's much different. Drink a twelve pack, bed at midnight, and up a 6 am, and only ride a half day.
    I'm sure there's a scientific explanation for this, but I swear I'm stronger sometimes when I'm nursing a hangover. Sometimes my wife will look at me and say "I can't believe you're going", but I refuse to waste a nice day laying around.

  38. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by 92gli View Post
    I'm sure there's a scientific explanation for this, but I swear I'm stronger sometimes when I'm nursing a hangover. Sometimes my wife will look at me and say "I can't believe you're going", but I refuse to waste a nice day laying around.
    I swear by riding when I'm hungover. It's very hard to motivate but a good, long sweaty ride just gets all the poison out and makes me feel so much better.

    Exercise is the best and fastest way to get booze out of your system.
    Vermonter - bikes, beers and skis.

  39. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by VTSession View Post
    I swear by riding when I'm hungover. It's very hard to motivate but a good, long sweaty ride just gets all the poison out and makes me feel so much better.

    Exercise is the best and fastest way to get booze out of your system.
    I don't drink whiskey much anymore, but when I would tie one on I'd drink LOTS of water along the way. Give the kidneys something to work with as it filters out the toxins and doesn't leave you dehydrated in the AM.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  40. #140
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    When I was very young I was an athlete and competed at a national level (not cycling). Then I started working my way through school, supporting a family and working sedentary jobs. I slowly became a physical mess. At age 46 my doctor gave me a "get your $&@! together or die young" speech. That's what got me started riding frequently. My weight is down, my energy is up, I'm not on any medication. So my aging feels pretty good. I will never be the explosively strong like I was as a young adult, but I feel better than I have in years. I'm not sure I would have made the urgently needed changes if my doctor had sugar-coated the message. His willingness to have a hard conversation made me motivated to make big changes. I'm grateful for that.

  41. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by LMN View Post
    Turning 41. Been riding since I was 8.

    The biggest change is my appetite for risk. I can ride as fast or perhaps even faster then when I was younger but not all the time. Nowadays there is a lot of mental checks I make before I really decide to push my limits. I need to feel that I am on and sharp, if I am feeling slightly off I will stay within my comfort zone.

    I am OK with this. Crashing hurts, and I have a lot of fun riding my bike smoothly and cleanly.
    One of the best parts of getting older and wiser is the fact that you can have a bigger bag of skill to rely on.

    At 49, I'm probably not as fit as I could have been at my previous mid-30's fitness peak, but with everything (bikes, training, my own patience and judgement) improving over time, I have little doubt that I'm faster than I was then.

    The issue isn't how many years have passed, it's what you did with them.

  42. #142
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    Tendonitis!

    I developed it in my elbows during a trip to Rabbit Valley a few years ago. It was bad enough I could barely twist a door knob. While it's much better now I still feel it, almost constantly, and it does become a factor when riding, especially if there's lots of pulling up on the bars to do.

    My aerobic fitness isn't what it used to be (peaked in my late 20s, I'm 43 now) but I'm actually way more muscular than I was then so... I guess I look better in a bathing suit.

    Other than that the biggest change is a general lack of motivation but that could be because of how long I've been riding my local trails - it gets boring sometimes.

  43. #143
    aka Manzanita Tom
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    58. Better shape now than I was in my 20s and 30s - mainly due to moving from Midwest and months of winter downtime, to NorCal, with year-round hiking/biking.

    Nothing to add to what has already been said by others in this age bracket. Things that are on my mind:
    1. I wish I could retire now so I could ride more - hopefully a couple more years and Iíll be there.
    2. I wish there was an easier way to find a riding posse of, shall we say, more seasoned riders like myself. Theyíre around, just havenít figured out a way to connect with them for regular rides (China Camp or Mt Tam).
    3. You guys in your 70s who are rocking it RULE! Thanks for posting up - you are my inspiration.

  44. #144
    kneecap
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    Lotta youngens here, ha.
    I'm 72, started riding mtb's at 58, just then having stopped racing enduro motos. Got to see some beautiful country that is mostly closed at this point.
    I ride with the younger crowd, since at my age not many left, ha.
    Took a test ride on an ebike last month, so that's what I'm mostly about presently.
    Kudos to RooHarris, the canoe, & maveric-c. we need an over 70 form !

  45. #145
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    Quote Originally Posted by VTSession View Post
    I swear by riding when I'm hungover. It's very hard to motivate but a good, long sweaty ride just gets all the poison out and makes me feel so much better.

    Exercise is the best and fastest way to get booze out of your system.
    Ditto that.
    Bucket loads of glycogen to burn after a long night of beers.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  46. #146
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    Well, I'll join in late to the party. Some of you might have already my post on returning to riding in my fifties on the over fifty thread, but I'll post here anyway. I just turned 57 and I enjoy riding as much as I ever did! I love getting out as often as I can, and I'm enjoying the North Shore here in BC as much as ever, though I have to be honest, I shy away from some of the stuff I might have ridden in the past just because I'm trying to avoid injury. My knees are even worse than they were in my forties...

    But, that said, I kinda think that in the eight months I've been back mountain biking, I'm actually a better technical rider than I used to be. If I'm not, well then, the improved bike technology has helped. Lines that used to give me pause don't as much - maybe it's the 29 inch wheels with the 2.6s on my Fuel that help.

    I'm in pretty good shape. Not race shape, or anything, but in better condition than I've been for a long time! I will NEVER be the fastest up the hill, or the fastest down, but I'm okay with that!

    Bottom line is that I still love this sport! I was thinking about flying to Alberta in early June for a family reunion, but I'm driving so I can take my bike!

  47. #147
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    Quote Originally Posted by dir-T View Post
    Tendonitis!

    I developed it in my elbows during a trip to Rabbit Valley a few years ago. It .
    Turmeric will resolve this issue.

  48. #148
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    I'm turning 68 in August. I started riding more seriously when I turned 50 and had some bad medical reports (cholesterol, weight and blood pressure). I lost 3 pounds in 6 months and did the Ore-to-Shore race (finished last... but finished!). Bought a titanium road bike with a front triple based on Joe Friel's recommendations. Over the years, I've used the granny less and less and have felt pretty stable for years. I took up multi-modal cycle commuting (folding bike-train-folding bike) 16 years ago, which helped keep me in shape.
    Then in January of this year, I slipped on the ice and gave myself a "Maisonneuve fracture", basically a really bad sprain and a broken fibula. This was not a bike injury... my "winter" folder has studded tires; I slipped on my patio. 3 months later, I'm in physical therapy and just getting back to the bike. I'm hopeful that I'll make a full recovery (I'm told it's likely) but it will take 6 to 9 months. I don't think age, per se, has slowed me down all that much. Time will tell!
    Steve

  49. #149
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steveroot View Post
    I'm turning 68 in August. I started riding more seriously when I turned 50 and had some bad medical reports (cholesterol, weight and blood pressure). I lost 3 pounds in 6 months and did the Ore-to-Shore race (finished last... but finished!). Bought a titanium road bike with a front triple based on Joe Friel's recommendations. Over the years, I've used the granny less and less and have felt pretty stable for years. I took up multi-modal cycle commuting (folding bike-train-folding bike) 16 years ago, which helped keep me in shape.
    Then in January of this year, I slipped on the ice and gave myself a "Maisonneuve fracture", basically a really bad sprain and a broken fibula. This was not a bike injury... my "winter" folder has studded tires; I slipped on my patio. 3 months later, I'm in physical therapy and just getting back to the bike. I'm hopeful that I'll make a full recovery (I'm told it's likely) but it will take 6 to 9 months. I don't think age, per se, has slowed me down all that much. Time will tell!
    Steve
    Great story Steve. I'm 7yrs your junior but I've felt my aging has slowed body-repair time. Not a lot but to me it's noticeable. Never really stopped riding so I've nursed a few injuries over the decades.
    oops I wasn't clipped in

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