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  1. #1
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    Winter gloves and tips

    Hello,
    today I tried to commute with my new Northwave 3 power gel (with a first layer of thin silk gloves) with a +2°C and +5°C temperatures (altitude difference of 350m along 10km) and my hands at half the ride were freezing with the initial loss of feeling in the extremities of the fingers! I was so disappointed cause I thought these gloves were more than enough for this ride weather
    Of course the main cause of this is that downhill I can go up to 40km/h so cold air will pass.
    Do you know if there exist any gloves <€50 that are suitable for these rides? Temps here can reach -10°C for weeks (even less but those days I don't think I will ride).

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    Winter gloves and tips

    I wear snowboard pipe gloves from burton. They have lasted 2 years no threads coming apart.

    I wear these down to about -5c. If im out of the wind trail riding and have my heart rate up i can get away with -10c

    I dont use poggies till -20c ish.

    Then i go to my motorfist WOT gloves back from when i mountain sledded or some specialized element 3.0 mits -10 to -20c



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  3. #3
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    Pogies.
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  4. #4
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    As temperatures go down, I progress from light gloves to heavy gloves to lobster mittens and then add Bar Mitts and then chemical hand warmers.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Pogies.
    This or Pearl Izumi Lobster Claws. I have 3 sets of gloves. Lobster claws for the 32 F (0 C), 40 degrees (5C) I have a winter glove, but it's not as thick as the lobster claw, and for 50 F (10 C), I have a thinner glove similar to the Northwave posted above, but mine is windproof.

    Oh yeah, I've had my gloves for about a decade with no signs of coming apart, etc. I've used them to dig trail, ride, and hike. Below gives you an idea about the 3 types of gloves I own. I did not compare any prices and I'm not affiliated with any of the sites posted below.

    Loster claws on amazon

    Pro Amfib glove

    I have another pair of gloves similar to these, but mine are windproof, which is fantastic on the road.

    Escape gloves

  6. #6
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    Pogies.


    then you can use 'normal gloves' like PI cyclone. Pogies work insanely well. no more figuring out 'how fat a glove vs control vs the temps' you need, pogies do it.

    and you can find cheap ones on amazon for under 20 bucks.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Pogies.
    I still don't understand completely how they work so well, but they do.

    As a secondary benefit, it's way easier to keep a thin pair of in-pogie liner gloves washed and dried when riding daily. Thick ski-type gloves take forever to dry.
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Pogies.
    Pogies are amazing. If you are riding in the cold they are the only thing that really works.
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  9. #9
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    As stated above numerous times, pogies + anything from regular biking gloves to heavy Lobster claws, depending on temp.

    I use 45NRTH Cobrafist pogies and rate them a perfect 10/10. They are warm though, and designed for truly cold weather riding (although they do have zipped vents for warmer days). They are also not inexpensive. There are lots of good options readily available for pogies.

    I just bought a pair of Specialized Element 3.0 lobster gloves. On their own, they are good to about minus 8C. Lower than that and the pogies are necessary.

    I run pogies all winter and choose my hand wear depending on temps. Wind is pretty much a non-factor with the pogies.

    I will be reaching for the Specialized Element 3.0 gloves on most days. When it gets super cold, I have a pair of Black Diamond lobster gloves that are good to at least minus 20C on their own (and much colder temps with the Cobrafist pogies).

    As others above do, I also carry a few chemical hand (and feet) warmers in my pack to increase options just in case I messed up on my glove choice.

    TL;DR: pogies + lobster gloves + chemical hand warmers in your pack/pocket
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  10. #10
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    Pogies, dogwood designs can be turned inside out and rolled up, so as your hands get warm, you can regulate the temp. Heavier gloves just kill my dexterity and my palm sweats while my fingers freeze, the glove always gets damp.
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    I meant to add as well, my experience is that there is a noticeable difference in hand comfort when using a carbon bar (and carbon brake levers), but I get it - for the OP, this is likely a less bling winter commuter bike.
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    Another vote for the pogies/Bar Mitts.

    I hate messing with gloves as I'm always misplacing them or can't find the particular pair I want. The pogies stay on the bike and I can ride even in 10-20F temps without any gloves whatsoever, which is also nice for commuting in non-bike clothing.

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    My only complaint about the neoprene Bar-Mitts and the Aliexpress imitations (I have one of each) is how freakin huge they are.

    If you want to take them off, they definitely won't fit in a jersey pocket, and will probably take up half of your pack. They're also big and floppy enough to cause sketchy no-handed riding on the road, particularly if you have studded tires.

    I had a pair of thin MEC-branded pogies back in the day that were 80% the warmth with 20% the massive-ness but the cuffs didn't have enough rigidity for easy in-out while riding.


    And yes, when I changed by carbon brake levers for aluminum last year, they definitely felt colder when winter came.
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post

    As others above do, I also carry a few chemical hand (and feet) warmers in my pack to increase options just in case I messed up on my glove choice.

    TL;DR: pogies + lobster gloves + chemical hand warmers in your pack/pocket

    I carry handwarmers mainly for the flat or other trail repair where you need your fingers and they end up freezing on you, a few packs of handwarmers is a game changer getting repairs sorted out sub-freezing. also carry a lighter and tinder in case I have unplanned extended downtime...get a fire going if no other options are present and true survival skills need to come about
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  15. #15
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    Insulated work gloves like Kincos are only about $20. They keep me warm to about 20F/-7C when I'm outside skiing all day and a bit colder while bike commuting for about 30 minutes. If you're on a budget they're worth considering.

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    Thanks all!
    I think I'll stick with regular gloves if I have to ride with pogies I'd rather take the bus really...

    My Northwave are also waterproof and windproof (or they say).

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    Quote Originally Posted by dir-T View Post
    Insulated work gloves like Kincos are only about $20. They keep me warm to about 20F/-7C when I'm outside skiing all day and a bit colder while bike commuting for about 30 minutes. If you're on a budget they're worth considering.
    Can you post a link?
    Yes I'm on a budget for this season so any cheap but warm lobster glove would be fine, my commute is 20-30 minutes.

    And how do you deal with cold wind in the face for those very cold days? I have a face mask that works for now but I'm pretty sure it won't work for those days where you are around -10°C.

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    Quote Originally Posted by solarplex View Post
    I wear snowboard pipe gloves from burton. They have lasted 2 years no threads coming apart.

    I wear these down to about -5c. If im out of the wind trail riding and have my heart rate up i can get away with -10c

    I dont use poggies till -20c ish.

    Then i go to my motorfist WOT gloves back from when i mountain sledded or some specialized element 3.0 mits -10 to -20c



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    Can you also post a link to those gloves?

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    I use normal gloves and pogies.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sandro87 View Post
    ...if I have to ride with pogies I'd rather take the bus really...
    I suspect we are not on the same page. I suspect you are not on the same page with most who have responded in this thread. That’s cool though.
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  21. #21
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    the ask was: winter gloves, and tips ?
    the answer generally is: any glove, and pogies
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  22. #22
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    New question: can I get away with gloves up to -10°C without pogies?

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    Quote Originally Posted by sandro87 View Post
    New question: can I get away with gloves up to -10°C without pogies?
    Yes. Easily. You can go much colder too. Solution: lobster gloves.

    For me the benefit of running pogies is that you can wear much lighter gloves if you wish so that you retain the same hand-bar feel/articulation that exists in more civilized temps (plus my pogies keep my lower arms nice and toasty as well). At -10C I could probably get away with wearing very light gloves with my pogies - maybe even biking gloves, especially if I was running a carbon bar and levers. I have not tried it but there are pouches inside my Cobrafists that I could put chemical warmers in. Not sure how much heat they would generate. Maybe none. I will try it when I can and will get back to you, which won’t be til next week. Thankfully we are in the positive temps right now. Balmy.
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by sandro87 View Post
    New question: can I get away with gloves up to -10°C without pogies?

    Yes, you will survive. People are different though, some are comfortable with relatively light gloves at those temps and others are miserable with nice ones. I'm in the latter camp, and if I'm not comfortable I'm not riding.

    If you're going pogie-less mittens are best in cold temps or as mentioned, lobster gloves. As for regular gloves I think ski gloves are probably best. OR, Showers Pass, etc.
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Yes, you will survive. People are different though, some are comfortable with relatively light gloves at those temps and others are miserable with nice ones. I'm in the latter camp, and if I'm not comfortable I'm not riding.

    If you're going pogie-less mittens are best in cold temps or as mentioned, lobster gloves. As for regular gloves I think ski gloves are probably best. OR, Showers Pass, etc.
    x2.

    I meant to say that as well. Minus 10C without wind is not too bad. But my ride is ruined unless my hands, feet and face are kept warm throughout.

    Cold weather lobster gloves, like my Black Diamonds, will EASILY handle minus 10C temps, pogie-less. My new Specialized Lobster gloves will not. No way. I like them a lot, but at minus 10C, pogies are mandatory with them.

    All that said, and not trying to beat a dead horse, but I am willing to give up style/convenience for comfort. OP - pogies may not be nearly as lame as you are thinking. I love mine. Without them I would be riding MUCH less. I don’t have time to reread this thread right now, but I assume you are riding with a flat mountain bike bar and not a road drop bar...
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  26. #26
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    before pogies, I thought I'd lose some control

    nope....my cheap pogies allow me to ride near identically to not using pogies, my hands can do whatever they need to do in and out of them (pop out push off a tree due to a balance screwup, or go for water bottle, hands back into pogies and on bars seamlessly)


    (also the same pogies can go on my road bike with no issues with me riding on the hoods and shifting/braking)
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    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    ...(also the same pogies can go on my road bike with no issues with me riding on the hoods and shifting/braking)
    Aaahhh. Ok. I don’t have the balls to ride my cross/road bikes in the winter so I have never tried to rig the pogies up to a drop bar. Sounds like it’s a non-issue.

    The one thing I don’t like about pogies is that on a narrower bar (my 2008 Kona Fire Mountain, that I retired this year from active winter duty), I felt constrained in the pogies. I couldn’t get my hands outboard enough for 100% comfort when braking and shifting. My bar was so narrow that I couldn’t push my brakes and shifters anymore inboard. Not an issue with my new 800mm Chromag FU40 bar on my Unit, but depending on the bar, pogies can feel constraining.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod View Post
    This or Pearl Izumi Lobster Claws. I have 3 sets of gloves. Lobster claws for the 32 F (0 C), 40 degrees (5C) I have a winter glove, but it's not as thick as the lobster claw, and for 50 F (10 C), I have a thinner glove similar to the Northwave posted above, but mine is windproof.

    Oh yeah, I've had my gloves for about a decade with no signs of coming apart, etc. I've used them to dig trail, ride, and hike. Below gives you an idea about the 3 types of gloves I own. I did not compare any prices and I'm not affiliated with any of the sites posted below.

    Loster claws on amazon

    Pro Amfib glove

    I have another pair of gloves similar to these, but mine are windproof, which is fantastic on the road.

    Escape gloves
    Pearl Izumi Lobster Claws are fantastic. I wore them in 20F on Sunday for 3 hours and my fingers were warm for the entire ride.
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  29. #29
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    I'm OK with mittens or lobster gloves.
    Funny how the Kincos on amazon.com are $20 but on amazon.it become €60+!

    What about the question about the face?

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    damn shitty servers

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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    I still don't understand completely how they work so well, but they do.

    As a secondary benefit, it's way easier to keep a thin pair of in-pogie liner gloves washed and dried when riding daily. Thick ski-type gloves take forever to dry.
    A large part of it is simply physics. Thermodynamics, specifically. With gloves that have separated fingers, you have a VERY high surface area to volume ratio. Great for bleeding off excess heat. Terrible for retaining it. With pogies, you get the opposite.

    Quote Originally Posted by sandro87 View Post
    Thanks all!
    I think I'll stick with regular gloves if I have to ride with pogies I'd rather take the bus really...

    My Northwave are also waterproof and windproof (or they say).
    Honestly, pogies are dreamy. Now, granted, at the temps you're talking about, my homemade pogies are too warm for me. I'll sweat terribly with them. But I also made them for colder conditions, too. 20F is about the temp where they become useful for me. In the sorts of weather you're talking about, I have had good results with softshell gloves. Mine are Seirus brand, and old AF. Probably getting to be time to replace them. But I also tend to run warmer than others and require less insulation to be comfortable.

    I remember years ago finding some pogies that were uninsulated and provided mostly just a shield for your hands from the wind. They might have been water resistant, too, to block splashes and light rain. I don't remember what they were (maybe someone here will know what I'm talking about) and can't find them. The closest I've managed to find are the Wolftooth pogies in "trail" mode (with the cuffs folded down) but those are even "more" than the ones I remember from years ago. I have a feeling that simply blocking the wind would be a major improvement.

    https://otsocycles.com/products/sing...-by-wolf-tooth

    I've also found that carbon bars (and brake levers) are WAY warmer in the cold than metal ones. I'd honestly put carbon bars on a winter bike for zero other reason. Similar reason to why resin platforms (with metal pins) are popular for winter riding.

    For the face? I rely heavily on my beard. Face masks just suck for me unless it's much colder than you describe. They wet out from the moisture in my breath, and then that gets cold and VERY uncomfortable. I cover my ears and my neck. This is another time that running warm is helpful. I mostly don't cover my face at all down to around 10F. I wear a Buff to protect my neck, and I can pull it up to cover my face whenever I need it (like when I'm stopped), so the time I actually have my face covered is probably less than 10% of my time out on the bike.

  32. #32
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    Pogies changed my life last winter... most of the time using them, I didn't need gloves. There are multiple manufacturers, companies and artisians both, making them. They can be cheap if you buy a brand like RockBros or expensive if purchasing one with features or for polar expeditions.

    I've had good luck with cross country ski gloves more so than with down hill gloves. The cross country ski gloves may be better for more aerobic activity. The down hill gloves are too thick with insulation, though they block the wind the best besides winter biking gloves and mitts like the Pearl Izumi or Specialized options. Kinco was mentioned as a good low cost option. If you like Kinco glove idea, but want something a bit nicer than have a look at Flylow.

    The right gear is always dependent on the person and the weather, good luck finding yours!
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

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    Yeah I'm worried about the thickness that won't allow me to brake easily.

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    Anything similar to Kinco or Flylow but sold directly in the EU? All of these are US products and the shipment costs more than the gloves themselves.

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    What is a brand or company you are familiar with that supplies work gloves? Hultafors? I know they make decent axes and knives for the price, don't know if they make gloves or clothing, etc.

    Google search for insulated leather/waterproof work gloves and see what comes up. That would get you a Kinco equivalent.

    Google search for winter cross country ski gloves and see what comes up. Rather than looking for specific brands, try to focus on the features the gloves you like offer and do your best to find a regional equivalent.
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

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    Just looked a little, perhaps a brand like Ejendals? Good luck!
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

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    https://www.hibike.com/craft-hybrid-...df2082393954a9 could this handle the weather I described?

    Seems like not every lobster gloves is enough, some are useful up to a certain point so I'm not sure what to get (for the prices I mentioned). Isn't the hand movement reduced a lot that you can't press the lever with these gloves?
    You also mentioned lobster ski gloves. I remember when skiing with those gloves you could barely grab the ski poles so I would guess the same is with the brake levers. That is really important for me for safety reasons since one way of my commute is completely downhill.

  38. #38
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    I figure this vid would helpful to those of us who picture ourselves being stuck on the bars with pogies during a crash: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NSXbtPG6wy4

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    Quote Originally Posted by sandro87 View Post
    I'm OK with mittens or lobster gloves.
    Funny how the Kincos on amazon.com are $20 but on amazon.it become €60+!

    What about the question about the face?
    for the face look at ski/snowboard gear. same thing...I use rossignol face mask and when really really cold, I tape up the nose hole and also use smith turbo-fan goggles
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    Wolftooth pogies and summer gloves down to 0F for me. Pogies make all the difference. The insulation is the big air gap and it never gets saturated with sweat like gloves do. Carbon bars and foam/silicone grips also help a lot.

    If you can't/won't do pogies then the next tip may help. Once your core is good and warm stop and swing your arms like a windmill as hard as you can until you can feel the blood pressure building up in your hands (maybe 30 seconds). This will open up your capillaries and increase the blood flow to your hands and make a big difference in keeping them warm.
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    Quote Originally Posted by sandro87 View Post
    Yeah I'm worried about the thickness that won't allow me to brake easily.
    And that's the BIGGEST reason pogies work so well and are so widely recommended. You can wear a thin glove and maintain dexterity, but stay warm.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tedsti View Post

    If you can't/won't do pogies then the next tip may help. Once your core is good and warm stop and swing your arms like a windmill as hard as you can until you can feel the blood pressure building up in your hands (maybe 30 seconds). This will open up your capillaries and increase the blood flow to your hands and make a big difference in keeping them warm,

    so you can properly slap yourself for not getting pogies.
    fixed that for you
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  43. #43
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    also I cringe at these 99 dollar jobs...man you can pay 20 bucks for the same effect (warm hands)

    https://www.amazon.com/Airhead-SLHM-...-goods&sr=1-29

    these aren't furry. good for 15deg F no problem with PI cyclones.

    you can pay a bit more for -extreme- versions
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    In the 2-5C range I like my dissent133.com gloves. They’re a layering system and you can buy all 4 gloves together or subsets. There’s a thin base layer, mid weight thermal layer then either a windproof or waterproof shell. I have the windproof pack and like them for those temps. I have more dexterity than ski gloves and can remove layers if I get warm. Much colder and I’m probably not riding, if I were then pogies make sense. They’re a little more money than your price range but not much. I paid about $75 but they’re out of the UK so you might get a better deal (looks like you’re in Italy).


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    I honestly can't find any gloves sold in EU that are not super expensive, also not sure if I can risk with a copy of the Kincos!
    So I'm considering some cheap pogies really and that are not HUGE and bulky. Any cheap ones from Amazon will do?

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by dir-T View Post
    Insulated work gloves like Kincos are only about $20. They keep me warm to about 20F/-7C when I'm outside skiing all day and a bit colder while bike commuting for about 30 minutes. If you're on a budget they're worth considering.
    Are work gloves the same as the ski gloves?
    Could this be made of the same stuff of what you're mentioned?
    https://discountworkgear.com/product...-ski-mitten-2/

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arebee View Post
    Pearl Izumi Lobster Claws are fantastic. I wore them in 20F on Sunday for 3 hours and my fingers were warm for the entire ride.
    Yes, they are. If it's super cold or very windy my finger tips may get just a little cold so a liner makes them good to zero or more. They're the warmest gloves I've ever used or owned. They're well worth the money and have held up very well over the years.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by sandro87 View Post
    Thanks all!
    I think I'll stick with regular gloves if I have to ride with pogies I'd rather take the bus really...

    My Northwave are also waterproof and windproof (or they say).
    Follow the links I posted for some gloves that will never leave your hands numb. They're not cheap, but as I said, I've abused mine by digging trails for hours, daily, in the winter and they're held up well. My hands sweat in the lobster gloves at 40 F, which is 10 C i believe.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by sandro87 View Post
    Thanks all!
    I think I'll stick with regular gloves if I have to ride with pogies I'd rather take the bus really...

    My Northwave are also waterproof and windproof (or they say).
    We are not on the same page. Follow the links I posted for some gloves that will never leave your hands numb in any weather. They're not cheap, but as I said, I've abused mine by digging trails for hours and daily on vacation. These have been fantastic. My hands sweat in the lobster gloves at 40 F, which is 10 C i believe. I think you're experiencing numbness in your gloves.

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    Waiting to see if there's a deal on Black Friday for the Izumi.
    Meanwhile do you think these will work? https://www.amazon.it/DokFin-Inverna...5&sr=1-10&th=1

    Cheap Chinese stuff. I would like something really small.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    And that's the BIGGEST reason pogies work so well and are so widely recommended. You can wear a thin glove and maintain dexterity, but stay warm.
    I think this point is generally lost by most people. I've tried riding in ski-gloves and there's not enough control to ride anything other than easy rolling wide trails at slow speed, apart from the additional issue of sweaty hands followed by eventual cold fingers that always seems to happen with those kind of gloves. The control using regular mtb gloves or glove-liners makes it like riding in the summer. There are some people that think for some reason that they won't be able to "get out" of the pogies if they fall. It makes no sense, because most people hold onto their bike when they all anyway and to come out you just let go like normal, nothing to hang up on. There's nothing "holding" your hands.

    They are a big part of the "being comfortable outside in the cold" effect, where you are able to enjoy the ride and stay out indefinitely, vs. fighting the conditions while the clock is ticking away until your hands go numb.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

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    I ride below freezing in the winter. Usually in the 20s and 30s (F).

    I use medium weight ski gloves (and I still ride technical downhills) and I use a hunters muff to warm my hands when stopped. It wraps around my waist like a fanny-pack and is toasty warm (with a hand-warmer inside) when I place my hands inside.

    https://heavy.com/outdoors/2018/10/hand-muff/

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    I think this point is generally lost by most people. I've tried riding in ski-gloves and there's not enough control to ride anything other than easy rolling wide trails at slow speed, apart from the additional issue of sweaty hands followed by eventual cold fingers that always seems to happen with those kind of gloves. The control using regular mtb gloves or glove-liners makes it like riding in the summer. There are some people that think for some reason that they won't be able to "get out" of the pogies if they fall. It makes no sense, because most people hold onto their bike when they all anyway and to come out you just let go like normal, nothing to hang up on. There's nothing "holding" your hands.

    They are a big part of the "being comfortable outside in the cold" effect, where you are able to enjoy the ride and stay out indefinitely, vs. fighting the conditions while the clock is ticking away until your hands go numb.
    I had my first pogie related crash yesterday. I'm using ATV pogies, with snaps I installed in the ends that snap into the bar end plugs to keep them in place. The fabric on the pogies are a ripstop type nylon. The singletrack I was on yesterday runs through gambel oak. A branch snagged my pogies and held on just long enough to turn the bars, tear the fabric and send me down. I had no issues getting my hands out of the pogies to brace for impact.

    Aside from that, I love our pogies. Thin glove liners are all that are needed, usually, and when that gets to be too much, I just fold them back over the bars. Many times I'll start the ride with the pogies on, then when body temp heats up, fold them back for the rest of the climb, the put them back to full coverage for the descents - that wind chill, even at 4-5 mph, takes it toll fast. Brake lever covers are also nice, and add grip with slippy glove liners...only for winter use though, annoying in the warmer months.
    I would advise not taking my advice.

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    I have been commuting in Calgary, AB in the winters for 15 years or so and have tried every variation and combination of things to keep my fingers and toes warm.

    I am one of those guys who gets cold fingers and toes and way too easily. Once the temps get close to 0 Degrees C, I am preparing for the worst. Always have, even when I was a kid, so my biggest complaint about winter is I have never been able to consistently find the right gloves and footwear. i ride with other guys who can get away with a liner inside of a riding glove and will be fine when I feel like I am going to have to amputate my digits. It really sucks.

    Snowboarding and ski gloves are too bulky to work and don't keep my fingers warm. Down mitts do well for warms but are terrible for riding. Various other attempts with wool liners, snowboard fleece liners, different riding specific winter gloves with or without liners have not been super successful, particularily past -10, for me. Shimano's goretex windblocker have been the best riding specific ones i have found though not the be all end all. I bought a pair of Under Armour windblock ones that work better in the colder days than the shimano's but they are not riding specific and are tight around my wrists, sometimes leading to numbness.

    Pogies work to keep the wind away. They can be cumbersome to get hands in and out of quickly on sketchy, icy rides but that is dependent on the size and bulkiness of the gloves. They don't do much for me for insulation past -10C, though, i find.

    I had two sets of AME heated mountain bike grips on my commuter and fat bike over the last three seasons and with carbon handle bars inside of pogies, they did an admirable job, especially down to the -25C-30C range. Unfortunately, they are crazy expensive an the on/off switches are terrible. I have had three of them stop workign between the two sets and now i have grips that work with two batteries and no way to turn them on or switch between heat levels. That sucks because i really liked them. AME has had problems with the switches over the years that they have been selling them and keep changing them to try to rectify the problems but that causes incompatibility issues between different model years.

    After my heated grips, were relegated to the parts bin, I took a chance on a set of heated gloves on Amazon. Expensive at $170 CDN and have had quite a few commutes and fat bike rides with them and two warm thumbs up so far. Hopefully, I can get through a few winters before they die. They were half of what some of the bigger names were charging for heated gloves so I am happy they are working so far.

    I know the OP didn't mention feet specifically but I am on a roll...
    Never splurged for mtb specific winter boots as I was not confident that they would work, given the high cost of them. After my experiences with gloves, i am leery that anything from Norhtwave, Shimano, 45North etc would work for me.

    I have winter hikers which work well for warmth and off bike hiking/pushing in snow but not the best for pedaling. The tread is too aggressive to work well with flat pedals and don't flex well at the ankle.

    I have also tried wool socks, thick, thin, multiples and also neoprene toe covers over the socks. None have been the best.

    Heated socks and heated insoles have been the best so far for me. Found a pair of socks on Aliexpress for $50CDn last year and my wife bought me a set of heated insoles this year. Between the two of them, I can regulate my toes very well. I use them in a pair of 5.10's Wet weather/cold weather shoes and that combination is pretty good except in really snowy or icy conditions. The tread is terrible for grip off the pedals. So, to combat, I have a pair of slip on ice spikes that I use for those rides where there is a chance I will need off pedal grip. The spikes can interfere with on pedal grip so I use plastic/nylon flat pedals that mitigate that a bit, not 100% though.

    So, if anyone else is like me, e-gloves and e-footwear is the way to go.

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gunnar-man View Post
    So, if anyone else is like me, e-gloves and e-footwear is the way to go.
    I also bought the heated insoles off aliexpress, the ones that use a USB plug.

    I then source the USB battery pack locally (i.e. Costco) to avoid charging no-name batteries from China in my home....on the advice of others.
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

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    Well I'm almost sold on pogies mainly because of the price (very cheap with Chinese options, if they're any good, still be confirmed by someone) and also because no one here said they're not good enough. Seems like they don't need to be that huge also.
    Where I live it rarely goes below -10°C and always during the night when I don't commute anyway.

  57. #57
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    just kicked out 20 miles on road in 35 deg steady wind and rain. used my cheap pogies on road bike and my hands were too warm with PI cyclones, so took gloves off completely. was 100% fine except when taking hands out from pogies....sorta chilly and wet
    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

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    delete

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    A good winter glove should have Primalof synthetic insulation. It is the best other than down. Primalof silver or gold won't get damp nor wet during severe physical exercise.
    Primalof gold is the best of synthetic. It tends to be expensive but it is worth it when you are stranded in middle of wilderness.



    Sent from my SM-G965W using Tapatalk

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