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  1. #1
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    What did you do to be a better mtbiker ?

    I joined a basic MTB workshop this morning. I realized that my skills are very far from being "good". I have decent experience in flowy trails before but the trails where I live now includes very steep descent, ascent, and very sharp turns with rocks, roots, etc...

    I want to ask you guys with let's say "expert" skills. What did you do to improve? How'd you become a better rider? How'd you choose your bike? etc... Can you share your brief story?
    Last edited by gat3keeper; 04-01-2019 at 03:55 AM.

  2. #2
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    I dunno that I have "expert" skills, but I can ride a lot of stuff confidently. But I could certainly stand to learn more and improve more.

    First and foremost, I've been riding for awhile. About 20yrs for actual mtb riding. There was a gap of several years where I didn't really ride, and then prior to that I rode whatever as a kid.

    Second, repetition. Practice. I gained a lot of technical skill from noodling around on campus in college. Skinnies, stairs, etc. Been to a few skills parks over the years, too.

    I've taken a few skills courses more recently. Those certainly help to accelerate the learning process. They set you up well to teach you HOW to practice certain things.

    Riding with others and learning from others is another big one, too. Sessioning things with a group and getting advice from others. Also giving advice, too. Helps you see other lines, other techniques you didn't think of while riding, things like that.

  3. #3
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    Sounds like you are in luck by moving to an area with just the right trails to advance your skills! Trails that are ridable, but barely, are the best!

    Ride the crap out of those trails and you will become better.
    For the record, I am no expert but am finding improvement in my riding by taking on harder steeper more technical trails until that becomes the new normal.
    And then I mourn for the days I were challenged by them
    This is either a good thing, or a very bad thing.

  4. #4
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    Were there a time when you are intimidated by some portions of the trail ? With what I experience this morning, there are sections that I didn't have the confidence if I can make it or not. I stopped at some sharp curves thinking I might slip or slide, am I overthinking ? What to do with this situations ?

  5. #5
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    To be clear, no expert skills here. But I do have 25+ years of pretty much year round riding under my belt. I am very happy with my skill level, but in no way would I ever characterize it as even remotely close to ďexpertĒ. Not even delusionally, after a day of riding and BSing over some post ride beers. Skill wise, maybe an extremely enthusiastic intermediate. On that front, I would honestly say though that my enthusiasm and motivation to improve, is unparalleled.

    That having been said, for me my improvement over the years has been LARGELY attributable to mileage, as obvious a statement as that may be. And riding stuff way beyond my comfort level. Among other things, I have tried to hit Moab, Whistler and Whistler Bike Park once a season.

    Early on, I had a horrible season filled with endos, horrendous crashes and bad injuries. I ditched my Spec SJ with its steeeeep HTA and replaced it with a Kona Bear. I also used flats that season to try to regroup.

    Bike + flats + Moab and Whistler, was game changing. That season and the next season was when I really started to progress (I subsequently went back to clipless primarily, although this year I am going to try to ride flats more than clipless).

    On the gear front, there is no doubt that full suspension, disc brakes, droppers, more progressive geo and other gear advancements have largely been responsible for my improvement over the years.

    This year, I bought a hardtail and hope to advance my skills as a result (so long as I donít beat the crap out of myself in the process).

    In the end though, there is no substitute for mileage. Including mileage on the toughest terrain you can handle, without risking life and limb.

    PS - one final thing... Fitness...

    I have been commuting year round to work for decades. Itís not an easy commute. When I hit the dirt, I notice a huge difference as a result of the pavement mileage, especially on the downs. When I am feeling especially strong, it feels like I can toss my bike around like a rag doll. It sucks badly to finally reach the summit and have nothing left in the tank for the downs.

    PPS - I have accompanied my daughter numerous times for private lessons at Canada Olympic Park. I have learned a lot myself hearing the basics repeated by different instructors. When I am at Whistler, I sometimes take a private lesson. Some of those instructors at Whistler are next level. Elbows bent and pointed out...

    Plus reading... Everyone should buy the book ďMastering Mountain Biking SkillsĒ by Lopes and MacCormack. I re-read it every year during the winter and continually review things in it with my daughter (I bought her her own book).

    ************

    TL; DR:

    1. Mileage
    2. Ride terrain beyond comfort level without risking life and limb
    3. Gear - change things up as required - donít be a luddite, and consider switching to flats to regain confidence
    4. Buy a hardtail
    5. Fitness is king - commute - ride pavement
    6. Lessons
    7. Buy Mastering Mountain Biking Skills by Lopes and MacCormack - read - repeat. Every serious rider should own this book and read it. Repeatedly.
    Last edited by mtnbkrmike; 03-31-2019 at 10:55 AM.

  6. #6
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    I started out on a full rigid bike with six gears in the back.
    Ripping trails and tipping ales

  7. #7
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    What did you do to be a better mtbiker ?

    I think the idea of an expert rider is very subjective. There are many mountain bike riding disciplines that use skills differently.

    My focus is on fitness to help me pilot my bike.

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  8. #8
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    Not an expert, but...

    Ride with control and balance.
    Fitness.
    Repetition/consistency.
    Watch/learn from others.

  9. #9
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    I wouldn't call myself an expert rider but i'd recommend riding as much as you can, ride different places and take time to try different features. You will be surprised how much you improve when you ride at different places and try new features.

  10. #10
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    Given your current terrain-
    This video helps deal with cornering to start.



    Setup before the corner.
    Imo you need a good front brake with more stopping power than you need. That helps with confidence. I'd recommend SLX. It bolts on with no line cutting or bleeding.
    If not on a ridged you need a fork with rebound damping that works. Many entry bikes lack this.

    When you're dealing with rocks/roots it helps to be off the seat so your legs help and to keep your heals down.
    Here's the vid on that technique.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ZKhkyoOcdg

    You can develop these techniques off the hill as far as moving your weight around the bike.

  11. #11
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    To be a better mountain biker; obey trail rules, don't ride muddy trails, yield to pedestrians and equestrians, yield to uphill riders, be modest when changing in the parking area, pick up your dog's poop...
    Do the math.

  12. #12
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    Do trail work and give back to the community. Always remember that everyone starts as a beginner. Ride within your skill set and remind yourself that gravity is a harsh mistress. Start joining group rides, suffer at the back for seasons, watch the moves and lines that others take. Best yet, drink a big cup of HTFU before each ride. Some light elbow and leg armor help with that too.

  13. #13
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    Here's one skill I recently taught my GF. Clocking your cranks back to the power stroke during a crux move. I use it more on the single speed than the geared bike.
    Ripping trails and tipping ales

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vader View Post
    I started out on a full rigid bike with six gears in the back.
    Yup, I built a bike with no suspension and one gear. The margin for error is much much smaller and it forces you to learn good techniques on the trail. It's challenging in a fun way, but probably not everyones ideal "one and only" bike.

    Other types of skills require practice. Session things that are hard for you (and fun), until you get it down. Building skills takes time, a lot of time. The more time you spend in the saddle the faster you will learn.

    Ride with riders that are faster and more skilled than you. Watch videos. Then practice practice practice.
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    I dunno that I have "expert" skills, but I can ride a lot of stuff confidently. But I could certainly stand to learn more and improve more.

    First and foremost, I've been riding for awhile. About 20yrs for actual mtb riding. There was a gap of several years where I didn't really ride, and then prior to that I rode whatever as a kid.

    Second, repetition. Practice. I gained a lot of technical skill from noodling around on campus in college. Skinnies, stairs, etc. Been to a few skills parks over the years, too.

    I've taken a few skills courses more recently. Those certainly help to accelerate the learning process. They set you up well to teach you HOW to practice certain things.

    Riding with others and learning from others is another big one, too. Sessioning things with a group and getting advice from others. Also giving advice, too. Helps you see other lines, other techniques you didn't think of while riding, things like that.
    I agree with riding with others, it gives you confidence to see others do it, my friend calls it Leveling up. He just follows me around and any line I take he takes, hes always amazed at what you can ride after you see someone else do it right in front of you.

    Come show me how to clean Bennett Gap. Took a nice dirt nap today on the drop.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by LaneDetroitCity View Post
    I agree with riding with others, it gives you confidence to see others do it, my friend calls it Leveling up. He just follows me around and any line I take he takes, hes always amazed at what you can ride after you see someone else do it right in front of you.

    Come show me how to clean Bennett Gap. Took a nice dirt nap today on the drop.
    I usually skip the drop. I am usually on that trail solo, and I have healthy risk management.

    I have only watched one other rider hit it, but I think I know the line I'd take. And it's actually mostly rollable, too.

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  17. #17
    LDC is ded,deth by trollz
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    I usually skip the drop. I am usually on that trail solo, and I have healthy risk management.

    I have only watched one other rider hit it, but I think I know the line I'd take. And it's actually mostly rollable, too.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk
    I'm off the drop till I have more than 100mm. Buying a new Ripley then hitting it. I'd like you to show me how to roll the twisted roll in for sure up before the drop. I'm currently hiking that every time because it's been wet and I didn't have a big knob front tire to stick the landing and sharp turn.

  18. #18
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    Another non-expert weighing in:

    I've found I've improved most by riding with people better than me and learning from them there.

    Riding solo I've found I'm helped by reriding moves I find troublesome over and over (either sessioning them, or just riding the same trails pretty regularly and trying different lines).

    I've liked riding at a bike park a lot of the same reasons. I can ride a 1200 foot drop trail five times in a row and see how I can improve each time. Obviously if you want to improve on techier sections, you need to make sure the park has/you ride the older school trails, but I both get a lot out of it and it's super fun.

  19. #19
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    I ride 100% alone, except when I'm racing or on a paid shuttle for a long day in the saddle. Every group ride turns into a slow social ride or stopping to session a section. It's just not my thing.
    Ripping trails and tipping ales

  20. #20
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    I joined a spam cult.
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  21. #21
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    Not saying I'm an expert but I better be OK for doing it for over 20 years.

    I try to ride with guys better than me. There are a few I know and when I can I try to hook up and ride with them; try to keep up; see how they ride a tough line; clean stuff they clean. Being in relatively underpopulated area makes finding really good riders tough but I know a few. Some local, some back in my hometown. My hometown guys are very cool with being competitive with each other. Pushing each other and even getting aggressive toward each other. They are also the guys who wouldn't let you get away with saying no to them for a ride - they'll drag you out at all cost. Locally, seems to be the exact opposite.


    Riding my "local" DH, Whiteface, often takes things to a very different level. Its just a really hard mountain, both skill-wise and physically. That mountain makes for a great training ground. Truly humbling.

    I ride a lot and make sure to ride stuff that I'm not particularly good at. Jumping, tight high speed corners - I'll ride a section over and over again until I've nailed it. I also like riding old school tech that are more like hiking than biking trails. Buffed out, manicured stuff was fun for a bit, but gets old real fast. My kid's getting a bmx bike this spring and I just might join him.

    Motor - as with any sport the most important thing is having strength/power, toughness, endurance. I do my best to keep fit in the off season with a lot of cross training that includes weights and running and xc skiing.

    Bikes - I try to be just a bit under biked. That way I rely more on skills to pull me through and it gives me the edge with quick acceleration and punchy climbs - which we have a lot of. Less bike lets me ride longer and faster overall, just maybe a second slower on the downs at most.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by gat3keeper View Post
    Were there a time when you are intimidated by some portions of the trail ? With what I experience this morning, there are sections that I didn't have the confidence if I can make it or not. I stopped at some sharp curves thinking I might slip or slide, am I overthinking ? What to do with this situations ?
    I still encounter stuff I am not confident enough to ride. Or stuff I am pretty sure I can ride, but the consequences for failure are above what I'm willing to accept. Or stuff I'll ride no problem most days, but just aren't feeling it at the time. Maybe I am really tired and know that my bike handling is suffering because of it - I'll walk stuff I usually won't. Or maybe I'm doing a faster pace ride and decide to pass the tech lines so I can save myself for later.

  23. #23
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    Only one way to really improve on a Mtb and that is to ride with guys that are wayyyyy better than you. By doing so you will push yourself out of your comfort zone and you will progress at a rapid rate.

  24. #24
    LDC is ded,deth by trollz
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    Heres some video from when my friend visited recently. I tried to show him lines and point out things and keep him motivated and lead him around so he can get confidence seeing his friend ride it in front of him so he knew we are all just people and not superheroes. That's how you grow. It's hard to do alone. I had someone show me the way and I try and do the same...



    https://www.instagram.com/jakesamborski/p/BvhzBMvHwuw/

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by ALimon View Post
    Only one way to really improve on a Mtb and that is to ride with guys that are wayyyyy better than you. By doing so you will push yourself out of your comfort zone and you will progress at a rapid rate.
    Not entirely true.

    There are many different ways to get better. Yes, that's one of them. And while it might be preferred by some, it's definitely not preferred by all. And certainly not everybody will progress rapidly doing it this way.

    First and foremost among the issues is that the more advanced riders ABSOLUTELY HAVE TO BE ON BOARD with it. 100% on board with it. They have to be willing to be extra encouraging and congratulate that rider for doing something they've never done before, even if it's something the advanced rider thinks is no big deal. I've ridden with enough people to know that not every advanced rider is chill about riding with slower riders. Some get really impatient and just want to ride their own pace. THAT does not help the slower, less skilled rider any more than just riding by themselves, and for some, it might wind up being actively discouraging.

    My most rapid skills improvement has come from riding solo, primarily. Specifically, just sessioning stuff and goofing around.

    Second has come from learning from skills instructors. That doesn't always mean paying for a skills class, but that's part of it. I know a lot of people who are certified skills instructors (even I have professional certs in this), and a few who own their own guiding/instruction businesses. Just riding with them and sessioning as a group is hugely informative. It's not that they're WAYYYY more skilled than me, though some are. It's more about a mutual back-and-forth over stuff. The learning goes both directions. Even as I watch people have trouble with something, I learn. It's almost like filming yourself practice skills stuff, and watching the footage later to see what you're doing right/wrong. What really makes this work is that people trained as skills instructors think differently about what they're doing when they're riding, and they relate things differently when they're giving advice. If some random rider is trying to tell me how to do something, half the time I don't understand what they're talking about.

    Fitness improvements have come from 2 areas. First, just riding more. Second, riding with people who are only a little bit faster than me. Not so much faster that they're gone (been there, it's no different than riding solo). But just fast enough that keeping up means pushing a little bit harder than usual.

  26. #26
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    Crash!

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  27. #27
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    Ride a lot. There are few substitutes for experience.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by ALimon View Post
    Only one way to really improve on a Mtb and that is to ride with guys that are wayyyyy better than you. By doing so you will push yourself out of your comfort zone and you will progress at a rapid rate.
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Not entirely true. Entirely untrue unless...


    the more advanced riders ABSOLUTELY HAVE TO BE ON BOARD with it. 100% on board with it and willing to not "send it" and just hope you keep up. They have to be willing to be extra encouraging and congratulate that rider for doing something they've never done before, even if it's something the advanced rider thinks is no big deal.

    I've ridden with enough people to know that not every advanced rider is chill about riding with slower riders. Some get really impatient and just want to ride their own pace. THAT does not help the slower, less skilled rider any more than just riding by themselves, and for some, it might wind up being actively discouraging. Absolutely!

    Second has come from learning from skills instructors. That doesn't always mean paying for a skills class, but that's part of it. I know a lot of people who are certified skills instructors (even I have professional certs in this), and a few who own their own guiding/instruction businesses. Just riding with them and sessioning as a group is hugely informative. It's not that they're WAYYYY more skilled than me, though some are. It's more about a mutual back-and-forth over stuff. The learning goes both directions. Even as I watch people have trouble with something, I learn. It's almost like filming yourself practice skills stuff, and watching the footage later to see what you're doing right/wrong. What really makes this work is that people trained as skills instructors think differently about what they're doing when they're riding, and they relate things differently when they're giving advice. If some random rider is trying to tell me how to do something, half the time I don't understand what they're talking about.
    I got coaching.

    What Harold says about coaching is absolutely spot on. And more than the mutual back and forth, a certification doesn't teach you to ride or give you any secret riding tricks. What it does teach you is how to give that feedback and, more importantly, it breaks skills down into component moves and teaches the coach how to analyze the student's position, movements and actions in a logical, methodical manner, enabling on target feedback and reinforcement.

    These comments are shades of gray, perhaps, but the "follow me and do what I do simply isn't the best way to learn. In biking, skiing or most any other adventure sport.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    Session things that are hard for you (and fun), until you get it down. Building skills takes time, a lot of time. The more time you spend in the saddle the faster you will learn.

    Ride with riders that are faster and more skilled than you. Watch videos. Then practice practice practice.
    ^ Worth repeating.

    These few ideas have worked for many, myself included. Think of yourself as a student and have fun with it.

    No expert at all but riding confidently and close to the level I'm happy with at 58 years. I'm somewhat risk averse so for me, the big rides with drops and seriously techy stuff is not on my menu. I'm happy putting along or walking it some.
    bachman must spread some Reputation around before giving it to himself again.


  30. #30
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    Hmm, if we're talking skills, just riding more and consciously pushing the limit of my comfort zone always was a big part for me.
    If we are talking being a better MTBer in terms of a better person, I combined 2 passions of mine: Maps and exploration and Mountain Biking. I made trail maps and descriptions for people who were newer to the sport, or unfamiliar with an area. Back in the UK I was often asked for routes and suggestions for rides up on the North Yorkshire Moors because that was where I spent a lot of my time. Back there, trail conditions played a big part, so picking routes that worked at whatever time of year it was was an art form.
    When I moved to the Tucson area, I did the same in the then undeveloped Tortolita Mtns. I photographed trails and GPS'ed them, helped build and maintain them, and then I took group rides out there every couple of weeks or so to show people the terrain and familiarize them with the area. It is now a popular riding area.
    It's all Here. Now.

  31. #31
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    Ride a lot, with riders who are better than me. Still doing that.

  32. #32
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    I am not an expert at all but the things I have found have improved my bike handling more then anything is sessioning stuff (which I find to be a ton of fun) and riding my BMX (also a lot of fun).

    Also getting a trainer and doing focused training sessions has been massive as it has given me fitness to ride longer which means I can spend more time on the bike.
    Ragley Big Wig, Sunday Soundwave (BMX), Nashbar CXSS (workout)

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by gat3keeper View Post
    I joined a basic MTB workshop this morning. I realized that my skills are very far from being "good". I have decent experience in flowy trails before but the trails where I live now includes very steep descent, ascent, and very sharp turns with rocks, roots, etc...

    I want to ask you guys with let's say "expert" skills. What did you do to improve? How'd you become a better rider? How'd you choose your bike? etc... Can you share your brief story?
    Quote Originally Posted by gat3keeper View Post
    Were there a time when you are intimidated by some portions of the trail ? With what I experience this morning, there are sections that I didn't have the confidence if I can make it or not. I stopped at some sharp curves thinking I might slip or slide, am I overthinking ? What to do with this situations ?
    I've been riding off road for 45 years (and I'm still not an expert ). I've done a lot of falling down. Fortunately, that was more frequent when my body could take it, and much less frequent now that I weigh more and healing is a slower process.

    Even as a kid I always thought fitness was very important in building skills. If you are gassed, then it is hard to focus on the task at hand, and it slows your reactions to recover if/when you screw up. Do all your shenanigans early in the ride, while you're fresh(er), but not too early. You want to know that you're not having an "off" day, which is a real thing, before you go for a big move.

    As far as terrain, there is an infinite amount of practice that can be done on very small obstacles. This will help you learn speed, momentum, and timing.
    Pedal skills.
    Braking skills.
    Cornering skills.

    Ride lots of different terrain, in all different conditions, with lots of different people (people who are willing to deliver you back home if you hurt yourself ).

    Don't be afraid to walk an obstacle, or to at least stop and survey it before you blunder into it. Have an escape plan.

    Big hills used to scare me. We rode motorcycle trails and there were some monster steep hills to ride down (the motos rode UP). This was all a game of progression. Start small, go slow, and graduate to bigger and faster stuff as you improve control and confidence.

    I'm no expert, and I'm always learning. And some things like jumping I will just never be that good at.
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    So be real.

    And don't forget to have fun!

    -F
    It's never easier - you just go faster.

  34. #34
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    What Dwayyo said...

    I'm one of the few out here who still enjoy reading biking magazines, and still learn new things even after 25+ years of riding & racing.
    The only important thing these days, is rhythm and melody. Rhythm...and melody.

  35. #35
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    1) Ride a lot
    2) Ride with folks who are better than me
    3) Ride stuff that's hard
    4) Ride a lot

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by gat3keeper View Post
    I want to ask you guys with let's say "expert" skills. What did you do to improve? How'd you become a better rider? How'd you choose your bike? etc... Can you share your brief story?
    Brief story? I'm too old for anything brief.

    Although I've been riding dirt on 26" and larger wheeled bikes since ~1978, I don't consider myself an expert. And I never will. My techniques may not be text book, but they work for me. I am comfortable on the most technical trails I come across, and ride trails the masses never set foot on. What did I do to improve to get to that point? Well, 40 years of riding, to begin with. But honestly, I never really gave it much thought. I ride for the fun of it, and I am one that does not like repetition, so riding the same trail repeatedly to get better at it is something I've never done. I'm not big on sessioning a section either. In hindsight, I feel my skills improved best by riding something different on a routine basis, and never really completely memorizing a trail. To borrow a musical term for playing music the performer has never seen before, I think "sight-reading" trails forces you to build a lot of skill quickly. You learn to quickly ad hoc assess and pick a line, which is something I feel many riders aren't good at. I think sight-reading trails leads to building confidence. You get comfortable with the unknown, which lets you focus more (subconsciously) on the task of learning how to ride versus fear. Assuming you understand the basic mechanics of riding a bike, your body instinctively knows what to do to keep you upright. You just need to practice it. In short, I've always felt like riding something you haven't memorized strengthens your ability to improve riding instinct and skill.

    So, just one old farts take on it.
    You didn't quit riding because you're old, you're old because you quit riding.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gat3keeper View Post
    I joined a basic MTB workshop this morning. I realized that my skills are very far from being "good". I have decent experience in flowy trails before but the trails where I live now includes very steep descent, ascent, and very sharp turns with rocks, roots, etc...

    I want to ask you guys with let's say "expert" skills. What did you do to improve? How'd you become a better rider? How'd you choose your bike? etc... Can you share your brief story?
    I refined my skills by riding with other who are fast/more skilled. These guys forced me to push myself and challenge myself. As a result over time my bike skills have improved. I still want to take skills class or get private coaching, but I am beyond the into level, but still no where near the top. I am probably closer to "expert" level given the general population, but not as good as many other riders. So skill coaching for me would need to be more targeted.
    Joe
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  38. #38
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    Been mtb'ing without "pause" since '89. My two big game changers:

    1. First year I rode 5,000 mi. Benefit here: fitness and skills. If you spend that much time riding, your skill set and fitness will improve.

    2. Indoor cycling year round. For me, I started taking spin classes and then became an indoor cycling (spin) instructor in 2011. Cardio through the roof. I ride indoors up to 11 times a week during the winter-I teach and/or take classes almost daily.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by fredcook View Post
    Brief story? I'm too old for anything brief.

    Although I've been riding dirt on 26" and larger wheeled bikes since ~1978, I don't consider myself an expert. And I never will. My techniques may not be text book, but they work for me. I am comfortable on the most technical trails I come across, and ride trails the masses never set foot on. What did I do to improve to get to that point? Well, 40 years of riding, to begin with. But honestly, I never really gave it much thought. I ride for the fun of it, and I am one that does not like repetition, so riding the same trail repeatedly to get better at it is something I've never done. I'm not big on sessioning a section either. In hindsight, I feel my skills improved best by riding something different on a routine basis, and never really completely memorizing a trail. To borrow a musical term for playing music the performer has never seen before, I think "sight-reading" trails forces you to build a lot of skill quickly. You learn to quickly ad hoc assess and pick a line, which is something I feel many riders aren't good at. I think sight-reading trails leads to building confidence. You get comfortable with the unknown, which lets you focus more (subconsciously) on the task of learning how to ride versus fear. Assuming you understand the basic mechanics of riding a bike, your body instinctively knows what to do to keep you upright. You just need to practice it. In short, I've always felt like riding something you haven't memorized strengthens your ability to improve riding instinct and skill.

    So, just one old farts take on it.
    ^^^Good take on trail variety.

    What did you do to be a better mtbiker ?-11-3.png
    (jeeze, that came out big...but there are about 50 Yoda quotes that could apply to MTBing)

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  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fleas View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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    (jeeze, that came out big...but there are about 50 Yoda quotes that could apply to MTBing)

    -F
    This should be a thread.
    Rigid SS 29er
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    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  41. #41
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    I have found it a 2 step process:

    1.) Buy a couple of the most popular MTB magazines
    2.) Buy what they say is the latest and greatest equipment...

    Boom, done.

    Happy April 1st.

  42. #42
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    Ride as much as possible with riders who are much better than you.


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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    I joined a spam cult.
    Fried with eggs and catsup.

    Also, ride. A lot. Endurance. Fitness.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    To be a better mountain biker; obey trail rules, don't ride muddy trails, yield to pedestrians and equestrians, yield to uphill riders, be modest when changing in the parking area, pick up your dog's poop...
    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    Do trail work and give back to the community. Always remember that everyone starts as a beginner. Ride within your skill set and remind yourself that gravity is a harsh mistress. Start joining group rides, suffer at the back for seasons, watch the moves and lines that others take. Best yet, drink a big cup of HTFU before each ride. Some light elbow and leg armor help with that too.
    love all of this advice for sure

    other than just riding, these things have helped me a lot

    #1 for me was just getting back into it...after 20 something years off. And not being afraid to try some things...like, not thinking "I am too old for that"

    #2 getting my rigid Surly Krampus....like a big boy BMX!! Having a bike you love to ride is motivational

    #3 working out really helped me gain the strength I needed for some balance things required for riding

    Quote Originally Posted by targnik View Post
    Crash!

    'Born to ride!'
    #4 . crashing...seriously. Not going out and looking to crash, but after having the first big one, it made me a bit more aware of my "edges". In a way, I feel like I have learned how to crash...like how to get out of some of the more typical types like loop outs and losing it in turns, and that has given me some confidence to push my edges...hockey coaches I have had always said if you don't fall, you don't learn how NOT to fall

    #5 . communicating with people on the trails, at the LBS, on the forums, and watching videos...constantly learning about how others do it, and how the don't do it helps me a lot
    Go practice. Figure it out. - Fleas

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  45. #45
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    Travel and ride different terrain at destination trails like McKenzie River Trail, Sedona, Gooseberry Mesa etc.
    Ripping trails and tipping ales

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    Rode bmx for 30 years

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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    This should be a thread.
    Go for it.

    -F
    It's never easier - you just go faster.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by #mtnbykr View Post
    Fried with eggs and catsup.

    Also, ride. A lot. Endurance. Fitness.
    Watch people who are better than you hit lines and try to figure out why they chose that line and made it work. The above helps you pull it off. Gotta have momentum.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by stixxs View Post
    Rode bmx for 30 years
    this as well....still do ride...
    Go practice. Figure it out. - Fleas

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  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod View Post
    Watch people who are better than you hit lines and try to figure out why they chose that line and made it work. The above helps you pull it off. Gotta have momentum.
    I love to do this....always like to follow someone who knows the trail well...they don't even need to be a better biker, but just have that knowledge of the "secret lines"

    I do this at the skatepark as well...always analyzing!
    Go practice. Figure it out. - Fleas

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  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    I love to do this....always like to follow someone who knows the trail well...they don't even need to be a better biker, but just have that knowledge of the "secret lines"

    I do this at the skatepark as well...always analyzing!
    Exactly. This was my method when i had to ride blind xc racing. Find the local and hold their wheel or try to. They czn set you up for the next corner, you get to stay off the brakes, and have more flow.

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  52. #52
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    Things I did/do:

    Fitness: rode a singlespeed, hit the gym, lost weight

    Skills: competed in trials, spend time working on specific skills rather than just fitness, watch high level riders' YouTube videos to see their line choices (e.g., Nate Hills and Jeff Kendall-Weed, not Singletrack Sampler -- he's about to crash, just give him a minute), learn some backcountry navigation skills

    Equipment: good suspension, good tires, good brakes, body armor so I could push my limits a bit, contact lenses and goggles for better vision, learned how to dial in my bike so it's working right

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by LaneDetroitCity View Post
    I'm off the drop till I have more than 100mm. Buying a new Ripley then hitting it. I'd like you to show me how to roll the twisted roll in for sure up before the drop. I'm currently hiking that every time because it's been wet and I didn't have a big knob front tire to stick the landing and sharp turn.
    I'm surprised you have trouble with that move...isn't everything in Pisgah a flow trail? Or you at least possess the ability to turn it into a flow trail?!
    Last edited by LaXCarp; 04-02-2019 at 10:37 AM.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by LaXCarp View Post
    I'm surprised you have travel with that move...isn't everything in Pisgah a flow trail? Or you at least possess the ability to turn it into a flow trail?!
    Did you read my post or rush to make a funny? We can ride it together on fast trak 2.1 tires in the wet and you can show me how it's done. PM me when you want to setup a ride.

  55. #55
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    Weekly oral favors improve biking skills.
    The only important thing these days, is rhythm and melody. Rhythm...and melody.

  56. #56
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    I find that riding with a group challenges me to think fast and pedal hard. It's a good cardio workout and peer pressure makes you push through stuff you might avoid. However, if I don't clear a feature, I hike the bike past it and keep moving.

    This is why riding alone or with one or two like-minded riders is good. You stop and "session" trail features. If you analyze a map of my rides, you'll see me repeating the same 15 feet of trail for half an hour in some spots. That's where a trail feature beat me and I rode it over and over again until I cleaned it or finally gave up.

    (Screenshot from Strava map of my most recent solo ride)
    What did you do to be a better mtbiker ?-20190402_102615.jpg

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    this as well....still do ride...
    Same here! Although it helped me in the long run the original transformation from the small bike to big bike was weird.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LaneDetroitCity View Post
    Did you read my post or rush to make a funny? We can ride it together on fast trak 2.1 tires in the wet and you can show me how it's done. PM me when you want to setup a ride.
    LOL is that the mountain bike equivalent of "meet me in the school yard at 5pm, i'll beat you up"?! Hard pass on you're offer to meet up in the woods on a borrowed XC bike to prove a point about an internet disagreement. Have fun riding your flow trails.

  59. #59
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    Focus on smooth and speed will follow.

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by LaXCarp View Post
    LOL is that the mountain bike equivalent of "meet me in the school yard at 5pm, i'll beat you up"?! Hard pass on you're offer to meet up in the woods on a borrowed XC bike to prove a point about an internet disagreement. Have fun riding your flow trails.
    Why would i beat you up lol. Thats one ridiculous statement. This thread is about becoming a better rider. I asked you to come show me how to be a better rider. Like i show other people trying to learn. As in cash those checks your mouth is writing by showing me how to ride something. Or just be a troll. You decide.
    Ill be out riding, youll still be trolling mtbr. Mtbr, where people who dont ride come to pretend they do.

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by stixxs View Post
    Same here! Although it helped me in the long run the original transformation from the small bike to big bike was weird.
    my BMX was my MTB in the 70's and 80's, so going to a 26er in the 90's was not too bad of a transition...the weirdest part was leaning forward to manipulate the handle bars....currently, I ride both bikes sort of the same...
    Go practice. Figure it out. - Fleas

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    Being fit, riding a lot and with folks better than me only got me so far. I did that for maybe 10 years and have progressed more in the last 3 by focusing on skill work despite not being anywhere close to as strong on the bike as I used to be.

    Doing focused work on manual front wheel lifts, bunny hops, punches, hops, nose pivots, etc, led to me be able to hit drops and jumps, get up ledges more easily and corner better. All the years of riding and sessioning obstacles on my local trails got me to clear things, but once I knew and practiced the proper technique everything became easier and more in control.

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Not entirely true.

    There are many different ways to get better. Yes, that's one of them. And while it might be preferred by some, it's definitely not preferred by all. And certainly not everybody will progress rapidly doing it this way.

    First and foremost among the issues is that the more advanced riders ABSOLUTELY HAVE TO BE ON BOARD with it. 100% on board with it. They have to be willing to be extra encouraging and congratulate that rider for doing something they've never done before, even if it's something the advanced rider thinks is no big deal. I've ridden with enough people to know that not every advanced rider is chill about riding with slower riders. Some get really impatient and just want to ride their own pace. THAT does not help the slower, less skilled rider any more than just riding by themselves, and for some, it might wind up being actively discouraging.

    My most rapid skills improvement has come from riding solo, primarily. Specifically, just sessioning stuff and goofing around.

    Second has come from learning from skills instructors. That doesn't always mean paying for a skills class, but that's part of it. I know a lot of people who are certified skills instructors (even I have professional certs in this), and a few who own their own guiding/instruction businesses. Just riding with them and sessioning as a group is hugely informative. It's not that they're WAYYYY more skilled than me, though some are. It's more about a mutual back-and-forth over stuff. The learning goes both directions. Even as I watch people have trouble with something, I learn. It's almost like filming yourself practice skills stuff, and watching the footage later to see what you're doing right/wrong. What really makes this work is that people trained as skills instructors think differently about what they're doing when they're riding, and they relate things differently when they're giving advice. If some random rider is trying to tell me how to do something, half the time I don't understand what they're talking about.

    Fitness improvements have come from 2 areas. First, just riding more. Second, riding with people who are only a little bit faster than me. Not so much faster that they're gone (been there, it's no different than riding solo). But just fast enough that keeping up means pushing a little bit harder than usual.
    How does riding solo make you a better rider? Thatís probably worst way to improve your skills. You know that saying ďpractice makes perfect?Ē Well it doesnít. Practice makes permanent, not perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect! Best way to perfect your riding skills is to ride with guys that know how to ride. Monkey see monkey do. Ride with riders that are skilled, observe and learn. Success leaves clues. And skilled riders leave lots of clues. I canít think of one sport that Iíve played throughout the course of my life that I could have excelled at alone. Iíve always gravitated to the guy who was the best, learned from him, then competed hard against him until I could beat him. Competition brings out the best in all of us.

  64. #64
    Nat
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    I find it interesting that with mountain biking (and other endurance sports) people will spend an awful lot of time working on conditioning but very little time working on skills. In most other sports, especially those involving a ball, people spend a lot of time working on different drills to improve their skills but that doesn't seem to be the case with the endurance crowd. I've been guilty of it too. If I have a couple of hours to ride, I would rather do my favorite loop than focus on a specific move but when I have put in the time, I've noticed the results. I like seeing in this thread several people mentioning spending time working on specific skills.

  65. #65
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    I quit smoking cigarettes to become a better rider, can't say I noticed any difference but now I have more money to spend on parts

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    Quote Originally Posted by LaneDetroitCity View Post
    Why would i beat you up lol. Thats one ridiculous statement. This thread is about becoming a better rider. I asked you to come show me how to be a better rider. Like i show other people trying to learn. As in cash those checks your mouth is writing by showing me how to ride something. Or just be a troll. You decide.
    Yes, I have zero interest in personally showing you, but I'm flattered by the sincere invitation. Me showing you how I can ride the drop really doesn't teach you anything; I just like to point out hypocrisy when I see it. In one thread you let your big ballz blow in the breeze by calling everything in Pisgah a flow trail, now in a different thread those big ballz withered away faster than a dandelion in a desert..all because of the big bad drop on Bennett.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ALimon View Post
    How does riding solo make you a better rider? Thatís probably worst way to improve your skills. You know that saying ďpractice makes perfect?Ē Well it doesnít. Practice makes permanent, not perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect! Best way to perfect your riding skills is to ride with guys that know how to ride. Monkey see monkey do. Ride with riders that are skilled, observe and learn. Success leaves clues. And skilled riders leave lots of clues. I canít think of one sport that Iíve played throughout the course of my life that I could have excelled at alone. Iíve always gravitated to the guy who was the best, learned from him, then competed hard against him until I could beat him. Competition brings out the best in all of us.
    You saw one word (solo) and drew the wrong conclusions about what I was actually saying.

    The absolute most important thing I learned and developed in those solo sessioning and goofing off sessions was balance. You're not going to develop your balance very fast trying to chase people who are way faster than you on the trail. The solo work I learned fastest on wasn't even on trails. Back then, I never even rode trails by myself. But I did goof off on campus and urban/greenway rides a lot. Lots of basic skills like balancing on skinnies, wheel lifts, crap like that.

    No doubt I would have developed that skill faster had I been properly instructed on how to practice and what to practice. But I made do because nobody was offering skills instruction anywhere near me back then. And proper instruction is NOT the same as just mimicking other people. Maybe you'll learn something that way. But maybe not. An instructor who actually knows how to teach is in a completely different universe.

    And no, competition does not bring out the best in everybody. Like with everything, some people thrive with it. Others don't. Competition turns some people into douchebags. If competition is your thing, then great. But recognize it's not for everybody. There ARE actually people who don't want anything to do with competition when they ride. They have other motivations.

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by LaXCarp View Post
    Yes, I have zero interest in personally showing you, but I'm flattered by the sincere invitation. Me showing you how I can ride the drop really doesn't teach you anything; I just like to point out hypocrisy when I see it. In one thread you let your big ballz blow in the breeze by calling everything in Pisgah a flow trail, now in a different thread those big ballz withered away faster than a dandelion in a desert..all because of the big bad drop on Bennett.
    Don't forget that he was also recently in the Single Speed forum asking about building a rigid SS for Pisgah to make it more challenging. Based on this thread he should probably save his money and work on hitting everything with a full suspension first...

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by ALimon View Post
    Best way to perfect your riding skills is to ride with guys that know how to ride. Monkey see monkey do. Ride with riders that are skilled, observe and learn.
    I agree somewhat, but you need to find a group that is willing to take you in. My experience has been that any group of skilled riders goes into pack mode, hammering through everything at vomit speed to complete the loop. Almost none of the hundreds of riders I have joined in recent years slows down enough to session, let alone teach.


    This monkey can't see because riders more skilled than me are always too far ahead down the trail to observe them. I don't have time to practice any skills because I am just trying to keep up. Riding alone means I have the luxury of trying new things and sessioning the spots that the riders I would like to emulate just blast through. They just hit it and quit it and move on. Unless I'm paying a coach to stand around and give me pointers, I don't expect them to hang back and show me how it's done.

    Do you do that? Pick up noobs on your rides and slow down so they can watch you?

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by LaXCarp View Post
    Yes, I have zero interest in personally showing you, but I'm flattered by the sincere invitation. Me showing you how I can ride the drop really doesn't teach you anything; I just like to point out hypocrisy when I see it. In one thread you let your big ballz blow in the breeze by calling everything in Pisgah a flow trail, now in a different thread those big ballz withered away faster than a dandelion in a desert..all because of the big bad drop on Bennett.
    Actually I said it's a flow trail on a 160 bike. Read the thread again. I also said there are some flow trails in Pisgah, not all are flow trails. I also hit the drop everytime but last time I crashed and broke my brake lever so I'm taking a break from that until I get my new Ripley.

    In the meantime I am wanting to see the "pro line" on a roll down with a twist. Was hoping an expert such as yourself could show me. Cause I'm in the camp of monkey see monkey do. Its faster to run it anyways in the stage race. This is more about mastering a certain section for personal pleasure.

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by SingleSpeedSteven View Post
    Don't forget that he was also recently in the Single Speed forum asking about building a rigid SS for Pisgah to make it more challenging. Based on this thread he should probably save his money and work on hitting everything with a full suspension first...
    How is riding a SS in Pisgah easier? I said to keep wear off my race bikes. I said I'm NOT in a hurry on those rides. You literally can't read or comprehend. You asked me not to troll your threads, but you have posted on every thread I made. So I guess you want to make it personal.

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by LaneDetroitCity View Post
    How is riding a SS in Pisgah easier? I said to keep wear off my race bikes. I said I'm NOT in a hurry on those rides. You literally can't read or comprehend. You asked me not to troll your threads, but you have posted on every thread I made. So I guess you want to make it personal.
    Not personal, I just find it incredibly entertaining to read all of the BS you post periodically throughout my workday. You're on the level of Trump tweets when it comes to ridiculousness.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SingleSpeedSteven View Post
    Not personal, I just find it incredibly entertaining to read all of the BS you post periodically throughout my workday. You're on the level of Trump tweets when it comes to ridiculousness.
    Cool. So my YouTube channel is going to be a huge hit. Thanks for being a part of my market research study on mtbr.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LaneDetroitCity View Post
    Was hoping an expert such as yourself could show me.
    Well I ain't your guy because you annoy the sh*t outta me. Maybe ask the next "EndurBro" you see.

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    I find that riding with a group challenges me to think fast and pedal hard. It's a good cardio workout and peer pressure makes you push through stuff you might avoid. However, if I don't clear a feature, I hike the bike past it and keep moving.

    This is why riding alone or with one or two like-minded riders is good. You stop and "session" trail features. If you analyze a map of my rides, you'll see me repeating the same 15 feet of trail for half an hour in some spots. That's where a trail feature beat me and I rode it over and over again until I cleaned it or finally gave up.

    (Screenshot from Strava map of my most recent solo ride)
    Click image for larger version. 

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    I absolutely can't stand that crap. I guess I'm always in race mode riding at a blistering pace. The last time I rode with others was six years ago. The other four riders (local Big Bear hotshots) were pissed when they showed up because I had a dog, but we dropped three of them who were yakking like they were in a sewing circle. The other rider hung on and was amazed at my dog's speed and line selection.
    Ripping trails and tipping ales

  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    I agree somewhat, but you need to find a group that is willing to take you in. My experience has been that any group of skilled riders goes into pack mode, hammering through everything at vomit speed to complete the loop. Almost none of the hundreds of riders I have joined in recent years slows down enough to session, let alone teach.


    This monkey can't see because riders more skilled than me are always too far ahead down the trail to observe them. I don't have time to practice any skills because I am just trying to keep up. Riding alone means I have the luxury of trying new things and sessioning the spots that the riders I would like to emulate just blast through. They just hit it and quit it and move on. Unless I'm paying a coach to stand around and give me pointers, I don't expect them to hang back and show me how it's done.

    Do you do that? Pick up noobs on your rides and slow down so they can watch you?
    My group of riders consists of pros, experts, local shredders and those who more or less can ride but are looking to take their riding to the next level. So they tag along, meet the crew and find themselves getting invites to more of our rides. We donít mind having lesser skilled riders join us as long as theyíre committed to improving their riding and put out the effort. We ride a lot of different terrain. We often session jump lines, berm lines and tech during our rides. Plenty to learn in that environment. I ride with a great crew, we consider ourselves stewards of the sport and we donít mind helping those willing to improve.

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vader View Post
    I absolutely can't stand that crap. I guess I'm always in race mode riding at a blistering pace. The last time I rode with others was six years ago. The other four riders (local Big Bear hotshots) were pissed when they showed up because I had a dog, but we dropped three of them who were yakking like they were in a sewing circle. The other rider hung on and was amazed at my dog's speed and line selection.
    That's why I do it on solo rides. I learn how to clear a feature so that when I am trying to hang onto the puke-pace hammerhead group, they don't have to wait for me at that feature.

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by ALimon View Post
    My group of riders consists of pros, experts, local shredders and those who more or less can ride but are looking to take their riding to the next level. So they tag along, meet the crew and find themselves getting invites to more of our rides. We donít mind having lesser skilled riders join us as long as theyíre committed to improving their riding and put out the effort. We ride a lot of different terrain. We often session jump lines, berm lines and tech during our rides. Plenty to learn in that environment. I ride with a great crew, we consider ourselves stewards of the sport and we donít mind helping those willing to improve.
    You have assembled a crew of unicorns. Magical!

  79. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    I agree somewhat, but you need to find a group that is willing to take you in. My experience has been that any group of skilled riders goes into pack mode, hammering through everything at vomit speed to complete the loop. Almost none of the hundreds of riders I have joined in recent years slows down enough to session, let alone teach.


    This monkey can't see because riders more skilled than me are always too far ahead down the trail to observe them. I don't have time to practice any skills because I am just trying to keep up. Riding alone means I have the luxury of trying new things and sessioning the spots that the riders I would like to emulate just blast through. They just hit it and quit it and move on. Unless I'm paying a coach to stand around and give me pointers, I don't expect them to hang back and show me how it's done.

    Do you do that? Pick up noobs on your rides and slow down so they can watch you?
    I think both riding solo and with better folks helps, which I think you are saying. Riding with a group motivates you to hit things you normally wouldn't. Sometimes, you are just following a line and find you are past an obstacle that you would never have hit otherwise. We had a group of 4 out last year and the first two guys gapped me when I got a roll about as large as you could reasonably roll that became an immediate right turn with a wall on one side and "go to the hospital" drop off on the other and straight ahead. I pulled up and called out to the #2 guy asking if he road the feature. He answered, "Yes, but I didn't mean too". I walked it safely, that you very much, but I have hit other features that I wouldn't have following people.

    But, I think I have progressed more as a rider practiciing skills solo and sessioning features like you mentioned earlier. If you're solo, you never have to ask someone else if the 11th attempt is too many and you should quit trying something!

    Depending on the group and ride day though, the folks I ride with are normally willing to stop and work on something at least a few times. If you're always redlined trying to keep going, I find improvement is limited for me at least. And actually, I tend to fall on something stupid towards the end of the ride and maybe go backwards waiting for something heal up.

  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by Train Wreck View Post
    I quit smoking cigarettes to become a better rider, can't say I noticed any difference but now I have more money to spend on parts
    Wow, too funny. I ride, play hockey, and play drums and have smoked for 30 years. I am decent at all but always wondered if quitting would make me better.

  81. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    You have assembled a crew of unicorns. Magical!
    Weíre not unicorns nor are we magical. Just a cool group of guys who checked their egoís and attitudes at the front door.

  82. #82
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    Will having multiple types of bike at your disposal will help you a better rider? (ex.. XC, HT, enduro, etc..)

    Or just stick with the bike depends on what your local trails has to offer?

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  83. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by gat3keeper View Post
    Will having multiple types of bike at your disposal will help you a better rider? (ex.. XC, HT, enduro, etc..)

    Or just stick with the bike depends on what your local trails has to offer?
    Yes, riding different disciplines will help develop skills and make you a more well rounded rider. Many skills transfer from one discipline to another IMO.
    Rigid SS 29er
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    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  84. #84
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    I live in the Midwest and have found that due to the weather, the only real way for me to accomplish anything is by cross training on different bikes. Rigid SS has taught me the majority of what I know when it comes to picking lines, riding a big full suspension bike in places like Angelfire and Crested Butte has taught me how to ride harder and stay off the brakes, putting a lot of miles in on a gravel bike through the winter has helped me dial in my nutrition for mtb season. The list goes on and on. I tend to cross train, even if I don't get a ton of enjoyment out of it (ie my gravel bike).

  85. #85
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    I suck so bad that just about anything I do makes me a better rider, including watching a bunch of youtube video.

  86. #86
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    Drink IPA's and become proficient in the use of words like 'stoke' 'steeze' and 'yew!'.
    No moss...

  87. #87
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    Becoming good on a road bike. It is almost impossible to get in great shape on the trails. There's just too much coasting.

  88. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    Becoming good on a road bike. It is almost impossible to get in great shape on the trails. There's just too much coasting.
    Not true, especially at an amateur level.

    SSers spend more time coasting than most, and are usually among the strongest riders. (just an example)
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    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  89. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    It is almost impossible to get in great shape on the trails. There's just too much coasting.
    Not true. Think interval training.

  90. #90
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    I believe Schulze is in TX, with lots of short rollers on his local trails.

    In which case, his comments make sense, IMO.


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  91. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffw-13 View Post
    Drink IPA's and become proficient in the use of words like 'stoke' 'steeze' and 'yew!'.
    Perfecting one's 'yew' is a tough process. I've found it helps to ride with stronger yewers than yourself and maybe even watch a few yewtube videos for tips.

  92. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by gat3keeper View Post
    What did you do to improve? How'd you become a better rider?
    45 years of practice...


  93. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDwayyo View Post
    Perfecting one's 'yew' is a tough process. I've found it helps to ride with stronger yewers than yourself and maybe even watch a few yewtube videos for tips.
    Take a bike trip to Yewtah.

  94. #94
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    oh yew guys...


  95. #95
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    Home of the Yewt Indian tribe.

  96. #96
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    p-yew...it is starting to smell in here....
    Go practice. Figure it out. - Fleas

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    LET IT SNOW!

  97. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    p-yew...it is starting to smell in here....
    You might have to set out a bowl of p-yew pourri.

  98. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    Becoming good on a road bike. It is almost impossible to get in great shape on the trails. There's just too much coasting.
    Coasting? How so? My mtb doesnít propel itself. If I donít pedal, I donít move.

  99. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    Not true, especially at an amateur level.

    SSers spend more time coasting than most, and are usually among the strongest riders. (just an example)
    Anyone who wants to get strong rides on the road. If you think that's debatable then you are sorely out of touch.

    An attainable example is the pro youtube guys singletrack sampler and BKXC. All these guys do is ride mountain bikes. They did some ftp tests recently and I was surprised to read in the comments that both of them were low Cat 4 upper Cat 5 for road racing. I checked the numbers and it was right. That is not far above an untrained level.

    You want to be able to put down power on your mountain bike? Ride road.

  100. #100
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    I ride road.

    What did you do to be a better mtbiker ?-img_1110.jpg

    I do find that it helps with cardio. It also keeps things fresh for mountain biking. There are stints where I ride nothing but my road bike...and when I get back on the MTB...it kinda renews the MTB stoke.

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